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Chin, Bennett B.

Overview:

Stem cells and Progenitor Cells; Single Photon Emission Tomography; Positron Emission Tomography; Small Animal Imaging; Oncologic Imaging; Cardiovascular Imaging; novel radiotracer development; drug development; translational imaging

Positions:

Adjunct Associate in the Department of Radiology

Radiology, Nuclear Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1987

M.D. — University of Texas, Medical Branch at Galveston

Grants:

A Phase II Study Evaluating The Efficacy and Safety of Ultratrace Iobenguane I131

Administered By
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine
AwardedBy
Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
March 01, 2015
End Date
February 28, 2020

Conditional lethality of copper and disulfiram as a therapeutic modality for prostate cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
AwardedBy
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
May 15, 2016
End Date
May 15, 2018

Bayer-Exini Radium-223 Retrospective Study

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals Inc
Role
Radiation Oncologist
Start Date
March 01, 2016
End Date
February 11, 2018

Cross-disciplinary Training in Medical Physics

Administered By
Radiology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
July 01, 2007
End Date
June 30, 2013

Small Animal PET / CT Molecular Imaging

Administered By
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
April 01, 2011
End Date
March 31, 2012
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Publications:

Synthesis and Preliminary Evaluation of 5-[18F]fluoroleucine.

Amino acid transporters, such as LAT1, are overexpressed in aggressive prostate and breast carcinomas, directly influencing pathways of growth and proliferation.The purpose of this study was to synthesize and characterize a novel 18F labeled leucine analog, 5-[18F]fluoroleucine, as a potential imaging agent for aggressive tumors which may not be amenable to imaging by FDG PET.5-fluoroleucine was synthesized and characterized, and its 18F-labeled analog was synthesized from a mesylate precursor. First, breast cancer cell line assays were performed to evaluate uptake of 3H- or 14C-labeled L-leucine and other essential amino acids. Both L-leucine and 5- [18F]fluoroleucine were tested for uptake and accumulation over time, and for uptake via LAT1. Biodistribution studies were performed to estimate radiation dosimetry for human studies. Small animal PET / CT studies of a breast cancer were performed to evaluate in vivo 5-[18F]fluoroleucine tumor uptake.Breast cancer cell lines showed increasing high net accumulation of L-[14C]leucine. Both L-leucine and 5-[18F]fluoroleucine showed increasing uptake over time in in vitro tumor cell assays, and uptake was also shown to occur via LAT1. The biodistribution study of 5-[18F]fluoroleucine showed rapid renal excretion, no significant in vivo metabolism, and acceptable dosimetry for use in humans. In vivo small animal PET / CT imaging of a breast cancer xenograft showed uptake of 5- [18F]fluoroleucine in the tumor, which progressively increased over time.5-[18F]fluoroleucine is a leucine analog which may be useful in identifying tumors with high or upregulated expression of amino acid transporters, providing additional information that may not be provided by FDG PET.

Authors
Chin, BB; McDougald, D; Weitzel, DH; Hawk, T; Reiman, RE; Zalutsky, MR; Vaidyanathan, G
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, McDougald, D, Weitzel, DH, Hawk, T, Reiman, RE, Zalutsky, MR, and Vaidyanathan, G. "Synthesis and Preliminary Evaluation of 5-[18F]fluoroleucine." Current radiopharmaceuticals 10.1 (January 2017): 41-50.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/13590
PMID
28034351
Source
epmc
Published In
Current Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume
10
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
41
End Page
50
DOI
10.2174/1874471009666161230114954

FDG PET/CT Imaging of Prostate Carcinosarcoma.

We present a case of carcinosarcoma of the prostate. Workup of urinary retention after a previously treated squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate led to a transurethral prostate resection revealing carcinosarcoma of the prostate, which on F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated moderate to high avidity of this atypical prostate cancer, with partial obstruction of the urinary system and lung metastases. While FDG PET is not avid for typical prostatic adenocarcinomas, it should be considered for evaluation of atypical prostate cancers.

Authors
Oldan, JD; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Oldan, JD, and Chin, BB. "FDG PET/CT Imaging of Prostate Carcinosarcoma." Clinical nuclear medicine 41.8 (August 2016): 629-631.
PMID
27187727
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
41
Issue
8
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
629
End Page
631
DOI
10.1097/rlu.0000000000001250

Incidental Thyroid Nodules at Non-FDG PET Nuclear Medicine Imaging: Evaluation of Prevalence and Malignancy Rate.

The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid nodules detected incidentally on non-FDG PET nuclear medicine imaging studies, the malignancy rate, and predictors of malignancy.A retrospective review of more than 10 years of patient records at an academic medical center identified the cases of 31 patients with incidental focal radiotracer-avid thyroid findings on non-FDG PET nuclear medicine studies who underwent biopsy or surgical excision. Statistical analysis of patient and imaging features was performed to identify features predictive of malignancy. Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound and American Thyroid Association biopsy criteria were applied to patients who had ultrasound images for review.Thirty-one patients had incidental thyroid findings on (99m)Tc-sestamibi parathyroid scans (80.6%), (111)In-pentetreotide scans (16.1%), and (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin cardiac scans (3.2%). These three types of scans accounted for 21,402 total examinations in the study period. Thus, the prevalence of incidental thyroid findings on non-PET nuclear medicine studies that were evaluated by pathologic examination was 0.14%. The malignancy rate was 16.1% (5/31). No clinical or imaging features were identified as predictive of malignancy. Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound and American Thyroid Association criteria were applied to 23 thyroid nodules with available ultrasound images. According to both sets of criteria, biopsy was recommended for 19 of 23 (82.6%) nodules, and one of three (33.3%) cases of thyroid cancer was missed.Most thyroid nodules incidentally detected on non-FDG PET nuclear medicine studies are detected on (99m)Tc-sestamibi parathyroid scans and (111)In-pentetreotide scans. Because these nodules are extremely rare and the malignancy rate is high, further evaluation of incidental focal radiotracer-avid thyroid findings with ultrasound is an appropriate recommendation.

Authors
Yerubandi, V; Chin, BB; Sosa, JA; Hoang, JK
MLA Citation
Yerubandi, V, Chin, BB, Sosa, JA, and Hoang, JK. "Incidental Thyroid Nodules at Non-FDG PET Nuclear Medicine Imaging: Evaluation of Prevalence and Malignancy Rate." AJR. American journal of roentgenology 206.2 (February 2016): 420-425.
PMID
26797373
Source
epmc
Published In
AJR. American journal of roentgenology
Volume
206
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
420
End Page
425
DOI
10.2214/ajr.15.15192

Intraarterial Microdosing: A Novel Drug Development Approach, Proof-of-Concept PET Study in Rats.

Intraarterial microdosing (IAM) is a novel drug development approach combining intraarterial drug delivery and microdosing. We aimed to demonstrate that IAM leads to target exposure similar to that of systemic full-dose administration but with minimal systemic exposure. IAM could enable the safe, inexpensive, and early study of novel drugs at the first-in-human stage and the study of established drugs in vulnerable populations.Insulin was administered intraarterially (ipsilateral femoral artery) or systemically to 8 CD IGS rats just before blood sampling or 60-min (18)F-FDG uptake PET imaging of ipsilateral and contralateral leg muscles (lateral gastrocnemius) and systemic muscles (spinotrapezius). The (18)F-FDG uptake slope analysis was used to compare the interventions. Plasma levels of insulin and glucose were compared using area under the curve calculated by the linear trapezoidal method. A physiologically based computational pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics model was constructed to simulate the relationship between the administered dose and response over time.(18)F-FDG slope analysis found no difference between IAM and systemic full-dose slopes (0.0066 and 0.0061, respectively; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.024 to 0.029; P = 0.7895), but IAM slope was statistically significantly greater than systemic microdose (0.0018; 95% CI, -0.045 to -0.007; P = 0.0147) and sham intervention (-0.0015; 95% CI, 0.023-0.058; P = 0.0052). The pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data were used to identify model parameters that describe membrane insulin binding and glucose-insulin dynamics.Target exposure after IAM was similar to systemic full dose administration but with minimal systemic effects. The computational pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics model can be generalized to predict whole-body response. Findings should be validated in larger, controlled studies in animals and humans using a range of targets and classes of drugs.

Authors
Burt, T; Rouse, DC; Lee, K; Wu, H; Layton, AT; Hawk, TC; Weitzel, DH; Chin, BB; Cohen-Wolkowiez, M; Chow, S-C; Noveck, RJ
MLA Citation
Burt, T, Rouse, DC, Lee, K, Wu, H, Layton, AT, Hawk, TC, Weitzel, DH, Chin, BB, Cohen-Wolkowiez, M, Chow, S-C, and Noveck, RJ. "Intraarterial Microdosing: A Novel Drug Development Approach, Proof-of-Concept PET Study in Rats." November 2015.
PMID
26315828
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
56
Issue
11
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1793
End Page
1799
DOI
10.2967/jnumed.115.160986

Intraarterial Microdosing: A Novel Drug Development Approach, Proof-of-Concept PET Study in Rats

Authors
Burt, T; Rouse, DC; Lee, K; Wu, H; Layton, AT; Hawk, TC; Weitzel, DH; Chin, BB; Cohen-Wolkowiez, M; Chow, S-C; Noveck, RJ
MLA Citation
Burt, T, Rouse, DC, Lee, K, Wu, H, Layton, AT, Hawk, TC, Weitzel, DH, Chin, BB, Cohen-Wolkowiez, M, Chow, S-C, and Noveck, RJ. "Intraarterial Microdosing: A Novel Drug Development Approach, Proof-of-Concept PET Study in Rats." JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE 56.11 (November 2015): 1793-1799.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
56
Issue
11
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1793
End Page
1799
DOI
10.2967/jnumed.115.160986

Exploring the Clinical Benefit of Docetaxel or Enzalutamide After Disease Progression During Abiraterone Acetate and Prednisone Treatment in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

Abiraterone acetate (AA) has demonstrated improved outcomes in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, data are lacking on the effect of AA on subsequent efficacy of enzalutamide or docetaxel.We included men with mCRPC who received AA and subsequent enzalutamide or docetaxel by August 12, 2013. Patients were separated into 3 groups: group A, treated with AA then enzalutamide before chemotherapy; group B, treated with AA then docetaxel; and group C, treated with AA and enzalutamide after chemotherapy. The primary objective was to describe the response and overall survival with subsequent therapy.There were 28 evaluable patients who received enzalutamide after AA (9 in group A and 19 in group C) and 13 patients who received docetaxel after AA (group B). Group A patients had more visceral disease and higher baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and group C men had a higher level of pain and multiple poor prognostic features. Median progression-free survival was 3.6, 5.1, and 2.8 months, respectively, and median overall survival was 8.5, not reached, and 9.6 months, respectively. A ≥ 50% PSA decline was achieved in 11%, 63%, and 5% of group A, B, and C patients, respectively. Radiographic or clinical progression as best response was noted in 55.5%, 30.8%, and 68.4% in each respective group.In this chart review of consecutive men with progressive mCRPC after AA, we found modest activity for enzalutamide and docetaxel, with clear cross-resistance for AA and enzalutamide. These data might inform the complex treatment decisions after AA treatment.

Authors
Zhang, T; Dhawan, MS; Healy, P; George, DJ; Harrison, MR; Oldan, J; Chin, B; Armstrong, AJ
MLA Citation
Zhang, T, Dhawan, MS, Healy, P, George, DJ, Harrison, MR, Oldan, J, Chin, B, and Armstrong, AJ. "Exploring the Clinical Benefit of Docetaxel or Enzalutamide After Disease Progression During Abiraterone Acetate and Prednisone Treatment in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer." Clinical genitourinary cancer 13.4 (August 2015): 392-399.
PMID
25708161
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical genitourinary cancer
Volume
13
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
392
End Page
399
DOI
10.1016/j.clgc.2015.01.004

INTRA-ARTERIAL MICRODOSING (IAM), A NOVEL DRUG DEVELOPMENT APPROACH, PROOF OF CONCEPT IN RATS

Authors
Burt, T; Wu, H; Layton, AT; Rouse, DC; Chin, BB; Hawk, TC; Weitzel, DH; Cohen-Wolkowiez, M; Chow, S; Noveck, RJ
MLA Citation
Burt, T, Wu, H, Layton, AT, Rouse, DC, Chin, BB, Hawk, TC, Weitzel, DH, Cohen-Wolkowiez, M, Chow, S, and Noveck, RJ. "INTRA-ARTERIAL MICRODOSING (IAM), A NOVEL DRUG DEVELOPMENT APPROACH, PROOF OF CONCEPT IN RATS." August 2015.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Clinical Therapeutics
Volume
37
Issue
8
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
E40
End Page
E41

Lifetime Attributable Risk of Cancer From Radiation Exposure During Parathyroid Imaging: Comparison of 4D CT and Parathyroid Scintigraphy.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to measure the organ doses and effective dose (ED) for parathyroid 4D CT and scintigraphy and to estimate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence associated with imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Organ radiation doses for 4D CT and scintigraphy were measured on the basis of imaging with our institution's protocols. An anthropomorphic phantom with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors was scanned to measure CT organ dose. Organ doses from the radionuclide were based on International Commission for Radiological Protection report 80. ED was calculated for 4D CT and scintigraphy and was used to estimate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence for patients differing in age and sex with the approach established by the Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report. A 55-year-old woman was selected as the standard patient according to the demographics of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. RESULTS: Organs receiving the highest radiation dose from 4D CT were the thyroid (150.6 mGy) and salivary glands (137.8 mGy). For scintigraphy, the highest organ doses were to the colon (41.5 mGy), gallbladder (39.8 mGy), and kidneys (32.3 mGy). The ED was 28 mSv for 4D CT, compared with 12 mSv for scintigraphy. In the exposed standard patient, the lifetime attributable risk for cancer incidence was 193 cancers/100,000 patients for 4D CT and 68 cancers/100,000 patients for scintigraphy. Given a baseline lifetime incidence of cancer of 46,300 cancers/100,000 patients, imaging results in an increase in lifetime incidence of cancer over baseline of 0.52% for 4D CT and 0.19% for scintigraphy. CONCLUSION: The ED of 4D CT is more than double that of scintigraphy, but both studies cause negligible increases in lifetime risk of cancer. Clinicians should not allow concern for radiation-induced cancer to influence decisions regarding workup in older patients.

Authors
Hoang, JK; Reiman, RE; Nguyen, GB; Januzis, N; Chin, BB; Lowry, C; Yoshizumi, TT
MLA Citation
Hoang, JK, Reiman, RE, Nguyen, GB, Januzis, N, Chin, BB, Lowry, C, and Yoshizumi, TT. "Lifetime Attributable Risk of Cancer From Radiation Exposure During Parathyroid Imaging: Comparison of 4D CT and Parathyroid Scintigraphy." AJR. American journal of roentgenology 204.5 (May 2015): W579-W585.
PMID
25905965
Source
epmc
Published In
AJR. American journal of roentgenology
Volume
204
Issue
5
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
W579
End Page
W585
DOI
10.2214/ajr.14.13278

Castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis response measured by 18F-fluoride PET after treatment with dasatinib and correlation with progression-free survival: results from American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6687.

(18)F-fluoride PET quantitatively images bone metabolism and may serve as a pharmacodynamic assessment for systemic therapy such as dasatinib, a potent SRC kinase inhibitor, with activity in bone.This was an imaging companion trial (American College of Radiology Imaging Network [ACRIN] 6687) to a multicenter metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) tissue biomarker-guided therapeutic trial (NCT00918385). Men with bone metastatic CRPC underwent (18)F-fluoride PET before and 12 weeks after initiation of dasatinib (100 mg daily). Dynamic imaging was performed over a 15-cm field of view for trial assessments. The primary endpoint was to determine whether changes in (18)F-fluoride incorporation in tumor and normal bone occurred in response to dasatinib. Other endpoints included differential effect of dasatinib between (18)F-fluoride incorporation in tumor and normal bone, (18)F-fluoride transport in bone metastases, correlation with progression-free survival (PFS), prostate-specific antigen, and markers of bone turnover.Eighteen participants enrolled, and 17 underwent interpretable baseline (18)F-fluoride PET imaging before initiation of dasatinib. Twelve of 17 patients underwent on-treatment PET imaging. Statistically significant changes in response to dasatinib were identified by the SUVmaxavg (average of maximum standardized uptake value [SUVmax] for up to 5 tumors within the dynamic field of view) in bone metastases (P = 0.0002), with a significant differential (18)F-fluoride PET response between tumor and normal bone (P < 0.0001). Changes in (18)F-fluoride incorporation in bone metastases had borderline correlation with PFS by SUVmaxavg (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.00; P = 0.056). Changes by SUVmaxavg correlated with bone alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.0014) but not prostate-specific antigen (P = 0.47).This trial provides evidence of the ability (18)F-fluoride PET to delineate treatment response of dasatinib in CRPC bone metastases with borderline correlation with PFS.

