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Fayanju, Oluwadamilola Motunrayo

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

A.B. 2001

A.B. — Harvard University

M.A. 2001

M.A. — Harvard University

M.D. 2007

M.D. — Washington University School of Medicine

MPHS 2011

MPHS — Washington University School of Medicine

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Washington University School of Medicine

Breast Surgical Oncology Fellow, Surgery

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Awards:

Duke CTSA KL2 Career Development Award. Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA).

Type
University
Awarded By
Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA)
Date
January 01, 2017

Duke Health Fellow. School of Medicine.

Type
University
Awarded By
School of Medicine
Date
January 01, 2017

Conquer Cancer Foundation Merit Award, Quality Care Symposium. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Type
National
Awarded By
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
Date
January 01, 2016

1st prize, Resident/Fellow Competition, Commission on Cancer (CoC) Abstract Contest. Missouri Chapter of the American College of Surgeons (Missouri ACS).

Type
State
Awarded By
Missouri Chapter of the American College of Surgeons (Missouri ACS)
Date
January 01, 2012

Conquer Cancer Foundation Merit Award, Breast Cancer Symposium. American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Type
National
Awarded By
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
Date
January 01, 2012

Publications:

Axillary Nodal Evaluation in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients: Potential Effects on Treatment Decisions and Survival

© 2018, Society of Surgical Oncology. Background: Recent studies suggest that surgical lymph node (LN) evaluation may be omitted in select elderly breast cancer patients as it may not influence adjuvant therapy decisions. To evaluate differences in adjuvant therapy receipt and overall survival (OS), we compared clinically node-negative (cN0) elderly patients who did and did not undergo axillary surgery. Methods: Patients aged ≥70 years in the National Cancer Database (2004–2014) with cT1-3, cN0 breast cancer were divided into two cohorts—those with surgical LN evaluation (one or more nodes removed) and those without (no nodes removed). Propensity scores were used to match patients based on age, year of diagnosis, tumor grade, cT stage, estrogen receptor status, and Charlson–Deyo comorbidity score. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the effect of LN surgery on OS. Results: Overall, 133,778 patients were matched, of whom 102,247 patients (76.4%) underwent nodal surgery. Patients undergoing nodal surgery were more likely to receive chemotherapy (pN1-3: 22.2%; pN0: 5.8%; cN0-no nodal surgery: 2.8%; p < 0.001), radiation (pN1-3: 49.7%; pN0: 47.5%; cN0-no nodal surgery: 26%; p < 0.001), and endocrine therapy (pN1-3: 72%; pN0: 58.5%; cN0-no nodal surgery: 46.5%; p < 0.001). After adjustment for known covariates, patients who did not undergo nodal surgery had a worse OS (hazard ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.61–1.70). Conclusions: For elderly cN0 breast cancer patients, axillary surgery was associated with higher rates of adjuvant therapy and improved OS. A selective approach to omitting nodal surgery should be considered in elderly patients with cN0 breast cancer as axillary staging may influence subsequent treatment decisions and long-term outcomes.

Authors
Tamirisa, N; Thomas, SM; Fayanju, OM; Greenup, RA; Rosenberger, LH; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES; Plichta, JK
MLA Citation
Tamirisa, N, Thomas, SM, Fayanju, OM, Greenup, RA, Rosenberger, LH, Hyslop, T, Hwang, ES, and Plichta, JK. "Axillary Nodal Evaluation in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients: Potential Effects on Treatment Decisions and Survival." Annals of Surgical Oncology 25.10 (October 1, 2018): 2890-2898.
Source
scopus
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
10
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
2890
End Page
2898
DOI
10.1245/s10434-018-6595-2

Evolving Patterns of Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction by Race/Ethnicity: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis from 1998 to 2014

