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Clarke, Jeffrey Melson

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2008

M.D. — Indiana University School of Medicine

Categorical Internal Medicine Residency, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Hematology and Medical Oncology Fellowship, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Chief Resident, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

TOP 1705

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
August 09, 2018
End Date
July 31, 2023

SPI-POZ-202

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
December 06, 2017
End Date
November 30, 2022

M15-534

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
March 30, 2017
End Date
February 28, 2022

Bayer 16044

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Bayer HealthCare AG
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
March 31, 2017
End Date
March 14, 2021

A screening protocol to determine tumor antigen expression and HLA sub-type ofr eligibility determination for clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of Autologous T Cell expressing enhance

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Adaptimmune Limited
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
February 01, 2016
End Date
January 31, 2021

Genentech GO29537

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2015
End Date
July 30, 2020

A phase I/IIa study of BMS986148 a Mesothelin directed antibody drug conjugate in subjects with select advanced solid tumors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
May 01, 2015
End Date
April 30, 2020

mRNA-4157-P101

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Moderna Therapeutics, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
December 11, 2017
End Date
December 30, 2019

Adaptimmune MAGE

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Adaptimmune Limited
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
January 11, 2018
End Date
November 30, 2019

First-in-human dose escalation of TEW-7197 monotherapy in subjects with advanced stage solid tumors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
MedPacto, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2014
End Date
July 30, 2019

A phase Ib study of combination Regorafenib with PF-03446962 in patient with refactory metastatic colorectal cancer or G

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
January 01, 2013
End Date
March 31, 2019

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
AwardedBy
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
November 01, 2016
End Date
November 01, 2018

Evaluation of Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Resected Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
AwardedBy
Lung Cancer Initiative of North Carolina
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2015
End Date
June 30, 2018

Lilly H9H-MC-JBEF

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Eli Lilly and Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
May 01, 2016
End Date
June 18, 2018

Blood-based Biomarker Profiling for TEW-7197

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
AwardedBy
MedPacto, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
May 04, 2016
End Date
May 03, 2018
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Publications:

Yield of Malignant Pleural Effusion for Detection of Oncogenic Driver Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

Pleural fluid can be used to assess targetable mutations in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The primary objective of this study was to assess the yield of pleural fluid cytology for targetable oncogenic mutations (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ALK, and ROS1 gene rearrangements). We also assessed pleural fluid volume necessary for molecular testing.Retrospective review was performed of 134 consecutive patients with lung adenocarcinoma associated malignant pleural effusions. EGFR and KRAS testing was done using PCR amplification followed by DNA sequencing, or next generation sequencing in more recent cases that included BRAF assessment. Fluorescence in situ hybridization employing break-apart probes was used to test for ALK and ROS1 rearrangements.Mutation analysis on pleural fluid cell-block was performed on 56 patients. It was adequate for complete analysis ordered including EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, ALK, and ROS1 rearrangements on 40 (71.4%) samples. For individual mutations, EGFR testing was possible in 38 of 49 (77.6%); KRAS 22 of 28 (78.6%); BRAF 10 of 13 (76.9%), ALK gene rearrangement 42 of 51 (82.4%) and ROS1 gene rearrangement in 21 of 28 (75%) pleural fluid specimens. The analysis was satisfactory in 13 of 19 (68.4%) samples with ≤100 mL versus 27 of 37 (72.9%) with >100 mL of fluid tested (P-value=0.7).Genetic mutation analysis can be performed on malignant pleural effusions secondary to lung adenocarcinoma, independent of fluid volume.

Authors
DeMaio, A; Clarke, JM; Dash, R; Sebastian, S; Wahidi, MM; Shofer, SL; Cheng, GZ; Li, X; Wang, X; Mahmood, K
MLA Citation
DeMaio, A, Clarke, JM, Dash, R, Sebastian, S, Wahidi, MM, Shofer, SL, Cheng, GZ, Li, X, Wang, X, and Mahmood, K. "Yield of Malignant Pleural Effusion for Detection of Oncogenic Driver Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinoma." Journal of Bronchology & Interventional Pulmonology (July 25, 2018).
PMID
30048416
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Bronchology & Interventional Pulmonology
Publish Date
2018
DOI
10.1097/lbr.0000000000000534

Immune Checkpoint Blockade: The New Frontier in Cancer Treatment.

