Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Core Faculty Member, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy

Duke - Margolis Center For Health Policy
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School, Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

3D Biology Signatures defined by Nanostring Max System

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
North Carolina Biotechnology Center
Role
Major User
Start Date
End Date

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Targeting RNA splicing in race-related aggressive and lethal prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Prostate Cancer Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PC150506: Small molecule targeting of RNA splice variants driving tumor aggressiveness

Administered By
Chemistry
Awarded By
United States Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Abstract PO-137: Comparative transcriptomic analysis of prostate cancer from African American and Caucasian American men by Gleason score and race

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>African American (AA) men exhibit 2-3 times higher mortality from prostate cancer compared with Caucasian American (CA) men. Factors contributing to the disparity include societal-, neighborhood- and institutional-level determinants of health. In addition, a number of studies have reported individual-level ancestry-related biological differences, including in mutations, copy number variation, aggregate gene expression and response to treatment between AA and CA prostate cancer patients. Previously, by comparing the transcriptome between 20 AA and 15 CA prostate cancer patients, we identified a large number of race-related Alternative RNA Splicing (ARS) events. Among these, we further demonstrated that an exon skipping event involving exon 20 within PIK3CD increased tumor growth rate, metastatic potential and drug resistance in prostate cancer. To expand our previous findings, we collected non-neoplastic and tumor-paired tissue from 37 AA and 40 CA prostate cancer patients with different Gleason score categories: 14 high grade (4 AA and 10 CA), 22 low grade (10 AA and 12 CA), and 41 intermediate grade (23 AA and 18 CA). DNA and RNA were isolated for ancestral genotyping and RNA seq analysis, respectively. To achieve RNA sequencing depth adequate for ARS analysis, we performed RNA seq of 150 bp paired-end and an average of 5 × 106 reads per sample. The read alignment was done using Star 2 TwoPass pipeline. The rMATS pipeline was used for ARS annotation and quantification. We identified 105,403 ARS events, including 60,657 exon skipping, 17,439 alternative acceptor, 12,737 alternative donor, 9,555 retained intron and 5,015 mutually exclusive exon. Using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, we compared the Percent Spliced In (PSI) between AA and CA of the same Gleason score category and identified ARS events exhibiting ΔPSI &amp;gt; 15% and p-value &amp;lt; 0.05. Specifically, we identified 536 race-related ARS events in high grade, 492 race-related ARS events in low grade, and 447 race-related ARS events in intermediate grade. Gene Ontology analysis demonstrated that the genes undergoing race-related ARS events function in cellular processes relevant to cancer biology, including metabolic processes in low grade, NF-kappaB signaling in intermediate grade and cell motility in high grade. Specific examples of these genes include ERG and PARP2 in high grade, KLK2 and DNMT1 in intermediate grade, and AURKA and SEMA3A in low grade. These findings support a potential role for the ARS process in diversifying gene expression, potentially contributing to prostate cancer aggressiveness in AA patients. The race-related ARS events identified in our work represent potential biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for precision oncology in the context of prostate cancer. Further analysis of the function of prioritized race-related ARS events and their association with local ancestry is ongoing. Funding: DoD Prostate Cancer Research Program Health Disparity Research Award. NIH Basic Research in Cancer Health Disparities R01 Award. Prostate Cancer Foundation Movember Challenge Award.</jats:p> <jats:p>Citation Format: Muthana Al Abo, Wen-Chi Foo, Daniel J. George, Steven R. Patierno, Jennifer A. Freedman. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of prostate cancer from African American and Caucasian American men by Gleason score and race [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference: 14th AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved; 2021 Oct 6-8. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2022;31(1 Suppl):Abstract nr PO-137.</jats:p>
MLA Citation
Abo, Muthana Al, et al. “Abstract PO-137: Comparative transcriptomic analysis of prostate cancer from African American and Caucasian American men by Gleason score and race.” Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &Amp; Prevention, vol. 31, no. 1_Supplement, American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), 2022. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-137.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1521539
Source
crossref
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
31
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-137

Toward Achieving Health Equity - ASPO's 2022 Annual Meeting March 13-15, 2022 Marriott University Park, Tucson, Arizona.

