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Bonner, Melanie Jean

Overview:

My current research efforts focus on evaluating and remediating cognitive functioning in children with illnesses that impact the central nervous system. Current projects include: 1) evaluation of a cognitive intervention for children with sickle cell disease; 2) intervention aimed at improving adherence to medication regiments in children with sickle cell disease; and 3) remediation of cognitive deficits in children undergoing treatment for pediatric tumors.  I also consult on several multi-center projects aimed at evaluating cognitive functioning and quality of life in children with disease.  

Positions:

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry, Child & Family Mental Health and Developmental Neuroscience
School of Medicine

Professor of the Practice in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience

Psychology and Neuroscience
Trinity College of Arts & Sciences

Associate Professor in Surgery

Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1995

Ph.D. — Virginia Polytech Institute and State University

Grants:

An integrated and diverse genomic medicine program for undiagnosed diseases

Administered By
Pediatrics, Medical Genetics
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
July 01, 2014
End Date
March 31, 2018

TCD With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (TWITCH) Closeout

Administered By
Pediatrics, Hematology-Oncology
AwardedBy
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
August 01, 2014
End Date
July 31, 2015

Network Plasticity in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

Administered By
Pediatrics, Neurology
AwardedBy
Child Neurology Foundation
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
January 01, 2013
End Date
December 31, 2014

Feasibility of a Couple-based Intervention for Parents of Children with Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
July 09, 2012
End Date
December 31, 2014

Development of a Novel Cognitive Remediation Program for 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

Administered By
Pediatrics, Medical Genetics
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2011
End Date
August 31, 2014

Training in Psychological Intervention Research

Administered By
Psychology and Neuroscience
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Training Faculty
Start Date
June 01, 2006
End Date
May 31, 2011

TRICCS: Targeting Inattention in Childhood Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Psychiatry, Child & Family Mental Health and Developmental Neuroscience
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 2007
End Date
August 31, 2010

Deficits in Facial Expression Recognition in Childhood Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Psychiatry, Child & Family Mental Health and Developmental Neuroscience
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2007
End Date
June 30, 2009
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Publications:

De Novo Truncating Variants in ASXL2 Are Associated with a Unique and Recognizable Clinical Phenotype.

Authors
Shashi, V; Pena, LDM; Kim, K; Burton, B; Hempel, M; Schoch, K; Walkiewicz, M; McLaughlin, HM; Cho, M; Stong, N; Hickey, SE; Shuss, CM; Freemark, MS; Bellet, JS; Keels, MA; Bonner, MJ; El-Dairi, M; Butler, M; Kranz, PG; Stumpel, CTRM; Klinkenberg, S; Oberndorff, K; Alawi, M; Santer, R; Petrovski, S; Kuismin, O; Korpi-Heikkilä, S; Pietilainen, O; Aarno, P; Kurki, MI; Hoischen, A; Need, AC; Goldstein, DB; Kortüm, F
MLA Citation
Shashi, V, Pena, LDM, Kim, K, Burton, B, Hempel, M, Schoch, K, Walkiewicz, M, McLaughlin, HM, Cho, M, Stong, N, Hickey, SE, Shuss, CM, Freemark, MS, Bellet, JS, Keels, MA, Bonner, MJ, El-Dairi, M, Butler, M, Kranz, PG, Stumpel, CTRM, Klinkenberg, S, Oberndorff, K, Alawi, M, Santer, R, Petrovski, S, Kuismin, O, Korpi-Heikkilä, S, Pietilainen, O, Aarno, P, Kurki, MI, Hoischen, A, Need, AC, Goldstein, DB, and Kortüm, F. "De Novo Truncating Variants in ASXL2 Are Associated with a Unique and Recognizable Clinical Phenotype." American journal of human genetics 100.1 (January 2017): 179-.
PMID
28061364
Source
epmc
Published In
The American Journal of Human Genetics
Volume
100
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
179
DOI
10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.12.004

De Novo Truncating Variants in ASXL2 Are Associated with a Unique and Recognizable Clinical Phenotype.

The ASXL genes (ASXL1, ASXL2, and ASXL3) participate in body patterning during embryogenesis and encode proteins involved in epigenetic regulation and assembly of transcription factors to specific genomic loci. Germline de novo truncating variants in ASXL1 and ASXL3 have been respectively implicated in causing Bohring-Opitz and Bainbridge-Ropers syndromes, which result in overlapping features of severe intellectual disability and dysmorphic features. ASXL2 has not yet been associated with a human Mendelian disorder. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in six unrelated probands with developmental delay, macrocephaly, and dysmorphic features. All six had de novo truncating variants in ASXL2. A careful review enabled the recognition of a specific phenotype consisting of macrocephaly, prominent eyes, arched eyebrows, hypertelorism, a glabellar nevus flammeus, neonatal feeding difficulties, hypotonia, and developmental disabilities. Although overlapping features with Bohring-Opitz and Bainbridge-Ropers syndromes exist, features that distinguish the ASXL2-associated condition from ASXL1- and ASXL3-related disorders are macrocephaly, absence of growth retardation, and more variability in the degree of intellectual disabilities. We were also able to demonstrate with mRNA studies that these variants are likely to exert a dominant-negative effect, given that both alleles are expressed in blood and the mutated ASXL2 transcripts escape nonsense-mediated decay. In conclusion, de novo truncating variants in ASXL2 underlie a neurodevelopmental syndrome with a clinically recognizable phenotype. This report expands the germline disorders that are linked to the ASXL genes.

Authors
Shashi, V; Pena, LDM; Kim, K; Burton, B; Hempel, M; Schoch, K; Walkiewicz, M; McLaughlin, HM; Cho, M; Stong, N; Hickey, SE; Shuss, CM; Freemark, MS; Bellet, JS; Keels, MA; Bonner, MJ; El-Dairi, M; Butler, M; Kranz, PG; Stumpel, CTRM; Klinkenberg, S; Oberndorff, K; Alawi, M; Santer, R; Petrovski, S; Kuismin, O; Korpi-Heikkilä, S; Pietilainen, O; Aarno, P; Kurki, MI; Hoischen, A; Need, AC; Goldstein, DB; Kortüm, F
MLA Citation
Shashi, V, Pena, LDM, Kim, K, Burton, B, Hempel, M, Schoch, K, Walkiewicz, M, McLaughlin, HM, Cho, M, Stong, N, Hickey, SE, Shuss, CM, Freemark, MS, Bellet, JS, Keels, MA, Bonner, MJ, El-Dairi, M, Butler, M, Kranz, PG, Stumpel, CTRM, Klinkenberg, S, Oberndorff, K, Alawi, M, Santer, R, Petrovski, S, Kuismin, O, Korpi-Heikkilä, S, Pietilainen, O, Aarno, P, Kurki, MI, Hoischen, A, Need, AC, Goldstein, DB, and Kortüm, F. "De Novo Truncating Variants in ASXL2 Are Associated with a Unique and Recognizable Clinical Phenotype." American journal of human genetics 99.4 (October 2016): 991-999.
PMID
27693232
Source
epmc
Published In
The American Journal of Human Genetics
Volume
99
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
991
End Page
999
DOI
10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.08.017

Benefit Finding in Maternal Caregivers of Pediatric Cancer Survivors: A Mixed Methods Approach.

Benefit finding has been described as the identification of positive effects resulting from otherwise stressful experiences. In this mixed methods study, we examined the relations between qualitative themes related to benefit finding and quantitative measures of psychosocial adjustment and coping as reported by maternal caregivers of survivors of pediatric cancer.Female caregivers of survivors of pediatric cancer (n = 40) completed a qualitative questionnaire about their experiences caring for their child, along with several quantitative measures. Qualitative questionnaires were coded for salient themes, including social support and personal growth. Correlation matrices evaluated associations between qualitative themes and quantitative measures of stress and coping.Identified benefits included social support and personal growth, as well as child-specific benefits. Total benefits reported were significantly positively correlated with availability of emotional resources. Coping methods were also associated, with accepting responsibility associated with fewer identified benefits.Despite the stress of their child's illness, many female caregivers of survivors of pediatric cancer reported finding benefits associated with their experience. Benefit finding in this sample was associated with better adjustment.

Authors
Willard, VW; Hostetter, SA; Hutchinson, KC; Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK
MLA Citation
Willard, VW, Hostetter, SA, Hutchinson, KC, Bonner, MJ, and Hardy, KK. "Benefit Finding in Maternal Caregivers of Pediatric Cancer Survivors: A Mixed Methods Approach." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 33.5 (September 2016): 353-360.
PMID
26811326
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
33
Issue
5
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
353
End Page
360
DOI
10.1177/1043454215620119

Executive functioning and health-related quality of life in pediatric sickle cell disease.

Research consistently indicates that children with sickle cell disease (SCD) face multiple risk factors for neurocognitive impairment. Despite this, no empirical research to date has examined the impact of neurocognitive functioning on quality of life for this pediatric group. Thus, the current study aims to examine the relationship between executive functioning and quality of life in a sample of children with SCD and further explore psychosocial and family/caregiver resources as moderators of this relationship. A total of 45 children with SCD aged 8 to 16 years and their caregivers completed measures of quality of life, behavioral ratings of executive functioning, and psychosocial functioning. Hierarchical linear regression models were utilized to determine the impact of executive functioning on quality of life and further test the interaction effects of proposed moderating variables. Controlling for age, pain, and socioeconomic status (SES), executive functioning was found to significantly predict child- and parent-reported quality of life among youth with SCD. Psychosocial resources of the primary caregiver or family was not found to moderate the relationship between executive functioning and quality of life. These results provide the first empirical evidence that lower executive skills negatively predict quality of life for children with SCD, supporting clinical and research efforts which aim to establish efficacious interventions that target cognitive decrements within this pediatric population.

Authors
Allen, TM; Anderson, LM; Rothman, JA; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Allen, TM, Anderson, LM, Rothman, JA, and Bonner, MJ. "Executive functioning and health-related quality of life in pediatric sickle cell disease." Child neuropsychology : a journal on normal and abnormal development in childhood and adolescence (July 21, 2016): 1-18.
PMID
27439898
Source
epmc
Published In
Child Neuropsychology
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1
End Page
18
DOI
10.1080/09297049.2016.1205011

Social functioning and facial expression recognition in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

This study examined social functioning and facial expression recognition (FER) in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) compared to typically developing peers. Specifically, the current research aimed to identify hypothesised relationships between neurocognitive ability, FER and social functioning.Children, ages 8 to 16, with NF1 (n = 23) and typically developing peers (n = 23) were recruited during regularly scheduled clinic visits and through advertisements on an institutional clinical trials website, respectively. Participants completed a measure of FER, an abbreviated intelligence test and questionnaires regarding their quality of life and behavioural functioning. Parents were also asked to complete questionnaires regarding the social-emotional and cognitive functioning of their child.As expected, there were significant differences between children with NF1 and typically developing peers across domains of social functioning and FER. Within the sample of children with NF1, there were no significant associations observed between cognitive measures, social functioning and facial recognition skills.Children with NF1 exhibited high rates of social impairment and weak FER skills compared to controls. The absence of associations between FER with cognitive and social variables, however, suggests something unique about this skill in children with NF1. Theoretical comparisons are made to children with autism spectrum disorders, as this condition may serve as a potentially useful model in better understanding FER in children with NF1.

Authors
Allen, T; Willard, VW; Anderson, LM; Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Allen, T, Willard, VW, Anderson, LM, Hardy, KK, and Bonner, MJ. "Social functioning and facial expression recognition in children with neurofibromatosis type 1." Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR 60.3 (March 2016): 282-293.
PMID
26805654
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume
60
Issue
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
282
End Page
293
DOI
10.1111/jir.12248

Hydroxycarbamide versus chronic transfusion for maintenance of transcranial doppler flow velocities in children with sickle cell anaemia-TCD With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (TWiTCH): a multicentre, open-label, phase 3, non-inferiority trial.

For children with sickle cell anaemia and high transcranial doppler (TCD) flow velocities, regular blood transfusions can effectively prevent primary stroke, but must be continued indefinitely. The efficacy of hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea) in this setting is unknown; we performed the TWiTCH trial to compare hydroxyurea with standard transfusions.TWiTCH was a multicentre, phase 3, randomised, open-label, non-inferiority trial done at 26 paediatric hospitals and health centres in the USA and Canada. We enrolled children with sickle cell anaemia who were aged 4-16 years and had abnormal TCD flow velocities (≥ 200 cm/s) but no severe vasculopathy. After screening, eligible participants were randomly assigned 1:1 to continue standard transfusions (standard group) or hydroxycarbamide (alternative group). Randomisation was done at a central site, stratified by site with a block size of four, and an adaptive randomisation scheme was used to balance the covariates of baseline age and TCD velocity. The study was open-label, but TCD examinations were read centrally by observers masked to treatment assignment and previous TCD results. Participants assigned to standard treatment continued to receive monthly transfusions to maintain 30% sickle haemoglobin or lower, while those assigned to the alternative treatment started oral hydroxycarbamide at 20 mg/kg per day, which was escalated to each participant's maximum tolerated dose. The treatment period lasted 24 months from randomisation. The primary study endpoint was the 24 month TCD velocity calculated from a general linear mixed model, with the non-inferiority margin set at 15 cm/s. The primary analysis was done in the intention-to-treat population and safety was assessed in all patients who received at least one dose of assigned treatment. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01425307.Between Sept 20, 2011, and April 17, 2013, 159 patients consented and enrolled in TWiTCH. 121 participants passed screening and were then randomly assigned to treatment (61 to transfusions and 60 to hydroxycarbamide). At the first scheduled interim analysis, non-inferiority was shown and the sponsor terminated the study. Final model-based TCD velocities were 143 cm/s (95% CI 140-146) in children who received standard transfusions and 138 cm/s (135-142) in those who received hydroxycarbamide, with a difference of 4·54 (0·10-8·98). Non-inferiority (p=8·82 × 10(-16)) and post-hoc superiority (p=0·023) were met. Of 29 new neurological events adjudicated centrally by masked reviewers, no strokes were identified, but three transient ischaemic attacks occurred in each group. Magnetic resonance brain imaging and angiography (MRI and MRA) at exit showed no new cerebral infarcts in either treatment group, but worsened vasculopathy in one participant who received standard transfusions. 23 severe adverse events in nine (15%) patients were reported for hydroxycarbamide and ten serious adverse events in six (10%) patients were reported for standard transfusions. The most common serious adverse event in both groups was vaso-occlusive pain (11 events in five [8%] patients with hydroxycarbamide and three events in one [2%] patient for transfusions).For high-risk children with sickle cell anaemia and abnormal TCD velocities who have received at least 1 year of transfusions, and have no MRA-defined severe vasculopathy, hydroxycarbamide treatment can substitute for chronic transfusions to maintain TCD velocities and help to prevent primary stroke.National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health.