Immune checkpoint blockers have revolutionized cancer treatment in recent years. These agents are now approved for the treatment of several malignancies, including melanoma, squamous and non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Studies have demonstrated the significant impact of immunotherapy versus standard of care on patient outcomes, including durable response and extended survival. The use of immunotherapy-based combination therapy has been shown to further extend duration of response and survival. Immunotherapies function through modulation of the immune system, which can lead to immune-mediated adverse events (imAEs). These include a range of dermatologic, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and hepatic toxicities, as well as other less common inflammatory events. ImAEs are typically low grade and manageable when identified early and treated with appropriate measures. Identifying the right patient for the right therapy will become more important as new immunotherapies and immunotherapy-based combinations are approved and costs of cancer care continue to rise.

Authors
Clarke, JM; George, DJ; Lisi, S; Salama, AKS
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, George, DJ, Lisi, S, and Salama, AKS. "Immune Checkpoint Blockade: The New Frontier in Cancer Treatment." Targeted oncology 13.1 (February 13, 2018): 1-20.
PMID
29441437
Source
epmc
Published In
Targeted Oncology
Volume
13
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
1
End Page
20
DOI
10.1007/s11523-017-0549-7

Immune Activation in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Plus Ipilimumab.

Purpose: To determine the immunologic effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus ipilimumab in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.Experimental Design: This is a single-arm chemotherapy plus phased ipilimumab phase II study of 24 treatment-naïve patients with stage IB-IIIA NSCLC. Patients received neoadjuvant therapy consisting of 3 cycles of paclitaxel with either cisplatin or carboplatin and ipilimumab included in the last 2 cycles.Results: Chemotherapy alone had little effect on immune parameters in PBMCs. Profound CD28-dependent activation of both CD4 and CD8 cells was observed following ipilimumab. Significant increases in the frequencies of CD4+ cells expressing activation markers ICOS, HLA-DR, CTLA-4, and PD-1 were apparent. Likewise, increased frequencies of CD8+ cells expressing the same activation markers, with the exception of PD-1, were observed. We also examined 7 resected tumors and found higher frequencies of activated tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes than those observed in PBMCs. Surprisingly, we found 4 cases of preexisting tumor-associated antigens (TAA) responses against survivin, PRAME, or MAGE-A3 present in PBMC at baseline, but neither increased frequencies nor the appearance of newly detectable responses following ipilimumab therapy. Ipilimumab had little effect on the frequencies of circulating regulatory T cells and MDSCs.Conclusions: This study did not meet the primary endpoint of detecting an increase in blood-based TAA T-cell responses after ipilimumab. Collectively, these results highlight the immune activating properties of ipilimumab in early-stage NSCLC. The immune profiling data for ipilimumab alone can contribute to the interpretation of immunologic data from combined immune checkpoint blockade immunotherapies. Clin Cancer Res; 23(24); 7474-82. ©2017 AACR.

Authors
Yi, JS; Ready, N; Healy, P; Dumbauld, C; Osborne, R; Berry, M; Shoemaker, D; Clarke, J; Crawford, J; Tong, B; Harpole, D; D'Amico, TA; McSherry, F; Dunphy, F; McCall, SJ; Christensen, JD; Wang, X; Weinhold, KJ
MLA Citation
Yi, JS, Ready, N, Healy, P, Dumbauld, C, Osborne, R, Berry, M, Shoemaker, D, Clarke, J, Crawford, J, Tong, B, Harpole, D, D'Amico, TA, McSherry, F, Dunphy, F, McCall, SJ, Christensen, JD, Wang, X, and Weinhold, KJ. "Immune Activation in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Plus Ipilimumab." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 23.24 (December 2017): 7474-7482.
PMID
28951518
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
23
Issue
24
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
7474
End Page
7482
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-17-2005

Systemic Bevacizumab for Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis: A Single Center Experience of Two Cases.