Authors
Sergesketter, AR; Thomas, SM; Lane, WO; Orr, JP; Fayanju, OM; Greenup, RA; Hollenbeck, ST
MLA Citation
Sergesketter, AR, Thomas, SM, Lane, WO, Orr, JP, Fayanju, OM, Greenup, RA, and Hollenbeck, ST. "Evolving Patterns of Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction by Race/Ethnicity: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis from 1998 to 2014." Owen Wangensteen Scientific Forum / Annual Clinical Congress of the American-College-of-Surgeons (ACS). October 21, 2018 - October 25, 2018. Boston, MA.: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, October 1, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume
227
Issue
4
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
S207
End Page
S207
DOI
10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2018.07.453

Axillary Nodal Evaluation in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients: Potential Effects on Treatment Decisions and Survival.

Recent studies suggest that surgical lymph node (LN) evaluation may be omitted in select elderly breast cancer patients as it may not influence adjuvant therapy decisions. To evaluate differences in adjuvant therapy receipt and overall survival (OS), we compared clinically node-negative (cN0) elderly patients who did and did not undergo axillary surgery.Patients aged ≥70 years in the National Cancer Database (2004-2014) with cT1-3, cN0 breast cancer were divided into two cohorts-those with surgical LN evaluation (one or more nodes removed) and those without (no nodes removed). Propensity scores were used to match patients based on age, year of diagnosis, tumor grade, cT stage, estrogen receptor status, and Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the effect of LN surgery on OS.Overall, 133,778 patients were matched, of whom 102,247 patients (76.4%) underwent nodal surgery. Patients undergoing nodal surgery were more likely to receive chemotherapy (pN1-3: 22.2%; pN0: 5.8%; cN0-no nodal surgery: 2.8%; p < 0.001), radiation (pN1-3: 49.7%; pN0: 47.5%; cN0-no nodal surgery: 26%; p < 0.001), and endocrine therapy (pN1-3: 72%; pN0: 58.5%; cN0-no nodal surgery: 46.5%; p < 0.001). After adjustment for known covariates, patients who did not undergo nodal surgery had a worse OS (hazard ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.61-1.70).For elderly cN0 breast cancer patients, axillary surgery was associated with higher rates of adjuvant therapy and improved OS. A selective approach to omitting nodal surgery should be considered in elderly patients with cN0 breast cancer as axillary staging may influence subsequent treatment decisions and long-term outcomes.

Authors
Tamirisa, N; Thomas, SM; Fayanju, OM; Greenup, RA; Rosenberger, LH; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES; Plichta, JK
MLA Citation
Tamirisa, N, Thomas, SM, Fayanju, OM, Greenup, RA, Rosenberger, LH, Hyslop, T, Hwang, ES, and Plichta, JK. "Axillary Nodal Evaluation in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients: Potential Effects on Treatment Decisions and Survival." October 2018.
PMID
29968029
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
10
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
2890
End Page
2898
DOI
10.1245/s10434-018-6595-2

The Association of Extent of Axillary Surgery and Survival in Women with N2-3 Invasive Breast Cancer.

Although surgical management of the axilla for breast cancer continues to evolve, axillary lymphadenectomy remains the standard of care for women with advanced nodal disease. We sought to evaluate national patterns of care in axillary surgery, and its association with overall survival (OS) among women with N2-3 invasive breast cancer.Women (18-90 years) with clinical N2-3 invasive breast cancer who underwent axillary surgery were identified from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) from 2004 to 2013. Axillary surgery was categorized as sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB, 1-5 nodes) or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND, ≥ 10 nodes). Patient and treatment characteristics, trends over time, and overall survival (OS) were compared by surgical treatment.Overall, 22,156 patients were identified. At diagnosis, 68.5% had cN2 and 31.5% had cN3 disease. Treatment included: lumpectomy (27%), mastectomy (73%), adjuvant chemotherapy (53.4%), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) (39.7%), radiation (74%), and endocrine therapy (54.4%). In total, 9.9% (n = 2190) underwent SLNB and 90.1% (n = 19,966) underwent ALND. Receipt of SLNB was associated with private insurance, grade 3 disease, invasive ductal cancer, NAC, and lumpectomy (all p < 0.001). After adjustment for known covariates, including chemotherapy use, ALND was associated with improved survival [hazard ratio (HR) 0.68, p < 0.001] and this effect was similar for N2 and N3 patients (axillary surgery × cN-stage interaction p = 0.29).Axillary lymphadenectomy was associated with improved survival in patients presenting with clinical N2-3 invasive breast cancer. Further studies, particularly in the neoadjuvant setting, are needed to identify breast cancer patients with advanced nodal disease who may safely avoid a lesser extent of axillary surgery.