Authors
Ware, RE; Davis, BR; Schultz, WH; Brown, RC; Aygun, B; Sarnaik, S; Odame, I; Fuh, B; George, A; Owen, W; Luchtman-Jones, L; Rogers, ZR; Hilliard, L; Gauger, C; Piccone, C; Lee, MT; Kwiatkowski, JL; Jackson, S; Miller, ST; Roberts, C; Heeney, MM; Kalfa, TA; Nelson, S; Imran, H; Nottage, K; Alvarez, O; Rhodes, M; Thompson, AA; Rothman, JA; Helton, KJ; Roberts, D; Coleman, J; Bonner, MJ; Kutlar, A; Patel, N; Wood, J; Piller, L; Wei, P; Luden, J; Mortier, NA; Stuber, SE; Luban, NLC; Cohen, AR et al.
MLA Citation
Ware, RE, Davis, BR, Schultz, WH, Brown, RC, Aygun, B, Sarnaik, S, Odame, I, Fuh, B, George, A, Owen, W, Luchtman-Jones, L, Rogers, ZR, Hilliard, L, Gauger, C, Piccone, C, Lee, MT, Kwiatkowski, JL, Jackson, S, Miller, ST, Roberts, C, Heeney, MM, Kalfa, TA, Nelson, S, Imran, H, Nottage, K, Alvarez, O, Rhodes, M, Thompson, AA, Rothman, JA, Helton, KJ, Roberts, D, Coleman, J, Bonner, MJ, Kutlar, A, Patel, N, Wood, J, Piller, L, Wei, P, Luden, J, Mortier, NA, Stuber, SE, Luban, NLC, and Cohen, AR et al. "Hydroxycarbamide versus chronic transfusion for maintenance of transcranial doppler flow velocities in children with sickle cell anaemia-TCD With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (TWiTCH): a multicentre, open-label, phase 3, non-inferiority trial." Lancet (London, England) 387.10019 (February 2016): 661-670.
PMID
26670617
Source
epmc
Published In
The Lancet
Volume
387
Issue
10019
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
661
End Page
670
DOI
10.1016/s0140-6736(15)01041-7

Social functioning in survivors of pediatric brain tumors: Contribution of neurocognitive and social-cognitive skills

Authors
Willard, VW; Allen, TM; Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Willard, VW, Allen, TM, Hardy, KK, and Bonner, MJ. "Social functioning in survivors of pediatric brain tumors: Contribution of neurocognitive and social-cognitive skills." Children's Health Care (December 23, 2015): 1-15.
Source
crossref
Published In
Children's Health Care
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1
End Page
15
DOI
10.1080/02739615.2015.1124769

TCD with Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (TWiTCH): Hydroxyurea Therapy As an Alternative to Transfusions for Primary Stroke Prevention in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

Authors
Ware, RE; Davis, BR; Schultz, WH; Brown, C; Aygun, B; Sarnaik, SA; Odame, I; Fuh, B; George, A; Owen, W; Luchtman-Jones, L; Rogers, ZR; Hilliard, L; Gauger, C; Piccone, CM; Lee, MT; Kwiatkowski, J; Jackson, S; Miller, ST; Roberts, CW; Heeney, MM; Kalfa, TA; Nelson, SC; Imran, H; Nottage, KA; Alvarez, OA; Rhodes, M; Thompson, AA; Rothman, J; Helton, KJ; Roberts, D; Coleman, J; Bonner, MJ; Kutlar, A; Patel, N; Wood, JC; Piller, L; Wei, P; Luden, J; Mortier, NA; Stuber, S; Luban, NLC; Cohen, AR et al.
MLA Citation
Ware, RE, Davis, BR, Schultz, WH, Brown, C, Aygun, B, Sarnaik, SA, Odame, I, Fuh, B, George, A, Owen, W, Luchtman-Jones, L, Rogers, ZR, Hilliard, L, Gauger, C, Piccone, CM, Lee, MT, Kwiatkowski, J, Jackson, S, Miller, ST, Roberts, CW, Heeney, MM, Kalfa, TA, Nelson, SC, Imran, H, Nottage, KA, Alvarez, OA, Rhodes, M, Thompson, AA, Rothman, J, Helton, KJ, Roberts, D, Coleman, J, Bonner, MJ, Kutlar, A, Patel, N, Wood, JC, Piller, L, Wei, P, Luden, J, Mortier, NA, Stuber, S, Luban, NLC, and Cohen, AR et al. "TCD with Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (TWiTCH): Hydroxyurea Therapy As an Alternative to Transfusions for Primary Stroke Prevention in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia." December 3, 2015.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Blood
Volume
126
Issue
23
Publish Date
2015

Fatigue in Children With Sickle Cell Disease: Association With Neurocognitive and Social-Emotional Functioning and Quality of Life.

Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) report fatigue in addition to acute and chronic pain, which can decrease overall health-related quality of life (HRQL). The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and HRQL. Given limited prior research, secondary objectives included investigation of associations between fatigue and functional outcomes, including child neurocognitive and social-emotional functioning. Children aged 8 to 16 years (N=32) and a caregiver completed measures of fatigue, HRQL, pain, and neurocognitive and social-emotional functioning. Controlling for pain and number of SCD-related hospitalizations, hierarchical linear regression models were used to determine the impact of child-reported and parent-reported fatigue on child HRQL. Correlational analyses were used to explore the relationship between fatigue and additional child outcomes. Data indicated that children with SCD experience clinically relevant levels of fatigue, which independently predicts lower HRQL. Fatigue was also associated with lower working memory, executive functioning, and higher levels of internalizing symptoms. Given its observed impact on HRQL and relationship to functional outcomes, fatigue may be an important target of clinical, home, or school interventions. This practice may attenuate the burden of fatigue in these patients, and in turn, help improve the quality of life of children living with SCD.

Authors
Anderson, LM; Allen, TM; Thornburg, CD; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Anderson, LM, Allen, TM, Thornburg, CD, and Bonner, MJ. "Fatigue in Children With Sickle Cell Disease: Association With Neurocognitive and Social-Emotional Functioning and Quality of Life." Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology 37.8 (November 2015): 584-589.
PMID
26479993
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Volume
37
Issue
8
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
584
End Page
589
DOI
10.1097/mph.0000000000000431

Social cognitive training in adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: feasibility and preliminary effects of the intervention.

Children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have deficits in social cognition and social skills that contribute to poor adaptive functioning. These deficits may be of relevance to the later occurrence of serious psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia. Yet, there are no evidence-based interventions to improve social cognitive functioning in children with 22q11DS.Using a customised social cognitive curriculum, we conducted a pilot small-group-based social cognitive training (SCT) programme in 13 adolescents with 22q11DS, relative to a control group of nine age- and gender-matched adolescents with 22q11DS.We found the SCT programme to be feasible, with high rates of compliance and satisfaction on the part of the participants and their families. Our preliminary analyses indicated that the intervention group showed significant improvements in an overall social cognitive composite index.SCT in a small-group format for adolescents with 22q11DS is feasible and results in gains in social cognition. A larger randomised controlled trial would permit assessment of efficacy of this promising novel intervention.

Authors
Shashi, V; Harrell, W; Eack, S; Sanders, C; McConkie-Rosell, A; Keshavan, MS; Bonner, MJ; Schoch, K; Hooper, SR
MLA Citation
Shashi, V, Harrell, W, Eack, S, Sanders, C, McConkie-Rosell, A, Keshavan, MS, Bonner, MJ, Schoch, K, and Hooper, SR. "Social cognitive training in adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: feasibility and preliminary effects of the intervention." Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR 59.10 (October 2015): 902-913.
PMID
25871427
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume
59
Issue
10
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
902
End Page
913
DOI
10.1111/jir.12192

The potential utility of parent-reported attention screening in survivors of childhood cancer to identify those in need of comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation.

Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for neuropsychological late effects, yet identifying those in need of evaluation and obtaining needed services can be challenging for the medical team. Finding time- and cost-effective screening measures that can be used to identify children in need of evaluation is a clinical priority. Our objective was to investigate the association between parent-rated attention problems and related neuropsychological impairments in childhood cancer survivors as a means of identifying those at high risk for difficulties.Cognitive and psychosocial data of survivors who completed neuropsychological evaluations were retrospectively abstracted. Parents of 70 survivors of pediatric cancer (mean age, 11.6 years) completed the Conners Parent Rating Scale and the Child Behavior Checklist. Children also completed a measure of intellectual functioning. The 18 symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity were abstracted from the Conners questionnaire, and participants were classified according to whether or not they met attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom criteria (≥6 inattentive symptoms).Survivors who met symptom criteria for ADHD (27%) demonstrated greater impairments in IQ and working memory, but not processing speed, than survivors who did not. Meeting ADHD symptom criteria was also associated with greater externalizing and social problems but not more internalizing symptoms. ADHD symptom screening was associated with low sensitivity (range = 26.3%-69.2%) but stronger specificity (range = 75.0%-82.7%) for neuropsychological difficulties.Parental ratings of attentional symptoms may be a useful way to screen survivors who may be in need of a full neuropsychological assessment.

Authors
Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Wigdor, AB; Allen, TM; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, Wigdor, AB, Allen, TM, and Bonner, MJ. "The potential utility of parent-reported attention screening in survivors of childhood cancer to identify those in need of comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation." Neuro-oncology practice 2.1 (March 2015): 32-39.
PMID
26034639
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro-oncology practice
Volume
2
Issue
1
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
32
End Page
39
DOI
10.1093/nop/npu026

Examination of risk factors for intellectual and academic outcomes following treatment for pediatric medulloblastoma.

The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the effects of hearing loss and posterior fossa syndrome (PFS), in addition to age at diagnosis and disease risk status, on change in intellectual and academic outcomes following diagnosis and treatment in a large sample of medulloblastoma patients.Data from at least 2 cognitive and academic assessments were available from 165 patients (ages 3-21 years) treated with surgery, risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation, and 4 courses of chemotherapy with stem cell support. Patients underwent serial evaluation of cognitive and academic functioning from baseline up to 5 years post diagnosis.Serious hearing loss, PFS, younger age at diagnosis, and high-risk status were all significant risk factors for decline in intellectual and academic skills. Serious hearing loss and PFS independently predicted below-average estimated mean intellectual ability at 5 years post diagnosis. Patients with high-risk medulloblastoma and young age at diagnosis (<7 years) exhibited the largest drop in mean scores for intellectual and academic outcomes.Despite a significant decline over time, intellectual and academic outcomes remained within the average range at 5 years post diagnosis for the majority of patients. Future studies should determine if scores remain within the average range at time points further out from treatment. Patients at heightened risk should be closely monitored and provided with recommendations for appropriate interventions.

Authors
Schreiber, JE; Gurney, JG; Palmer, SL; Bass, JK; Wang, M; Chen, S; Zhang, H; Swain, M; Chapieski, ML; Bonner, MJ; Mabbott, DJ; Knight, SJ; Armstrong, CL; Boyle, R; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Schreiber, JE, Gurney, JG, Palmer, SL, Bass, JK, Wang, M, Chen, S, Zhang, H, Swain, M, Chapieski, ML, Bonner, MJ, Mabbott, DJ, Knight, SJ, Armstrong, CL, Boyle, R, and Gajjar, A. "Examination of risk factors for intellectual and academic outcomes following treatment for pediatric medulloblastoma." Neuro-oncology 16.8 (August 2014): 1129-1136.
PMID
24497405
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
16
Issue
8
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1129
End Page
1136
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/nou006

Working memory abilities among children treated for medulloblastoma: parent report and child performance.

We investigated the 5-year postsurgical developmental trajectory of working memory (WM) in children with medulloblastoma using parent and performance-based measures.This study included 167 patients treated for medulloblastoma. Serial assessments of WM occurred at predetermined time points for 5 years.There was a subtle, statistically significant increase in parental concern about WM, coupled with a statistically significant decrease in age-standardized scores on performance-based measures. However, whole-group mean scores on both parent and performance-based measures remained in the age-expected range. Posterior fossa syndrome was consistently associated with poorer WM. Younger age at treatment and higher treatment intensity were associated with greater negative change in WM performance only.Most children treated for medulloblastoma display WM within the age-appropriate range according to parent report and performance. However, the subtle negative changes over time and identified subgroups at increased risk highlight the need for ongoing monitoring of this population.

Authors
Knight, SJ; Conklin, HM; Palmer, SL; Schreiber, JE; Armstrong, CL; Wallace, D; Bonner, M; Swain, MA; Evankovich, KD; Mabbott, DJ; Boyle, R; Huang, Q; Zhang, H; Anderson, VA; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Knight, SJ, Conklin, HM, Palmer, SL, Schreiber, JE, Armstrong, CL, Wallace, D, Bonner, M, Swain, MA, Evankovich, KD, Mabbott, DJ, Boyle, R, Huang, Q, Zhang, H, Anderson, VA, and Gajjar, A. "Working memory abilities among children treated for medulloblastoma: parent report and child performance." Journal of pediatric psychology 39.5 (June 2014): 501-511.
PMID
24627465
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
39
Issue
5
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
501
End Page
511
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsu009

Prognostic factors that increase the risk for reduced white matter volumes and deficits in attention and learning for survivors of childhood cancers.