Authors
Yu, EY; Duan, F; Muzi, M; Deng, X; Chin, BB; Alumkal, JJ; Taplin, M-E; Taub, JM; Herman, B; Higano, CS; Doot, RK; Hartfeil, D; Febbo, PG; Mankoff, DA
MLA Citation
Yu, EY, Duan, F, Muzi, M, Deng, X, Chin, BB, Alumkal, JJ, Taplin, M-E, Taub, JM, Herman, B, Higano, CS, Doot, RK, Hartfeil, D, Febbo, PG, and Mankoff, DA. "Castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis response measured by 18F-fluoride PET after treatment with dasatinib and correlation with progression-free survival: results from American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6687." Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine 56.3 (March 2015): 354-360.
PMID
25635138
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
56
Issue
3
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
354
End Page
360
DOI
10.2967/jnumed.114.146936

Quantitative differences in [(18)F] NaF PET/CT: TOF versus non-TOF measurements.

[(18)F] sodium fluoride (NaF) PET/CT is a current, clinically relevant method to assess bone metastases. Time-of-flight (TOF) PET provides better statistical data quality, which can improve either lower image noise or improve resolution, or both, depending on the image reconstruction. Improved resolution can improve quantitative measurements of standardized uptake value (SUV) in small structures. These quantitative differences may be important in both clinical interpretation and multicenter clinical trials where quantification is integral to assessing response to therapy. The purpose of this study is to determine if and by how much SUV quantitatively differs between TOF and conventional non-TOF reconstructions in [(18)F] NaF PET/CT. SUV measurements (mean and maximum) were compared in TOF and non-TOF [(18)F] NaF PET-CT reconstructions for 47 prostate cancer patients in normal regions including: soft tissue (n=282 total regions; liver, aorta, posterior abdominal fat, bladder, brain, and paraspinal muscles), and osseous structures (n=188; T12 vertebral body, femoral diaphyseal cortex, femoral head, and lateral rib). Comparisons were also made for benign degenerative changes (n=281) and metastases (n=159). TOF and non-TOF SUVs were assessed with paired t-test and linear correlations. Normal soft tissue showed lower SUVmean for TOF compared to non-TOF in liver, brain, and adipose. All osseous structures showed higher SUVmean for TOF compared to non-TOF including normal regions, degenerative joint disease, and metastases. For all metastatic lesions, the average SUVmean increased by 2.5%, and in degenerative joint disease it increased by 3.5% on TOF reconstructions. Smaller lesion size was a significant factor influencing this increase in SUVmean. TOF SUVmean values are higher in osseous structures and lower in background soft tissue structures. While these differences are statistically significant, the magnitudes of these changes are relatively modest. Smaller osseous lesions may have higher contrast and higher SUVmean values with TOF reconstruction compared to non-TOF reconstructions. The differences in TOF vs. non-TOF images should be considered when evaluating response to therapy and in the design of multi-center clinical trials.

Authors
Oldan, JD; Turkington, TG; Choudhury, K; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Oldan, JD, Turkington, TG, Choudhury, K, and Chin, BB. "Quantitative differences in [(18)F] NaF PET/CT: TOF versus non-TOF measurements." American journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging 5.5 (January 2015): 504-514.
PMID
26550541
Source
epmc
Published In
American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume
5
Issue
5
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
504
End Page
514

18F sodium fluoride PET / CT in patients with prostate cancer: quantification of normal tissues, benign degenerative and malignant lesions

Authors
Oldan, JD; Hawkins, AS; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Oldan, JD, Hawkins, AS, and Chin, BB. "18F sodium fluoride PET / CT in patients with prostate cancer: quantification of normal tissues, benign degenerative and malignant lesions (In preparation)." World Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2015).
Source
manual
Published In
World Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Publish Date
2015

Preliminary dosimetry results from a Phase II study evaluation the efficacy and safety of UltraTrace® Iobenguane I 131 in patients with relapsed/refractory malignant pheochromocytoma /paraganglioma

Authors
Pryma, DA; Jimenez, C; Chin, BB; Olsen, JR; Pampaloni, MH; Solnes, LB; Stubbs, J; Armor, T; Jensen, JD; Wong, V
MLA Citation
Pryma, DA, Jimenez, C, Chin, BB, Olsen, JR, Pampaloni, MH, Solnes, LB, Stubbs, J, Armor, T, Jensen, JD, and Wong, V. "Preliminary dosimetry results from a Phase II study evaluation the efficacy and safety of UltraTrace® Iobenguane I 131 in patients with relapsed/refractory malignant pheochromocytoma /paraganglioma." 2015.
Source
manual
Published In
European Society of Nuclear Medicine
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
P040
End Page
P040

Quantitative Differences in SUV measurements: Time-of-Flight vs non-Time-of-Flight in 18F Sodium Fluoride PET-CT

Authors
Oldan, JD; Durham, NC; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Oldan, JD, Durham, NC, and Chin, BB. "Quantitative Differences in SUV measurements: Time-of-Flight vs non-Time-of-Flight in 18F Sodium Fluoride PET-CT." November 2014.
Source
manual
Published In
RSNA
Publish Date
2014

Phase-1 clinical trial results of high-specific-activity carrier-free 123I-iobenguane.

A first-in-human phase 1 clinical study was performed on 12 healthy adults with a high-specific-activity carrier-free formulation of (123)I-iobenguane. Clinical data are presented on the behavior of this receptor-targeting imaging agent.Whole-body and thoracic planar and SPECT imaging were performed over 48 h for calculation of tissue radiation dosimetry and for evaluation of clinical safety and efficacy.A reference clinical imaging database acquired over time for healthy men and women injected with high-specific-activity (123)I-iobenguane showed organ distribution and whole-body retention similar to those of conventional (123)I-iobenguane. The heart-to-mediastinum ratios for the high-specific-activity formulation were statistically higher than for conventional formulations, and the predicted radiation dosimetry estimations for some organs varied significantly from those based on animal distributions.Human normal-organ kinetics, radiation dosimetry, clinical safety, and imaging efficacy provide compelling evidence for the use of high-specific-activity (123)I-iobenguane.

Authors
Chin, BB; Kronauge, JF; Femia, FJ; Chen, J; Maresca, KP; Hillier, S; Petry, NA; James, OG; Oldan, JD; Armor, T; Stubbs, JB; Stabin, MG; Babich, JW
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Kronauge, JF, Femia, FJ, Chen, J, Maresca, KP, Hillier, S, Petry, NA, James, OG, Oldan, JD, Armor, T, Stubbs, JB, Stabin, MG, and Babich, JW. "Phase-1 clinical trial results of high-specific-activity carrier-free 123I-iobenguane." Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine 55.5 (May 2014): 765-771.
PMID
24627436
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
55
Issue
5
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
765
End Page
771
DOI
10.2967/jnumed.113.124057

Castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis response measured by 18F-fluoride PET after treatment with dasatinib and correlation with progression-free survival: Results from ACRIN 6687

Authors
Yu, EY; Duan, F; Muzi, M; Deng, X; Chin, BB; Alumkal, JA; Taplin, ME; Taub, JM; Herman, B; Higano, CS; Doot, RK; Hartfeil, D; Febbo, PG; Mankoff, DA
MLA Citation
Yu, EY, Duan, F, Muzi, M, Deng, X, Chin, BB, Alumkal, JA, Taplin, ME, Taub, JM, Herman, B, Higano, CS, Doot, RK, Hartfeil, D, Febbo, PG, and Mankoff, DA. "Castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis response measured by 18F-fluoride PET after treatment with dasatinib and correlation with progression-free survival: Results from ACRIN 6687." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2014.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Publish Date
2014

Correlation of F-18-fluoride PET response to dasatinib in castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases with progression-free survival: Preliminary results from ACRIN 6687

Authors
Yu, EY; Duan, F; Muzi, M; Gorelick, J; Chin, B; Alumkal, JJ; Taplin, M-E; Herman, B; Higano, CS; Doot, RK; Hartfeil, DM; Febbo, PG; Mankoff, DA; Clinical, DDPC; Imaging, ACR
MLA Citation
Yu, EY, Duan, F, Muzi, M, Gorelick, J, Chin, B, Alumkal, JJ, Taplin, M-E, Herman, B, Higano, CS, Doot, RK, Hartfeil, DM, Febbo, PG, Mankoff, DA, Clinical, DDPC, and Imaging, ACR. "Correlation of F-18-fluoride PET response to dasatinib in castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases with progression-free survival: Preliminary results from ACRIN 6687." May 20, 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Issue
15
Publish Date
2013

Patient-specific model of NaF PET to facilitate multicenter clinical trial PET imaging protocols and analysis: preliminary results of a CT-based simulation

Authors
Wilson, JM; Chisholm, KL; Oldan, JD; Segars, WP; Turkington, TG; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Wilson, JM, Chisholm, KL, Oldan, JD, Segars, WP, Turkington, TG, and Chin, BB. "Patient-specific model of NaF PET to facilitate multicenter clinical trial PET imaging protocols and analysis: preliminary results of a CT-based simulation." February 1, 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
54
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
26
End Page
27

Sodium fluoride PET/CT of metastatic disease burden: Preliminary results of reproducibility measurements

Authors
Oldan, JD; Chisholm, KL; Kurdziel, K; Wilson, JM; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Oldan, JD, Chisholm, KL, Kurdziel, K, Wilson, JM, and Chin, BB. "Sodium fluoride PET/CT of metastatic disease burden: Preliminary results of reproducibility measurements." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2013.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
53
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1433
End Page
1433

Phantom and simulation study to determine image noise levels for a CT-based simulation platform of NaF PET uptake

Authors
Wilson, JM; Chisholm, KL; Turklington, TG; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Wilson, JM, Chisholm, KL, Turklington, TG, and Chin, BB. "Phantom and simulation study to determine image noise levels for a CT-based simulation platform of NaF PET uptake." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2013.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
53
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
2083
End Page
2083

Effects of dasatinib on prostate cancer bone metastases and normal bone measured by 18F-fluoride PET: Preliminary results from ACRIN 6687

Authors
Yu, EY; Duan, F; Muzi, M; Gorelick, J; Chin, BB; Alumkal, JJ; Taplin, ME; Doot, RK; Febbo, PG; Mankoff, DA
MLA Citation
Yu, EY, Duan, F, Muzi, M, Gorelick, J, Chin, BB, Alumkal, JJ, Taplin, ME, Doot, RK, Febbo, PG, and Mankoff, DA. "Effects of dasatinib on prostate cancer bone metastases and normal bone measured by 18F-fluoride PET: Preliminary results from ACRIN 6687." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2013.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
53
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
289
End Page
289

Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of n.c.a. iodoquine: a novel radiotracer with high uptake in cells with high ALDH1 expression.

PURPOSE: Chloroquine has demonstrated high affinity for aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1), an enzyme expressed in the highly tumorigenic CD133+ brain tumor initiating subpopulation. The purpose of this study is to report the novel synthesis of a chloroquine analogue, n.c.a. iodoquine, and the in vitro and in vivo uptake in cells with high ALDH1 content. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Iodoquine was synthesized in novel no-carrier-added forms (n.c.a.) for both 125I and 123I. I25I IQ and 18F FDG cell uptake assays were performed in the L1210 and L1210cpa (cyclophosphamide resistant), A549, and MG456 glioblastoma cell lines. Uptake was expressed as a percent of the administered activity. 125I IQ biodistribution studies assessed organ uptake at 1, 4, and 24 hours after IV administration (n= 15 total; 5 mice/timepoint). Radiation dosimetry estimates were calculated using standard OLINDA/EXM software. In vivo imaging of 123I IQ uptake in MG456 glioblastoma mouse model (n=10) was performed with small animal high resolution micro-SPECT. Autoradiography and histology co-localized radiotracer and tumor biodistribution. Uptake in MG456 glioblastoma tumors was quantified with gamma counting. RESULTS: L1210 cpa (high ALDH1) showed significantly higher 125I IQ uptake compared to the parental L1210 (low ALDH1) for all time points through 4 hours (20.7% ± 1.4% versus 11.0% ± 0.5%; 21.3% ± 0.9% versus 11.0% ± 0.4%; 20.6% ± 0.7% versus 9.4% ± 0.3%; and 15.7% ± 0.7% versus 7.5% + 0.4% at 30 minutes, and 1, 2 and 4 hours, respectively; p < 0.001 for all time points). In the CD133+ fraction of MG456 glioblastoma cell line, IQ uptake was significantly higher compared to FDG at all time points through 4 hours (81.5% ± 0.9% versus 1.3% ± 0.1%; 88.8% ± 0.4% versus 1.3% ± 0.1%; 87.8% ± 2.1% versus 1.7% ± 0.2%; and 87.0% ± 2.4% versus 1.8% ± 0.1 at 30 minutes, and 1, 2 and 4 hours, respectively; p > 0.001 for all time points). The A549 lung cancer cell line also showed high IQ uptake through 4 hours. IQ normal biodistribution studies showed rapid renal excretion and very low normal background brain activity after IV administration. In vivo micro-SPECT images showed mild uptake in larger MG456 glioblastomas (n=6) as verified with autoradiography and histology. Gamma well counter uptake in large tumors was 2.3% ± 0.48% ID/g (n=5). CONCLUSION: Iodoquine localizes to cells with high ALDH1 content. Cell assays show high 125I IQ uptake in the MG456 cell line, and in vivo micro-SPECT imaging showed mild 123I IQ uptake in MG456 glioblastomas. Further studies are necessary to investigate 131I IQ as a potential therapeutic agent targeting the highly tumorigenic CD133+ brain tumor stem cell subpopulation.

Authors
Chin, BB; Hjelemand, A; Rich, J; Song, H; Lascola, C; Storms, R; McLendon, R; Reiman, R; Greer, KL; Metzler, SD; McDougald, D; Dai, D; Vaidyanathan, G
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Hjelemand, A, Rich, J, Song, H, Lascola, C, Storms, R, McLendon, R, Reiman, R, Greer, KL, Metzler, SD, McDougald, D, Dai, D, and Vaidyanathan, G. "Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of n.c.a. iodoquine: a novel radiotracer with high uptake in cells with high ALDH1 expression." Curr Radiopharm 5.1 (January 2012): 47-58.
PMID
21864242
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume
5
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
47
End Page
58

An alternative and expedient synthesis of radioiodinated 4-iodophenylalanine.

Radiolabeled amino acids have been used extensively in oncology both as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In our pursuit to develop radiopharmaceuticals to target breast cancer, we were interested in determining the uptake of radioiodinated 4-iodophenylalanine, among other labeled amino acids, in breast cancer cells. In this work, we have developed an alternative method for the synthesis of this agent. The novel tin precursor, (S)-tert-butyl 2-(tert-butoxycarbonylamino)-3-(4-(tributylstannyl)phenyl)propanoate (3) was synthesized from the known, corresponding iodo derivative. Initially, the labeled 4-iodophenylalanine was synthesized from the above tin precursor in two steps with radiochemical yields of 91.6 ± 2.7% and 83.7 ± 1.7% (n=5), for the radioiodination (first) and deprotection (second) step, respectively. Subsequently, it was synthesized in a single step with an average radiochemical yield of 94.8 ± 3.4% (n=5). After incubation with MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 60 min, an uptake of up to 49.0 ± 0.7% of the input dose was seen; in comparison, the uptake of [¹⁴C]phenylalanine under the same conditions was 55.9 ± 0.5%. Furthermore, the uptake of both tracers was inhibited to a similar degree in a concentration-dependent manner by both unlabeled phenylalanine and 4-iodophenylalanine. With [¹⁴C]phenylalanine as the tracer, IC₅₀ values of 1.45 and 2.50 mM were obtained for Phe and I-Phe, respectively, and these values for [¹²⁵I]I-Phe inhibition were 1.3 and 1.0 mM. In conclusion, an improved and convenient method for the synthesis of no-carrier-added 4-[(⁎)I]phenylalanine was developed and the radiotracer prepared by this route demonstrated an amino acid transporter-mediated uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro that was comparable to that of [¹⁴C]phenylalanine.