Authors
Park, TS; Thomas, SM; Rosenberger, LH; Fayanju, OM; Plichta, JK; Blitzblau, RC; Ong, CT; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES; Greenup, RA
MLA Citation
Park, TS, Thomas, SM, Rosenberger, LH, Fayanju, OM, Plichta, JK, Blitzblau, RC, Ong, CT, Hyslop, T, Hwang, ES, and Greenup, RA. "The Association of Extent of Axillary Surgery and Survival in Women with N2-3 Invasive Breast Cancer." Annals of Surgical Oncology 25.10 (October 2018): 3019-3029.
PMID
29978365
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
10
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
3019
End Page
3029
DOI
10.1245/s10434-018-6587-2

The Clinical Significance of Breast-only and Node-only Pathologic Complete Response (pCR) After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy (NACT): A Review of 20,000 Breast Cancer Patients in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB).

To determine whether the association between overall survival (OS) and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in breast cancer patients varies with tumor subtype and anatomic extent of pathologic complete response (pCR).pCR after NACT predicts improved OS in breast cancer, but it is unclear whether pCR limited to the breast or axilla is also associated with OS.Women with cT1-3/cN0-1 breast cancer diagnosed in 2010 to 2014 who underwent surgery following NACT were identified in the NCDB and divided into 4 subtypes based on reported hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate OS. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with post-NACT response, defined as upstage (yp stage>clinical stage); no change (clinical stage = yp stage); overall (breast+axilla, ypT0N0), breast-only (ypT0N1/N1mic), or node-only (ypT1-3N0) pCR.Of 33,162 identified patients, 20,265 experienced overall pCR (n = 6370, 19.2%), breast-only pCR (n = 494, 1.5%), node-only pCR (n = 1133, 3.4%), no stage change (n = 9641, 29.1%), or upstage (n = 2627, 7.9%). Compared with no stage change, breast-only pCR was associated with improved OS in triple-negative disease [hazard ratio = 0.58, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.37-0.89], and node-only pCR was associated with improved OS in both triple-negative (hazard ratio = 0.55,95% CI = 0.39-0.76) and HR+/HER2- disease (hazard ratio = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.33-0.89). For patients achieving overall (breast+axilla) pCR, unadjusted 5-year OS was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.93-0.95), with no difference between patients who were cN0 (hazard ratio = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93-0.96) or cN1 (hazard ratio = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92-0.96) at diagnosis.In node-positive patients, pCR limited to either the breast or axilla predicts survival for select receptor subtypes. In patients achieving pCR in both the breast and axilla, survival is driven by response to NACT rather than presenting cN stage.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Ren, Y; Thomas, SM; Greenup, RA; Plichta, JK; Rosenberger, LH; Tamirisa, N; Force, J; Boughey, JC; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Ren, Y, Thomas, SM, Greenup, RA, Plichta, JK, Rosenberger, LH, Tamirisa, N, Force, J, Boughey, JC, Hyslop, T, and Hwang, ES. "The Clinical Significance of Breast-only and Node-only Pathologic Complete Response (pCR) After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy (NACT): A Review of 20,000 Breast Cancer Patients in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB).(Accepted)" Annals of Surgery 268.4 (October 2018): 591-601.
PMID
30048319
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgery
Volume
268
Issue
4
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
591
End Page
601
DOI
10.1097/sla.0000000000002953

Metaplastic Breast Cancer Treatment and Outcomes in 2500 Patients: A Retrospective Analysis of a National Oncology Database.