In children, CNS-directed cancer therapy is thought to result in decreased cerebral white matter volumes (WMV) and subsequent neurocognitive deficits. This study was designed as a prospective validation of the purported reduction in WMV, associated influential factors, and its relationship to neurocognitive deficits in a very large cohort of both acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and malignant brain tumors (BT) survivors in comparison to an age similar cohort of healthy sibling controls.The effects of host characteristics and CNS treatment intensity on WMV were investigated in 383 childhood cancer survivors (199 ALL, 184 BT) at least 12 months post-completion of therapy and 67 healthy siblings that served as a control group. t-Tests and multiple variable linear models were used to assess cross-sectional WMV and its relation with neurocognitive function.BT survivors had lower WMV than ALL survivors, who had less than the control group. Increased CNS treatment intensity, younger age at treatment, and greater time since treatment were significantly associated with lower WMV. Additionally, cancer survivors did not perform as well as the control group on neurocognitive measures of intelligence, attention, and academic achievement. Reduced WMV had a larger impact on estimated IQ among females and children treated at a younger age.Survivors of childhood cancer that have undergone higher intensity therapy at a younger age have significantly less WMV than their peers and this difference increases with time since therapy. Decreased WMV is associated with significantly lower scores in intelligence, attention, and academic performance in survivors.

Authors
Reddick, WE; Taghipour, DJ; Glass, JO; Ashford, J; Xiong, X; Wu, S; Bonner, M; Khan, RB; Conklin, HM
MLA Citation
Reddick, WE, Taghipour, DJ, Glass, JO, Ashford, J, Xiong, X, Wu, S, Bonner, M, Khan, RB, and Conklin, HM. "Prognostic factors that increase the risk for reduced white matter volumes and deficits in attention and learning for survivors of childhood cancers." Pediatric blood & cancer 61.6 (June 2014): 1074-1079.
PMID
24464947
Source
epmc
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
61
Issue
6
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1074
End Page
1079
DOI
10.1002/pbc.24947

The Impact of Cognitive Functioning on Quality of Life in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

Authors
Allen, TM; Anderson, LM; Nambuba, J; Thornburg, CD; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Allen, TM, Anderson, LM, Nambuba, J, Thornburg, CD, and Bonner, MJ. "The Impact of Cognitive Functioning on Quality of Life in Children with Sickle Cell Disease." JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PEDIATRICS 35.2 (2014): S11-S11.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume
35
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
S11
End Page
S11

Predictors of Fatigue in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

Authors
Anderson, LM; Allen, TM; Nambuba, J; Thornburg, CD; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Anderson, LM, Allen, TM, Nambuba, J, Thornburg, CD, and Bonner, MJ. "Predictors of Fatigue in Children with Sickle Cell Disease." JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PEDIATRICS 35.2 (2014): S12-S12.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume
35
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
S12
End Page
S12

Reorganization and stability for motor and language areas using cortical stimulation: case example and review of the literature.

The cerebral organization of language in epilepsy patients has been studied with invasive procedures such as Wada testing and electrical cortical stimulation mapping and more recently with noninvasive neuroimaging techniques, such as functional MRI. In the setting of a chronic seizure disorder, clinical variables have been shown to contribute to cerebral language reorganization underscoring the need for language lateralization and localization procedures. We present a 14-year-old pediatric patient with a refractory epilepsy disorder who underwent two neurosurgical resections of a left frontal epileptic focus separated by a year. He was mapped extraoperatively through a subdural grid using cortical stimulation to preserve motor and language functions. The clinical history and extensive workup prior to surgery is discussed as well as the opportunity to compare the cortical maps for language, motor, and sensory function before each resection. Reorganization in cortical tongue sensory areas was seen concomitant with a new zone of ictal and interictal activity in the previous tongue sensory area. Detailed neuropsychological data is presented before and after any surgical intervention to hypothesize about the extent of reorganization between epochs. We conclude that intrahemispheric cortical plasticity does occur following frontal lobe resective surgery in a teenager with medically refractory seizures.

Authors
Serafini, S; Komisarow, JM; Gallentine, W; Mikati, MA; Bonner, MJ; Kranz, PG; Haglund, MM; Grant, G
MLA Citation
Serafini, S, Komisarow, JM, Gallentine, W, Mikati, MA, Bonner, MJ, Kranz, PG, Haglund, MM, and Grant, G. "Reorganization and stability for motor and language areas using cortical stimulation: case example and review of the literature." Brain sciences 3.4 (November 26, 2013): 1597-1614.
PMID
24961623
Source
epmc
Published In
Brain Sciences
Volume
3
Issue
4
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1597
End Page
1614
DOI
10.3390/brainsci3041597

Processing speed, attention, and working memory after treatment for medulloblastoma: an international, prospective, and longitudinal study.

PURPOSE: The current study prospectively examined processing speed (PS), broad attention (BA), and working memory (WM) ability of patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma over a 5-year period. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 126 patients, ages 3 to 21 years at diagnosis, enrolled onto a collaborative protocol for medulloblastoma. Patients were treated with postsurgical risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (n = 36 high risk [HR]; n = 90 average risk) followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell support. Patients completed 509 neuropsychological evaluations using the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities Third Edition (median of three observations per patient). RESULTS: Linear mixed effects models revealed that younger age at diagnosis, HR classification, and higher baseline scores were significantly associated with poorer outcomes in PS. Patients treated as HR and those with higher baseline scores are estimated to have less favorable outcomes in WM and BA over time. Parent education and marital status were significantly associated with BA and WM baseline scores but not change over time. CONCLUSION: Of the three key domains, PS was estimated to have the lowest scores at 5 years after diagnosis. Identifying cognitive domains most vulnerable to decline should guide researchers who are aiming to develop efficacious cognitive intervention and rehabilitation programs, thereby improving the quality of survivorship for the pediatric medulloblastoma population.

Authors
Palmer, SL; Armstrong, C; Onar-Thomas, A; Wu, S; Wallace, D; Bonner, MJ; Schreiber, J; Swain, M; Chapieski, L; Mabbott, D; Knight, S; Boyle, R; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Palmer, SL, Armstrong, C, Onar-Thomas, A, Wu, S, Wallace, D, Bonner, MJ, Schreiber, J, Swain, M, Chapieski, L, Mabbott, D, Knight, S, Boyle, R, and Gajjar, A. "Processing speed, attention, and working memory after treatment for medulloblastoma: an international, prospective, and longitudinal study." J Clin Oncol 31.28 (October 1, 2013): 3494-3500.
PMID
23980078
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Issue
28
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
3494
End Page
3500
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2012.47.4775

Feasibility and preliminary efficacy data from a computerized cognitive intervention in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are significantly impaired in their academic performance and functionality due to cognitive deficits, especially in attention, memory, and other facets of executive function. Compounding these cognitive deficits is the remarkably high risk of major psychoses, occurring in 25% of adolescents and adults with the disorder. There are currently no evidence-based interventions designed to improve the cognitive deficits in these individuals. We implemented a neuroplasticity-based computerized cognitive remediation program for 12 weeks in 13 adolescents with 22q11DS, assessed feasibility, and measured changes in cognition before and after the intervention compared to a control group of 10 age- and gender-matched children with 22q11DS. Our results indicated that despite their cognitive impairments, this intervention is feasible in children with 22q11DS, with high rates of adherence and satisfaction. Our preliminary analyses indicate that gains in cognition occur with the intervention. Further study in a larger randomized controlled trial would enable assessment of efficacy of this novel intervention.

Authors
Harrell, W; Eack, S; Hooper, SR; Keshavan, MS; Bonner, MS; Schoch, K; Shashi, V
MLA Citation
Harrell, W, Eack, S, Hooper, SR, Keshavan, MS, Bonner, MS, Schoch, K, and Shashi, V. "Feasibility and preliminary efficacy data from a computerized cognitive intervention in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome." Res Dev Disabil 34.9 (September 2013): 2606-2613.
PMID
23751300
Source
pubmed
Published In
Research in Developmental Disabilities
Volume
34
Issue
9
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
2606
End Page
2613
DOI
10.1016/j.ridd.2013.05.009

Pain and other non-neurological adverse events in children with sickle cell anemia and previous stroke who received hydroxyurea and phlebotomy or chronic transfusions and chelation: Results from the SWiTCH clinical trial

To compare the non-neurological events in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and previous stroke enrolled in SWiTCH. The NHLBI-sponsored Phase III multicenter randomized clinical trial stroke with transfusions changing to hydroxyurea (SWiTCH) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00122980) compared continuation of chronic blood transfusion/iron chelation to switching to hydroxyurea/phlebotomy for secondary stroke prevention and management of iron overload. All randomized children were included in the analysis (intention to treat). The Fisher's Exact test was used to compare the frequency of subjects who experienced at least one SCA-related adverse event (AE) or serious adverse event (SAE) in each arm and to compare event rates. One hundred and thirty three subjects, mean age 13 ± 3.9 years (range 5.2-19.0 years) and mean time of 7 years on chronic transfusion at study entry, were randomized and treated. Numbers of subjects experiencing non-neurological AEs were similar in the two treatment arms, including SCA-related events, SCA pain events, and low rates of acute chest syndrome and infection. However, fewer children continuing transfusion/chelation experienced SAEs (P = 0.012), SCA-related SAEs (P = 0.003), and SCA pain SAEs (P = 0.016) as compared to children on the hydroxyurea/phlebotomy arm. The timing of phlebotomy did not influence SAEs. Older age at baseline predicted having at least 1 SCA pain event. Patients with recurrent neurological events during SWiTCH were not more likely to experience pain. In children with SCA and prior stroke, monthly transfusions and daily iron chelation provided superior protection against acute vaso-occlusive pain SAEs when compared to hydroxyurea and monthly phlebotomy. Am. J. Heamtol. 88:932-938, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Alvarez, O; Yovetich, NA; Scott, JP; Owen, W; Miller, ST; Schultz, W; Lockhart, A; Aygun, B; Flanagan, J; Bonner, M; al, E
MLA Citation
Alvarez, O, Yovetich, NA, Scott, JP, Owen, W, Miller, ST, Schultz, W, Lockhart, A, Aygun, B, Flanagan, J, Bonner, M, and al, E. "Pain and other non-neurological adverse events in children with sickle cell anemia and previous stroke who received hydroxyurea and phlebotomy or chronic transfusions and chelation: Results from the SWiTCH clinical trial." American Journal of Hematology 88.11 (2013): 932-938.
Source
scival
Published In
American Journal of Hematology
Volume
88
Issue
11
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
932
End Page
938
DOI
10.1002/ajh.23547

Fatigue in Children with Sickle Cell Disease: Impact on Quality of Life

Authors
Anderson, LM; Allen, TM; Andrzejewski, L; Thornburg, CD; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Anderson, LM, Allen, TM, Andrzejewski, L, Thornburg, CD, and Bonner, MJ. "Fatigue in Children with Sickle Cell Disease: Impact on Quality of Life." JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PEDIATRICS 34.6 (2013): S1-S1.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume
34
Issue
6
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
S1
End Page
S1

Sluggish cognitive tempo in survivors of pediatric brain tumors

The presence of neurocognitive late effects in survivors of pediatric brain tumors is well established. However, there remains some debate about how best to conceptualize these deficits. Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is a proposed conceptual framework that has been used to describe a subset of children with ADHD who exhibit a particular profile characterized by lethargy, day dreaming and staring, and poor organization. Previous work has suggested that survivors of leukemia exhibit a similar profile, but it has not yet been examined in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. A sample of 65 survivors of pediatric brain tumors, 25 survivors of leukemia and 50 community controls completed the Child Behavior Checklist, with four items used to measure SCT. Survivors completed additional measures of neurocognitive functioning. Survivors of brain tumors demonstrated significantly greater symptoms of SCT than survivors of leukemia or controls. SCT was associated with attention problems and working memory deficits and the presence of a VP-shunt. Results provided conditional support for the presence of SCT in survivors of brain tumors, with further research needed to determine the clinical utility of the framework. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

Authors
Willard, VW; Hardy, KK; Allen, TM; Hwang, EI; Gururangan, S; Hostetter, SA; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Willard, VW, Hardy, KK, Allen, TM, Hwang, EI, Gururangan, S, Hostetter, SA, and Bonner, MJ. "Sluggish cognitive tempo in survivors of pediatric brain tumors." Journal of Neuro-Oncology 114.1 (2013): 71-78.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Neuro-Oncology
Volume
114
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
71
End Page
78
DOI
10.1007/s11060-013-1149-8

Working memory training in survivors of pediatric cancer: A randomized pilot study

Objectives Survivors of pediatric brain tumors and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for neurocognitive deficits, but few empirically supported treatment options exist. We examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a home-based, computerized working memory training program, CogmedRM, with survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Survivors of brain tumors or ALL (n = 20) with identified deficits in attention and/or working memory were randomized to either the success-adapted computer intervention or a non-adaptive, active control condition. Specifically, children in the adaptive condition completed exercises that became more challenging with each correct trial, whereas those in the non-adaptive version trained with exercises that never increased in difficulty. All participants were asked to complete 25 training sessions at home, with weekly, phone-based coaching support. Brief assessments were completed pre-intervention and post-intervention; outcome measures included both performance-based and parent-report measures of working memory and attention. Results Eighty-five percent of survivors were compliant with the intervention, with no adverse events reported. After controlling for baseline intellectual functioning, survivors who completed the intervention program evidenced significant post-training improvements in their visual working memory and in parent-rated learning problems compared with those in the active control group. No differences in verbal working memory functioning were evident between groups, however. Conclusions Home-based, computerized cognitive training demonstrates good feasibility and acceptability in our sample. Children with higher intellectual functioning at baseline appeared to benefit more from the training, although further study is needed to clarify the strength, scope, and particularly the generalizability of potential treatment effects. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Authors
Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Allen, TM; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, Allen, TM, and Bonner, MJ. "Working memory training in survivors of pediatric cancer: A randomized pilot study." Psycho-Oncology 22.8 (2013): 1856-1865.
Source
scival
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
22
Issue
8
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1856
End Page
1865
DOI
10.1002/pon.3222

Pain and other non-neurological adverse events in children with sickle cell anemia and previous stroke who received hydroxyurea and phlebotomy or chronic transfusions and chelation: Results from the SWiTCH clinical trial