BACKGROUND Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP), caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), is the most common benign neoplasm of the larynx and central airways. RRP has a significant impact on quality life and high annual costs to healthcare. Currently, there is no cure for RRP, leading to repeated debulking operations for symptomatic palliation. Various local adjuvant therapies have also been studied with mixed efficacy. HPV oncogene products increase expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) providing a potential target for treatment of RRP. Bevacizumab, a recombinant monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF, has shown efficacy in patients with localized disease. CASE REPORT We present two cases of extensive airway and parenchymal RRP successfully managed with systemically administered bevacizumab, a recombinant monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF. CONCLUSIONS Bevacizumab has shown efficacy in patients with localized disease, but here we illustrate the potential of bevacizumab for patients with extensive parenchymal burden as well as provide a brief review of the literature.

Authors
Bedoya, A; Glisinski, K; Clarke, J; Lind, RN; Buckley, CE; Shofer, S
MLA Citation
Bedoya, A, Glisinski, K, Clarke, J, Lind, RN, Buckley, CE, and Shofer, S. "Systemic Bevacizumab for Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis: A Single Center Experience of Two Cases." The American Journal of Case Reports 18 (July 31, 2017): 842-846.
PMID
28757601
Source
epmc
Published In
The American Journal of Case Reports
Volume
18
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
842
End Page
846
DOI
10.12659/AJCR.904416

Surrogate clinical endpoints to predict overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer trials-are we in a new era?

Surrogate endpoints for clinical trials in oncology offer an alternative metric for measuring clinical benefit, allowing for shorter trial duration, smaller patient cohorts, and single arm design. The correlation of surrogate endpoints with overall survival (OS) in therapeutic studies is a central consideration to their validity. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published an analysis of fourteen clinical trials in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and discovered a strong association between response rate and progression free survival. Furthermore, a correlation between response rate and OS is demonstrated when analyzing the experimental treatment arm separately, minimizing bias from patient crossover. We also highlight multiple, important considerations when using response as an endpoint in clinical trials involving NSCLC patients.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Wang, X; Ready, NE
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, Wang, X, and Ready, NE. "Surrogate clinical endpoints to predict overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer trials-are we in a new era?." Translational Lung Cancer Research 4.6 (December 2015): 804-808.
PMID
26798592
Source
epmc
Published In
Translational Lung Cancer Research
Volume
4
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
804
End Page
808
DOI
10.3978/j.issn.2218-6751.2015.05.03

Identifying Blood-Based Protein Biomarkers for Antiangiogenic Agents in the Clinic: A Decade of Progress.

Agents that inhibit tumor angiogenesis are widely used and have provided meaningful survival benefits to patients in multiple disease settings. However, these agents differ significantly in their mechanisms of action and potential toxicities, and there are currently no prospectively validated biomarkers to guide the selection of agents for individual patients. Blood-based protein biomarkers are well suited for trials investigating antiangiogenic agents for multiple reasons. Many elements of the molecular pathways that antiangiogenic agents target are present and detectable in the circulation, sample collection is minimally invasive, and samples can be collected throughout the course of treatment. Blood-based biomarkers for antiangiogenic therapies are urgently needed to guide the development of therapeutic strategies. This review provides a brief summary of the current blood-based protein biomarkers for antiangiogenic therapies.

Authors
Hatch, AJ; Clarke, JM; Nixon, AB; Hurwitz, HI
MLA Citation
Hatch, AJ, Clarke, JM, Nixon, AB, and Hurwitz, HI. "Identifying Blood-Based Protein Biomarkers for Antiangiogenic Agents in the Clinic: A Decade of Progress." Cancer journal (Sudbury, Mass.) 21.4 (July 2015): 322-326. (Review)
PMID
26222085
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Journal (Sudbury, Mass.)
Volume
21
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
322
End Page
326
DOI
10.1097/ppo.0000000000000129

Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer: american society of clinical oncology clinical practice guideline update 2014.