Authors
Vaidyanathan, G; McDougald, D; Grasfeder, L; Zalutsky, MR; Chin, B
MLA Citation
Vaidyanathan, G, McDougald, D, Grasfeder, L, Zalutsky, MR, and Chin, B. "An alternative and expedient synthesis of radioiodinated 4-iodophenylalanine." Appl Radiat Isot 69.10 (October 2011): 1401-1406.
PMID
21621415
Source
pubmed
Published In
Applied Radiation and Isotopes
Volume
69
Issue
10
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
1401
End Page
1406
DOI
10.1016/j.apradiso.2011.05.004

Feasibility of whole-body functional mouse imaging using helical pinhole SPECT.

PURPOSE: Detailed in vivo whole-body biodistributions of radiolabeled tracers may characterize the longitudinal progression of disease, and changes with therapeutic interventions. Small-animal imaging in mice is particularly attractive due to the wide array of well characterized genetically and surgically created models of disease. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging using pinhole collimation provides high resolution and sensitivity, but conventional methods using circular acquisitions result in severe image truncation and incomplete sampling of data, which prevent the accurate determination of whole-body radiotracer biodistributions. This study describes the feasibility of helical acquisition paths to mitigate these effects. PROCEDURES: Helical paths of pinhole apertures were implemented using an external robotic stage aligned with the axis of rotation (AOR) of the scanner. Phantom and mouse scans were performed using helical paths and either circular or bi-circular orbits at the same radius of rotation (ROR). The bi-circular orbits consisted of two 360-degree scans separated by an axial shift to increase the axial field of view (FOV) and to improve the complete-sampling properties. RESULTS: Reconstructions of phantoms and mice acquired with helical paths show good image quality and are visually free of both truncation and axial-blurring artifacts. Circular orbits yielded reconstructions with both artifacts and a limited effective FOV. The bi-circular scans enlarged the axial FOV, but still suffered from truncation and sampling artifacts. CONCLUSIONS: Helical paths can provide complete sampling data and large effective FOV, yielding 3D full-body in vivo biodistributions while still maintaining a small distance from the aperture to the object for good sensitivity and resolution.

Authors
Metzler, SD; Vemulapalli, S; Jaszczak, RJ; Akabani, G; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Metzler, SD, Vemulapalli, S, Jaszczak, RJ, Akabani, G, and Chin, BB. "Feasibility of whole-body functional mouse imaging using helical pinhole SPECT." Mol Imaging Biol 12.1 (January 2010): 35-41.
PMID
19521736
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Imaging and Biology
Volume
12
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
35
End Page
41
DOI
10.1007/s11307-009-0234-z

Nuclear Medical Imaging of Myocardial Perfusion

Authors
James, O; Nichols, K; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
James, O, Nichols, K, and Chin, BB. "Nuclear Medical Imaging of Myocardial Perfusion." Cardiovascular Imagining. Ed. VB Ho and GP Reddy. Saunders (Elseiver), 2010. (Chapter)
Source
manual
Volume
1
Publish Date
2010

Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Ventricular Function

Authors
Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Chin, BB. "Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Ventricular Function." Cardiovascular Imaging. Ed. V Ho and GP Reddy. Saunders (Elseiver), 2010. (Chapter)
Source
manual
Publish Date
2010

Metabolic Screening of Cancer Cell Metabolism

Authors
Chin, BB; Xia, WS; Dai, D; MacDougald, D; Spector, N
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Xia, WS, Dai, D, MacDougald, D, and Spector, N. "Metabolic Screening of Cancer Cell Metabolism." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2010.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
51
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
1181
End Page
1181

Factors Influencing Cancer Cell Line Assays of Metabolism

Authors
Dai, D; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Dai, D, and Chin, BB. "Factors Influencing Cancer Cell Line Assays of Metabolism." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2010.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
51
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
1193
End Page
1193

Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling.

INTRODUCTION: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. METHODS: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. RESULTS: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [(125)I]FMIC and [(125)I]DEIBA were 70+/-5% and 47+/-14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. CONCLUSION: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

Authors
Vaidyanathan, G; Song, H; Affleck, D; McDougald, DL; Storms, RW; Zalutsky, MR; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Vaidyanathan, G, Song, H, Affleck, D, McDougald, DL, Storms, RW, Zalutsky, MR, and Chin, BB. "Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling." Nucl Med Biol 36.8 (November 2009): 919-929.
PMID
19875048
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nuclear Medicine and Biology
Volume
36
Issue
8
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
919
End Page
929
DOI
10.1016/j.nucmedbio.2009.08.001

Increasing uptake time in FDG-PET: standardized uptake values in normal tissues at 1 versus 3 h.

OBJECTIVE: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging at more than 1 h after 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D: -glucose (FDG) administration may result in less blood pool activity and possibly decreased normal FDG uptake in tissues such as liver. Lower normal background activity could be an important component of improved image contrast on delayed imaging. Increasing FDG uptake in normal organs, however, may mitigate the beneficial effects of blood pool clearance. The purpose of this study is to determine the normal tissue and blood pool FDG uptake at 1 and 3 h after injection. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ninety-nine patients with known or suspected malignancy referred for FDG-PET-computed tomography (CT) were retrospectively evaluated. PET imaging was performed at either 1 h (60 +/- 15 min; n = 50) or at 3 h (180 +/- 15 min; n = 49) after FDG administration. Normal tissue FDG uptake without involvement by malignancy or influenced by artifact (misregistration, "brown fat," focal muscle uptake, focal atherosclerotic disease) was confirmed by inspection of both the PET and CT scans. Aortic blood pool, adipose tissue, bone marrow, cerebellum, liver, lungs, muscle, and spleen were quantitatively evaluated by CT-guided region of interest analysis in three contiguous slices. Mean standardized uptake values (SUVs) were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Mean SUVs on the 3- versus 1-h images were significantly lower for aortic blood pool 13% (p < 0.0001) and adipose tissue 20% (p < 0.008). FDG uptake showed significant increases at 3 h compared to 1-h imaging in the cerebellum 40% (p < 0.0001), bone marrow 25% (p = 0.003), muscle 21% (p = 0.0004), and spleen 13% (p = 0.01). The liver and lung showed no significant differences (1%, p = 0.85; -2%, p = 0.62, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: On FDG imaging at 3 h compared to 1 h, significant changes were apparent, but the magnitude of changes was modest overall. Three-hour delayed imaging demonstrated significantly lower aortic blood pool and adipose tissue activity and significantly higher cerebellum, muscle, spleen, and bone marrow activity. Hepatic and lung activities were not significantly different. These results suggest that previously reported improvements in tumor image contrast with delayed imaging may be primarily due to cumulative FDG uptake within the tumor rather than reduction in normal background activity.

Authors
Chin, BB; Green, ED; Turkington, TG; Hawk, TC; Coleman, RE
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Green, ED, Turkington, TG, Hawk, TC, and Coleman, RE. "Increasing uptake time in FDG-PET: standardized uptake values in normal tissues at 1 versus 3 h." Mol Imaging Biol 11.2 (March 2009): 118-122.
PMID
19037614
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Imaging and Biology
Volume
11
Issue
2
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
118
End Page
122
DOI
10.1007/s11307-008-0177-9

Radiation dose estimates of [125I] and [131I] – iodoquine, a putative radiotracer targeting cells with high ALDH expression

Authors
Chin, BB; Reiman, RE; Song, H; Vaidyanathan, G
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Reiman, RE, Song, H, and Vaidyanathan, G. "Radiation dose estimates of [125I] and [131I] – iodoquine, a putative radiotracer targeting cells with high ALDH expression." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2009.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
50
Issue
S1
Publish Date
2009

Left ventricular volumes and function in mice: Comparison of 99mTc gated blood pool SPECT with MRI using high spatial and temporal resolution techniques

Authors
Chin, BB; Bucholz, E; Metzler, SD; Greer, KL; Song, H; Hedlund, L; Jaszcak, RJ; Nicholas, K
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Bucholz, E, Metzler, SD, Greer, KL, Song, H, Hedlund, L, Jaszcak, RJ, and Nicholas, K. "Left ventricular volumes and function in mice: Comparison of 99mTc gated blood pool SPECT with MRI using high spatial and temporal resolution techniques." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2008.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
49
Issue
S1
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
813
End Page
813

Clinical utility of combined 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography - Computed tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies

18F-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) has demonstrated high accuracy in the staging and evaluation of colorectal and esophageal carcinomas. Current data supports the emerging use for staging and evaluation of recurrence in a number of other gastrointestinal tumors including pancreatic, hepatocellular, and gastric carcinomas, as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, cholangiocarcinoma, and carcinoma of unknown primary. The current established and emerging clinical indications, the diagnostic accuracy, and the limitations for GI tumors will be reviewed. The use of combined PET-CT further improves diagnostic accuracy. © 2008 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

Authors
Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Chin, BB. "Clinical utility of combined 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography - Computed tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies." Current Medical Imaging Reviews 4.4 (2008): 255-269.
Source
scival
Published In
Current medical imaging reviews
Volume
4
Issue
4
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
255
End Page
269
DOI
10.2174/157340508786404107

Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in breast cancer

Similar to the previously discussed approved applications in oncology, FDGPET in breast cancer has demonstrated superior diagnostic accuracy compared with conventional anatomic imaging for the detection of distant metastases. This increased accuracy in lesion detection has translated into improved staging, especially in cases with a high clinical suspicion or pre-test probability of distant metastases. In addition to staging and restaging, another application for FDGPET covered by Medicare is in the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. This chapter briefly reviews the basic classification and imaging aspects of breast cancer; describes the currently approved clinical indications, as defined by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS); and discusses the accuracy, strengths, and limitations of FDG-PET.

Authors
Chin, BB; Workman, RB; Coleman, RE
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Workman, RB, and Coleman, RE. "Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in breast cancer." (December 1, 2007): 89-103. (Chapter)
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
89
End Page
103
DOI
10.1007/978-0-387-38335-4_6

Left ventricular functional assessment in mice: feasibility of high spatial and temporal resolution ECG-gated blood pool SPECT.

PURPOSE: To prospectively determine feasibility of evaluating murine left ventricular (LV) function with electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated blood pool single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: All animal studies had institutional animal care and use committee approval. SPECT was performed with conventional time-binned acquisition (eight frames per ECG cycle) in normal mice (normal group A, n = 6) and mice with myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 8). To determine feasibility of high temporal resolution and rapid data acquisition, another group of normal mice (normal group B, n = 4) underwent imaging with conventional (eight-frame) time-binned and list-mode (LM) acquisitions. LM acquisitions were reconstructed with eight and 16 frames per ECG cycle and 10 minutes of data (short LM). SPECT images were assessed visually, and LV-to-lung background activity ratios were calculated. LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes were defined with a phase analysis and threshold method. LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was calculated from LV volumes and count-based methods (n = 18 mice). Fractional shortening (FS) at echocardiography defined MI dysfunction (mild MI: FS > or = 50%; severe MI: FS < 50%). Group means were compared for significant differences with analysis of variance. RESULTS: ECG-gated blood pool SPECT demonstrated normal, concentric LV contraction in all normal mice (n = 10). LV-to-lung background ratio was more than 10:1 (range, 10.3-29.4; n = 18). Focal wall motion abnormalities were detected at SPECT both visually and with phase analysis in all mice with severe MI (n = 5). Mice with severe MI had significantly lower LVEF than normal group A mice (32% +/- 14 [standard deviation] vs 64% +/- 8%; P < .001). All mice with mild MI (n = 3) had normal contraction and LVEF. In paired acquisitions in normal group B mice, all reconstructions (n = 16) showed normal LV contraction. LVEF was not significantly different (P = .88) between time-binned (71% +/- 12), eight-frame LM (71% +/- 12), 16-frame LM (77% +/- 10), and short LM (73% +/- 14) reconstructions. CONCLUSION: Murine LV functional assessment is feasible with high spatial and temporal resolution ECG-gated blood pool SPECT. LV dysfunction can be quantified and focal wall motion abnormalities detected in the MI model of heart failure.

Authors
Chin, BB; Metzler, SD; Lemaire, A; Curcio, A; Vemulapalli, S; Greer, KL; Petry, NA; Turkington, TG; Coleman, RE; Rockman, H; Jaszczak, RJ
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Metzler, SD, Lemaire, A, Curcio, A, Vemulapalli, S, Greer, KL, Petry, NA, Turkington, TG, Coleman, RE, Rockman, H, and Jaszczak, RJ. "Left ventricular functional assessment in mice: feasibility of high spatial and temporal resolution ECG-gated blood pool SPECT." Radiology 245.2 (November 2007): 440-448.
PMID
17940303
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiology
Volume
245
Issue
2
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
440
End Page
448
DOI
10.1148/radiol.2452061973

[I-125] iodoquine uptake in tumor cell lines with high ALDH expression

Authors
Chin, BB; Storms, RW; Base, K; Lascola, C; Haystead, T; Zalutsky, MR; Vaidyanathan, G
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Storms, RW, Base, K, Lascola, C, Haystead, T, Zalutsky, MR, and Vaidyanathan, G. "[I-125] iodoquine uptake in tumor cell lines with high ALDH expression." October 2007.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume
34
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
S222
End Page
S222

FDG PET uptake in normal tissues: Imaging at one and three hours after injection

Authors
Green, E; Chin, BB; Turkington, TG; Hawk, TC; Coleman, RE
MLA Citation
Green, E, Chin, BB, Turkington, TG, Hawk, TC, and Coleman, RE. "FDG PET uptake in normal tissues: Imaging at one and three hours after injection." Washington, DC, June 5, 2007.
Source
manual
Published In
54th Annual Meeting of Society of Nuclear Medicine
Publish Date
2007

Rapid and automated method to analyze left ventricular function in mice: ECG gated blood pool micro-SPECT imaging of murine myocardial function

Authors
Chin, BB; Metzler, SD; Siddiqi, S; Petry, N; Greer, KL; Coleman, RE; Jaszcak, RJ; Nichols, K
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Metzler, SD, Siddiqi, S, Petry, N, Greer, KL, Coleman, RE, Jaszcak, RJ, and Nichols, K. "Rapid and automated method to analyze left ventricular function in mice: ECG gated blood pool micro-SPECT imaging of murine myocardial function." Washington,DC. June 4, 2007.
Source
manual
Published In
54th Annual Meeting of Society of Nuclear Medicine
Publish Date
2007

Cell therapy in murine atherosclerosis: in vivo imaging with high-resolution helical SPECT.

PURPOSE: To determine the feasibility of in vivo localization and quantification of indium 111 (111In)-oxine-labeled bone marrow (BM) with high-resolution whole-body helical single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in an established murine model of atherosclerosis and vascular repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. BM from young B6 Rosa 26 Lac Z+/+ mice was radiolabeled with 111In-oxine. On days 1, 4, and 7 after administration of radiolabeled cells, five C57/BL6 apolipoprotein E-deficient mice and five wild-type (WT) control mice were imaged with whole-body high-resolution helical SPECT. Quantification with SPECT was compared with ex vivo analysis by means of gamma counting. Autoradiography and beta-galactosidase staining were used to verify donor cell biodistribution. Linear regression was used to assess the correlation between continuous variables. Two-tailed Student t test was used to compare values between groups, and paired two-tailed t test was used to assess changes within subjects at different time points. RESULTS: SPECT image contrast was high, with clear visualization of BM, liver, and spleen 7 days after administration of radiolabeled cells. SPECT revealed that 42% and 58% more activity was localized to the aorta and BM (P<.05 for both), respectively, in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice versus WT mice. Furthermore, 28% and 27% less activity was localized to the liver and spleen (P<.05 for both), respectively, in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice versus WT mice. SPECT and organ gamma counts showed good quantitative correlation (r=0.9). beta-Galactosidase staining and microautoradiography of recipient aortas showed donor cell localization to the intima of visible atherosclerotic plaque but not to unaffected regions of the vessel wall. CONCLUSION: High-resolution in vivo helical pinhole SPECT can be used to monitor and quantify early biodistribution of 111In-oxine-labeled BM in a murine model of progenitor cell therapy for atherosclerosis.