To compare the non-neurological events in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and previous stroke enrolled in SWiTCH. The NHLBI-sponsored Phase III multicenter randomized clinical trial stroke with transfusions changing to hydroxyurea (SWiTCH) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00122980) compared continuation of chronic blood transfusion/iron chelation to switching to hydroxyurea/phlebotomy for secondary stroke prevention and management of iron overload. All randomized children were included in the analysis (intention to treat). The Fisher's Exact test was used to compare the frequency of subjects who experienced at least one SCA-related adverse event (AE) or serious adverse event (SAE) in each arm and to compare event rates. One hundred and thirty three subjects, mean age 13 ± 3.9 years (range 5.2-19.0 years) and mean time of 7 years on chronic transfusion at study entry, were randomized and treated. Numbers of subjects experiencing non-neurological AEs were similar in the two treatment arms, including SCA-related events, SCA pain events, and low rates of acute chest syndrome and infection. However, fewer children continuing transfusion/chelation experienced SAEs (P = 0.012), SCA-related SAEs (P = 0.003), and SCA pain SAEs (P = 0.016) as compared to children on the hydroxyurea/phlebotomy arm. The timing of phlebotomy did not influence SAEs. Older age at baseline predicted having at least 1 SCA pain event. Patients with recurrent neurological events during SWiTCH were not more likely to experience pain. In children with SCA and prior stroke, monthly transfusions and daily iron chelation provided superior protection against acute vaso-occlusive pain SAEs when compared to hydroxyurea and monthly phlebotomy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Alvarez, O; Yovetich, NA; Scott, JP; Owen, W; Miller, ST; Schultz, W; Lockhart, A; Aygun, B; Flanagan, J; Bonner, M; al, E
MLA Citation
Alvarez, O, Yovetich, NA, Scott, JP, Owen, W, Miller, ST, Schultz, W, Lockhart, A, Aygun, B, Flanagan, J, Bonner, M, and al, E. "Pain and other non-neurological adverse events in children with sickle cell anemia and previous stroke who received hydroxyurea and phlebotomy or chronic transfusions and chelation: Results from the SWiTCH clinical trial." American Journal of Hematology (2013).
PMID
23861242
Source
scival
Published In
American Journal of Hematology
Publish Date
2013
DOI
10.1002/ajh.23547

The health education for lupus study: a randomized controlled cognitive-behavioral intervention targeting psychosocial adjustment and quality of life in adolescent females with systemic lupus erythematosus.

INTRODUCTION: To examine in a randomize controlled feasibility clinical trial the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention designed to manage pain, enhance disease adjustment and adaptation and improve quality of life among female adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: Female adolescents (n = 53) ranging in age from 12 to 18 years were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups including a cognitive-behavioral intervention, an education-only arm and a no-contact control group. Participants were assessed at baseline, postintervention and at 3- and 6-month intervals after completion of the intervention. RESULTS: No significant differences were revealed among the 3 treatment arms for any of the dependent measures at any of the assessment points. For the mediator variables, a posthoc secondary analysis did reveal increases in coping skills from baseline to postintervention among the participants in the cognitive-behavioral intervention group compared with both the no-contact control group and the education-only group. CONCLUSION: Although no differences were detected in the primary outcome, a possible effect on coping of female adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus was detected in this feasibility study. Whether the impact of training in the area of coping was of sufficient magnitude to generalize to other areas of functioning, such as adjustment and adaptation, is unclear. Future phase III randomized trials will be needed to assess additional coping models and to evaluate the dose of training and its influence on pain management, adjustment and health-related quality of life.

Authors
Brown, RT; Shaftman, SR; Tilley, BC; Anthony, KK; Kral, MC; Maxson, B; Mee, L; Bonner, MJ; Vogler, LB; Schanberg, LE; Connelly, MA; Wagner, JL; Silver, RM; Nietert, PJ
MLA Citation
Brown, RT, Shaftman, SR, Tilley, BC, Anthony, KK, Kral, MC, Maxson, B, Mee, L, Bonner, MJ, Vogler, LB, Schanberg, LE, Connelly, MA, Wagner, JL, Silver, RM, and Nietert, PJ. "The health education for lupus study: a randomized controlled cognitive-behavioral intervention targeting psychosocial adjustment and quality of life in adolescent females with systemic lupus erythematosus." Am J Med Sci 344.4 (October 2012): 274-282.
PMID
22996139
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume
344
Issue
4
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
274
End Page
282
DOI
10.1097/MAJ.0b013e3182449be9

Parent-reported social outcomes after treatment for pediatric embryonal tumors: A prospective longitudinal study

Purpose: To examine longitudinal parent-reported social outcomes for children treated for pediatric embryonal brain tumors. Patients and Methods: Patients (N = 220) were enrolled onto a multisite clinical treatment protocol. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist/6-18 at the time of their child's diagnosis and yearly thereafter. A generalized linear mixed effects model regression approach was used to examine longitudinal changes in parent ratings of social competence, social problems, and withdrawn/depressed behaviors with demographic and treatment factors as covariates. Results: During the 5-year period following diagnosis and treatment, few patients were reported to have clinically elevated scores on measures of social functioning. Mean scores differed significantly from population norms, yet remained within the average range. Several factors associated with unfavorable patterns of change in social functioning were identified. Patients with high-risk treatment status had a greater increase in parent-reported social problems (P = .001) and withdrawn/depressed behaviors (P = .01) over time compared with average-risk patients. Patients with posterior fossa syndrome had greater parent-reported social problems over time (P = .03). Female patients showed higher withdrawn/depressed scores over time compared with male patients (P < .001). Patient intelligence, age at diagnosis, and parent education level also contributed to parent report of social functioning. Conclusion: Results of this study largely suggest positive social adjustment several years after diagnosis and treatment of a pediatric embryonal tumor. However, several factors, including treatment risk status and posterior fossa syndrome, may be important precursors of long-term social outcomes. Future research is needed to elucidate the trajectory of social functioning as these patients transition into adulthood. © 2012 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Authors
Brinkman, TM; Palmer, SL; Chen, S; Zhang, H; Evankovich, K; Swain, MA; Bonner, MJ; Janzen, L; Knight, S; Armstrong, CL; Boyle, R; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Brinkman, TM, Palmer, SL, Chen, S, Zhang, H, Evankovich, K, Swain, MA, Bonner, MJ, Janzen, L, Knight, S, Armstrong, CL, Boyle, R, and Gajjar, A. "Parent-reported social outcomes after treatment for pediatric embryonal tumors: A prospective longitudinal study." Journal of Clinical Oncology 30.33 (2012): 4134-4140.
PMID
23071220
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
30
Issue
33
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
4134
End Page
4140
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2011.40.6702

Induction chemotherapy and conformal radiation therapy for very young children with nonmetastatic medulloblastoma: Children's Oncology Group study P9934

Purpose: P9934 was a prospective trial of systemic chemotherapy, second surgery, and conformal radiation therapy (CRT) limited to the posterior fossa and primary site for children between 8 months and 3 years old with nonmetastatic medulloblastoma. The study was open from June 2000 until June 2006. Patients and Methods: After initial surgery, children received four cycles of induction chemotherapy, followed by age- and response-adjusted CRT to the posterior fossa (18 or 23.4 Gy) and tumor bed (cumulative 50.4 or 54 Gy) and maintenance chemotherapy. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were evaluated and event-free survival (EFS) results were directly compared with a previous study of multiagent chemotherapy without irradiation (Pediatric Oncology Group [POG] trial 9233). Results: Seventy-four patients met eligibility requirements. The 4-year EFS and overall survival probabilities were 50% ± 6% and 69% ± 5.5%, respectively, which compared favorably to the results from POG 9233. Analysis showed that the desmoplastic/nodular subtype was a favorable factor in predicting survival. Our 4-year EFS rate was 58% ± 8% for patients with desmoplasia. Whereas seven of 10 patients who had disease progression before CRT had primary-site failure, 15 of 19 patients who progressed after CRT had distant-site failure. Neurodevelopmental assessments did not show a decline in cognitive or motor function after protocol-directed chemotherapy and CRT. Conclusion: The addition of CRT to postoperative chemotherapy in young children with nonmetastatic medulloblastoma increased event-free survival compared with the use of postoperative chemotherapy alone. Future studies will use histopathologic typing (desmoplastic/nodular versus nondesmoplastic/nodular) to stratify patients for therapy by risk of relapse. © 2012 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Authors
Ashley, DM; Merchant, TE; Strother, D; Zhou, T; Duffner, P; Burger, PC; Miller, DC; Lyon, N; Bonner, MJ; Msall, M; Buxton, A; Geyer, R; Kun, LE; Coleman, L; Pollack, IF
MLA Citation
Ashley, DM, Merchant, TE, Strother, D, Zhou, T, Duffner, P, Burger, PC, Miller, DC, Lyon, N, Bonner, MJ, Msall, M, Buxton, A, Geyer, R, Kun, LE, Coleman, L, and Pollack, IF. "Induction chemotherapy and conformal radiation therapy for very young children with nonmetastatic medulloblastoma: Children's Oncology Group study P9934." Journal of Clinical Oncology 30.26 (2012): 3181-3186.
PMID
22851568
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
30
Issue
26
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
3181
End Page
3186
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2010.34.4341

Health- quality of life in sickle cell disease: Past, present, and future

Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is defined as the patient's appraisal of how his/her well being and level of functioning, compared to the perceived ideal, are affected by individual health. The study of HRQL in children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) has begun to flourish. Given the devastating complications of the disease and other co-morbid factors patients experience that influence HRQL, it is increasingly important to understand HRQL. The focus of this critical review was to examine past and current research in HRQL in SCD where a validated instrument was used. In addition, future directions for HRQL in SCD are explored. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Panepinto, JA; Bonner, M
MLA Citation
Panepinto, JA, and Bonner, M. "Health- quality of life in sickle cell disease: Past, present, and future." Pediatric Blood and Cancer 59.2 (2012): 377-385related.
PMID
22522407
Source
scival
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
59
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
377
End Page
385related
DOI
10.1002/pbc.24176

Working memory training in survivors of pediatric cancer: A randomized pilot study

Objectives: Survivors of pediatric brain tumors and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for neurocognitive deficits, but few empirically supported treatment options exist. We examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a home-based, computerized working memory training program, CogmedRM, with survivors of childhood cancer. Methods: Survivors of brain tumors or ALL (n=20) with identified deficits in attention and/or working memory were randomized to either the success-adapted computer intervention or a non-adaptive, active control condition. Specifically, children in the adaptive condition completed exercises that became more challenging with each correct trial, whereas those in the non-adaptive version trained with exercises that never increased in difficulty. All participants were asked to complete 25 training sessions at home, with weekly, phone-based coaching support. Brief assessments were completed pre-intervention and post-intervention; outcome measures included both performance-based and parent-report measures of working memory and attention. Results: Eighty-five percent of survivors were compliant with the intervention, with no adverse events reported. After controlling for baseline intellectual functioning, survivors who completed the intervention program evidenced significant post-training improvements in their visual working memory and in parent-rated learning problems compared with those in the active control group. No differences in verbal working memory functioning were evident between groups, however. Conclusions: Home-based, computerized cognitive training demonstrates good feasibility and acceptability in our sample. Children with higher intellectual functioning at baseline appeared to benefit more from the training, although further study is needed to clarify the strength, scope, and particularly the generalizability of potential treatment effects. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Authors
Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Allen, TM; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, Allen, TM, and Bonner, MJ. "Working memory training in survivors of pediatric cancer: A randomized pilot study." Psycho-Oncology (2012).
PMID
23203754
Source
scival
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Publish Date
2012
DOI
10.1002/pon.3222

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NEUROCOGNITIVE ABILITY AND PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTIONING IN CHILDREN WITH NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE 1

Authors
Allen, TM; Willard, VW; Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Allen, TM, Willard, VW, Hardy, KK, and Bonner, MJ. "THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NEUROCOGNITIVE ABILITY AND PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTIONING IN CHILDREN WITH NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE 1." ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE 41 (April 2011): S180-S180.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
41
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
S180
End Page
S180

Computerized cognitive training in survivors of childhood cancer: a pilot study.

The objective of the current study was to pilot a computerized cognitive training program, Captain's Log, in a small sample of survivors of childhood cancer. A total of 9 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors with attention and working memory deficits were enrolled in a home-based 12-week cognitive training program. Survivors returned for follow-up assessments postintervention and 3 months later. The intervention was associated with good feasibility and acceptability. Participants exhibited significant increases in working memory and decreases in parent-rated attention problems following the intervention. Findings indicate that home-based, computerized cognitive intervention is a promising intervention for survivors with cognitive late effects; however, further study is warranted with a larger sample.