To provide current recommendations about the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer.PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines from November 2012 through July 2014. An update committee reviewed the identified abstracts.Of the 53 publications identified and reviewed, none prompted a change in the 2013 recommendations.Most hospitalized patients with active cancer require thromboprophylaxis throughout hospitalization. Routine thromboprophylaxis is not recommended for patients with cancer in the outpatient setting. It may be considered for selected high-risk patients. Patients with multiple myeloma receiving antiangiogenesis agents with chemotherapy and/or dexamethasone should receive prophylaxis with either low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or low-dose aspirin. Patients undergoing major surgery should receive prophylaxis starting before surgery and continuing for at least 7 to 10 days. Extending prophylaxis up to 4 weeks should be considered in those undergoing major abdominal or pelvic surgery with high-risk features. LMWH is recommended for the initial 5 to 10 days of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as well as for long-term secondary prophylaxis (at least 6 months). Use of novel oral anticoagulants is not currently recommended for patients with malignancy and VTE because of limited data in patients with cancer. Anticoagulation should not be used to extend survival of patients with cancer in the absence of other indications. Patients with cancer should be periodically assessed for VTE risk. Oncology professionals should educate patients about the signs and symptoms of VTE.

Authors
Lyman, GH; Bohlke, K; Khorana, AA; Kuderer, NM; Lee, AY; Arcelus, JI; Balaban, EP; Clarke, JM; Flowers, CR; Francis, CW; Gates, LE; Kakkar, AK; Key, NS; Levine, MN; Liebman, HA; Tempero, MA; Wong, SL; Somerfield, MR; Falanga, A; American Society of Clinical Oncology,
MLA Citation
Lyman, GH, Bohlke, K, Khorana, AA, Kuderer, NM, Lee, AY, Arcelus, JI, Balaban, EP, Clarke, JM, Flowers, CR, Francis, CW, Gates, LE, Kakkar, AK, Key, NS, Levine, MN, Liebman, HA, Tempero, MA, Wong, SL, Somerfield, MR, Falanga, A, and American Society of Clinical Oncology, . "Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer: american society of clinical oncology clinical practice guideline update 2014." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 33.6 (February 2015): 654-656.
PMID
25605844
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
33
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
654
End Page
656
DOI
10.1200/jco.2014.59.7351

Understanding the mechanisms of action of antiangiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer: a clinician's perspective.

Multiple clinical trials using bevacizumab, ziv-aflibercept, and regorafenib have recently demonstrated efficacy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. While the net clinical benefit of each of these therapies in the second-line and refractory disease setting appears to be similar, important distinctions exist between the agents at the pharmacodynamic, tumor microenvironment, and clinical levels. The purpose of this review is to survey the preclinical evidence regarding the mechanisms of action of these novel antiangiogenic agents and provide an overview of their respective clinical activity, while highlighting distinctions between therapies. Fundamental understanding of these distinctions may aid in clinical decisions and choice of antiangiogenic therapies.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Hurwitz, HI; Rangwala, F
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, Hurwitz, HI, and Rangwala, F. "Understanding the mechanisms of action of antiangiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer: a clinician's perspective." Cancer treatment reviews 40.9 (October 2014): 1065-1072. (Review)
PMID
25047778
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Treatment Reviews
Volume
40
Issue
9
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1065
End Page
1072
DOI
10.1016/j.ctrv.2014.07.001

Understanding the mechanisms of action of antiangiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer: A clinician's perspective

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd.Multiple clinical trials using bevacizumab, ziv-aflibercept, and regorafenib have recently demonstrated efficacy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. While the net clinical benefit of each of these therapies in the second-line and refractory disease setting appears to be similar, important distinctions exist between the agents at the pharmacodynamic, tumor microenvironment, and clinical levels. The purpose of this review is to survey the preclinical evidence regarding the mechanisms of action of these novel antiangiogenic agents and provide an overview of their respective clinical activity, while highlighting distinctions between therapies. Fundamental understanding of these distinctions may aid in clinical decisions and choice of antiangiogenic therapies.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Hurwitz, HI; Rangwala, F
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, Hurwitz, HI, and Rangwala, F. "Understanding the mechanisms of action of antiangiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer: A clinician's perspective." Cancer Treatment Reviews 40.9 (2014): 1065-1072.
Source
scival
Published In
Cancer Treatment Reviews
Volume
40
Issue
9
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1065
End Page
1072
DOI
10.1016/j.ctrv.2014.07.001

Understanding and targeting resistance to anti-angiogenic therapies.