BACKGROUND:Metaplastic breast cancer (MBC) is characterized by chemoresistance and hematogenous spread. We sought to identify factors associated with improved MBC outcomes and increased likelihood of MBC diagnosis. METHODS:Women ≥ 18 years of age with stage I-III MBC and non-MBC diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 were identified in the National Cancer Data Base. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate associations with overall survival (OS). Multivariate logistic regression identified factors associated with MBC diagnosis. RESULTS:Overall, 2451 MBC and 568,057 non-MBC patients were included; 70.3% of MBC vs. 11.3% of non-MBC patients were triple negative (p < 0.001). Five-year OS was reduced among MBC vs. non-MBC patients for the entire cohort (72.7 vs. 87.5%) and among triple-negative patients (71.1 vs. 77.8%; both p < 0.001). In MBC, triple-negative (vs. luminal) subtype was not associated with worse OS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-1.54, p = 0.28). Compared with non-MBC patients, MBC patients were more likely to receive mastectomy (59.0 vs. 44.9%), chemotherapy (74.1 vs. 43.1%), and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND; 35.2 vs. 32.2%, all p ≤ 0.001). MBC patients more frequently had negative ALND (pN0) than non-MBC patients (20.0 vs. 10.6%, p < 0.001). Among MBC patients, chemotherapy (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.53-0.89, p = 0.004) and radiotherapy (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.39-0.69, p < 0.001) were associated with improved survival, while ALND was associated with decreased survival (HR 1.37, 95% CI 1.06-1.77, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS:MBC patients had worse survival than non-MBC patients, independent of receptor status, suggesting that MBC may confer an additional survival disadvantage. Multimodal therapy was associated with improved outcomes, but ALND was not and may be overutilized in MBC.

Authors
Ong, CT; Campbell, BM; Thomas, SM; Greenup, RA; Plichta, JK; Rosenberger, LH; Force, J; Hall, A; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Ong, CT, Campbell, BM, Thomas, SM, Greenup, RA, Plichta, JK, Rosenberger, LH, Force, J, Hall, A, Hyslop, T, Hwang, ES, and Fayanju, OM. "Metaplastic Breast Cancer Treatment and Outcomes in 2500 Patients: A Retrospective Analysis of a National Oncology Database." Annals of Surgical Oncology 25.8 (August 2018): 2249-2260.
PMID
29855830
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
8
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
2249
End Page
2260
DOI
10.1245/s10434-018-6533-3

Extent of axillary surgery in women with Stage IV breast cancer

Authors
Lane, W; Thomas, S; Plichta, J; Rosenberger, L; Fayanju, O; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES; Greenup, R
MLA Citation
Lane, W, Thomas, S, Plichta, J, Rosenberger, L, Fayanju, O, Hyslop, T, Hwang, ES, and Greenup, R. "Extent of axillary surgery in women with Stage IV breast cancer." 19th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Breast-Surgeons. May 2, 2018 - May 6, 2018. Orlando, FL.: SPRINGER, June 1, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
291
End Page
292

Select choices in benign breast disease

Authors
Rao, R; Bailey, L; Berry, T; Buras, R; Degnim, A; Fayanju, O; Froman, J; Golesorkhi, N; Greenburg, C; Ludwig, K; Ma, A; Mautner, S; Krontiras, H; Sowden, M; Wexelman, B; Landercasper, J
MLA Citation
Rao, R, Bailey, L, Berry, T, Buras, R, Degnim, A, Fayanju, O, Froman, J, Golesorkhi, N, Greenburg, C, Ludwig, K, Ma, A, Mautner, S, Krontiras, H, Sowden, M, Wexelman, B, and Landercasper, J. "Select choices in benign breast disease." 19th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Breast-Surgeons. May 2, 2018 - May 6, 2018. Orlando, FL.: SPRINGER, June 1, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
304
End Page
305

Restaging de novo metastatic breast cancer to refine prognostic estimates.