Authors
Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, and Bonner, MJ. "Computerized cognitive training in survivors of childhood cancer: a pilot study." J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 28.1 (January 2011): 27-33.
PMID
20966158
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
28
Issue
1
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
27
End Page
33
DOI
10.1177/1043454210377178

How parents cope with their child's diagnosis and treatment of an embryonal tumor: Results of a prospective and longitudinal study

The current study reports longitudinal coping responses among parents of children diagnosed with an embryonal brain tumor. Patients (n = 219) were enrolled on a treatment protocol for a pediatric embryonal brain tumor. Their parents (n = 251) completed the Coping Response Inventory at time of their child's diagnosis and yearly thereafter, resulting in 502 observations. Outcomes were examined with patient and parent age at diagnosis, patient risk, parent gender and education as covariates. At the time of diagnosis, the highest observed coping method was seeking guidance with well above average scores (T = 61.6). Over time, younger parents were found to seek guidance at a significantly higher rate than older parents (P = .016) and the use of acceptance resignation and seeking alternative results by all parents significantly increased (P = .011 and P < .0001 respectively). The use of emotional discharge was also observed above average at time of diagnosis (T = 55.4) with younger fathers being more likely to exhibit emotional discharge than older fathers (P = .002). Differences in coping according to age of the patient and parent education level are also discussed. Results show a high need for guidance, and above average emotional discharge, especially among younger parents. It is imperative for the healthcare team to lead with accurate information so that these parents may make informed decisions about the care of their child. This need remains high years after diagnosis. Therefore it is critical to continue a consistent level of effective communication and support, even following treatment. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Authors
Palmer, SL; Lesh, S; Wallace, D; Bonner, MJ; Swain, M; Chapieski, L; Janzen, L; Mabbott, D; Knight, S; Boyle, R; Armstrong, CL; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Palmer, SL, Lesh, S, Wallace, D, Bonner, MJ, Swain, M, Chapieski, L, Janzen, L, Mabbott, D, Knight, S, Boyle, R, Armstrong, CL, and Gajjar, A. "How parents cope with their child's diagnosis and treatment of an embryonal tumor: Results of a prospective and longitudinal study." Journal of Neuro-Oncology 105.2 (2011): 253-259.
PMID
21499990
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Neuro-Oncology
Volume
105
Issue
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
253
End Page
259
DOI
10.1007/s11060-011-0574-9

How parents cope with their child's diagnosis and treatment of an embryonal tumor: results of a prospective and longitudinal study

The current study reports longitudinal coping responses among parents of children diagnosed with an embryonal brain tumor. Patients (n = 219) were enrolled on a treatment protocol for a pediatric embryonal brain tumor. Their parents (n = 251) completed the Coping Response Inventory at time of their child's diagnosis and yearly thereafter, resulting in 502 observations. Outcomes were examined with patient and parent age at diagnosis, patient risk, parent gender and education as covariates. At the time of diagnosis, the highest observed coping method was seeking guidance with well above average scores (T = 61.6). Over time, younger parents were found to seek guidance at a significantly higher rate than older parents (P = .016) and the use of acceptance resignation and seeking alternative results by all parents significantly increased (P = .011 and P < .0001 respectively). The use of emotional discharge was also observed above average at time of diagnosis (T = 55.4) with younger fathers being more likely to exhibit emotional discharge than older fathers (P = .002). Differences in coping according to age of the patient and parent education level are also discussed. Results show a high need for guidance, and above average emotional discharge, especially among younger parents. It is imperative for the healthcare team to lead with accurate information so that these parents may make informed decisions about the care of their child. This need remains high years after diagnosis. Therefore it is critical to continue a consistent level of effective communication and support, even following treatment. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Authors
Palmer, SL; Lesh, S; Wallace, D; Bonner, MJ; Swain, M; Chapieski, L; Janzen, L; Mabbott, D; Knight, S; Boyle, R; Armstrong, CL; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Palmer, SL, Lesh, S, Wallace, D, Bonner, MJ, Swain, M, Chapieski, L, Janzen, L, Mabbott, D, Knight, S, Boyle, R, Armstrong, CL, and Gajjar, A. "How parents cope with their child's diagnosis and treatment of an embryonal tumor: results of a prospective and longitudinal study." Journal of Neuro-Oncology (2011): 1-7.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Neuro-Oncology
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
1
End Page
7
DOI
10.1007/s11060-011-0574-9

Technical aspects and testing of a program to assess deficits in facial expression recognition in childhood cancer survivors

The research presented here focuses on the ease of use of an instrument's interface for a target pediatric population, where participants were asked to interpret virtual character facial expressions. Fortyone children, both pediatric cancer survivors and healthy recruits, took part in six tasks that had them describe or express their confidence in descriptions of different facial expressions, portrayed either overtly or subtly and dynamically or statically by eight virtual characters. In this test of usability and feasibility, childhood cancer survivors performed comparably to healthy participants, suggesting that this instrument is feasible for use with cancer patients. © Virtual Reality Medical Institute.

Authors
Hubal, RC; Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Fitzgerald, DP; Willard, VW; Allen, TM
MLA Citation
Hubal, RC, Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Fitzgerald, DP, Willard, VW, and Allen, TM. "Technical aspects and testing of a program to assess deficits in facial expression recognition in childhood cancer survivors." Journal of Cyber Therapy and Rehabilitation 4.3 (2011): 363-369.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Cyber Therapy and Rehabilitation
Volume
4
Issue
3
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
363
End Page
369

Associations between leisure-time physical activity and health-related quality of life among adolescent and adult survivors of childhood cancers.

OBJECTIVE: Survivors of childhood cancer are at an increased risk for reduced quality of life (QOL), yet few studies have explored factors associated with improving health-related QOL (HRQOL) in this population. We thus explored the relationship between physical activity (PA) and HRQOL among survivors of childhood cancer. METHODS: A total of 215 survivors of childhood lymphoma, leukemia, and central nervous system cancers completed mailed surveys that elicited information regarding leisure-time PA (LTPA) measured in metabolic equivalents, HRQOL, and diagnostic and demographic factors. Correlations and adjusted regression models were used to explore the relationship between LTPA and HRQOL. RESULTS: In the total sample, modest, yet significant linear associations were observed between LTPA and overall HRQOL (beta=0.17, p<0.01), as well as each of the respective subscales (beta=0.11-0.23 and p's<0.05 to <0.001). Among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer, LTPA was significantly associated with overall HRQOL (beta=0.27), cancer worry (beta=0.36), cognitive function (beta=0.32), body appearance (beta=0.29), and social function (beta=0.27) (all p's<0.05). Among adult survivors of childhood cancer, LTPA was only significantly associated with physical function (beta=0.28, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Significant associations exist between LTPA and HRQOL; however, the association was stronger and observed in more domains for adolescent survivors of childhood cancer. More research is needed to determine the antecedents and consequences of PA in this population.

Authors
Paxton, RJ; Jones, LW; Rosoff, PM; Bonner, M; Ater, JL; Demark-Wahnefried, W
MLA Citation
Paxton, RJ, Jones, LW, Rosoff, PM, Bonner, M, Ater, JL, and Demark-Wahnefried, W. "Associations between leisure-time physical activity and health-related quality of life among adolescent and adult survivors of childhood cancers." Psychooncology 19.9 (September 2010): 997-1003.
PMID
19918964
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
19
Issue
9
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
997
End Page
1003
DOI
10.1002/pon.1654

HOW DO PARENTS COPE WITH THEIR CHILD'S DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF AN EMBRYONAL TUMOR? RESULTS OF A PROSPECTIVE AND LONGITUDINAL STUDY

Authors
Palmer, SL; Lesh, S; Wallace, D; Bonner, MJ; Swain, M; Chapieski, L; Mabbott, DJ; Knight, S; Boyle, R; Armstrong, C; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Palmer, SL, Lesh, S, Wallace, D, Bonner, MJ, Swain, M, Chapieski, L, Mabbott, DJ, Knight, S, Boyle, R, Armstrong, C, and Gajjar, A. "HOW DO PARENTS COPE WITH THEIR CHILD'S DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF AN EMBRYONAL TUMOR? RESULTS OF A PROSPECTIVE AND LONGITUDINAL STUDY." June 2010.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
12
Issue
6
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
II16
End Page
II16

Perceived social competency in children with brain tumors: comparison between children on and off therapy.

Children with brain tumors are at risk for a number of cognitive, academic, and social difficulties as a consequence of their illness and its treatment. Of these, the least is known about social functioning, particularly over the course of the illness. Thirty children with brain tumors were evaluated using neurocognitive and psychological measures, including a measure of perceived competency. Results indicated that off-therapy brain tumor patients reported more concerns about their social competence than both a normative sample and children on treatment. Findings highlight the need for more research aimed at helping survivors cope with long-term stressors associated with their illness.

Authors
Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Watral, MA; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, Watral, MA, and Bonner, MJ. "Perceived social competency in children with brain tumors: comparison between children on and off therapy." J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 27.3 (May 2010): 156-163.
PMID
20147514
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
27
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
156
End Page
163
DOI
10.1177/1043454209357918

Health related quality of life in sickle cell disease: just scratching the surface.

Authors
Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ. "Health related quality of life in sickle cell disease: just scratching the surface." Pediatr Blood Cancer 54.1 (January 2010): 1-2.
PMID
19785024
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
54
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
1
End Page
2
DOI
10.1002/pbc.22301

Neurocognitive outcome 12 months following cerebellar mutism syndrome in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma

The aim is to prospectively assess early neurocognitive outcome of children who developed cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) following surgical resection of a posterior fossa embryonal tumor, compared with carefully matched control patients. Children who were enrolled on an ongoing IRB-approved protocol for treatment of embryonal tumors, were diagnosed with postoperative CMS, and had completed prospectively planned neuropsychological evaluation at 12 months postdiagnosis were considered eligible. The cognitive outcomes of these patients were examined in comparison to patients without CMS from the same treatment protocol and matched with regard to primary diagnosis, age at diagnosis, and risk/corresponding treatment (n 5 22 pairs). Seventeen were also matched according to gender, and 14 were also matched according to race. High-risk patients received 36-39.6 Gy CSI and 3D conformal boost to the primary site to 55.8-59.4 Gy. Average-risk patients received 23.4 Gy CSI and 3D conformal boost to the primary site to 55.8 Gy. Significant group differences were found on multiple cognitive outcomes. While the matched control patients exhibited performance in the average range, patients who developed CMS postsurgery were found to have significantly lower performance in processing speed, attention, working memory, executive processes, cognitive efficiency, reading, spelling, and math. Patients treated for medulloblastoma who experience postoperative CMS show an increased risk for neurocognitive impairment, evident as early as 12 months following diagnosis. This study highlights the need for careful follow-up with neuropsychological evaluation and for obtaining critical support for patients and their families. © The Author(s) 2010.

Authors
Palmer, SL; Hassall, T; Evankovich, K; Mabbott, DJ; Bonner, M; Deluca, C; Cohn, R; Fisher, MJ; Morris, EB; Broniscer, A; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Palmer, SL, Hassall, T, Evankovich, K, Mabbott, DJ, Bonner, M, Deluca, C, Cohn, R, Fisher, MJ, Morris, EB, Broniscer, A, and Gajjar, A. "Neurocognitive outcome 12 months following cerebellar mutism syndrome in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma." Neuro-Oncology 12.12 (2010): 1311-1317.
PMID
20713408
Source
scival
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
12
Issue
12
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
1311
End Page
1317
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noq094

Long-term efficacy of methylphenidate in enhancing attention regulation, social skills, and academic abilities of childhood cancer survivors

Purpose: Methylphenidate (MPH) ameliorates attention problems experienced by some cancer survivors in the short term, but its long-term efficacy is unproven. Patients and Methods: This study investigates the long-term effectiveness of maintenance doses of MPH in survivors of childhood brain tumors (n = 35) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 33) participating in a 12-month MPH trial. Measures of attention (Conners' Continuous Performance Test [CPT], Conners' Rating Scales [CRS]), academic abilities (Wechsler Individual Achievement Test [WIAT]), social skills (Social Skills Rating System [SSRS]), and behavioral problems (Child Behavior Checklist [CBCL]) were administered at premedication baseline and at the end of the MPH trial while on medication. A cancer control group composed of patients who were not administered MPH (brain tumor = 31 and acute lymphoblastic leukemia = 23) was assessed on the same measures 2 months apart. Results: For the MPH group, repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant improvement in performance on a measure of sustained attention (CPT indices, P < .05); parent, teacher, and self-report ratings of attention (CRS indices, P < .05), and parent ratings of social skills or behavioral problems (SSRS and CBCL indices; P < .05). In contrast, the cancer control group only showed improvement on parent ratings of attention (Conners' Parent Rating Scale indices; P < .05) and social skills (SSRS and CBCL indices; P < .05). There was no significant improvement on the academic measure (WIAT) in either group. Conclusion: Attention and behavioral benefits of MPH for childhood cancer survivors are maintained across settings over the course of a year. Although academic gains were not identified, MPH may offer benefits in academic areas not assessed. © 2010 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Authors
Conklin, HM; Reddick, WE; Ashford, J; Ogg, S; Howard, SC; Morris, EB; Brown, R; Bonner, M; Christensen, R; Wu, S; Xiong, X; Khan, RB
MLA Citation
Conklin, HM, Reddick, WE, Ashford, J, Ogg, S, Howard, SC, Morris, EB, Brown, R, Bonner, M, Christensen, R, Wu, S, Xiong, X, and Khan, RB. "Long-term efficacy of methylphenidate in enhancing attention regulation, social skills, and academic abilities of childhood cancer survivors." Journal of Clinical Oncology 28.29 (2010): 4465-4472.
PMID
20837955
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
28
Issue
29
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
4465
End Page
4472
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2010.28.4026

Predicting methylphenidate response in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial

Objective To investigate the methylphenidate (MPH) response rate among childhood survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and brain tumors (BTs) and to identify predictors of positive MPH response. Methods Cancer survivors (N = 106; BT = 51 and ALL = 55) identified as having attention deficits and learning problems participated in a 3-week, double-blind, crossover trial consisting of placebo, low-dose MPH (0.3 mg/kg), and moderate-dose MPH (0.6 mg/kg). Weekly teacher and parent reports on the Conners' Rating Scales were gathered. Results Following moderate MPH dose, 45.28 of the sample was classified as responders. Findings revealed that more problems endorsed prior to the medication trial on parent and teacher ratings were predictive of positive medication response (p <. 05). Conclusions MPH significantly reduces attention problems in a subset of childhood cancer survivors. Parent and teacher ratings may assist in identifying children most likely to respond to MPH so prescribing may be optimally targeted.

Authors
Conklin, HM; Helton, S; Ashford, J; Mulhern, RK; Reddick, WE; Brown, R; Bonner, M; Jasper, BW; Wu, S; Xiong, X; Khan, RB
MLA Citation
Conklin, HM, Helton, S, Ashford, J, Mulhern, RK, Reddick, WE, Brown, R, Bonner, M, Jasper, BW, Wu, S, Xiong, X, and Khan, RB. "Predicting methylphenidate response in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial." Journal of Pediatric Psychology 35.2 (2010): 144-155.
PMID
19465537
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
35
Issue
2
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
144
End Page
155
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsp044

SLUGGISH COGNITIVE TEMPO IN SURVIVORS OF PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMORS

Authors
Willard, VW; Allen, TM; Hardy, KK; Sawyer, KA; Gururangan, S; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Willard, VW, Allen, TM, Hardy, KK, Sawyer, KA, Gururangan, S, and Bonner, MJ. "SLUGGISH COGNITIVE TEMPO IN SURVIVORS OF PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMORS." October 2009.
PMID
23661102
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
11
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
643
End Page
643

Gender differences in facial expression recognition in survivors of pediatric brain tumors.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between gender, history of cranial radiation therapy (CRT) and facial expression recognition (FER) skill in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. METHODS: Fifty-three survivors (27 females) completed a measure of FER and an intelligence test. RESULTS: There was a significant interaction between gender and CRT on ability to interpret low-intensity facial expressions, such that females who had not had CRT made fewer errors than either females who had CRT or males. CONCLUSION: A history of CRT has a notable effect on FER skill in females: girls who received CRT performed significantly more poorly than girls who did not.