Authors
Gomez, SL; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Gomez, Scarlett Lin, and Steven R. Patierno. “Toward Achieving Health Equity - ASPO's 2022 Annual Meeting March 13-15, 2022 Marriott University Park, Tucson, Arizona.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, vol. 30, no. 11, Nov. 2021, p. 2140. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-21-1081.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501836
PMID
34728533
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
2140
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-21-1081

Abstract 750: Ancestry-related differentially spliced and expressed genes in prostate cancer

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>Prostate cancer (PCa) affects disproportionally men from different population groups. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program’s (SEER’s) 2018 report reveals that PCa incidence and mortality rates are ~2 times higher among African American (AA) men in comparison with white men. In addition to differences in social, lifestyle and structural determinants of health, there is accumulating evidence for a biological contribution to racial disparity in PCa. To date, most work focused on understanding further the molecular mechanisms underlying racial disparity in PCa has analyzed differential aggregate gene expression and mutation among PCa from patients of different population groups. Our recently published work reported alternative RNA splicing (ARS) as a mechanism promoting tumor aggressiveness and drug resistance in PCa from AA patients. Here, we analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data using the Genomic Data Commons to analyze differential aggregate gene expression (2-fold mean change, p &amp;lt; 0.001, Wilcoxon rank sum test) and TCGASpliceSeq to analyze ARS (20% median change, percent spliced in) between PCa from AA and white patients. From our analysis of the 307 PCa specimens from white patients and 49 PCa specimens from AA patients, we identified 71 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 73 differential RNA splicing events (DRSEs) between PCa from AA and white patients. 51 of the DEGs (~72%) exhibit increased expression levels in PCa from AA patients compared with white patients. Among the DRSEs, the majority involve exon skipping (35 events, ~48%). Notably, the genes that exhibit differential aggregate gene expression and the genes that undergo differential ARS do not overlap, indicating that ancestry-related differences in aggregate gene expression and ARS can be independent events. However, a significant number of the Gene Ontology terms corresponding to the genes exhibiting ancestry-related differential aggregate gene expression or differential ARS do overlap, indicating that, despite these two distinct mechanisms of regulation (transcription and RNA splicing), both differentially regulate common pathways in PCa between AA and white patients. In addition, we identified 10 trans-acting splicing factors (SFs), whose aggregate gene expression significantly differed between PCa from AA and white patients, suggesting a potential mechanistic relationship between these SFs and the identified DRSEs. These findings increase understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying racial disparity in PCa. Upon further study, such DEGs and DRSEs have the potential to be candidates for novel precision medicine interventions.</jats:p> <jats:p>Citation Format: Muthana Al Abo, Daniel J. George, Jennifer A. Freedman, Steven R. Patierno. Ancestry-related differentially spliced and expressed genes in prostate cancer [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2019; 2019 Mar 29-Apr 3; Atlanta, GA. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Res 2019;79(13 Suppl):Abstract nr 750.</jats:p>
Authors
MLA Citation
Abo, Muthana Al, et al. “Abstract 750: Ancestry-related differentially spliced and expressed genes in prostate cancer.” Cancer Research, vol. 79, no. 13_Supplement, American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), 2019, pp. 750–750. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.am2019-750.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417240
Source
crossref
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
79
Published Date
Start Page
750
End Page
750
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.am2019-750

Abstract PL02-02: Spliceomics: Alternative RNA splicing as a source of ancestry-related molecular targets in precision oncology and cancer disparities

Authors
MLA Citation
Patierno, Steven R. “Abstract PL02-02: Spliceomics: Alternative RNA splicing as a source of ancestry-related molecular targets in precision oncology and cancer disparities.” Experimental and Molecular Therapeutics, American Association for Cancer Research, 2019. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs18-pl02-02.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417391
Source
crossref
Published In
Experimental and Molecular Therapeutics
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs18-pl02-02

Modifiable patient-reported factors associated with cancer-screening knowledge and participation in a community-based health assessment.

BACKGROUND: We sought to identify modifiable factors associated with cancer screening in a community-based health assessment. METHODS: 24 organizations at 47 community events in central North Carolina distributed a 91-item survey from April-December 2017. Responses about (1) interest in disease prevention, (2) lifestyle choices (e.g., diet, tobacco), and (3) perceptions of primary care access/quality were abstracted to examine their association with self-reported screening participation and knowledge about breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. RESULTS: 2135/2315 participants (92%; 38.5% White, 38% Black, 9.9% Asian) completed screening questions. >70% of screen-eligible respondents reported guideline-concordant screening. Healthy dietary habits were associated with greater knowledge about breast and colorectal cancer screening; reporting negative attitudes about and barriers to healthcare were associated with less breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer screening. Having a place to seek medical care (a proxy for primary care access) was independently associated with being ∼5 times as likely to undergo colorectal screening (OR 4.66, 95% CI 1.58-13.79, all p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In this diverse, community-based sample, modifiable factors were associated with screening engagement, highlighting opportunities for behavioral intervention.
Authors
MLA Citation
Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M., et al. “Modifiable patient-reported factors associated with cancer-screening knowledge and participation in a community-based health assessment.Am J Surg, Nov. 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2022.10.059.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1555407
PMID
36411107
Source
pubmed
Published In
Am J Surg
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2022.10.059