Authors
Vemulapalli, S; Metzler, SD; Akabani, G; Petry, NA; Niehaus, NJ; Liu, X; Patil, NH; Greer, KL; Jaszczak, RJ; Coleman, RE; Dong, C; Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Vemulapalli, S, Metzler, SD, Akabani, G, Petry, NA, Niehaus, NJ, Liu, X, Patil, NH, Greer, KL, Jaszczak, RJ, Coleman, RE, Dong, C, Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ, and Chin, BB. "Cell therapy in murine atherosclerosis: in vivo imaging with high-resolution helical SPECT." Radiology 242.1 (January 2007): 198-207.
PMID
17185668
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiology
Volume
242
Issue
1
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
198
End Page
207
DOI
10.1148/radiol.2421051461

Gastrointestinal malignancies evaluated with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

(18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography has demonstrated high accuracy in the staging and evaluation of colorectal and esophageal carcinomas. FDG PET is demonstrating increasing utility in a number of other gastrointestinal tumours and clinical scenarios. The established clinical indications for its use, the diagnostic accuracy, and limitations will be reviewed. Data on the emerging indications and limitations for pancreatic, hepatocellular, and gastric carcinomas, as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumours, cholangiocarcinoma, and carcinoma of unknown primary will also be briefly discussed. The use of combined PET-CT is demonstrating further improvements in diagnostic accuracy.

Authors
Chin, BB; Chang, PPL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, and Chang, PPL. "Gastrointestinal malignancies evaluated with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography." Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 20.1 (February 2006): 3-21. (Review)
PMID
16473798
Source
pubmed
Published In
Best Practice & Research: Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume
20
Issue
1
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
3
End Page
21
DOI
10.1016/j.bpg.2005.08.001

FDG PET in Breast Cancer

Authors
Chin, BB; Workman, R; Coleman, RE
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Workman, R, and Coleman, RE. "FDG PET in Breast Cancer." PET/CT Essentials for Clinical Practice. Springer, 2006. (Chapter)
Source
manual
Publish Date
2006

In vivo Ultrahigh Resolution ECG Gated Pinhole 99mTc Tetrofosmin SPECT Imaging of Myocardial Function in the Transaortic Constriction Murine model of Heart Failure

Authors
Chin, BB; Metzler, SD; Perrino, C; Mao, L; Petry, N; Niehaus, N; Greer, KL; Jaszcak, RJ; Rockman, H
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Metzler, SD, Perrino, C, Mao, L, Petry, N, Niehaus, N, Greer, KL, Jaszcak, RJ, and Rockman, H. "In vivo Ultrahigh Resolution ECG Gated Pinhole 99mTc Tetrofosmin SPECT Imaging of Myocardial Function in the Transaortic Constriction Murine model of Heart Failure." 2006.
Source
manual
Published In
Molecular Imaing Biology
Volume
7
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
273
End Page
273

Ultrahigh Spatial and Temporal Resolution ECG Gated Blood Pool Micro-SPECT Imaging of Murine Myocardial Function

Authors
Chin, BB; Metzler, SD; Lemaire, A; Curcio, A; Mao, L; Roberts, H; Petry, N; Niehaus, N; Coleman, RE; Jaszcak, RJ; Rockman, H
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Metzler, SD, Lemaire, A, Curcio, A, Mao, L, Roberts, H, Petry, N, Niehaus, N, Coleman, RE, Jaszcak, RJ, and Rockman, H. "Ultrahigh Spatial and Temporal Resolution ECG Gated Blood Pool Micro-SPECT Imaging of Murine Myocardial Function." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2006.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
47
End Page
47

Molecular imaging of small animals with a triple-head SPECT system using pinhole collimation.

Pinhole collimation yields high sensitivity when the distance from the object to the aperture is small, as in the case of imaging small animals. Fine-resolution images may be obtained when the magnification is large since this mitigates the effect of detector resolution. Large magnifications in pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) may be obtained by using a collimator whose focal length is many times the radius of rotation. This may be achieved without truncation if the gamma camera is large. We describe a commercially available clinical scanner mated with pinhole collimation and an external linear stage. The pinhole collimation gives high magnification. The linear stage allows for helical pinhole SPECT. We have used the system to image radiolabeled molecules in phantoms and small animals.

Authors
Metzler, SD; Jaszczak, RJ; Patil, NH; Vemulapalli, S; Akabani, G; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Metzler, SD, Jaszczak, RJ, Patil, NH, Vemulapalli, S, Akabani, G, and Chin, BB. "Molecular imaging of small animals with a triple-head SPECT system using pinhole collimation." IEEE Trans Med Imaging 24.7 (July 2005): 853-862.
PMID
16011314
Source
pubmed
Published In
IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging
Volume
24
Issue
7
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
853
End Page
862

99mTc Red Blood Cell Labeling Methods For Cardiac Function And Vascular Blood Pool Localization

Authors
Vemulapalli, S; Metzler, SD; Petry, N; Niehaus, N; Greer, KL; Coleman, RE; Dong, C; Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Vemulapalli, S, Metzler, SD, Petry, N, Niehaus, N, Greer, KL, Coleman, RE, Dong, C, Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ, and Chin, BB. "99mTc Red Blood Cell Labeling Methods For Cardiac Function And Vascular Blood Pool Localization." 2005.
Source
manual
Published In
Molecular Imaing Biology
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
304
End Page
304

ECG Gated Ultrahigh resolution pinhole SPECT for In Vivo Murine Myocardial Functional Assessment

Authors
Chin, BB; Lemaire, A; Metzler, SD; Vemulapalli, S; Greer, KL; Petry, N; Niehaus, N; Coleman, RE; Rockman, HA
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Lemaire, A, Metzler, SD, Vemulapalli, S, Greer, KL, Petry, N, Niehaus, N, Coleman, RE, and Rockman, HA. "ECG Gated Ultrahigh resolution pinhole SPECT for In Vivo Murine Myocardial Functional Assessment." Molecular Imaging Biology, 2005.
Source
manual
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
176
End Page
176

2-Deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose uptake in intercostal respiratory muscles on positron emission tomography/computed tomography: smokers versus nonsmokers.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in the intercostal respiratory muscles (ICM) of smokers versus nonsmokers using positron emission tomography (PET). PROCEDURES: Ninety-six whole-body PET/computed tomography (CT) scans were retrospectively reviewed; 61 studies were from smokers and 35 from nonsmokers. The ICM uptake from the lung apices to the level of the carina was visually scored with respect to FDG intensity as follows: 0 = uptake less than or equal to lung uptake; 1 = greater than lung, but less than mediastinal blood pool; 2 = equal to mediastinal blood pool; and 3 = greater than mediastinal blood pool. RESULTS: In smokers, 30 out of 61 (49.2%) PET/CT scans had uptake that localized to ICM, compared to 3/35 (8.6%) studies in nonsmokers. Average ICM uptake was significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers (0.787 +/- 0.933 and 0.143 +/- 0.494, respectively; P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Increased FDG uptake in ICM is a physiologic pattern of uptake that is frequently seen and is more common in smokers.

Authors
Jacene, HA; Patel, PP; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Jacene, HA, Patel, PP, and Chin, BB. "2-Deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose uptake in intercostal respiratory muscles on positron emission tomography/computed tomography: smokers versus nonsmokers." Mol Imaging Biol 6.6 (November 2004): 405-410.
PMID
15564151
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Imaging and Biology
Volume
6
Issue
6
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
405
End Page
410
DOI
10.1016/j.mibio.2004.08.002

Exogenously administered adult stem cells localize preferentially to the bone marrow and aorta in atherosclerotic mice: In vivo localization and quantification with ultra high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography

Authors
Vemulapalli, S; Metzler, SD; Akabani, G; Petry, N; Niehaus, NJ; Liu, XL; Patil, NH; Greer, KL; Jaszczak, RJ; Coleman, RE; Dong, CM; Goldschmidt-Clermont, P; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Vemulapalli, S, Metzler, SD, Akabani, G, Petry, N, Niehaus, NJ, Liu, XL, Patil, NH, Greer, KL, Jaszczak, RJ, Coleman, RE, Dong, CM, Goldschmidt-Clermont, P, and Chin, BB. "Exogenously administered adult stem cells localize preferentially to the bone marrow and aorta in atherosclerotic mice: In vivo localization and quantification with ultra high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography." October 26, 2004.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Circulation
Volume
110
Issue
17
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
435
End Page
435

Modulation of thyroidal radioiodine uptake by theophylline.

Diagnostic and therapeutic use of radioiodine in the management of thyroid disorders depends on the ability of thyroid cells to concentrate radioiodine, a process regulated by thyrotropin and dependent on the intracellular increase in cAMP. We tested the ability of theophylline, a drug known to increase intracellular cAMP via inhibition of phosphodiesterase, to modulate the thyroidal radioiodine uptake in FRTL-5 cells, in mice and in humans. In FRTL-5 cells, theophylline increased the uptake of radioactive iodine and intracellular cAMP only at low concentrations (1 microM). In mice, theophylline increased slightly the radioiodine uptake, although this increase varied from 1.5- to 6.6-fold. In humans, theophylline decreased slightly the radioiodine uptake, a decrease that became more pronounced with time after radioiodine administration. These studies suggest that theophylline modulates the radioiodine uptake in a dose-dependent fashion, although the modulation is mild and probably not applicable to the clinical setting.

Authors
Lee, JM; Zemans, RL; Hejazi, M; Chin, BB; Ladenson, PW; Caturegli, P
MLA Citation
Lee, JM, Zemans, RL, Hejazi, M, Chin, BB, Ladenson, PW, and Caturegli, P. "Modulation of thyroidal radioiodine uptake by theophylline." Exp Mol Pathol 77.2 (October 2004): 116-120.
PMID
15351234
Source
pubmed
Published In
Experimental and Molecular Pathology
Volume
77
Issue
2
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
116
End Page
120
DOI
10.1016/j.yexmp.2004.05.002

PET/CT: artifacts caused by bowel motion.

BACKGROUND AND AIM: In a combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) system, the CT images can be used for attenuation correction as well as for image fusion. However, quantitative and qualitative differences have been reported between CT based attenuation corrected PET and conventional transmission scan corrected PET images. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential differences in PET/CT caused by attenuation differences in bowel due to motion. METHODS: Twelve patients had PET/CT scans performed using 68Ge transmission and CT attenuation correction methods. Three emission imaging datasets were generated including CT corrected PET, Ge corrected PET, and the difference images (CT corrected PET minus Ge corrected PET). PET difference images were used to identify regions of mismatch and to quantify possible discordance between images by using standardized uptake values (SUVs). Using the Ge corrected PET as the standard, differences in emission images were classified as an overestimation (pattern A) or an underestimation (pattern B) in these difference images. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-three mismatched areas were identified. Among them, overestimated areas in CT corrected image were detected in 36 regions (pattern A), while underestimated areas were evaluated in the remaining 87 regions (pattern B). The mean value of the difference in pattern A (mean +/- standard deviation = 0.84 +/- 0.44) was slightly higher than that in pattern B (0.60 +/- 0.23), and statistically significant. Six of 36 regions in pattern A had an SUV of greater than 2.5 in CT corrected PET but less than 2.5 in Ge corrected PET; two of 87 regions with pattern B demonstrated an SUV greater than 2.5 in Ge corrected PET and less than 2.5 in CT corrected PET. CONCLUSION: Physiological bowel motion may result in attenuation differences and subsequent differences in SUVs. Overestimation of fluorodeoxyglucose uptake should not be misinterpreted as disease.

Authors
Nakamoto, Y; Chin, BB; Cohade, C; Osman, M; Tatsumi, M; Wahl, RL
MLA Citation
Nakamoto, Y, Chin, BB, Cohade, C, Osman, M, Tatsumi, M, and Wahl, RL. "PET/CT: artifacts caused by bowel motion." Nucl Med Commun 25.3 (March 2004): 221-225.
PMID
15094438
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nuclear Medicine Communications
Volume
25
Issue
3
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
221
End Page
225

Recombinant human thyrotropin stimulation of fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography uptake in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

TSH stimulates thyrocyte metabolism, glucose transport, and glycolysis. 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is a glucose analog used in positron emission tomography (PET) to detect occult well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of recombinant human TSH (rTSH) on FDG PET uptake in patients with residual or recurrent disease. Seven patients with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma, negative 131-I scintigraphy, and biochemical evidence of residual disease were randomized and prospectively studied with FDG PET both on thyroid hormone suppression and rTSH stimulation within 1 wk. All lesions seen on the TSH suppression scans were seen on the rTSH stimulation studies. rTSH stimulation studies identified four additional lesions not seen on TSH suppression. One patient was positive on rTSH stimulation alone. The mean (2.54 +/- 0.72 vs. 1.79 +/- 0.88) and maximum (2.49 +/- 0.95 vs. 1.74 +/- 0.81) lesion to background ratios were significantly higher with rTSH stimulation, compared with TSH suppression (P = 0.02 for both). rTSH stimulation improves the detectability of occult thyroid metastases with FDG PET, compared with scans performed on TSH suppression.

Authors
Chin, BB; Patel, P; Cohade, C; Ewertz, M; Wahl, R; Ladenson, P
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Patel, P, Cohade, C, Ewertz, M, Wahl, R, and Ladenson, P. "Recombinant human thyrotropin stimulation of fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography uptake in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma." J Clin Endocrinol Metab 89.1 (January 2004): 91-95.
PMID
14715833
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume
89
Issue
1
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
91
End Page
95
DOI
10.1210/jc.2003-031027

Prolonged In Vivo Visualization of 111Indium Oxine Radiolabeled Progenitor Cells in Rabbit Myocardial Infarction

Authors
Chin, BB; David, BH; Morimoto, Y; Greer, K; Thompson, RB; Niehouse, N; Pety, N; Jaszczak, R; Coleman, RE; Taylor, DA
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, David, BH, Morimoto, Y, Greer, K, Thompson, RB, Niehouse, N, Pety, N, Jaszczak, R, Coleman, RE, and Taylor, DA. "Prolonged In Vivo Visualization of 111Indium Oxine Radiolabeled Progenitor Cells in Rabbit Myocardial Infarction." Springer Verlag (Germany), 2004.
Source
manual
Published In
Molecular Imaging and Biology
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
95
End Page
95

In vivo Bone Marrow cell trafficking in mice with 111-In oxine radiolabeling and helical pinhole SPECT

Authors
Vemulapali, S; Metzler, SD; Akabani, G; Petry, N; Niehaus, NJ; Liu, X; Patil, NH; Greer, KL; Jaszczak, R; Coleman, RE; Dong, C; Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Vemulapali, S, Metzler, SD, Akabani, G, Petry, N, Niehaus, NJ, Liu, X, Patil, NH, Greer, KL, Jaszczak, R, Coleman, RE, Dong, C, Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ, and Chin, BB. "In vivo Bone Marrow cell trafficking in mice with 111-In oxine radiolabeling and helical pinhole SPECT." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2004.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
45
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
7
End Page
7

Tc-99m MDP Whole Body Mouse Imaging: Helical versus Circular orbit Pinhole SPECT

Authors
Metzler, SD; Patil, N; Vemulapali, S; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Metzler, SD, Patil, N, Vemulapali, S, and Chin, BB. "Tc-99m MDP Whole Body Mouse Imaging: Helical versus Circular orbit Pinhole SPECT." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2004.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
45
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
586
End Page
586

Exogenously administered adult stem cells localize preferentially to the bone marrow and aorta in atherosclerotic mice: In vivo localization and quantification with ultra high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography

Authors
Vemulapali, S; Metzler, SD; Akabani, G; Petry, N; Niehaus, N; Greer, KL; Turkington, T; Jaszczak, RJ; Coleman, RE; Dong, C; Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ; Chin, BB; James, R
MLA Citation
Vemulapali, S, Metzler, SD, Akabani, G, Petry, N, Niehaus, N, Greer, KL, Turkington, T, Jaszczak, RJ, Coleman, RE, Dong, C, Goldschmidt-Clermont, PJ, Chin, BB, and James, R. "Exogenously administered adult stem cells localize preferentially to the bone marrow and aorta in atherosclerotic mice: In vivo localization and quantification with ultra high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography." American Heart Association, 2004.
Source
manual
Published In
Circulation
Volume
110
Issue
7
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
435
End Page
435 & 2048 Suppl

Combined positron emission tomography - computed tomography improves specificity for thyroid carcinoma by identifying vocal cord activity after laryngeal nerve paralysis.