Authors
Willard, VW; Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Willard, VW, Hardy, KK, and Bonner, MJ. "Gender differences in facial expression recognition in survivors of pediatric brain tumors." Psychooncology 18.8 (August 2009): 893-897.
PMID
19061181
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
18
Issue
8
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
893
End Page
897
DOI
10.1002/pon.1502

Adjustment of caregivers of pediatric patients with brain tumors: a cross-sectional analysis.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to compare the psychological adjustment of caregivers of children with brain tumors who are on-treatment with caregivers of children who are off-treatment. METHODS: Data were collected from 90 participants: 47 (52.2%) caregivers of children undergoing active treatment (on-treatment) and 43 (47.8%) caregivers of children off-treatment on measures of global psychological distress and illness and caregiving related distress. RESULTS: Results revealed that the two groups differed significantly in their reported symptoms of general psychological distress, with the off-treatment caregivers reporting significantly lower levels of general distress. However, off-treatment caregivers continued to experience elevated levels of uncertainty and caregiving burden related to their child's illness. CONCLUSIONS: There is significant evidence suggesting that the burden of caring for a child with a brain tumor is ongoing, continuing well into the off-treatment period. These results also suggest that the psychosocial functioning of these caregivers is best assessed using measures designed specifically to evaluate illness-related psychosocial functioning (e.g. the Parent Experience of Child Illness, Impact on Family Scale).

Authors
Hutchinson, KC; Willard, VW; Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Hutchinson, KC, Willard, VW, Hardy, KK, and Bonner, MJ. "Adjustment of caregivers of pediatric patients with brain tumors: a cross-sectional analysis." Psychooncology 18.5 (May 2009): 515-523.
PMID
18756585
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
18
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
515
End Page
523
DOI
10.1002/pon.1421

A pilot study of hydroxyurea to prevent chronic organ damage in young children with sickle cell anemia.

BACKGROUND: Hydroxyurea improves laboratory parameters and prevents acute clinical complications of sickle cell anemia (SCA) in children and adults, but its effects on organ function remain incompletely defined. METHODS: To assess the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea in young children with SCA and to prospectively assess kidney and brain function, 14 young children (mean age 35 months) received hydroxyurea at a mean maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 28 mg/kg/day. RESULTS: After a mean of 25 months, expected laboratory effects included significant increases in hemoglobin, MCV and %HbF along with significant decreases in reticulocytes, absolute neutrophil count, and bilirubin. There was no significant increase in glomerular filtration rate by DTPA clearance or Schwartz estimate. Mean transcranial Doppler (TCD) velocity changes were -25.6 cm/sec (P < 0.01) and -26.8 cm/sec (P < 0.05) in the right and left MCA vessels, respectively. At study exit, no child had conditional or abnormal TCD values, and none developed brain ischemic lesions or vasculopathy progression by MRI/MRA. Growth and neurocognitive scores were preserved and Impact-on-Family scores improved. CONCLUSIONS: These pilot data indicate hydroxyurea at MTD is well-tolerated by both children and families, and may prevent chronic organ damage in young children with SCA.

Authors
Thornburg, CD; Dixon, N; Burgett, S; Mortier, NA; Schultz, WH; Zimmerman, SA; Bonner, M; Hardy, KK; Calatroni, A; Ware, RE
MLA Citation
Thornburg, CD, Dixon, N, Burgett, S, Mortier, NA, Schultz, WH, Zimmerman, SA, Bonner, M, Hardy, KK, Calatroni, A, and Ware, RE. "A pilot study of hydroxyurea to prevent chronic organ damage in young children with sickle cell anemia." Pediatr Blood Cancer 52.5 (May 2009): 609-615.
PMID
19061213
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
52
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
609
End Page
615
DOI
10.1002/pbc.21738

Additional evidence of a nonverbal learning disability in survivors of pediatric brain tumors

The purpose of the study was to further examine the utility of the nonverbal learning disability (NLD) model for characterizing deficits in pediatric brain tumor survivors. Data from measures of cognitive, academic, and social functioning were gathered from 101 survivors. Results revealed a pattern consistent with expectations based on the NLD model including stronger verbal than nonverbal intellectual and memory functioning, stronger reading than math skills, and weaknesses in visual-motor integration and processing speed. Moreover, findings support evidence of social problems in this sample. Further testing of the NLD model is needed to provide a comprehensive roadmap for assessment and intervention in pediatric cancer survivors. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Gururangan, S
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, and Gururangan, S. "Additional evidence of a nonverbal learning disability in survivors of pediatric brain tumors." Children's Health Care 38.1 (2009): 49-63.
Source
scival
Published In
Children's Health Care
Volume
38
Issue
1
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
49
End Page
63
DOI
10.1080/02739610802615849

Healthy lifestyle choices after cancer treatment.

Authors
Willard, VW; Bonner, MJ; Guill, AB
MLA Citation
Willard, VW, Bonner, MJ, and Guill, AB. "Healthy lifestyle choices after cancer treatment." Cancer Treat Res 150 (2009): 343-352. (Review)
PMID
19834679
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Treatment and Research
Volume
150
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
343
End Page
352
DOI
10.1007/b109924_22

Hydrocephalus as a possible additional contributor to cognitive outcome in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between shunted hydrocephalus and intellectual, memory and academic functioning in a group of survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma. METHODS: Data from measures of cognitive, memory, academic and visual-motor functioning were gathered retrospectively from 35 survivors. Of these survivors, 10 (28.6%) required ventriculoperitoneal-shunt placement for hydrocephalus posttumor resection. RESULTS: Results revealed that participants with shunted hydrocephalus demonstrated significantly lower IQs, lower nonverbal intellectual functioning, lower academic skills in writing and math, and impairments in visual-motor abilities when compared with those without shunt. CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight the need to explore other variables--in addition to radiation and chemotherapy--as risk factors for neurocognitive impairments in survivors. Furthermore, identification of physiological substrates underlying these deficits is needed.

Authors
Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ; Willard, VW; Watral, MA; Gururangan, S
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Bonner, MJ, Willard, VW, Watral, MA, and Gururangan, S. "Hydrocephalus as a possible additional contributor to cognitive outcome in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma." Psychooncology 17.11 (November 2008): 1157-1161.
PMID
18636431
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
17
Issue
11
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
1157
End Page
1161
DOI
10.1002/pon.1349

Social functioning and facial expression recognition in survivors of pediatric brain tumors.

OBJECTIVE: To assess social functioning and facial expression recognition skill in survivors of pediatric brain tumors (BT) as compared to children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). METHODS: The social functioning of 51 survivors of BT and 31 children with JRA was assessed using a facial expression recognition task, questionnaire ratings of social functioning, and an IQ screener. RESULTS: After controlling for estimated IQ, survivors of BT made significantly more errors interpreting adult facial expressions as compared to children with JRA. Additionally, history of therapy and diagnosis age predicted performance on the child portion of the facial recognition task. Finally, survivors of BT demonstrated significantly impaired social functioning across multiple measures when compared to children with JRA. CONCLUSIONS: Survivors of pediatric BT showed significant deficits in social functioning as compared to an illness comparison group. Errors in facial expression recognition represent another method for evaluating deficits that contribute to social outcomes.

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Anthony, KK; Hood, M; Gururangan, S
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, Anthony, KK, Hood, M, and Gururangan, S. "Social functioning and facial expression recognition in survivors of pediatric brain tumors." J Pediatr Psychol 33.10 (November 2008): 1142-1152.
PMID
18390896
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
33
Issue
10
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
1142
End Page
1152
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsn035

Psychosocial functioning in parents of adult survivors of childhood cancer.

BACKGROUND: Although significant progress has been made in identifying long-term sequelae for adult survivors of childhood cancer, comparatively little attention has been paid to the functioning of their parents. In a previous study, we observed that a majority of adult survivors are accompanied to clinic visits by at least 1 parent, suggesting ongoing concern for their children's health. In the current study, we explore psychologic stressors that characterize this population and might account for this finding. PROCEDURE: Responses to measures of psychosocial functioning (ie, Brief Symptom Inventory, Impact on Family Scale, Impact of Events Scale, Parent Experience of Child Illness Scale) were compared between 27 parents of adult survivors (mean age=25.6 y) of pediatric cancer and 28 parents of current pediatric cancer patients (mean age=10.2 y) on, or within 1 year of, active treatment. RESULTS: Compared with parents of pediatric cancer patients on treatment, parents of adult survivors demonstrated few significant differences in overall psychologic functioning, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and adjustment to the disease experience. Indeed, the 2 groups differed only in their report of objective and family burden (eg, financial cost, time off from work, less time with family members), and in their levels of anger associated with the illness experience. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that parents who continue to accompany their adult child to clinic may remain psychologically vulnerable many years after the end of treatment, and that the impact of having a child with a life-threatening illness may not diminish even years into the child's survivorship.

Authors
Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ; Masi, R; Hutchinson, KC; Willard, VW; Rosoff, PM
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Bonner, MJ, Masi, R, Hutchinson, KC, Willard, VW, and Rosoff, PM. "Psychosocial functioning in parents of adult survivors of childhood cancer." J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 30.2 (February 2008): 153-159.
PMID
18376269
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Volume
30
Issue
2
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
153
End Page
159
DOI
10.1097/MPH.0b013e31815814d9

Childhood cancer survivors' perceived barriers to improving exercise and dietary behaviors.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine childhood cancer survivors' barriers to increasing exercise and consuming less fat and more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and calcium-rich foods. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Cases from a comprehensive cancer center. SAMPLE: Convenience sample of 144 childhood cancer survivors aged 13-35 years identified through previous research. Surveys were returned by 118 participants (82% response rate). METHODS: Descriptive statistics with chi-square tests were performed between subgroups defined by age (< 18 years and < or = 18 years) and diagnosis (leukemia, lymphoma, and central nervous system cancers). MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Barriers to exercise, consuming less fat, and eating more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and calcium-rich foods. FINDINGS: Proportionately more childhood cancer survivors reported barriers to exercise and following a low-fat diet than to consuming more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and calcium-rich foods. Primary barriers to exercise included being too tired (57%), being too busy (53%), and not belonging to a gym (48%), whereas barriers for restricting high-fat foods were commercials that make high-fat foods look so appealing (58%) and having friends who eat a lot of high-fat foods (50%). Difficulty associated with ordering healthy foods when dining out also was a leading barrier to following a low-fat diet (50%), as well as eating more whole grains (31%), fruits and vegetables (30%), and calcium-rich foods (15%). CONCLUSIONS: Childhood cancer survivors report several barriers to exercise and consuming a low-fat diet with more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and calcium-rich foods. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: This study's findings may be helpful to nurses, health educators, and allied health professionals in developing effective interventions that promote healthful lifestyle change among childhood cancer survivors.

Authors
Arroyave, WD; Clipp, EC; Miller, PE; Jones, LW; Ward, DS; Bonner, MJ; Rosoff, PM; Snyder, DC; Demark-Wahnefried, W
MLA Citation
Arroyave, WD, Clipp, EC, Miller, PE, Jones, LW, Ward, DS, Bonner, MJ, Rosoff, PM, Snyder, DC, and Demark-Wahnefried, W. "Childhood cancer survivors' perceived barriers to improving exercise and dietary behaviors." Oncol Nurs Forum 35.1 (January 2008): 121-130.
PMID
18192161
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
35
Issue
1
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
121
End Page
130
DOI
10.1188/08.ONF.121-130

Further validation of the parent experience of child illness scale

The objective of this research is to provide further validation of the Parent Experience of Child Illness (PECI) scale. One hundred twenty-five caregivers of patients (age < 1-17 years) diagnosed with cancer returned questionnaire data at Time 1, and 75 caregivers at Time 2. Findings provide support for the psychometric properties of the PECI, including good test-retest reliability and convergent and discriminant validity. The PECI appears to be a valid assessment tool for evaluation of the distress and perceived resources of caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. Continued evaluation is needed with other chronic illness groups. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Hutchinson, KC; Guill, AB
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, Hutchinson, KC, and Guill, AB. "Further validation of the parent experience of child illness scale." Children's Health Care 37.2 (2008): 145-157.
Source
scival
Published In
Children's Health Care
Volume
37
Issue
2
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
145
End Page
157
DOI
10.1080/02739610802006569

Neuropsychological assessment, neuroimaging, and neuropsychiatric evaluation in pediatric and adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD).

Traditionally, neuropsychological deficits due to Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) have been understudied in adults. We have begun to suspect, however, that symptomatic and asymptomatic Cerebrovascular Events (CVE) may account for an alarming number of deficits in this population. In the current brief review, we critically evaluated the pediatric and adult literatures on the neurocognitive effects of SCD. We highlighted the studies that have been published on this topic and posit that early detection of CVE via neurocognitive testing, neuropsychiatric evaluations, and neuroimaging may significantly reduce adult cognitive and functional morbidities.