Therapies targeting tumor angiogenesis are used in a variety of malignancies, however not all patients benefit from treatment and impact on tumor control may be transient and modest. Mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic therapies can be broadly categorized into VEGF-axis dependent alterations, non-VEGF pathways, and stromal cell interactions. Complimentary combinations of agents that inhibit alternative mechanisms of blood vessel formation may optimize inhibition of angiogenesis and improve clinical benefit for patients. The purpose of this review is to detail the preclinical evidence for mechanisms of angiogenic resistance and provide an overview of novel therapeutic approaches exploiting these pathways.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Hurwitz, HI
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, and Hurwitz, HI. "Understanding and targeting resistance to anti-angiogenic therapies." J Gastrointest Oncol 4.3 (September 2013): 253-263.
PMID
23997938
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology
Volume
4
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
253
End Page
263
DOI
10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2013.036

Targeted inhibition of VEGF receptor 2: an update on ramucirumab.

Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B) is a fully humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody, targeting the extracellular domain of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Numerous Phase I - II trials in various malignancies have shown promising clinical antitumor efficacy and tolerability. Most recently, the large Phase III REGARD trial evaluated ramucirumab in patients with refractory metastatic gastric cancer. Patients receiving ramucirumab experienced a median overall survival of 5.2 months compared to 3.8 months on placebo.The purpose of this article is to review the preclinical motivation for VEGFR2-targeted therapies and survey recent data from clinical trials involving ramucirumab, as well as highlight ongoing studies.Rational multi-target approaches to angiogenesis are needed to overcome resistance mechanisms. Predictive angiogenic biomarkers are also needed to optimize patient selection for novel anti-angiogenic agents.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Hurwitz, HI
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, and Hurwitz, HI. "Targeted inhibition of VEGF receptor 2: an update on ramucirumab." Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy 13.8 (August 2013): 1187-1196. (Review)
PMID
23803182
Source
epmc
Published In
Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Volume
13
Issue
8
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1187
End Page
1196
DOI
10.1517/14712598.2013.810717

Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

PURPOSE: To provide recommendations about prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. Prophylaxis in the outpatient, inpatient, and perioperative settings was considered, as were treatment and use of anticoagulation as a cancer-directed therapy. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature published from December 2007 to December 2012 was completed in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Committee reviewed evidence to determine which recommendations required revision. RESULTS: Forty-two publications met eligibility criteria, including 16 systematic reviews and 24 randomized controlled trials. RECOMMENDATIONS: Most hospitalized patients with cancer require thromboprophylaxis throughout hospitalization. Thromboprophylaxis is not routinely recommended for outpatients with cancer. It may be considered for selected high-risk patients. Patients with multiple myeloma receiving antiangiogenesis agents with chemotherapy and/or dexamethasone should receive prophylaxis with either low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or low-dose aspirin. Patients undergoing major cancer surgery should receive prophylaxis, starting before surgery and continuing for at least 7 to 10 days. Extending prophylaxis up to 4 weeks should be considered in those with high-risk features. LMWH is recommended for the initial 5 to 10 days of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as well as for long-term (6 months) secondary prophylaxis. Use of novel oral anticoagulants is not currently recommended for patients with malignancy and VTE. Anticoagulation should not be used for cancer treatment in the absence of other indications. Patients with cancer should be periodically assessed for VTE risk. Oncology professionals should provide patient education about the signs and symptoms of VTE.