Authors
Chin, BB; Patel, P; Hammoud, D
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Patel, P, and Hammoud, D. "Combined positron emission tomography - computed tomography improves specificity for thyroid carcinoma by identifying vocal cord activity after laryngeal nerve paralysis." Thyroid 13.12 (December 2003): 1183-1184.
PMID
14751041
Source
pubmed
Published In
Thyroid
Volume
13
Issue
12
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
1183
End Page
1184
DOI
10.1089/10507250360731604

111In oxine labelled mesenchymal stem cell SPECT after intravenous administration in myocardial infarction.

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown therapeutic potential if successfully delivered to the intended site of myocardial infarction. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of 111In oxine labelling of MSCs and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging after intravenous administration in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Adult farm pigs (n=2) were subjected to closed chest experimental myocardial infarction. 111In oxine labelled MSCs (1 x 10(7) to 2 x 10(7) cells) were infused intravenously, and SPECT imaging was performed initially and on days 1, 2, 7 and 14. High quality SPECT images were obtained through 2 weeks of imaging. High initial MSC localization occurred in the lungs and slow progressive accumulation occurred in the liver, spleen and bone marrow. Renal activity was mild and persistent throughout imaging. No appreciable accumulation occurred in the myocardium. It is concluded that 111In oxine radiolabelling of MSCs is feasible, and in vivo imaging with SPECT provides a non-invasive method for sequentially monitoring cell trafficking with good spatial resolution. Because intravenous administration of MSCs results in significant lung activity that obscures the assessment of myocardial cell trafficking, alternative routes of administration should be investigated for this application.

Authors
Chin, BB; Nakamoto, Y; Bulte, JWM; Pittenger, MF; Wahl, R; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Nakamoto, Y, Bulte, JWM, Pittenger, MF, Wahl, R, and Kraitchman, DL. "111In oxine labelled mesenchymal stem cell SPECT after intravenous administration in myocardial infarction." Nucl Med Commun 24.11 (November 2003): 1149-1154.
PMID
14569169
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nuclear Medicine Communications
Volume
24
Issue
11
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
1149
End Page
1154
DOI
10.1097/01.mnm.0000101606.64255.03

Anatomical loci of HIV-associated immune activation and association with viraemia.

BACKGROUND: Lymphocyte activation, associated with vaccination or infection, can be measured by positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated the ability of PET to detect and measure magnitude of lymph-node activation among asymptomatic HIV-1-infected individuals. METHODS: Initially we assessed PET response in eight HIV-1-uninfected individuals who had received licensed killed influenza vaccine. In an urban teaching hospital, we recruited 12 patients recently infected with HIV-1 (<18 months since seroconversion) and 11 chronic long-term HIV-1 patients who had stable viraemia by RT-PCR (non-progressors). After injection with fluorine-18-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose, patients underwent PET. We correlated summed PET signal from nodes with viral load by linear regression on log-transformed values. FINDINGS: Node activation was more localised after vaccination than after HIV-1 infection. In early and chronic HIV-1 disease, node activation was greater in cervical and axillary than in inguinal and iliac chains (p<0.0001), and summed PET signal correlated with viraemia across a 4 log range (r2=0.98, p<0.0001). Non-progressors had small numbers of persistently active nodes, most of which were surgically accessible. INTERPRETATION: The anatomical restriction we noted may reflect microenvironmental niche selection, and tight correlation of PET signal with viraemia suggests target-cell activation determines steady-state viral replication.

Authors
Iyengar, S; Chin, B; Margolick, JB; Sabundayo, BP; Schwartz, DH
MLA Citation
Iyengar, S, Chin, B, Margolick, JB, Sabundayo, BP, and Schwartz, DH. "Anatomical loci of HIV-associated immune activation and association with viraemia." Lancet 362.9388 (September 20, 2003): 945-950.
PMID
14511927
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Lancet
Volume
362
Issue
9388
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
945
End Page
950
DOI
10.1016/S0140-6736(03)14363-2

FDG PET in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies

Authors
Chin, BB; Wahl, R
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, and Wahl, R. "FDG PET in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies." Gut 52.Suppl 4 (June 2003): IV23-IV29.
Source
manual
Published In
Gut
Volume
52
Issue
Suppl 4
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
IV23
End Page
IV29

18F-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies.

Positron emission tomography with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose is an imaging technology that is demonstrating increasing utility in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies.

Authors
Chin, BB; Wahl, RL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, and Wahl, RL. "18F-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies." Gut 52 Suppl 4 (June 2003): iv23-iv29. (Review)
PMID
12746265
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gut
Volume
52 Suppl 4
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
iv23
End Page
iv29

Effects of nonionic intravenous contrast agents at PET/CT imaging: phantom and canine studies.

PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of intravenous contrast agents on quantitative values obtained with a combined positron emission tomographic (PET) and computed tomographic (CT) scanner by using several phantoms and a dog. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was mixed with different concentrations of contrast agent with the same syringe (phantom 1), and the phantom was scanned. After image reconstruction with various attenuation maps, radioactivity concentrations were compared. Then, FDG solutions with (phantom 2) or surrounded by (phantom 3) various concentrations of contrast agent were scanned repeatedly, and radioactivity concentration was compared. Finally, PET and CT with and without contrast agent were performed in a dog. PET images were reconstructed by using different attenuation maps, and radioactivity concentrations were compared. The radioactivity concentration on germanium 68 (68Ge)-based corrected images was regarded as standard, and percentage bias, defined as difference divided by measured activity of 68Ge-based corrected images, was assessed. The relationship between the concentration of contrast agent and the percentage bias was assessed with the Pearson coefficient r, and the significance of correlations was evaluated with the Fisher z test. RESULTS: All phantom studies demonstrated that presence of a contrast agent resulted in overestimation of emission data. CT numbers showed a strong positive correlation with the percentage bias in phantoms 2 (r = 0.999) and 3 (r = 0.987); the maximum percentage bias at 1,360 HU reached approximately 45%. These effects were independent of FDG concentration. In a canine model, presence of a contrast agent also increased emission activity, but the percentage bias was less than 15% in the liver and smaller in all other organs except the kidney (26%). CONCLUSION: High concentrations of a contrast agent caused considerable overestimation of apparent tracer activity in phantom studies; however, the emission bias was relatively modest in vivo, except in areas with very high contrast agent concentrations.

Authors
Nakamoto, Y; Chin, BB; Kraitchman, DL; Lawler, LP; Marshall, LT; Wahl, RL
MLA Citation
Nakamoto, Y, Chin, BB, Kraitchman, DL, Lawler, LP, Marshall, LT, and Wahl, RL. "Effects of nonionic intravenous contrast agents at PET/CT imaging: phantom and canine studies." Radiology 227.3 (June 2003): 817-824.
PMID
12773683
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiology
Volume
227
Issue
3
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
817
End Page
824
DOI
10.1148/radiol.2273020299

False-positive ventilation-perfusion scan in a patient with a transplanted lung.

A false-positive ventilation perfusion (V/Q) scan in a patient with a transplanted lung and secondary pulmonary artery stenosis is reported. The patient was examined for tachypnea and shortness of breath after single lung transplantation. A V/Q scan revealed multiple perfusion defects in the transplanted lung, with no corresponding ventilation defects. A pulmonary angiogram revealed pulmonary artery stenosis and no pulmonary emboli. The authors describe a false-positive V/Q scan in a patient after lung transplantation.

Authors
Hammoud, D; Chin, B
MLA Citation
Hammoud, D, and Chin, B. "False-positive ventilation-perfusion scan in a patient with a transplanted lung." Clin Nucl Med 28.6 (June 2003): 472-475.
PMID
12911095
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
28
Issue
6
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
472
End Page
475
DOI
10.1097/01.RLU.0000067506.04468.05

F-18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies

Authors
Chin, BB; Wahl, RL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, and Wahl, RL. "F-18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies." June 2003.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Gut
Volume
52
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
23
End Page
29

PET-CT evaluation of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose myocardial uptake: effect of respiratory motion.

PURPOSE: Using combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computerized tomography (CT) instrumentation, PET measurements of myocardial tracer uptake performed with CT attenuation correction may differ from estimates using 68Germanium transmission correction due to differences in respiratory motion during acquisition. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of respiratory motion on the CT acquisition and emission corrected images, and to evaluate the correlation of diaphragm position with regional differences in myocardial 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in clinical studies. METHODS: A canine myocardial FDG-PET study was performed with controlled ventilation. Attenuation correction was performed with CT scans acquired at end expiration and end inspiration, and throughout multiple respiratory cycles with conventional 68Germanium transmission scan. The mean myocardial FDG activity was evaluated in multiple short axis regions of interest (n=40) using each of these three AC maps. Differences in emission during CT acquisitions were identified and expressed as bias (%) compared to 68Germanium corrected data. Ten patient studies with high myocardial FDG uptake were retrospectively selected from a clinical population referred for whole body oncology studies. All subjects had both CT and 68Germanium AC. After analysis for diaphragm misregistration defined by imaging and diaphragm position, subjects were divided into two groups: Group A controls (n=5) with no or mild misregistration, and Group B (n=5) with moderate or severe diaphragm misregistration. Regional emission bias (n=400 regions) from CT correction was defined by using the 68Germanium attenuation corrected emission as the standard. RESULTS: The canine study using end-expiration CT for attenuation correction showed regional overestimation of activity (1.8%+/-0.7% for inferior; 2.0%+/-0.5% for inferolateral) compared to the 68Germanium corrected images. Conversely, the study using end-inspiration CT attenuation correction showed underestimation (-3.9%+/-0.5% for inferior; -4.0%+/-0.6% for inferolateral) of myocardial activity compared to 68Germanium corrected images. In subjects, Group B showed significant relative underestimation of FDG myocardial activity compared to Group A in the regions adjacent to the diaphragm including the inferior (P=0.0003), inferoseptal (P=0.008), and inferolateral (P<0.0001) regions. CONCLUSIONS: In canine myocardium, differences in respiration influenced CT attenuation maps and subsequent CT attenuation corrected PET images in the inferolateral and lateral regions. In clinical PET-CT studies, diaphragm misregistration is associated with relative decreased emission activity in inferior, inferoseptal, and inferolateral walls. Nonuniformity of bias in the emission data can affect quantitative accuracy, and therefore, the interpretation of myocardial viability. Further studies are required to determine if the frequency of these findings warrants the use of 68Germanium transmission attenuation correction in myocardial FDG-PET. The quantitative differences between these techniques were typically modest.

Authors
Chin, BB; Nakamoto, Y; Kraitchman, DL; Marshall, L; Wahl, R
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Nakamoto, Y, Kraitchman, DL, Marshall, L, and Wahl, R. "PET-CT evaluation of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose myocardial uptake: effect of respiratory motion." Mol Imaging Biol 5.2 (March 2003): 57-64.
PMID
14499145
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Imaging and Biology
Volume
5
Issue
2
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
57
End Page
64

111-In-oxine Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cell SPECT after Intravenous Administration in Myocardial Infarction

Authors
Chin, BB; Nakamoto, Y; Bulte, JWM; Pittenger, MF; Wahl, RL; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Nakamoto, Y, Bulte, JWM, Pittenger, MF, Wahl, RL, and Kraitchman, DL. "111-In-oxine Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cell SPECT after Intravenous Administration in Myocardial Infarction." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2003.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
44
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
710
End Page
710

Utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas: Initial Evaluation

Authors
Cohade, C; Mourtzikos, KA; Clark, DP; Erozan, YS; Borowitz, MJ; Chin, BB; Vonderheid, EC; Wahl, RI
MLA Citation
Cohade, C, Mourtzikos, KA, Clark, DP, Erozan, YS, Borowitz, MJ, Chin, BB, Vonderheid, EC, and Wahl, RI. "Utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas: Initial Evaluation." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2003.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
44
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
273
End Page
273

18F FDG Uptake in Intercostal Respiratory Muscles on PET/CT: Smokers versus Nonsmokers

Authors
Jacene, HA; Patel, PV; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Jacene, HA, Patel, PV, and Chin, BB. "18F FDG Uptake in Intercostal Respiratory Muscles on PET/CT: Smokers versus Nonsmokers." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2003.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
44
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
309
End Page
309

Influenza vaccine and FDG-PET [3]

Authors
Iyengar, S; Chin, B; Sabundayo, B; Margolick, J; Schwartz, DH
MLA Citation
Iyengar, S, Chin, B, Sabundayo, B, Margolick, J, and Schwartz, DH. "Influenza vaccine and FDG-PET [3]." Lancet 362.9400 (2003): 2024-2025.
PMID
14683672
Source
scival
Published In
Lancet
Volume
362
Issue
9400
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
2024
End Page
2025
DOI
10.1016/S0140-6736(03)15035-0

111In oxine labelled mesenchymal stem cell SPECT after intravenous administration in myocardial infarction

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown therapeutic potential if successfully delivered to the intended site of myocardial infarction. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of 111In oxine labelling of MSCs and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging after intravenous administration in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. Adult farm pigs (n = 2) were subjected to closed chest experimental myocardial infarction. 111In oxine labelled MSCs (1 × 10 7 to 2 × 107 cells) were infused intravenously, and SPECT imaging was performed initially and on days 1, 2, 7 and 14. High quality SPECT images were obtained through 2 weeks of imaging. High initial MSC localization occurred in the lungs and slow progressive accumulation occurred in the liver, spleen and bone marrow. Renal activity was mild and persistent throughout imaging. No appreciable accumulation occurred in the myocardium. It is concluded that 111In oxine radiolabelling of MSCs is feasible, and in vivo imaging with SPECT provides a non-invasive method for sequentially monitoring cell trafficking with good spatial resolution. Because intravenous administration of MSCs results in significant lung activity that obscures the assessment of myocardial cell trafficking, alternative routes of administration should be investigated for this application. (© 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins).

Authors
Chin, BB; Nakamoto, Y; Bulte, JWM; Pittenger, MF; Wahl, R; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Nakamoto, Y, Bulte, JWM, Pittenger, MF, Wahl, R, and Kraitchman, DL. "111In oxine labelled mesenchymal stem cell SPECT after intravenous administration in myocardial infarction." Nuclear Medicine Communications 24.11 (2003): 1149-1154.
Source
scival
Published In
Nuclear Medicine Communications
Volume
24
Issue
11
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
1149
End Page
1154
DOI
10.1097/00006231-200311000-00005

18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies

Positron emission tomography with F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose is an imaging technology that is demonstrating increasing utility in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies.

Authors
Chin, BB; Wahl, RL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, and Wahl, RL. "18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal malignancies." Gut 52.SUPPL. 4 (2003): iv23-iv29.
Source
scival
Published In
Gut
Volume
52
Issue
SUPPL. 4
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
iv23
End Page
iv29
DOI
10.1136/gut.52.suppl_4.iv23

PET-CT localizes previously undetectable metastatic lesions in recurrent fallopian tube carcinoma.

BACKGROUND: Fallopian tube carcinoma is a rare malignancy that commonly recurs after initial surgical resection. New combined instrumentation with co-registered PET and CT is a new technique that combines functional and anatomic imaging to detect metastatic disease that may be difficult to detect with either modality alone. CASE: We present two cases of suspected fallopian tube carcinoma recurrence demonstrating the unique potential of combined PET-CT using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). These cases demonstrate the unique capability to detect and localize metastatic disease when serum CA-125, laparoscopy, and CT scan alone were unable to detect recurrence. CONCLUSION: PET-CT with FDG may prove to be a sensitive and accurate method for detection of metastatic disease and may influence the clinical management of recurrent fallopian tube carcinoma.

Authors
Patel, PV; Cohade, C; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Patel, PV, Cohade, C, and Chin, BB. "PET-CT localizes previously undetectable metastatic lesions in recurrent fallopian tube carcinoma." Gynecol Oncol 87.3 (December 2002): 323-326.
PMID
12468334
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gynecologic Oncology
Volume
87
Issue
3
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
323
End Page
326

Quantitative evaluation of 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose uptake in hepatic metastases with combined PET-CT: iterative reconstruction with CT attenuation correction versus filtered back projection with 68Germanium attenuation correction.