Authors
Plichta, JK; Thomas, SM; Sergesketter, AR; Fayanju, OM; Greenup, RA; Rosenberger, LH
MLA Citation
Plichta, JK, Thomas, SM, Sergesketter, AR, Fayanju, OM, Greenup, RA, and Rosenberger, LH. "Restaging de novo metastatic breast cancer to refine prognostic estimates.": AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, May 20, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
36
Issue
15
Publish Date
2018
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2018.36.15_suppl.e13083

Treatment Patterns and Outcomes for Breast Cancer with Isolated Supraclavicular Metastases

Authors
Thomas, SM; Fayanju, OM; Plichta, JK; Rosenberger, LH; Force, J; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES; Greenup, RA
MLA Citation
Thomas, SM, Fayanju, OM, Plichta, JK, Rosenberger, LH, Force, J, Hyslop, T, Hwang, ES, and Greenup, RA. "Treatment Patterns and Outcomes for Breast Cancer with Isolated Supraclavicular Metastases." 71st Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology. March 21, 2018 - March 24, 2018. Chicago, IL.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
S26
End Page
S26

Clinical and Pathologic Stage Discordance is Associated with Breast Cancer Prognosis

Authors
Plichta, JK; Thomas, SM; Greenup, RA; Fayanju, OM; Rosenberger, LH; Tamirisa, N; Hyslop, T; Hwang, ES
MLA Citation
Plichta, JK, Thomas, SM, Greenup, RA, Fayanju, OM, Rosenberger, LH, Tamirisa, N, Hyslop, T, and Hwang, ES. "Clinical and Pathologic Stage Discordance is Associated with Breast Cancer Prognosis." 71st Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology. March 21, 2018 - March 24, 2018. Chicago, IL.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
S94
End Page
S94

Decreasing Rates of Axillary Lymph Node Dissections Over Time: Implications for Surgical Trainee Exposure and Operative Skills Development

Authors
Rosenberger, LH; Thomas, SM; Youngwirth, LM; Plichta, JK; Fayanju, OM; Greenup, RA; Hwang, ES
MLA Citation
Rosenberger, LH, Thomas, SM, Youngwirth, LM, Plichta, JK, Fayanju, OM, Greenup, RA, and Hwang, ES. "Decreasing Rates of Axillary Lymph Node Dissections Over Time: Implications for Surgical Trainee Exposure and Operative Skills Development." 71st Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology. March 21, 2018 - March 24, 2018. Chicago, IL.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
S87
End Page
S88

Race, Marital Status and Stage are Associated with Patient-Reported Distress After Breast Cancer Diagnosis: A Review of > 5000 Patient Visits

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Yenokyan, K; Goldstein, BA; Stashko, I; Power, S; Hwang, ES
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Yenokyan, K, Goldstein, BA, Stashko, I, Power, S, and Hwang, ES. "Race, Marital Status and Stage are Associated with Patient-Reported Distress After Breast Cancer Diagnosis: A Review of > 5000 Patient Visits." 71st Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology. March 21, 2018 - March 24, 2018. Chicago, IL.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2018.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
S54
End Page
S54

Benchmarking the American Society of Breast Surgeon Member Performance for More Than a Million Quality Measure-Patient Encounters.

