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DCI Blog

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Duke Cancer Institute (DCI) Blog provides updates, organizational announcements, the latest in funding opportunities and information on upcoming conferences and symposiums. This blog also highlights inspiring patient stories and the accomplishments and achievements of DCI faculty and staff. Subscribers are invited to submit story ideas and other news of interest. Email submissions and feedback to Karen E. Butler, Director of Communications, Duke Cancer Institute.

Duke Surgeon Champions Equity In Breast Cancer Support And Care 

On an icy day in January a diverse group of female veterans – eight in all – braved the elements to attend the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) for the hospital’s first-ever Breast Cancer Support Group gathering. Duke breast surgical oncologist Oluwadamilola “Lola” Fayanju, MD, MA,...

Deputy Director Receives Equity, Diversity And Inclusion Award

Deputy director of Duke Cancer Institute Steven Patierno, PhD, recently received the 2018 Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Award from the Duke Office for Institutional Equity. Patierno wears many hats, so to speak. He is responsible for overseeing all of DCI's initiatives in the realms of...

IBC Consortium To Host First-Ever Annual Meeting (2.28.18)

In partnership with the Duke School of Medicine, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke Department of Surgery, and the IBC Network Foundation , the Duke Consortium for Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) will host its first-ever Annual Meeting, “Engaging Our Community in IBC Research and Awareness,” on Wednesday...

ACA Medicaid Expansion Cut Disparities in Cancer Care for Minorities, Poor

States that fully expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act cut their rates of uninsured cancer patients by more than half between 2011 and 2014. Black patients and those living in the highest poverty areas saw the greatest benefit from Medicaid expansion, according to a Duke...

Reducing Health Disparities in Our Communities

Black men face an unfortunate paradox when it comes to prostate cancer. They are the group hit hardest by this common disease, yet they are less likely than other groups to receive screening or medical care for this disease. The National Cancer Institute estimates that black men are 60 percent more...