PURPOSE: Iterative reconstruction (IR) is a statistical reconstruction method that may be influenced by high background activity such as in the liver. Recently developed combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computerized tomography (CT) instrumentation utilizes CT attenuation correction that may also differ compared to 68Germanium (68Ge) segmented attenuation correction (IR SAC). Quantitative differences could affect the clinical interpretation of metastatic foci and subsequent response to therapy. The purpose of this study is to characterize potential quantitative differences specifically in hepatic metastases. PROCEDURES: Thirty-three metastatic liver lesions in 23 patients were evaluated. Whole-body 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose(FDG) PET images were obtained on a dedicated PET-CT device and reconstructed with IR and CT measured attenuation correction (IR CT MAC), IR and 68Ge segmented attenuation correction, and also with filtered back-projection and segmented attenuation correction (FBP SAC). Regions of interest over the liver lesions (L) and liver background (B) were drawn on FBP SAC images and superimposed on the co-registered IR CT MAC and IR SAC images for comparison. To identify the individual effects of IR and CT attenuation correction, IR SAC was first compared to FBP SAC, followed by a comparison of IR CT MAC and IR SAC. Differences were expressed as bias (%) and compared to FBP SAC. RESULTS: Compared to FBP SAC, IR SAC showed significantly lower liver lesion (mean bias -7.1%; P < 0.00001), significantly higher liver background (mean bias -3.5%; P = 0.005), and significantly lower L/B ratio (mean bias -10.1%; P < 0.00001). Compared to IR SAC, the IR CT MAC showed small but not statistically significant increases in liver lesion (mean bias 3.0%; P = 0.1) and liver background (mean bias 4.3%; P = 0.09), and no significant difference in L/B ratio (mean bias -1.3%; P = 0.5). The overall effect of IR CT MAC compared to FBP SAC was a significant decrease in liver lesion (mean bias -4.2%; P = 0.002), significant increase in liver background (mean bias 8.7%; P = 0.002), and significantly lower L/B (mean bias -11.1%; P < 0.00001) compared to FBP SAC. CONCLUSION: Compared to FBP, IR resulted in significantly lower mean hepatic tumor activity, higher mean liver background activity, and lower L/B activity, but these differences were modest. These differences were similarly seen in the CT corrected IR CT MAC when compared to FBP SAC. CT attenuation correction did not result in significant differences when compared to 68Ge correction. Although the differences in IR CT MAC were modest, consistent reconstruction methods are important to decrease the measurement variability and improve reproducibility.

Authors
Chin, BB; Patel, PV; Nakamoto, Y; Cohade, C; Osman, M; Marshall, LT; Wahl, RL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Patel, PV, Nakamoto, Y, Cohade, C, Osman, M, Marshall, LT, and Wahl, RL. "Quantitative evaluation of 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose uptake in hepatic metastases with combined PET-CT: iterative reconstruction with CT attenuation correction versus filtered back projection with 68Germanium attenuation correction." Mol Imaging Biol 4.6 (November 2002): 399-409.
PMID
14537104
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Imaging and Biology
Volume
4
Issue
6
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
399
End Page
409

Single-vessel coronary artery stenosis: myocardial perfusion imaging with Gadomer-17 first-pass MR imaging in a swine model of comparison with gadopentetate dimeglumine.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the ability of Gadomer-17 to depict perfusion defects in a closed-chest swine model of single-vessel coronary artery disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve pigs underwent closed-chest placement of a flow reducer for 70%-90% luminal stenosis in the proximal left anterior coronary artery. Magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging with Gadomer-17 and gadopentetate dimeglumine, microsphere blood flow (MBF) testing, and technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) 2 methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed during dipyridamole vasodilation. Comparisons of percentage signal intensity (SI) increase (PSIC) in remote and ischemic myocardium were made with repeated measurements analysis of variance after injection of both tracers. RESULTS: Perfusion defects and reduced PSIC in the anterior ischemic versus the inferior remote myocardium could be identified after injection of both Gadomer-17 (PSIC, 66% +/- 30 [mean +/- SD] vs 100% +/- 32, respectively; P <.001) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (PSIC, 49% +/- 31 vs 81% +/- 43, respectively; P <.005). The size of perfusion defect depicted with both tracers was highly correlated with defect size at (99m)Tc MIBI SPECT (r = 0.69, P <.05 for Gadomer-17 and r = 0.60, P =.05 for gadopentetate dimeglumine) and with areas of reduced MBF (r = 0.70, P <.05 for Gadomer-17 and r = 0.80, P <.05 for gadopentetate dimeglumine). PSIC also correlated with MBF (r = 0.89, P <.001 for Gadomer-17 and r = 0.75, P <.001 for gadopentetate dimeglumine). Gadomer-17 allowed differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic myocardium, as demonstrated by reduced PSIC (PSIC, 48% +/- 38 vs 72% +/- 31, respectively; P <.001) until 20 minutes after contrast material injection. In contrast, differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic myocardium was possible only until 55 seconds after injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (PSIC, 36% +/- 24 vs 56% +/- 27, respectively; P <.005) but not at any time point thereafter. CONCLUSION: With the study conditions, Gadomer-17 provided more prolonged differentiation of ischemic from remote myocardium than that with gadopentetate dimeglumine.

Authors
Gerber, BL; Bluemke, DA; Chin, BB; Boston, RC; Heldman, AW; Lima, JAC; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Gerber, BL, Bluemke, DA, Chin, BB, Boston, RC, Heldman, AW, Lima, JAC, and Kraitchman, DL. "Single-vessel coronary artery stenosis: myocardial perfusion imaging with Gadomer-17 first-pass MR imaging in a swine model of comparison with gadopentetate dimeglumine." Radiology 225.1 (October 2002): 104-112.
PMID
12354992
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiology
Volume
225
Issue
1
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
104
End Page
112
DOI
10.1148/radiol.2251011377

Standardized Uptake Values in 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]Fluoro-D-Glucose with Positron Emission Tomography. Clinical Significance of Iterative Reconstruction and Segmented Attenuation Compared with Conventional Filtered Back Projection and Measured Attenuation Correction.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical significance of differences in 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) lymph node standardized uptake values (SUV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection using iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction (IR SAC) compared to filtered back-projection with measured attenuation correction (FBP MAC). PROCEDURES: Seven patients with HIV infection and multiple focal lymph node abnormalities were investigated with whole-body FDG-PET. Mean and maximum SUVs from lymph node regions of interest (n = 961) were compared for quantitative differences between reconstruction techniques. RESULTS: IR MAC resulted in significantly lower mean SUV [0.06; 95% (confidence interval (CI)) = 0.04-0.07] and maximum SUV (0.82; 95% CI = 0.77-0.88) values compared to FBP MAC. With IR, segmentation of attenuation correction (AC) resulted in significantly higher mean SUV (0.12; 95% CI = 0.11-0.13) and maximum SUV (0.21; 95% CI = 0.18-0.23) values compared to IR MAC. The overall effect of both IR and SAC was a slight but significant increase in mean SUV (0.06; 95% CI = 0.06-0.08; bias = 2.1%) and a significant decrease in maximum SUV (0.62; 95% CI = 0.56-0.67) compared to FBP MAC. CONCLUSIONS: With our reconstruction parameters, significant differences in mean and maximum SUV values were observed. The magnitude of the mean SUV difference, however, was small. IR SAC is a promising method to accurately quantify standardized uptake values for clinical use.

Authors
Chin, BB; Lyengar, S; Sabundayo, BP; Schwartz, D
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Lyengar, S, Sabundayo, BP, and Schwartz, D. "Standardized Uptake Values in 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]Fluoro-D-Glucose with Positron Emission Tomography. Clinical Significance of Iterative Reconstruction and Segmented Attenuation Compared with Conventional Filtered Back Projection and Measured Attenuation Correction." Mol Imaging Biol 4.4 (July 2002): 294-300.
PMID
14537120
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Imaging and Biology
Volume
4
Issue
4
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
294
End Page
300

Optimal characterization of myocardial perfusion with AngioMARK.

Authors
Bluemke, DA; Kraitchman, DL; Heldman, A; Chin, BB; Steinert, C
MLA Citation
Bluemke, DA, Kraitchman, DL, Heldman, A, Chin, BB, and Steinert, C. "Optimal characterization of myocardial perfusion with AngioMARK." Acad Radiol 9 Suppl 1 (May 2002): S78-.
PMID
12019902
Source
pubmed
Published In
Academic Radiology
Volume
9 Suppl 1
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
S78

Myocardial contractile reserve and perfusion defect severity with rest and stress dobutamine (99m)Tc-sestamibi SPECT in canine stunning and subendocardial infarction.

UNLABELLED: Myocardial contractile reserve and resting perfusion scintigraphy provide independent information to assess myocardial viability. The purpose of this study was to simultaneously evaluate both with (99m)Tc-sestamibi SPECT and low-dose dobutamine in canine stunning and subendocardial infarction (SEMI). METHODS: Eighteen dogs were included in the study: 7 normal, 7 stunned, and 4 with SEMI. Closed-chest stunning and SEMI were produced by angioplasty balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (20 and 90 min, respectively). Subsequent radiolabeled mircospheres confirmed reflow, and (99m)Tc-sestamibi was then administered at rest. Gated SPECT and MRI tagging were performed at rest and during low-dose dobutamine infusion (5 microg/kg/min). SPECT systolic wall thickening index (SWI) and MRI radial strain quantified myocardial contraction. Postmortem 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining quantified SEMI. RESULTS: Defect severity by SPECT in the anterior wall was mild and was not statistically different for the stunned versus SEMI groups (P = not significant). At rest, anterior wall SPECT SWI was significantly higher in the normal versus stunned groups (21.1 +/- 3.1 vs. 10.1 +/- 9.0; P = 0.0002) and the normal versus SEMI groups (21.1 +/- 3.1 vs. 2.6 +/- 6.0; P = 0.000002). With low-dose dobutamine, SWI increased significantly compared with rest for the stunned group (29.1 +/- 10.4 vs. 10.1 +/- 9.0; P = 0.000007) but did not increase significantly for the SEMI group (11.0 +/- 11.3 vs. 2.6 +/- 6.0; P = 0.09); SWI during low-dose dobutamine infusion for the stunned group was comparable to that for the normal group (29.1 +/- 10.4 vs. 28.2 +/- 7.0; P = 0.80). SWI also showed correlation with MRI radial strain (r = 0.42; P = 0.00015). CONCLUSION: Defect severity for stunned myocardium and SEMI was mild and was not significantly different. Contractile reserve was significantly different in stunned myocardium and SEMI. (99m)Tc-Sestamibi SPECT at rest and with low-dose dobutamine is a promising new technique to simultaneously assess myocardial perfusion and contractile reserve.

Authors
Chin, BB; Esposito, G; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Esposito, G, and Kraitchman, DL. "Myocardial contractile reserve and perfusion defect severity with rest and stress dobutamine (99m)Tc-sestamibi SPECT in canine stunning and subendocardial infarction." J Nucl Med 43.4 (April 2002): 540-550.
PMID
11937600
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
43
Issue
4
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
540
End Page
550

MRI detection of myocardial perfusion defects due to coronary artery stenosis with MS-325.

PURPOSE: To assess the value of an intravascular, albumin-targeted contrast agent, MS-325, in visualizing myocardial ischemia with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) stenosis was created in 19 pigs using a closed-chest modified angioplasty technique. Myocardial ischemia was detected by first-pass, contrast-enhanced MRI at peak dipyridamole stress and was compared to Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Regional coronary blood flow was determined using microspheres. RESULTS: Inducible myocardial ischemia with >40% reduction in stress myocardial blood flow was created in eight animals. An MRI defect, classified as > or=75% reduction in peak myocardial signal intensity in the affected territory, was detected in 92.3% of these animals. In the presence of mild coronary stenosis, there was uniform enhancement with MRI and tracer uptake by SPECT. Concordance of MRI and SPECT for detecting perfusion defects was 85%. CONCLUSION: The pattern of prolonged and persistent MR hypoenhancement of the ischemic myocardial bed using MS-325, which is retained primarily in the vascular bed due to its albumin-binding properties, facilitates the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

Authors
Kraitchman, DL; Chin, BB; Heldman, AW; Solaiyappan, M; Bluemke, DA
MLA Citation
Kraitchman, DL, Chin, BB, Heldman, AW, Solaiyappan, M, and Bluemke, DA. "MRI detection of myocardial perfusion defects due to coronary artery stenosis with MS-325." J Magn Reson Imaging 15.2 (February 2002): 149-158.
PMID
11836770
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume
15
Issue
2
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
149
End Page
158

Comparison between Gadomer-17 and Gadolinium-DTPa for the assessment of myocardial perfusionusing first pass MRI in a swine model of single vessel coronary artery stenosis

Authors
Gerber, BL; Bluemke, DA; Chin, BB; et al,
MLA Citation
Gerber, BL, Bluemke, DA, Chin, BB, and et al, . "Comparison between Gadomer-17 and Gadolinium-DTPa for the assessment of myocardial perfusionusing first pass MRI in a swine model of single vessel coronary artery stenosis." Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), 2002.
Source
manual
Published In
Radiology
Publish Date
2002

Quantitative differences in 18FDG uptake due to respiratory motion in PET CT: Attenuation correction using CT in End Inspiration and End Expiration versus Ge-68 correction

Authors
Chin, BB; Nakamoto, Y; Kraitchman, DL; Clark, P; Wahl, R
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Nakamoto, Y, Kraitchman, DL, Clark, P, and Wahl, R. "Quantitative differences in 18FDG uptake due to respiratory motion in PET CT: Attenuation correction using CT in End Inspiration and End Expiration versus Ge-68 correction." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2002.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
43
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
58
End Page
58

Quantitative Accuracy of 18FDG Uptake in Metastatic Liver Lesions with PET CT: Iterative reconstruction with CT attenuation correction versus Iterative reconstruction and FBP with Ge68 attenuation correction

Authors
Patel, P; Chin, BB; Osman, M; Marshall, L; Wahl, R
MLA Citation
Patel, P, Chin, BB, Osman, M, Marshall, L, and Wahl, R. "Quantitative Accuracy of 18FDG Uptake in Metastatic Liver Lesions with PET CT: Iterative reconstruction with CT attenuation correction versus Iterative reconstruction and FBP with Ge68 attenuation correction." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2002.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
43
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
214
End Page
214

PET CT Evaluation of 18FDG Myocardial Uptake: Effect of Respiratory Motion

Authors
Chin, BB; Nakamoto, Y; Kraitchman, DL; Marshall, L; Wahl, R
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Nakamoto, Y, Kraitchman, DL, Marshall, L, and Wahl, R. "PET CT Evaluation of 18FDG Myocardial Uptake: Effect of Respiratory Motion." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2002.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
43
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
190
End Page
190

PET CT Evaluation of 18FDG Myocardial Uptake: Effect of Respiratory Motion

Authors
Chin, BB; Nakamoto, Y; Kraitchman, DL; Marshall, L; Wahl, R
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Nakamoto, Y, Kraitchman, DL, Marshall, L, and Wahl, R. "PET CT Evaluation of 18FDG Myocardial Uptake: Effect of Respiratory Motion." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2002.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
43
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
190
End Page
190

Effects of Non-Ionic Intravenous Contrast Agents on PET/CT: Phantom and Canine Studies

Authors
Nakamoto, Y; Chin, BB; Kraitchman, DL; Lawler, LP; Marshall, LT; Wajl, RL
MLA Citation
Nakamoto, Y, Chin, BB, Kraitchman, DL, Lawler, LP, Marshall, LT, and Wajl, RL. "Effects of Non-Ionic Intravenous Contrast Agents on PET/CT: Phantom and Canine Studies." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2002.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
43
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
13
End Page
13

Comparison of myocardial oxygen consumption using 11C acetate positron emission tomography scanning in a working and non-working heart transplant model.

OBJECTIVE: In acute cardiac rejection, changes in myocardial oxygen consumption occur; non-invasive detection of these metabolic changes would have obvious clinical utility. In the classic cervical, heterotopic, canine, transplant model, the heart is non-working. It has a low myocardial oxygen consumption. Creation of a working model with normal myocardial oxygen consumption would enhance validity of non-human studies. METHODS: Clearance of 11C acetate was determined by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and compared with myocardial oxygen consumption in normal and transplanted canine hearts. Donor hearts from mongrel dogs (2.5-3 kg; n=4) were transplanted into the neck of adult beagles (12-15 kg; n=4), no immunosuppression was given. Two non-working hearts were modified to eject only coronary flow via the right ventricle. In two hearts, a novel working model was created with aortic regurgitation to load the left ventricle. Working and non-working hearts underwent PET scanning on post-operative days 2 and 4. Normal dog hearts (n=2) and native hearts of transplanted dogs (n=3) were used to validate the scanning technique. Coronary sinus and aortic oxygen saturation data along with myocardial blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) confirmed that clearance of 11C acetate in normal and transplanted hearts followed a bi-exponential model. RESULTS: Myocardial oxygen consumption was correlated with the rate constant of 11C acetate rapid phase clearance (r=0.91) in normal and transplanted hearts. The working hearts had increased myocardial oxygen consumption compared to non-working hearts. CONCLUSIONS: This study (1) introduces a model of a working heterotopic cardiac transplantation with near-normal oxygen consumption; and (2) demonstrates that regional myocardial oxygen consumption in transplanted hearts can be detected by 11C acetate PET.