BACKGROUND:Nine breast cancer quality measures (QM) were selected by the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Quality Payment Programs (QPP) and other performance improvement programs. We report member performance. STUDY DESIGN:Surgeons entered QM data into an electronic registry. For each QM, aggregate "performance met" (PM) was reported (median, range and percentiles) and benchmarks (target goals) were calculated by CMS methodology, specifically, the Achievable Benchmark of Care™ (ABC) method. RESULTS:A total of 1,286,011 QM encounters were captured from 2011-2015. For 7 QM, first and last PM rates were as follows: (1) needle biopsy (95.8, 98.5%), (2) specimen imaging (97.9, 98.8%), (3) specimen orientation (98.5, 98.3%), (4) sentinel node use (95.1, 93.4%), (5) antibiotic selection (98.0, 99.4%), (6) antibiotic duration (99.0, 99.8%), and (7) no surgical site infection (98.8, 98.9%); all p values < 0.001 for trends. Variability and reasons for noncompliance by surgeon for each QM were identified. The CMS-calculated target goals (ABC™ benchmarks) for PM for 6 QM were 100%, suggesting that not meeting performance is a "never should occur" event. CONCLUSIONS:Surgeons self-reported a large number of specialty-specific patient-measure encounters into a registry for self-assessment and participation in QPP. Despite high levels of performance demonstrated initially in 2011 with minimal subsequent change, the ASBrS concluded "perfect" performance was not a realistic goal for QPP. Thus, after review of our normative performance data, the ASBrS recommended different benchmarks than CMS for each QM.

Authors
Landercasper, J; Fayanju, OM; Bailey, L; Berry, TS; Borgert, AJ; Buras, R; Chen, SL; Degnim, AC; Froman, J; Gass, J; Greenberg, C; Mautner, SK; Krontiras, H; Ramirez, LD; Sowden, M; Wexelman, B; Wilke, L; Rao, R
MLA Citation
Landercasper, J, Fayanju, OM, Bailey, L, Berry, TS, Borgert, AJ, Buras, R, Chen, SL, Degnim, AC, Froman, J, Gass, J, Greenberg, C, Mautner, SK, Krontiras, H, Ramirez, LD, Sowden, M, Wexelman, B, Wilke, L, and Rao, R. "Benchmarking the American Society of Breast Surgeon Member Performance for More Than a Million Quality Measure-Patient Encounters." Annals of Surgical Oncology 25.2 (February 2018): 501-511.
PMID
29168099
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
501
End Page
511
DOI
10.1245/s10434-017-6257-9

Molecular Genomic Testing for Breast Cancer: Utility for Surgeons.

Molecular genomic testing provides clinicians with both prognostic and (sometimes) predictive information that can help individualize treatment and decrease the risk of over- or under-treatment. We review the genomic tests that are currently available for clinical use in management of breast cancer, discuss ongoing research related to validating and expanding their utility in different patient populations, and explain why it is important for surgeons to know how to incorporate these tools into their clinical practice in order to individualize patient treatment, reduce unnecessary morbidity, and, accordingly, improve outcomes.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Park, KU; Lucci, A
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Park, KU, and Lucci, A. "Molecular Genomic Testing for Breast Cancer: Utility for Surgeons." Annals of Surgical Oncology 25.2 (February 2018): 512-519. (Review)
PMID
29159748
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
512
End Page
519
DOI
10.1245/s10434-017-6254-z

Sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer

Authors
Lucci, A; DeSnyder, SM; Fayanju, OL; Klimberg, VS
MLA Citation
Lucci, A, DeSnyder, SM, Fayanju, OL, and Klimberg, VS. "Sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer." Fischer's Mastery of Surgery, Seventh Edition. January 1, 2018. 667-671.
Source
scopus
Volume
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
667
End Page
671

Noninvasive breast cancer

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Sahin, AA; Hunt, KK
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Sahin, AA, and Hunt, KK. "Noninvasive breast cancer." The MD Anderson Surgical Oncology Handbook, Sixth Edition. January 1, 2018. 1-30.
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
1
End Page
30

ASO Author Reflections: Metaplastic Breast Cancer—The Case for Doing Less and More

Authors
Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM. "ASO Author Reflections: Metaplastic Breast Cancer—The Case for Doing Less and More(Accepted)." Annals of Surgical Oncology (January 1, 2018).
Source
scopus
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Publish Date
2018
DOI
10.1245/s10434-018-7009-1

Patient Age and Tumor Subtype Predict the Extent of Axillary Surgery Among Breast Cancer Patients Eligible for the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Trial Z0011.