Authors
Edwards, CL; Raynor, RD; Feliu, M; McDougald, C; Johnson, S; Schmechel, D; Wood, M; Bennett, GG; Saurona, P; Bonner, M; Wellington, C; DeCastro, LM; Whitworth, E; Abrams, M; Logue, P; Edwards, L; Martinez, S; Whitfield, KE
MLA Citation
Edwards, CL, Raynor, RD, Feliu, M, McDougald, C, Johnson, S, Schmechel, D, Wood, M, Bennett, GG, Saurona, P, Bonner, M, Wellington, C, DeCastro, LM, Whitworth, E, Abrams, M, Logue, P, Edwards, L, Martinez, S, and Whitfield, KE. "Neuropsychological assessment, neuroimaging, and neuropsychiatric evaluation in pediatric and adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD)." Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat 3.6 (December 2007): 705-709.
PMID
19300604
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment
Volume
3
Issue
6
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
705
End Page
709

Efficacy of hydroxyurea to prevent organ damage in young children with sickle cell anemia

Authors
Thornburg, CD; Dixon, N; Burgett, S; Mortier, NA; Zimmerman, SA; Bonner, MJ; Calatroni, A; Ware, RE
MLA Citation
Thornburg, CD, Dixon, N, Burgett, S, Mortier, NA, Zimmerman, SA, Bonner, MJ, Calatroni, A, and Ware, RE. "Efficacy of hydroxyurea to prevent organ damage in young children with sickle cell anemia." November 16, 2007.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Blood
Volume
110
Issue
11
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
992A
End Page
992A

Brief report: psychosocial functioning of fathers as primary caregivers of pediatric oncology patients.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the psychosocial functioning of fathers as primary caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: Fathers who identified themselves as the primary medical caregivers were given a packet of questionnaires, including the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), the Impact of Event Scale (IES), the Impact on Family Scale (IFS), the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire (CGSQ), and the Parent Experience of Child Illness (PECI) scale, to complete and return by mail. The 23 fathers who returned the questionnaire packets were compared with 23 mothers who were matched on demographic variables. RESULTS: There were no differences between groups on self-report measures of distress or illness-related parenting stress. Descriptively, however, the majority of parents were above normative means on measures of psychological distress with a significantly greater proportion of fathers endorsing elevated levels of depression on the BSI. CONCLUSION: Including fathers in pediatric psychosocial research is important and represents a growing trend in psycho-oncology.

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Hutchinson, KC
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, and Hutchinson, KC. "Brief report: psychosocial functioning of fathers as primary caregivers of pediatric oncology patients." J Pediatr Psychol 32.7 (August 2007): 851-856.
PMID
17426044
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
32
Issue
7
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
851
End Page
856
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsm011

Acute neurocognitive response to methylphenidate among survivors of childhood cancer: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial

Objective: To investigate the acute efficacy and adverse side effects of methylphenidate (MPH) among survivors of childhood cancer [acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or brain tumor (BT)] with learning impairments. Methods: Participants (N = 122) completed a two-day, in-clinic, double-blind, cross-over trial during which they received MPH (0.60 mg/kg of body weight) and placebo that were randomized in administration order across participants. Performance was evaluated using measures of attention, memory, and academic achievement. Results: A significant MPH versus placebo effect was revealed on a measure of attention, cognitive flexibility, and processing speed (Stroop Word-Color Association Test). Male gender, older age at treatment, and higher intelligence were predictive of better medication response. No significant differences were found for number or severity of adverse side effects as a function of active medication. Conclusions: MPH shows some neurocognitive benefit and is well tolerated by the majority of children surviving ALL and BT. © The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved.

Authors
Conklin, HM; Khan, RB; Reddick, WE; Helton, S; Brown, R; Howard, SC; Bonner, M; Christensen, R; Wu, S; Xiong, X; Mulhern, RK
MLA Citation
Conklin, HM, Khan, RB, Reddick, WE, Helton, S, Brown, R, Howard, SC, Bonner, M, Christensen, R, Wu, S, Xiong, X, and Mulhern, RK. "Acute neurocognitive response to methylphenidate among survivors of childhood cancer: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial." Journal of Pediatric Psychology 32.9 (2007): 1127-1139.
PMID
17569711
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
32
Issue
9
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
1127
End Page
1139
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsm045

Neuropsychological assessment, neuroimaging, and early neurocognitive evaluation in pediatric and adult patients with sickle cell disease

Authors
Edwards, ; CL, ; Raynor, ; RD, ; Feliu, ; M, ; McDougald, ; C, ; Johnson, ; Schmechel, ; D, ; Wood, ; M, ; Bennett, ; GG, ; Saurona, ; P, ; Bonner, ; al, MJE
MLA Citation
Edwards, , CL, , Raynor, , RD, , Feliu, , M, , McDougald, , C, , Johnson, , Schmechel, , D, , Wood, , M, , Bennett, , GG, , Saurona, , P, , Bonner, , and al, MJE. "Neuropsychological assessment, neuroimaging, and early neurocognitive evaluation in pediatric and adult patients with sickle cell disease." Neuropsychiatry Disease and Treatment 3 (2007): 1-5. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Neuropsychiatry Disease and Treatment
Volume
3
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
1
End Page
5

Fatigue in adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Willard, VW
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, and Willard, VW. "Fatigue in adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer." October 2006.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
476
End Page
476

Hydrocephalus as an additional risk factor for academic and intellectual outcome in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma treated with radiation

Authors
Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ; Willard, VW
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Bonner, MJ, and Willard, VW. "Hydrocephalus as an additional risk factor for academic and intellectual outcome in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma treated with radiation." October 2006.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
479
End Page
480

Parent and family psychosocial adjustment as a function of pediatric tumor type

Authors
Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ; Willard, VW; Hutchinson, KC
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Bonner, MJ, Willard, VW, and Hutchinson, KC. "Parent and family psychosocial adjustment as a function of pediatric tumor type." October 2006.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
479
End Page
479

Social and nonverbal functioning in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

Authors
Hood, MA; Anthony, KK; Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Schanberg, LE
MLA Citation
Hood, MA, Anthony, KK, Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, and Schanberg, LE. "Social and nonverbal functioning in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA)." September 2006.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume
54
Issue
9
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
S506
End Page
S506

Development and validation of the parent experience of child illness.

OBJECTIVE: To develop a measure of parent adjustment related to caring for a child with a chronic illness and to evaluate the reliability and validity of the measure with a group of parents of children with brain tumors. METHODS: One-hundred forty-nine parents of patients (age <1-17 years) diagnosed with a brain tumor were assessed using the 25-item self-report Parent Experience of Child Illness (PECI). Internal consistency, construct validity, and factor structure were assessed. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis yielded four theoretically coherent factors including: Guilt and Worry, Emotional Resources, Unresolved Sorrow and Anger, and Long-term Uncertainty. Internal reliability for the PECI scales ranged from .72 to .89, suggesting acceptable reliability. As evidence of construct validity, the PECI scales show significant, positive correlations with scales from established measures of parent adjustment. CONCLUSION: The PECI augments the current literature by providing a brief measure of parents' subjective distress and perceived Emotional Resources, domains that are critical but understudied in children with chronic illness and their caregivers.

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Guill, AB; McLaughlin, C; Schweitzer, H; Carter, K
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Guill, AB, McLaughlin, C, Schweitzer, H, and Carter, K. "Development and validation of the parent experience of child illness." J Pediatr Psychol 31.3 (April 2006): 310-321.
PMID
15917492
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
31
Issue
3
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
310
End Page
321
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsj034

Association between the Parent Experience of Childhood Illness (PECI) scale and clinician ratings of functioning among parents of children with cancer

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Willard, VW; Guill, AB
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Willard, VW, and Guill, AB. "Association between the Parent Experience of Childhood Illness (PECI) scale and clinician ratings of functioning among parents of children with cancer." PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY 15.1 (February 2006): S41-S42.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
15
Issue
1
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
S41
End Page
S42

Smaller white-matter volumes are associated with larger deficits in attention and learning among long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

BACKGROUND. The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have deficits in neurocognitive performance, and smaller white-matter volumes are associated with these deficits. METHODS. The patients studied included 112 ALL survivors (84 patients who had received chemotherapy only, 28 patients who had received chemotherapy and irradiation; 63 males, 49 females; mean age ± standard deviation, 4.1 yrs ± 2.6 yrs at diagnosis; mean ± standard deviation yrs since diagnosis, 6.0 ± 3.5 yrs), and 33 healthy siblings who participated as a control group. Neurocognitive tests of attention, intelligence, and academic achievement were performed; and magnetic resonance images were obtained and subsequently were segmented to yield tissue volume measurements. Comparisons of neurocognitive measures and tissue volumes between groups were performed, and the correlations between volumes and neurocognitive performance measures were assessed. RESULTS. Most performance measures demonstrated statistically significant differences from the normative test scores, but only attention measures exceeded 1.0 standard deviation from normal. Patients who had received chemotherapy alone had significantly larger volumes of white matter than patients who had received treatment that also included cranial irradiation, but their volumes remained significantly smaller than the volumes in the control group. Smaller white-matter volumes were associated significantly with larger deficits in attention, intelligence, and academic achievement. CONCLUSIONS. Survivors of childhood ALL had significant deficits in attention and smaller white-matter volumes that were associated directly with impaired neurocognitive performance. Cranial irradiation exacerbated these deficits. © 2006 American Cancer Society.

Authors
Reddick, WE; Shan, ZY; Glass, JO; Helton, S; Xiong, X; Wu, S; Bonner, MJ; Howard, SC; Christensen, R; Khan, RB; Pui, C-H; Mulhern, RK
MLA Citation
Reddick, WE, Shan, ZY, Glass, JO, Helton, S, Xiong, X, Wu, S, Bonner, MJ, Howard, SC, Christensen, R, Khan, RB, Pui, C-H, and Mulhern, RK. "Smaller white-matter volumes are associated with larger deficits in attention and learning among long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia." Cancer 106.4 (2006): 941-949.
PMID
16411228
Source
scival
Published In
Cancer
Volume
106
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
941
End Page
949
DOI
10.1002/cncr.21679

Factor analysis and teacher rating scales in childhood cancer survivors

Authors
Helton, S; Corwyn, RF; Bonner, MJ; Brown, RT; Mulhern, RK
MLA Citation
Helton, S, Corwyn, RF, Bonner, MJ, Brown, RT, and Mulhern, RK. "Factor analysis and teacher rating scales in childhood cancer survivors." Journal of Pediatric Psychology 31 (2006): 200-208. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
31
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
200
End Page
208

Development and validation of the ParentExperience of Illness (PECI) Questionnaire

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Guill, AB; McLaughlin, C; Schweitzer, H; Carter, K
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Guill, AB, McLaughlin, C, Schweitzer, H, and Carter, K. "Development and validation of the ParentExperience of Illness (PECI) Questionnaire." Journal of Pediatric Psychology 31 (2006): 310-321. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
31
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
310
End Page
321

Factor analysis and validity of the conners parent and teacher rating scales in childhood cancer survivors

Objective: To examine the factor structure of the Conners Parent Rating Scale - Revised: Short Form (CPRS-R:S) and the Conners Teacher Rating Scale - Revised: Short Form (CTRS-R:S) in children who are long-term survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or brain tumors (BT)and who have received central nervous system directed treatment. Method: Parents and teachers of 150 long-term survivors completed the CPRS-R:S or CTRS-R:S as part of a screening battery. The data were submitted to a maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis to test the construct validity of the scales and the forms were compared. The CPRS-R:S was also compared to selected subscales of the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) for further validation. Results: The analyses demonstrated an adequate fit of the original three-factor structure of the CTRS-R:S [oppositional, cognitive problems/inattention, hyperactivity]. The analyses of the CPRS-R:S suggested a less adequate fit of the original three-factor structure but principal components factor analysis yielded a three-factor solution with factors similar to those of Conners' original factor structure. Significant correlations were found between the CPRS-R:S and the selected subscales of the CBCL. Conclusions: These findings support the similar construct validity of the original CTRS-R:S and CPRS-R:S. Although significantly correlated, the CPRS-R:S and CTRS-R:S are not interchangeable in the assessment of survivors of childhood cancer. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved.

Authors
Helton, SC; Corwyn, RF; Bonner, MJ; Brown, RT; Mulhern, RK
MLA Citation
Helton, SC, Corwyn, RF, Bonner, MJ, Brown, RT, and Mulhern, RK. "Factor analysis and validity of the conners parent and teacher rating scales in childhood cancer survivors." Journal of Pediatric Psychology 31.2 (2006): 200-208.
PMID
16467320
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
31
Issue
2
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
200
End Page
208
DOI
10.1093/jpepsy/jsj010

Quality of life in pediatric brain tumor survivors

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Hardy, KK; Guill, AB; Willard, VW; Carter, KE; Gururangan, S
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Hardy, KK, Guill, AB, Willard, VW, Carter, KE, and Gururangan, S. "Quality of life in pediatric brain tumor survivors." July 2005.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
7
Issue
3
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
336
End Page
336

Survivors of childhood cancer and their guardians.

BACKGROUND: Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk for osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and second malignancies-conditions for which modifiable risk factors are recognized and lifestyle interventions have shown benefit. Although some data regarding health behaviors of this population exist, receptivity to health promotion is largely unknown. METHODS: A survey was mailed to 380 survivors (age range, 11-33 years) of childhood leukemia, lymphoma, or central nervous system carcinomas (and guardians of survivors < 18 years old) to elicit data on exercise, dietary intake of calcium, fat, and fruits and vegetables, smoking status, readiness to pursue lifestyle change, quality of life, and interest in various health interventions. RESULTS: Responses from 209 survivors (a 55% response rate) suggested that most did not meet guidelines for fruit and vegetable consumption (79%), calcium intake (68%), or exercise (52%), 42% were overweight/obese, and 84% consumed > 30% of calories from fat. Older (> 18 years) compared with younger (< 18 years) survivors were more likely to smoke (17% vs. 1%), to be obese (21.6% vs. 14.6%), and to have suboptimal calcium intakes (75.6% vs. 57.6%). No differences in lifestyle behaviors were observed between cancer groups. Compared with interventions aimed at weight control, improving self-esteem, or smoking cessation, the highest levels of interest were found consistently for interventions aimed at getting in shape and eating healthy. Survivors preferred mailed interventions to those delivered in-person, by telephone counselors, or via computers. CONCLUSIONS: Survivors of childhood cancer practiced several suboptimal health behaviors. Health promotion interventions aimed at areas of interest and delivered through acceptable channels have the potential to improve long-term health and function of this vulnerable population.