Authors
Zehr, KJ; Wong, CY; Chin, B; Ravert, HT; Dannals, RF; Hruban, RH; Wong, DF; Baumgartner, WA
MLA Citation
Zehr, KJ, Wong, CY, Chin, B, Ravert, HT, Dannals, RF, Hruban, RH, Wong, DF, and Baumgartner, WA. "Comparison of myocardial oxygen consumption using 11C acetate positron emission tomography scanning in a working and non-working heart transplant model." Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 19.1 (January 2001): 74-81.
PMID
11163564
Source
pubmed
Published In
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
Volume
19
Issue
1
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
74
End Page
81

Clinical significance of quantitative differences in FDG lymph node uptake during early HIV infection: Iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction versus filtered backprojection with measured attenuation correction

Authors
Chin, BB; Iyengar, S; Schwartz, D
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Iyengar, S, and Schwartz, D. "Clinical significance of quantitative differences in FDG lymph node uptake during early HIV infection: Iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction versus filtered backprojection with measured attenuation correction." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2001.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
42
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
828
End Page
828

A minimally invasive method for creating coronary stenosis in a swine model for MRI and SPECT imaging.

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To develop a less-invasive method for creating coronary stenosis in an animal model for the study of myocardial perfusion defects by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT). METHODS: Eleven farm pigs were instrumented with an MR-compatible coronary flow-reduction fitting in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). These fittings were turned from a nylon rod, tapered from a maximum outer diameter of 3 mm, and drilled to a specified inner diameter (depending on the degree of coronary stenosis desired). The flow-reducing fittings were delivered over a coronary guidewire and advanced to a wedge position in the proximal LAD with an angioplasty catheter via a carotid artery approach. Perfusion determined by contrast-enhanced MRI at peak dipyridamole stress was compared with that obtained by 99mTc sestamibi SPECT. Radiolabeled microspheres were injected at rest, after stenosis implantation, and at peak pharmacological stress to establish the severity of the coronary lesion. RESULTS: Coronary stenosis was successfully created in seven animals. Mild coronary stenoses (<60%) were created in four animals. Significant coronary stenoses (80%-90%) were created in three animals. Thrombosis of the coronary flow-reducing fittings was observed in four animals, leading to sudden death in three animals and myocardial infarction in one animal. CONCLUSIONS: This method of angioplasty-guided, LAD coronary stenosis creation in a swine model presents a less-invasive alternative to open-chest techniques such as hydraulic occluders and ameroid constrictors.

Authors
Kraitchman, DL; Bluemke, DA; Chin, BB; Heldman, AW; Heldman, AW
MLA Citation
Kraitchman, DL, Bluemke, DA, Chin, BB, Heldman, AW, and Heldman, AW. "A minimally invasive method for creating coronary stenosis in a swine model for MRI and SPECT imaging." Invest Radiol 35.7 (July 2000): 445-451.
PMID
10901107
Source
pubmed
Published In
Investigative Radiology
Volume
35
Issue
7
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
445
End Page
451

Characterization of canine myocardial contractile reserve with gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT in normal, stunned and subendocardial infarction

Authors
Chin, BB; Esposito, G; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Esposito, G, and Kraitchman, DL. "Characterization of canine myocardial contractile reserve with gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT in normal, stunned and subendocardial infarction." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2000.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
41
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
497
End Page
497

Detailed characterization of gated and ungated Tc-99m sestamibi defect severity in normal, stunned and subendocardial infarcted canine myocardium at rest and during low dose dobutamine infusion

Authors
Chin, BB; Esposito, G; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Esposito, G, and Kraitchman, DL. "Detailed characterization of gated and ungated Tc-99m sestamibi defect severity in normal, stunned and subendocardial infarcted canine myocardium at rest and during low dose dobutamine infusion." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2000.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
41
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
496
End Page
496

Tc-99m gated sestamibi SPECT evaluation of myocardial wall thickening correlates with tagged MRI measurements of radial strain

Authors
Esposito, G; Chin, BB; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Esposito, G, Chin, BB, and Kraitchman, DL. "Tc-99m gated sestamibi SPECT evaluation of myocardial wall thickening correlates with tagged MRI measurements of radial strain." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 2000.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
41
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
755
End Page
755

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy demonstrating contrast enhancement on MRI and uptake of thallium-201: a case report.

We describe a patient with AIDS who presented with focal neurological symptoms, and who had contrast-enhancing brain lesions on MRI which demonstrated increased thallium-201 uptake on SPECT. These findings were consistent with lymphoma; however, brain biopsy established a diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of PML with increased thallium-201 uptake on brain SPECT.

Authors
Port, JD; Miseljic, S; Lee, RR; Ali, SZ; Nicol, TL; Royal, W; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Port, JD, Miseljic, S, Lee, RR, Ali, SZ, Nicol, TL, Royal, W, and Chin, BB. "Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy demonstrating contrast enhancement on MRI and uptake of thallium-201: a case report." Neuroradiology 41.12 (December 1999): 895-898.
PMID
10639663
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuroradiology
Volume
41
Issue
12
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
895
End Page
898

Indium-111 capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) images before and after salvage radiation therapy.

Authors
Welsh, JS; Yanez, MH; Chin, BB; Howard, SP
MLA Citation
Welsh, JS, Yanez, MH, Chin, BB, and Howard, SP. "Indium-111 capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) images before and after salvage radiation therapy." Clin Nucl Med 24.12 (December 1999): 983-.
PMID
10595485
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
24
Issue
12
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
983

The value of a baseline bone scan in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

PURPOSE: This study evaluated the role of bone scans in managing newly diagnosed, untreated prostate cancer. METHODS: Two hundred seventy consecutive staging bone scans in patients (mean age, 69 years) with newly diagnosed prostate cancer who had serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) determinations and biopsies between January 1995 and October 1997 were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS: The bone scans were positive for metastatic bone disease in 24 patients and negative in 246. Serum PSA levels, the number of positive biopsy cores, the extent of tumor in the prostate gland, and Gleason scores were all significantly correlated with scintigraphic bone metastases (P < 0.0001 for each). Of the 177 patients with PSA levels less than 10 ng/ml, three had bone metastases. Bone metastases were found in 2 of 34 patients with PSA levels of 10.1 to 20 ng/ml, in 3 of 29 patients with PSA values of 20.1 to 50 ng/ml, and in 16 of 30 patients with PSA levels greater than 50.1 ng/ml. Only one patient had a bone metastasis when the prostate cancer involved fewer than 2 biopsy cores (1 of 135) or when disease was confined to one lobe (1 of 131), but the incidence increased significantly when the malignancy involved three or more biopsy cores (20 of 114) or disease was present in both prostate lobes (20 of 118). Four of 160 patients with Gleason scores less than 6 had bone metastases, whereas 20 of 110 patients with Gleason scores greater than 7 had bone metastases. CONCLUSIONS: The likelihood of bone metastases is low in patients with newly diagnosed, untreated prostate cancer when the initial PSA level was less than 10 ng/ml, the number of positive biopsy cores was less than 2, tumor was confined to one lobe, or the Gleason score was less than 6. However, none of these criteria can be used to exclude metastatic bone disease. A baseline bone scan is an important staging procedure and should be obtained to provide maximum data for clinical management of the disease.

Authors
Lin, K; Szabo, Z; Chin, BB; Civelek, AC
MLA Citation
Lin, K, Szabo, Z, Chin, BB, and Civelek, AC. "The value of a baseline bone scan in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer." Clin Nucl Med 24.8 (August 1999): 579-582.
PMID
10439178
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
24
Issue
8
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
579
End Page
582

Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin therapy in the evaluation and treatment of malignant thymoma.

PURPOSE: This report illustrates the potential diagnostic and therapeutic utility of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and therapy with somatostatin. METHODS: In-111 pentetreotide (In-111 octreotide), a somatostatin analog, was used to define the receptor status and the extent of disease in a case of malignant thymoma. RESULTS: Subsequent treatment with nonradioactive somatostatin inhibited tumor growth. CONCLUSION: In-111 octreotide may be useful to define tumor receptor status and may provide prognostic information useful in determining subsequent therapy.

Authors
Lin, K; Nguyen, BD; Ettinger, DS; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Lin, K, Nguyen, BD, Ettinger, DS, and Chin, BB. "Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin therapy in the evaluation and treatment of malignant thymoma." Clin Nucl Med 24.1 (January 1999): 24-28.
PMID
9890489
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
24
Issue
1
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
24
End Page
28

Nonsegmental ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy mismatch after radiation therapy.

PURPOSE: This report illustrates the utility of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in differentiating radiation pneumonitis from other causes of dyspnea, including pulmonary embolism, heart failure, obstructive tumor, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: A nonsegmental mismatched perfusion abnormality, which exactly conformed to a radiation port, was diagnostic of radiation pneumonitis. CONCLUSION: In patients with lung tumors presenting with dyspnea, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy may be useful in diagnosing radiation pneumonitis and effectively excluding other causes of dyspnea.

Authors
Chin, BB; Welsh, JS; Kleinberg, L; Ettinger, D; White, P
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Welsh, JS, Kleinberg, L, Ettinger, D, and White, P. "Nonsegmental ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy mismatch after radiation therapy." Clin Nucl Med 24.1 (January 1999): 54-56.
PMID
9890495
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
24
Issue
1
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
54
End Page
56

Noninvasive myocardial imaging

Authors
Blumeke, D; Chin, BB; Lima, JAC
MLA Citation
Blumeke, D, Chin, BB, and Lima, JAC. "Noninvasive myocardial imaging." Emergency Medicine: A comprehensive study guide. Ed. JE Tintinalli, GD Kelen, and JS Stapczynski. McGraw-Hill, 1999. (Chapter)
Source
manual
Publish Date
1999

Tc-99m Sestamibi gated SPECT in subendocardial infarction and myocardial stunning

Authors
Chin, BB; Kraitchman, D; Oznur, I
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Kraitchman, D, and Oznur, I. "Tc-99m Sestamibi gated SPECT in subendocardial infarction and myocardial stunning." Springer Verlag (Germany), 1999.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
Volume
6
Issue
S23
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
32
End Page
32

Correlation of myocardial strain measurements by 3D-tagged MR imaging with Tc-99m gated sestamibi SPECT thickening in normal stunned and infarcted myocardium

Authors
Esposito, G; Chin, BB; Kraitchman, DL
MLA Citation
Esposito, G, Chin, BB, and Kraitchman, DL. "Correlation of myocardial strain measurements by 3D-tagged MR imaging with Tc-99m gated sestamibi SPECT thickening in normal stunned and infarcted myocardium." Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), 1999.
Source
manual
Published In
Radiology
Volume
213
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
207
End Page
207

Noninvasive myocardial imaging

Authors
Blumeke, D; Chin, BB; Lima, JAC
MLA Citation
Blumeke, D, Chin, BB, and Lima, JAC. "Noninvasive myocardial imaging." Emergency Medicine: A comprehensive study guide. Ed. JE Tintinalli, GD Kelen, and JS Stapczynski. McGraw-Hill, 1999. (Chapter)
Source
manual
Publish Date
1999

Decreased bilateral frontal lobe perfusion in dementia of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Authors
Beall, DP; Martin, D; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Beall, DP, Martin, D, and Chin, BB. "Decreased bilateral frontal lobe perfusion in dementia of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis." Clin Nucl Med 23.12 (December 1998): 855-856.
PMID
9858308
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
23
Issue
12
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
855
End Page
856

Simultaneous chest radiographic findings of Hampton's hump, Westermark's sign, and vascular redistribution in pulmonary embolism.

Authors
Lu, P; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Lu, P, and Chin, BB. "Simultaneous chest radiographic findings of Hampton's hump, Westermark's sign, and vascular redistribution in pulmonary embolism." Clin Nucl Med 23.10 (October 1998): 701-702.
PMID
9790050
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
23
Issue
10
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
701
End Page
702

Tc-99m MDP scintigraphy of temporal bone metastasis from breast carcinoma.

Authors
Nguyen, BD; Chin, BB; Regan, F; Bohlman, ME
MLA Citation
Nguyen, BD, Chin, BB, Regan, F, and Bohlman, ME. "Tc-99m MDP scintigraphy of temporal bone metastasis from breast carcinoma." Clin Nucl Med 23.4 (April 1998): 253-254.
PMID
9554206
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
23
Issue
4
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
253
End Page
254

Gardner's syndrome with bone scintigraphic and CT demonstration.

Authors
Nguyen, BD; Chin, BB; Beall, DP
MLA Citation
Nguyen, BD, Chin, BB, and Beall, DP. "Gardner's syndrome with bone scintigraphic and CT demonstration." Clin Nucl Med 23.4 (April 1998): 234-235.
PMID
9554197
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
23
Issue
4
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
234
End Page
235

In-111 Prostascint scintigraphy may alter therapeutic management in patients with rising PSA values after radical prostatectomy

Authors
Chin, BB; Welsh, J; DeWeese, TL; Partin, A; Petronis, J
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Welsh, J, DeWeese, TL, Partin, A, and Petronis, J. "In-111 Prostascint scintigraphy may alter therapeutic management in patients with rising PSA values after radical prostatectomy." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 1998.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
39
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
149
End Page
149

Characterization of subendocardial infarction and myocardial stunning with gated Tc-99m sestamibi scintigraphy

Authors
Chin, BB; Kraitchman, D; Oznur, I
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Kraitchman, D, and Oznur, I. "Characterization of subendocardial infarction and myocardial stunning with gated Tc-99m sestamibi scintigraphy." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 1998.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
39
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
152
End Page
152

The value of bone scan in patients with newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma

Authors
Lin, K; Szabo, Z; Chin, BB; Civelek, AC
MLA Citation
Lin, K, Szabo, Z, Chin, BB, and Civelek, AC. "The value of bone scan in patients with newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma." 1998.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
39
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
194
End Page
194

Targeted radiotherapy for patients with rising PSA following radical prostatectomy guided by ProstaScint scintigraphy

Authors
Welsh, J; Chin, BB; Petronis, J; Howard, S; DeWeese, T
MLA Citation
Welsh, J, Chin, BB, Petronis, J, Howard, S, and DeWeese, T. "Targeted radiotherapy for patients with rising PSA following radical prostatectomy guided by ProstaScint scintigraphy." Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), 1998.
Source
manual
Published In
Radiology
Volume
209
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
286
End Page
286

Diagnostic accuracy of Tl-201 SPECT imaging in HIV positive patients with CNS lesions

Authors
Miseljic, S; Civelek, CC; Port, JD; Wolk, DA; McArthur, J; Mudun, A; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Miseljic, S, Civelek, CC, Port, JD, Wolk, DA, McArthur, J, Mudun, A, and Chin, BB. "Diagnostic accuracy of Tl-201 SPECT imaging in HIV positive patients with CNS lesions." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 1998.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
10
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
317
End Page
317

Retroperitoneal hemorrhage detected by RBC scintigraphy.

Authors
Chin, BB; Nguyen, BD
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, and Nguyen, BD. "Retroperitoneal hemorrhage detected by RBC scintigraphy." Clin Nucl Med 22.12 (December 1997): 867-868.
PMID
9408661
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
22
Issue
12
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
867
End Page
868

Tc-99m sestamibi scintigraphy of double parathyroid adenoma.

Authors
Nguyen, BD; Chin, BB; Lugo-Olivieri, CH
MLA Citation
Nguyen, BD, Chin, BB, and Lugo-Olivieri, CH. "Tc-99m sestamibi scintigraphy of double parathyroid adenoma." Clin Nucl Med 22.12 (December 1997): 856-.
PMID
9408653
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
22
Issue
12
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
856

In-111 pentetreotide SPECT imaging of carcinoid tumor of the duodenum.

Authors
Nguyen, BD; Chin, BB; Beall, DP
MLA Citation
Nguyen, BD, Chin, BB, and Beall, DP. "In-111 pentetreotide SPECT imaging of carcinoid tumor of the duodenum." Clin Nucl Med 22.11 (November 1997): 781-782.
PMID
9363392
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
22
Issue
11
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
781
End Page
782

Resting Tl-201 scintigraphy in the evaluation of myocardial sarcoidosis.