Authors
Lyman, GH; Khorana, AA; Kuderer, NM; Lee, AY; Arcelus, JI; Balaban, EP; Clarke, JM; Flowers, CR; Francis, CW; Gates, LE; Kakkar, AK; Key, NS; Levine, MN; Liebman, HA; Tempero, MA; Wong, SL; Prestrud, AA; Falanga, A; American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice,
MLA Citation
Lyman, GH, Khorana, AA, Kuderer, NM, Lee, AY, Arcelus, JI, Balaban, EP, Clarke, JM, Flowers, CR, Francis, CW, Gates, LE, Kakkar, AK, Key, NS, Levine, MN, Liebman, HA, Tempero, MA, Wong, SL, Prestrud, AA, Falanga, A, and American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice, . "Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 31.17 (June 2013): 2189-2204. (Review)
PMID
23669224
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Issue
17
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
2189
End Page
2204
DOI
10.1200/jco.2013.49.1118

Novel therapies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

In recent years, great success has been achieved on many fronts in the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), including novel chemotherapeutics, immunotherapies, bone microenvironment-targeted agents, and hormonal therapies. Numerous agents are currently in early-phase clinical trial development for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. These novel therapies target several areas of prostate tumor biology, including the upregulation of androgen signaling and biosynthesis, critical oncogenic intracellular pathways, epigenetic alterations, and cancer immunology. Importantly, the characterization of the prostate cancer genome offers the potential to exploit conserved genetic alterations, which may increase the efficacy of these targeted therapies. Predictive and prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed to maximize therapeutic efficacy and safety of these promising new treatments options in prostate cancer.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Armstrong, AJ
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, and Armstrong, AJ. "Novel therapies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer." Curr Treat Options Oncol 14.1 (March 2013): 109-126. (Review)
PMID
23322116
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Treatment Options in Oncology
Volume
14
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
109
End Page
126
DOI
10.1007/s11864-012-0222-4

Ipilimumab-Induced Pneumonitis: A Case Report

Authors
Mis, L; Clarke, JM
MLA Citation
Mis, L, and Clarke, JM. "Ipilimumab-Induced Pneumonitis: A Case Report." Journal of Pharmacy Technology 29.2 (March 2013): 94-98.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Pharmacy Technology
Volume
29
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
94
End Page
98
DOI
10.1177/875512251302900207

Ziv-aflibercept: binding to more than VEGF-A--does more matter?

The VELOUR and VITAL studies recently demonstrated ziv-aflibercept improved overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), including those previously treated with bevacizumab, but did not improve overall survival in non-small-cell lung cancer. Thus, VEGF-directed agents might be useful throughout the continuum of care in mCRC, but biomarkers are needed to identify patients likely to benefit.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Hurwitz, HI
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, and Hurwitz, HI. "Ziv-aflibercept: binding to more than VEGF-A--does more matter?." Nature Reviews. Clinical Oncology 10.1 (January 2013): 10-11.
PMID
23149898
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature Reviews. Clinical Oncology
Volume
10
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
10
End Page
11
DOI
10.1038/nrclinonc.2012.197

Adenovirus vaccine immunotherapy targeting WT1-expressing tumors.

IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Tumor associated antigens (TAAs) offer specific targets for developing cancer immunotherapies. In particular, viral vectors encoding transgenic TAAs have been used in recent vaccination strategies. Wilm's Tumor gene (WT1) is a robust TAA which is overexpressed in many malignancies and has been recently used to develop a novel recombinant adenovirus (Ad-WT1) for antitumor immunotherapy. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: The lines of evidence over the past two decades leading to the development of Ad-WT1 immunotherapy are reviewed, including preclinical studies and clinical trials using WT1-based vaccines and TAA-expressing adenoviral vectors for antitumor therapy. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: The fundamental immunogenic properties of WT1-based vaccines are detailed, as well as the recent progress in using adenoviral vectors for eliciting a TAA-specific immune response. The reader will also gain an understanding of the evidence supporting Ad-WT1 antitumor therapy in vivo. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Ad-WT1 elicits a potent CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell immune response and can effectively inhibit tumor growth in vivo, thus making it an important potential cancer therapy worthy of future investigation.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Morse, MA; Lyerly, HK; Clay, T; Osada, T
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, Morse, MA, Lyerly, HK, Clay, T, and Osada, T. "Adenovirus vaccine immunotherapy targeting WT1-expressing tumors." Expert Opin Biol Ther 10.6 (June 2010): 875-883. (Review)
PMID
20380487
Source
pubmed
Published In
Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Volume
10
Issue
6
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
875
End Page
883
DOI
10.1517/14712591003798278