Authors
Demark-Wahnefried, W; Werner, C; Clipp, EC; Guill, AB; Bonner, M; Jones, LW; Rosoff, PM
MLA Citation
Demark-Wahnefried, W, Werner, C, Clipp, EC, Guill, AB, Bonner, M, Jones, LW, and Rosoff, PM. "Survivors of childhood cancer and their guardians." Cancer 103.10 (May 15, 2005): 2171-2180.
PMID
15812823
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
103
Issue
10
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
2171
End Page
2180
DOI
10.1002/cncr.21009

Response rates to a mailed survey targeting childhood cancer survivors: a comparison of conditional versus unconditional incentives.

OBJECTIVE: Mailed surveys are widely used to collect epidemiologic and health service data. Given that nonresponse can threaten the validity of surveys, modest incentives are often used to increase response rates. A study was undertaken among childhood cancer survivors and their parents to determine if response rate to a mailed survey differed with provision of immediate versus delayed incentives. DESIGN: A self-administered survey designed to ascertain health behaviors was mailed to 397 childhood cancer survivors (and their parents if the survivor was <18 years of age). Subjects were randomized into two groups based on gender, age, race, and cancer type. One group received a 10 US dollars incentive with their blank survey (unconditional incentive), whereas the other group received the incentive upon receipt of their completed survey (conditional incentive). If children were minors, both the parent and the child received incentives. RESULTS: No significant differences in response rates were observed with respect to gender, age, race, or cancer type. However, significant differences in response rates were observed between incentive groups, with unconditional incentives yielding significantly higher response rates than conditional incentives for child survivors who were > or =18 years (64.4% versus 49.0%), as well as younger child survivors (62.5% versus 43.6%) and their parents (64.8% versus 41.5%; all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The provision of an immediate incentive generated significantly higher response rates to this mailed health survey among childhood cancer survivors and their parents. Given that survey studies are commonly conducted across various pediatric populations, these findings may help inform the design of future pediatric survey research.

Authors
Rosoff, PM; Werner, C; Clipp, EC; Guill, AB; Bonner, M; Demark-Wahnefried, W
MLA Citation
Rosoff, PM, Werner, C, Clipp, EC, Guill, AB, Bonner, M, and Demark-Wahnefried, W. "Response rates to a mailed survey targeting childhood cancer survivors: a comparison of conditional versus unconditional incentives." Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14.5 (May 2005): 1330-1332.
PMID
15894697
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
14
Issue
5
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
1330
End Page
1332
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-04-0716

Response rates to a mailed survey targeting childhood cancer survivors

Authors
Rosoff, PM; Werner, C; Clipp, E; Guill, AB; Bonner, MJ; Demark Wahnefried, W
MLA Citation
Rosoff, PM, Werner, C, Clipp, E, Guill, AB, Bonner, MJ, and Demark Wahnefried, W. "Response rates to a mailed survey targeting childhood cancer survivors." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention 14 (2005): 1330-1332. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume
14
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
1330
End Page
1332

Childhood cander survivors and their guardians: Current health behaviors and receptivity to health promotion programs

Authors
Demark Wahnefried, W; Werner, C; Clipp, E; Guill, AB; Bonner, MJ; Rosoff, PM
MLA Citation
Demark Wahnefried, W, Werner, C, Clipp, E, Guill, AB, Bonner, MJ, and Rosoff, PM. "Childhood cander survivors and their guardians: Current health behaviors and receptivity to health promotion programs." Cancer 103 (2005). (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Cancer
Volume
103
Publish Date
2005

Short-term efficacy of methylphenidate: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among survivors of childhood cancer.

PURPOSE: Children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and malignant brain tumors (BTs) have a higher incidence of attention and learning problems in school than do their healthy peers. The present study tests the hypothesis that the psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH) improves cognitive and social functioning among these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We report on 83 long-term survivors of ALL and BT identified as having attentional deficits on behavioral testing and parent or teacher report, and problems with academic achievement. The 47 male and 36 female patients ranged from 0.6 to 14.3 years (median, 5.4 years) of age at diagnosis and 6.7 to 17.9 years (median, 11.9 years) of age at participation. The patients (40 ALL, 43 BT) participated in a randomized, double-blind, 3-week home cross-over trial of placebo (bid), low-dose MPH (0.3 mg/kg; maximum dose, 10 mg bid), and moderate-dose MPH (0.6 mg/kg; maximum dose, 20 mg bid). The primary end points were weekly teacher and parent reports on the Conners' Rating Scales and Social Skills Rating System. RESULTS: Compared to placebo, significant improvement with MPH was reported by teachers and parents on the Conners' Rating Scales and by teachers on the Social Skills Rating System. However, no consistent advantage of moderate dose over low dose was observed. Of those participating, 66 (79.5%) of the 83 patients continued on best clinical management. CONCLUSION: Treatment with MPH can at least temporarily reduce some attentional and social deficits among survivors of childhood ALL and BT. Long-term follow-up will reveal those subsets of patients who are more likely to benefit from MPH.

Authors
Mulhern, RK; Khan, RB; Kaplan, S; Helton, S; Christensen, R; Bonner, M; Brown, R; Xiong, X; Wu, S; Gururangan, S; Reddick, WE
MLA Citation
Mulhern, RK, Khan, RB, Kaplan, S, Helton, S, Christensen, R, Bonner, M, Brown, R, Xiong, X, Wu, S, Gururangan, S, and Reddick, WE. "Short-term efficacy of methylphenidate: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among survivors of childhood cancer." J Clin Oncol 22.23 (December 1, 2004): 4795-4803.
PMID
15570081
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
22
Issue
23
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
4795
End Page
4803
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2004.04.128

Preliminary evidence of nonverbal learning disability in survivors of pediatric brain tumors

Authors
Hardy, KK; Bonner, MJ; Bromell, L; Gururangan, S
MLA Citation
Hardy, KK, Bonner, MJ, Bromell, L, and Gururangan, S. "Preliminary evidence of nonverbal learning disability in survivors of pediatric brain tumors." October 2004.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro-Oncology
Volume
6
Issue
4
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
446
End Page
446

Short-term efficacy of methylphenidate: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among survivors of childhood cancer.

PURPOSE: Children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and malignant brain tumors (BTs) have a higher incidence of attention and learning problems in school than do their healthy peers. The present study tests the hypothesis that the psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH) improves cognitive and social functioning among these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We report on 83 long-term survivors of ALL and BT identified as having attentional deficits on behavioral testing and parent or teacher report, and problems with academic achievement. The 47 male and 36 female patients ranged from 0.6 to 14.3 years (median, 5.4 years) of age at diagnosis and 6.7 to 17.9 years (median, 11.9 years) of age at participation. The patients (40 ALL, 43 BT) participated in a randomized, double-blind, 3-week home cross-over trial of placebo (bid), low-dose MPH (0.3 mg/kg; maximum dose, 10 mg bid), and moderate-dose MPH (0.6 mg/kg; maximum dose, 20 mg bid). The primary end points were weekly teacher and parent reports on the Conners' Rating Scales and Social Skills Rating System. RESULTS: Compared to placebo, significant improvement with MPH was reported by teachers and parents on the Conners' Rating Scales and by teachers on the Social Skills Rating System. However, no consistent advantage of moderate dose over low dose was observed. Of those participating, 66 (79.5%) of the 83 patients continued on best clinical management. CONCLUSION: Treatment with MPH can at least temporarily reduce some attentional and social deficits among survivors of childhood ALL and BT. Long-term follow-up will reveal those subsets of patients who are more likely to benefit from MPH.

Authors
Mulhern, RK; Khan, RB; Kaplan, S; Helton, S; Christensen, R; Bonner, M; Brown, R; Xiong, X; Wu, S; Gururangan, S; Reddick, WE
MLA Citation
Mulhern, RK, Khan, RB, Kaplan, S, Helton, S, Christensen, R, Bonner, M, Brown, R, Xiong, X, Wu, S, Gururangan, S, and Reddick, WE. "Short-term efficacy of methylphenidate: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among survivors of childhood cancer." Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 22.23 (2004): 4795-4803.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
22
Issue
23
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
4795
End Page
4803

Neurocognitive development of young children with sickle cell disease through three years of age.

OBJECTIVE: To determine (1) the neurocognitive development of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) from 6 months through 36 months of age, (2) the independent and combined contributions of biomedical risk and parenting risk to child neurocognitive functioning, and (3) the independent and combined contributions of biomedical risk, parent cognitive processes, and family functioning to parent adjustment. METHOD: The study sample included 89 African American children and their parents served through the Duke University-University of North Carolina Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center. Measures of cognitive and psychomotor development were obtained at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months of age, and parents completed self-report measures of the cognitive processes of daily stress and attributional style, psychological adjustment, and family functioning. RESULTS: There was no significant decrease in psychomotor functioning (PDI) over time but cognitive functioning (MDI) declined, with a significant decrease occurring between the 12- and 24-month assessment points. At 24 months, poorer cognitive functioning was associated with parenting risk, in terms of a learned-helplessness attributional style, and biomedical risk, in terms of HbSS phenotype. Levels of psychological distress within the clinical range were reported by 24% of the parents, and poorer parent adjustment was associated with high levels of daily stress, less knowledge about child development, lower expectations of efficacy, and HbSC phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that young children with SCD are at risk for neurocognitive impairment and provide support for the initiation of early intervention studies to promote neurocognitive development.

Authors
Thompson, RJ; Gustafson, KE; Bonner, MJ; Ware, RE
MLA Citation
Thompson, RJ, Gustafson, KE, Bonner, MJ, and Ware, RE. "Neurocognitive development of young children with sickle cell disease through three years of age." J Pediatr Psychol 27.3 (April 2002): 235-244.
PMID
11909931
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume
27
Issue
3
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
235
End Page
244

The impact of sickle cell disease on cognitive functioning and learning

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) refers to a complex group of hereditary hematologic disorders that are most common in people of African descent (Sickle Cell Disease Guideline Panel, 1993). Although most children with SCD demonstrate adequate academic functioning, some children experience neurological insults such as strokes that can negatively affect school performance. Even in the absence of overt neurological disease, SCD puts some children at risk for neuropsychological sequelae including lowered intellectual functioning, academic skills deficits, impaired fine-motor functioning, and attentional deficits. Studies that document these deficits have evolved from descriptive summaries to more methodologically sound investigations of neuropsychological deficits with corresponding neuroradiographic findings. These studies will be reviewed to highlight the sometimes subtle and complex neuropsychological impairments found in some children with SCD. This review also will demonstrate the importance of careful monitoring and assessment of all children with SCD to facilitate early identification of that subset of children with neuropsychological sequelae. Additionally, possible indirect effects of SCD that can negatively impact school performance will be highlighted including absenteeism, psychological functioning, and pain coping. Finally, recommendations for school programming are offered to facilitate an optimal learning environment for school children with SCD.

Authors
Bonner, MJ; Schumacher, E; Gustafson, KE; Jr, RJT
MLA Citation
Bonner, MJ, Schumacher, E, Gustafson, KE, and Jr, RJT. "The impact of sickle cell disease on cognitive functioning and learning." School Psychology Review 28.2 (1999): 182-193.
Source
scival
Published In
School Psychology Review
Volume
28
Issue
2
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
182
End Page
193

Enhancing Commitment Improves Adherence to a Medical Regimen

A commitment-based intervention was evaluated for improvement of adherence to a 10-day antibiotic regimen. Experimental Ss made verbal and written commitments for adherence and completed tasks designed to increase their investment in a medication regimen. Control Ss performed similarly structured tasks unrelated to the medical regimen. Adherence, measured by unannounced pill counts, was significantly higher for experimental subjects than for control Ss. Self-reported adherence was significantly correlated with posttest self-efficacy but not with pretest self-efficacy. Adherence to a medical regimen may be improved by strategies conceptually based on the investment model of commitment, which provides a useful framework for further study of adherence. © 1994 American Psychological Association.

Authors
Putnam, DE; Finney, JW; Barkley, PL; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Putnam, DE, Finney, JW, Barkley, PL, and Bonner, MJ. "Enhancing Commitment Improves Adherence to a Medical Regimen." Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 62.1 (1994): 191-194.
PMID
8034823
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume
62
Issue
1
Publish Date
1994
Start Page
191
End Page
194
DOI
10.1037//0022-006X.62.1.191

The influence of behavioral family intervention on children's health and health care use

Authors
Finney, JW; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Finney, JW, and Bonner, MJ. "The influence of behavioral family intervention on children's health and health care use." Behavior Change 9 (1992): 157-170. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Behavior Change
Volume
9
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
157
End Page
170

The influence of behavioural family intervention on the health of chronically ill children

Authors
Finney, JW; Bonner, MJ
MLA Citation
Finney, JW, and Bonner, MJ. "The influence of behavioural family intervention on the health of chronically ill children." Behaviour Change 9.3 (1992): 157-170.
Source
scival
Published In
Behaviour Change
Volume
9
Issue
3
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
157
End Page
170

Matching treatment with recurrent abdominal pain symptoms: An evaluation of dietary fiber and relaxation treatments

We evaluated whether symptoms of recurrent abdominal pain in children provide a basis for treatment selection. Subjects were assigned to dietary fiber or relaxation treatments based upon whether they presented with symptoms of constipation. Elven subjects were treated in a combined multiple baseline and A-B or A-B-C design. As a control, some subjects recived the alternative treatment first. All four subjects with symptoms of constipation showed reductions in the number of stomachaches during the dietary fiber treatment. Of the seven subjects without symptoms of constipation, one showed reductions in stomachaches during the relaxation treatment, three showed some minimal reduction that was difficult to attribute to the relaxation treatment, two responded to the dietary fiber treatment, and one spontaneously improved during baseline. Results support the effectiveness of a dietary fiber treatment for children with symptoms of constipation. Minimal support was obtained for the effectiveness of a relaxation treatment for children without symptoms of constipation. Implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. © 1991 Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy. All right reserved.

Authors
Edwards, MC; Finney, JW; Bonner, M
MLA Citation
Edwards, MC, Finney, JW, and Bonner, M. "Matching treatment with recurrent abdominal pain symptoms: An evaluation of dietary fiber and relaxation treatments." Behavior Therapy 22.2 (1991): 257-267.
Source
scival
Published In
Behavior Therapy
Volume
22
Issue
2
Publish Date
1991
Start Page
257
End Page
267
DOI
10.1016/S0005-7894(05)80181-9
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