In patients with sarcoidosis, myocardial involvement is common and may be fatal. With extensive disease, the primary manifestations may include conduction abnormalities and arrhythmias, which may lead to sudden death. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy may be the most accurate method to assess extent of myocardial involvement and response to therapy.

Authors
Chin, BB; Civelek, AC; Mudun, A
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Civelek, AC, and Mudun, A. "Resting Tl-201 scintigraphy in the evaluation of myocardial sarcoidosis." Clin Nucl Med 22.7 (July 1997): 475-478.
PMID
9227871
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
22
Issue
7
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
475
End Page
478

Right and left ventricular volume and ejection fraction by tomographic gated blood-pool scintigraphy.

UNLABELLED: Tomographic techniques separate overlying structures, permitting measurements of absolute ventricular volumes. The purpose of this study was to determine absolute right and left ventricular volume and ejection fraction measurements with tomographic gated equilibrium blood-pool scintigraphy (TMUGA) compared to MRI and conventional planar scintigraphy. METHODS: Eighteen patients were studied. Ventricular volumes for TMUGA and MRI were calculated by modified Simpson's rule. TMUGA regions were defined by constraints including phase analysis, intensity threshold and visual inspection. MRI studies were acquired with a fast gradient-echo, ECG-gated, breath-hold technique and boundaries were defined by a semiautomated contour method. Conventional gated first-pass radionuclide angiography (FP) and planar gated equilibrium blood-pool scintigraphy (PMUGA) were performed for RV EF and LV EF, respectively. RESULTS: TMUGA absolute right ventricular volumes showed excellent-correlation with MRI for both right ventricular volumes (r = 0.91, slope = 0.90, s.e.e. = 15.7) and left ventricular volumes (r = 0.96, slope = 0.88, s.e.e. = 18.2). For left ventricular ejection fraction, TMUGA also showed excellent correlation with MRI (r = 0.94, slope = 1.10, s.e.e. = 9.0) and planar MUGA (r = 0.97, slope = 1.23, s.e.e. = 6.2). For right ventricular ejection fraction, TMUGA showed good correlation with both MRI (r = 0.88, slope = 0.79, s.e.e. = 6.0) and first-pass planar scintigraphy (r = 0.86, slope = 1.2, s.e.e. = 7.9). CONCLUSION: Tomographic gated blood-pool scintigraphy absolute right and left ventricular volumes and ejection fractions show good correlation with accepted techniques. Further studies are necessary to define the reproducibility of this method.

Authors
Chin, BB; Bloomgarden, DC; Xia, W; Kim, HJ; Fayad, ZA; Ferrari, VA; Berlin, JA; Axel, L; Alavi, A
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Bloomgarden, DC, Xia, W, Kim, HJ, Fayad, ZA, Ferrari, VA, Berlin, JA, Axel, L, and Alavi, A. "Right and left ventricular volume and ejection fraction by tomographic gated blood-pool scintigraphy." J Nucl Med 38.6 (June 1997): 942-948.
PMID
9189147
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
38
Issue
6
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
942
End Page
948

Global cardiac function using fast breath-hold MRI: validation of new acquisition and analysis techniques.

Calculation of global cardiac function parameters has been validated using fast, segmented k-space, breath-hold, gradient-echo, magnetic resonance images. Images of phantoms, experimental animals, normal volunteers, and patients were acquired with a 1.5 T clinical scanner. Humans were imaged using two phased-array surface coils in multicoil mode. Myocardial contours were extracted using a new interactive, semi-automated method based on the active contour model method. Images were acquired in the short-axis orientation, and, using a new imaging and analysis strategy, in rotating plane long-axis orientations, to provide better definition of the valve planes and the apex, and also to reduce the number of slices (compared with the short-axis method) required to sample the whole heart. Validation was accomplished through calculation of the volumes of phantoms and left and right ventricular masses of animal hearts. Functional parameters from MRI were compared with those from echocardiograms and radionuclide angiograms in normal volunteers and patients, respectively.

Authors
Bloomgarden, DC; Fayad, ZA; Ferrari, VA; Chin, B; Sutton, MG; Axel, L
MLA Citation
Bloomgarden, DC, Fayad, ZA, Ferrari, VA, Chin, B, Sutton, MG, and Axel, L. "Global cardiac function using fast breath-hold MRI: validation of new acquisition and analysis techniques." Magn Reson Med 37.5 (May 1997): 683-692.
PMID
9126942
Source
pubmed
Published In
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume
37
Issue
5
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
683
End Page
692

Basal Ganglia Dopamine Release in Tourette Syndrome.

Authors
Szymandki, S; Giuliano, J; Yokoi, F; Dogan, S; Villemagne, V; Chin, BB; Gjedde, A; Wong, DF
MLA Citation
Szymandki, S, Giuliano, J, Yokoi, F, Dogan, S, Villemagne, V, Chin, BB, Gjedde, A, and Wong, DF. "Basal Ganglia Dopamine Release in Tourette Syndrome." 1997.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
38
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
12
End Page
12

Parathyroid imaging with Tc-99m sestamibi planar and SPECT scintigraphy

Authors
Nguyen, BD; Chin, BB; Civelek, AC
MLA Citation
Nguyen, BD, Chin, BB, and Civelek, AC. "Parathyroid imaging with Tc-99m sestamibi planar and SPECT scintigraphy." Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), 1997.
Source
manual
Published In
Radiology
Volume
205
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
597
End Page
597

Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging of a retroesophageal parathyroid adenoma.

Authors
Nguyen, BD; Chin, BB; Imperial, AJ
MLA Citation
Nguyen, BD, Chin, BB, and Imperial, AJ. "Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging of a retroesophageal parathyroid adenoma." Clin Nucl Med 21.11 (November 1996): 880-.
PMID
8922853
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
21
Issue
11
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
880

Hemodynamic indices of myocardial dysfunction correlate with dipyridamole thallium-201 SPECT.

UNLABELLED: Important differences in hemodynamics and tracer kinetics occur with dipyridamole compared to exercise scintigraphy. To better understand the clinical significance of dipyridamole SPECT 201Tl scintigraphy, we examined the relationships between scintigraphy and clinical, and angiographic and hemodynamic variables in patients with CAD. METHODS: Forty-nine subjects were divided into three study groups. Patients in Groups A (n = 11) and B (n = 20) had a low (<5%) likelihood of CAD. Group A underwent maximal exercise thallium stress testing. Group B underwent thallium dipyridamole scintigraphy. Group C (n = 18) consisted of patients with coronary artery disease who had dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization within 2 wk. Thallium lung-to-myocardial ratio (L/M), left ventricular dilation and perfusion defect site were compared to hemodynamic, clinical and angiographic variables. RESULTS: The Group A L/M ratio of 0.23 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- 1 s.d.) was significantly lower (p < 0.001) compared to the Group B L/M ratio of 0.31 +/- 0.05. In Group C, the UM ratio showed correlation with indices of left ventricular dysfunction including lower resting ejection fraction (p = 0.02, r = 0.83), higher pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (p = 0.01, r = 0.58) and lower cardiac index (p = 0.03, r = 0.54). Left ventricular dilation was associated with hemodynamic changes of ventricular failure including lower resting ejection fraction (p = 0.008, r = 0.88) and higher pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (p = 0.02, r =0.54). Immediate and delayed perfusion defect size showed good correlation with lower resting left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.02, r = 0.83, and p = 0.004, r = 0.91, respectively). CONCLUSION: Lung uptake, left ventricular dilation and perfusion defect size show good correlation to hemodynamic indices of resting left ventricular dysfunction. A combination of these factors may be a better predictor of future cardiac events and prognosis.

Authors
Chin, BB; Moshin, J; Bouchard, M; Berlin, JA; Araujo, LI; Alavi, A
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Moshin, J, Bouchard, M, Berlin, JA, Araujo, LI, and Alavi, A. "Hemodynamic indices of myocardial dysfunction correlate with dipyridamole thallium-201 SPECT." J Nucl Med 37.5 (May 1996): 723-729.
PMID
8965134
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
37
Issue
5
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
723
End Page
729

Gated resting Tl-201 SPECT in the evaluation of myocardial viability.

Gating of resting Tl-201 SPECT to evaluate myocardial viability is now clinically feasible. Two cases are presented to illustrate the additional information of wall motion and wall thickening obtained from gating. This additional information may improve the classification of viable myocardium and requires further study.

Authors
Chin, BB; Kim, HJ; Zukerberg, B; Alavi, A
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Kim, HJ, Zukerberg, B, and Alavi, A. "Gated resting Tl-201 SPECT in the evaluation of myocardial viability." Clin Nucl Med 21.4 (April 1996): 275-279.
PMID
8925605
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
21
Issue
4
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
275
End Page
279

Absolute Right and Left Ventricular Volume and Ejection Fraction Measurements by Tomographic MUGA

Authors
Chin, BB; Bloomgarden, DC; Xia, W; Kim, HJ; Fayad, ZA; Ferrari, VA; Axel, L; Alavi, A
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Bloomgarden, DC, Xia, W, Kim, HJ, Fayad, ZA, Ferrari, VA, Axel, L, and Alavi, A. "Absolute Right and Left Ventricular Volume and Ejection Fraction Measurements by Tomographic MUGA." Elsevier, 1996.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume
2
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
215
End Page
215

Thallium-201 uptake in lung cancer.

Authors
Chin, BB; Zukerberg, BW; Buchpiguel, C; Alavi, A
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Zukerberg, BW, Buchpiguel, C, and Alavi, A. "Thallium-201 uptake in lung cancer." J Nucl Med 36.8 (August 1995): 1514-1519. (Review)
PMID
7629600
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
36
Issue
8
Publish Date
1995
Start Page
1514
End Page
1519

A New Method of Left Ventricular Volume Measurement with Tomographic Gated Blood Pool Scintigraphy. Validation with Gradient-Echo MRI

Authors
Chin, BB; Bloomgarden, DC; Zuckerberg, B; Xia, W; Kim, HJ; Fayad, ZA; Ferrari, VA; Araujio, LI; Axel, L; Alavi, A
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Bloomgarden, DC, Zuckerberg, B, Xia, W, Kim, HJ, Fayad, ZA, Ferrari, VA, Araujio, LI, Axel, L, and Alavi, A. "A New Method of Left Ventricular Volume Measurement with Tomographic Gated Blood Pool Scintigraphy. Validation with Gradient-Echo MRI." 1995.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
36
Publish Date
1995
Start Page
131
End Page
131

Evidence of Enhanced Blood Brain Barrier Breakdown in Brain Tumors following the Administration of RMP-7; A Bradykinin Analog

Authors
Alavi, A; Lattanand, C; Duncan, D; Chin, BB; Loessner, A; Veloso, T; Srivasta, V; Graney, W
MLA Citation
Alavi, A, Lattanand, C, Duncan, D, Chin, BB, Loessner, A, Veloso, T, Srivasta, V, and Graney, W. "Evidence of Enhanced Blood Brain Barrier Breakdown in Brain Tumors following the Administration of RMP-7; A Bradykinin Analog." Society of Nuclear Medicine, 1995.
Source
manual
Published In
Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
36
Publish Date
1995
Start Page
198
End Page
198

Misperfusion of the liver during hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy: value of preoperative angiography and postoperative pump scintigraphy.

OBJECTIVE: One purpose of this study was to determine if patients who have anatomic variations in their hepatic arteries are at increased risk for complications associated with the use of intrahepatic arterial infusion pumps. We also tried to determine the value of perfusion studies obtained with 99mTc-microspheres or 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin in detecting postoperative hepatic or visceral misperfusion and in predicting complications in patients with anatomic variants despite pre- or intraoperative attempts to correct the arterial abnormality. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We prospectively compared findings on scintigrams obtained after delivering the radionuclide through intrahepatic arterial infusion pumps with anatomic variations in hepatic arteries seen on celiac and superior mesenteric hepatic arteriograms obtained before placement of the pump in 49 consecutive patients with colon carcinoma metastatic to the liver. RESULTS: Despite pre- or intraoperative attempts to correct arterial abnormalities to ensure optimal perfusion of the liver in 24 patients with hepatic arterial anomalies seen on preoperative arteriograms, only two patients had normal findings on postoperative perfusion studies performed with 99mTc-microspheres and/or 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin. Abnormalities included perfusion of extrahepatic organs, including the spleen in 12 patients, stomach in seven, bowel in four, and pancreas in three. Eight patients had no perfusion of the left lobe of the liver, and three had no perfusion of the right lobe. Two patients had minimal or no perfusion of both lobes. In 23 of 25 patients with no demonstrable variations in vascular anatomy on preoperative celiac and superior mesenteric arteriograms, findings on hepatic pump scintigrams were normal. Of the 24 patients with abnormal scintigraphic findings, 20 had subsequent clinical complications. However, only two of the 25 patients with normal scintigraphic findings had clinical complications. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that patients with anatomic variations in the hepatic arterial system are at high risk for misperfusion during chemotherapy despite pre- or intraoperative efforts to alter the perfusion for chemotherapeutic agents delivered by intrahepatic arterial infusion pumps. Misperfusion can be detected by using pump scintigraphy, and therefore patients should be closely monitored with 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin perfusion studies to ensure successful delivery of the chemotherapeutic agents and to avoid serious clinical complications caused by inadvertent perfusion of other organs.

Authors
Civelek, AC; Sitzmann, JV; Chin, BB; Venbrux, A; Wagner, HN; Grochow, LB
MLA Citation
Civelek, AC, Sitzmann, JV, Chin, BB, Venbrux, A, Wagner, HN, and Grochow, LB. "Misperfusion of the liver during hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy: value of preoperative angiography and postoperative pump scintigraphy." AJR Am J Roentgenol 160.4 (April 1993): 865-870.
PMID
8456683
Source
pubmed
Published In
AJR. American journal of roentgenology
Volume
160
Issue
4
Publish Date
1993
Start Page
865
End Page
870
DOI
10.2214/ajr.160.4.8456683

Automated platelet counters: a comparative evaluation of latest instrumentation.

An extensive evaluation of performance characteristics and accuracy of clinical results for two automated multiparameter whole-blood cell counters (the Coulter Counter Model S-Plus and the Ortho ELT-8) and two single-parameter semiautomated platelet counters (the J. T. Baker MK-4/HC and the Clay-Adams Ultra-Flo 100) is described. Results of comparative assays performed on more than 1,200 clinical specimens are analyzed. These results are compared with manual determinations where appropriate. Particular attention is accorded to the accuracy of platelet counts, especially at abnormal levels below 70 X 10(3)/cu mm, where falsely elevated platelet counts may lead to serious clinical consequences. Both multiparameter instruments yielded accurate results, with the exception of low values reported by the ELT-8 for mean corpuscular volumes above 100 cu micrometer. Results for platelet counts were accurate for most specimens on all four instruments; the ELT-8 was the most reliable (P < 0.01), especially for the critically low counts. Although no instrument is infallible in determining platelet counts at all levels, the authors conclude that addition of platelet-counting capability represents a significant advancement over existing instrumentation.

Authors
Mayer, K; Chin, B; Magnes, J; Thaler, HT; Lotspeich, C; Baisley, A
MLA Citation
Mayer, K, Chin, B, Magnes, J, Thaler, HT, Lotspeich, C, and Baisley, A. "Automated platelet counters: a comparative evaluation of latest instrumentation." Am J Clin Pathol 74.2 (August 1980): 135-150.
PMID
7405891
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume
74
Issue
2
Publish Date
1980
Start Page
135
End Page
150

Radiology

Authors
Schamber, PC; Benson, J; Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Schamber, PC, Benson, J, and Chin, BB. "Radiology." Nuclear Medicine Imaging.. (Chapter)
Source
manual

Imaging Case: Inflammatory Breast Cancer with Distant Metastases

Authors
Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Chin, BB. "Imaging Case: Inflammatory Breast Cancer with Distant Metastases (In preparation)." Duke Review Cases. Ed. R Nelson. (Chapter)
Source
manual

Imaging Case: Colorectal Carcinoma recurrence with Mesenteric and peritoneal metastases

Authors
Chin, BB
MLA Citation
Chin, BB. "Imaging Case: Colorectal Carcinoma recurrence with Mesenteric and peritoneal metastases (In preparation)." Duke Review Cases. Ed. R Nelson. (Chapter)
Source
manual
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