Long-term survival of a woman with well differentiated papillary mesothelioma of the peritoneum: A case report and review of the literature

Introduction. Well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma of the peritoneum (WDPMP) is a rare subtype of epitheloid mesothelioma, which is usually seen in young women. WDPMP is generally considered of low malignant potential, however the long-term nature of the tumor remains poorly defined. Case presentation. We describe the long-term follow-up of a 60-year-old woman of West African descent who has survived 24 years with WDPMP after receiving extensive local and systemic adjuvant chemotherapy. Her clinical course has included three exploratory laparotomies with intraperitoneal and intravenous chemotherapy over two decades. Her course was complicated by anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy, for which she underwent an orthotopic heart transplant. Our patient is alive with stable radiological evidence of peritoneal disease, and continues to suffer from chronic abdominal pain. Conclusion: No consensus exists regarding optimal treatment strategies for WDPMP. However, given the low malignant potential of the tumor, careful consideration should be made before proceeding with aggressive interventions. Further, long-term follow-up reports are required to fully characterize this tumor. © 2010 Clarke and Helft; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Authors
Clarke, JM; Helft, P
MLA Citation
Clarke, JM, and Helft, P. "Long-term survival of a woman with well differentiated papillary mesothelioma of the peritoneum: A case report and review of the literature." Journal of Medical Case Reports 4 (2010).
PMID
21029480
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Medical Case Reports
Volume
4
Publish Date
2010
DOI
10.1186/1752-1947-4-346

Non-ampullary duodenal adenocarcinoma: factors important for relapse and survival.

BACKGROUND: Duodenal adenocarcinoma (DA) is rare, but potentially curable. Prospective data on treatment outcomes is scarce and large retrospective studies show conflicting results on the impact of radical resection, node-status, and adjuvant therapy. METHODS: In the past 17 years, 30 patients presented with resectable DA. Data on the aforementioned variables were acquired then analyzed for impact on recurrence and survival. RESULTS: Overall-survival rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 70.0%, 53.3%, and 33.3% respectively. Recurrence-free survival rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 53.3%, 30.0%, and 26.7%. Overall-survival rates for patients with node-positive disease at 1, 2, and 3 years were 68.8%, 43.8%, 12.5%, and for node-negative 70%, 60%, 60%. Recurrence-free survival in node-positive disease at 1, 2, 3 years was 50%, 12.5%, 12.5%, and for node negative 50%, 50%, and 40%. Median survival from diagnosis was 27.5 months (0.5-226.7 months). Significant predictors of recurrence and survival were nodal-status and AJCC stage (P < 0.001). Adjuvant therapy, surgical-type, pathological tumor-stage, and surgical margins were not significant. CONCLUSION: Nodal-status and overall pathological-stage significantly affect the prognosis for patients with DA, while resection-status and adjuvant therapy may not. The role of adjuvant therapy requires prospective trials for elucidation.

Authors
Struck, A; Howard, T; Chiorean, EG; Clarke, JM; Riffenburgh, R; Cardenes, HR
MLA Citation
Struck, A, Howard, T, Chiorean, EG, Clarke, JM, Riffenburgh, R, and Cardenes, HR. "Non-ampullary duodenal adenocarcinoma: factors important for relapse and survival." Journal of Surgical Oncology 100.2 (August 2009): 144-148.
PMID
19544358
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume
100
Issue
2
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
144
End Page
148
DOI
10.1002/jso.21319

Non-ampullary duodenal adenocarcinoma: Factors important for relapse and survival (Journal of Surgical Oncology (2009) 100, 2, (144-148))

Authors
Struck, A; Howard, T; Chiorean, EG; Clarke, JM; Riffenburgh, R; Cardenes, HR
MLA Citation
Struck, A, Howard, T, Chiorean, EG, Clarke, JM, Riffenburgh, R, and Cardenes, HR. "Non-ampullary duodenal adenocarcinoma: Factors important for relapse and survival (Journal of Surgical Oncology (2009) 100, 2, (144-148))." Journal of Surgical Oncology 100.5 (2009): 434--.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume
100
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
434-
DOI
10.1002/jso.21396
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