The American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z0011 trial established the safety of omitting axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for early-stage breast cancer patients with limited nodal disease undergoing lumpectomy. We examined the extent of axillary surgery among women eligible for Z0011 based on patient age and tumor subtype.Patients with cT1-2, cN0 breast cancers and one or two positive nodes diagnosed from 2009 to 2014 and treated with lumpectomy were identified in the National Cancer Data Base. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) was defined as the removal of 1-5 nodes and ALND as the removal of 10 nodes or more. Tumor subtype was categorized as luminal, human epidermal growth factor 2-positive (HER2+), or triple-negative. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of receiving SLNB alone versus ALND.The inclusion criteria were met by 28,631 patients (21,029 SLNB-alone and 7602 ALND patients). Patients 70 years of age or older were more likely to undergo SLNB alone than ALND (27.0% vs 20.1%; p < 0.001). The radiation therapy use rate was 89.4% after SLNB alone and 89.7% after ALND. In the multivariate analysis, the uptake of Z0011 recommendations increased over time (2014 vs 2009: odds ratio [OR] 13.02; p < 0.001). Younger patients were less likely to undergo SLNB alone than older patients (age <40 vs ≥70: OR 0.59; p < 0.001). Patients with HER2+ (OR 0.89) or triple-negative disease (OR 0.79) (p < 0.001) were less likely to undergo SLNB alone than those with luminal subtypes.Among women potentially eligible for ACOSOG Z0011, the use of SLNB alone increased over time in all groups, but the extent of axillary surgery differed by patient age and tumor subtype.

Authors
Ong, CT; Thomas, SM; Blitzblau, RC; Fayanju, OM; Park, TS; Plichta, JK; Rosenberger, LH; Hyslop, T; Shelley Hwang, E; Greenup, RA
MLA Citation
Ong, CT, Thomas, SM, Blitzblau, RC, Fayanju, OM, Park, TS, Plichta, JK, Rosenberger, LH, Hyslop, T, Shelley Hwang, E, and Greenup, RA. "Patient Age and Tumor Subtype Predict the Extent of Axillary Surgery Among Breast Cancer Patients Eligible for the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Trial Z0011." Annals of Surgical Oncology 24.12 (November 2017): 3559-3566.
PMID
28879416
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
24
Issue
12
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
3559
End Page
3566
DOI
10.1245/s10434-017-6075-0

Body mass index mediates the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in inflammatory breast cancer.

BACKGROUND:Obesity (BMI≥30) may be an etiologic and prognostic factor in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). We examined the relationship between BMI, pathologic complete response (pCR), and circulating-tumor-cell (CTC) levels in IBC. METHODS:Cohort included IBC patients diagnosed 2005-2015 who had neoadjuvant chemotherapy during a prospective trial on CTCs and pathologic review describing pCR. Chi-square, logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify clinicopathologic associations with event-free survival (EFS). RESULTS:Of 73 patients, 61 (84%) had CTC values, 22 (30%) achieved a pCR, and 39 (53%) were obese. There was no difference between obese and non-obese patients for pCR rates (31% vs. 29%, p = 0.90) or presence of CTCs (23% vs. 26%, p = 0.80). Among non-obese patients, CTCs were associated with worse EFS (HR 11.69, p < 0.01), but among obese patients, there was no difference in EFS between those with and without CTCs. CONCLUSIONS:BMI mediates CTCs' prognostic significance in IBC.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Hall, CS; Bauldry, JB; Karhade, M; Valad, LM; Kuerer, HM; DeSnyder, SM; Barcenas, CH; Lucci, A
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Hall, CS, Bauldry, JB, Karhade, M, Valad, LM, Kuerer, HM, DeSnyder, SM, Barcenas, CH, and Lucci, A. "Body mass index mediates the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in inflammatory breast cancer." American Journal of Surgery 214.4 (October 2017): 666-671.
PMID
28720217
Source
epmc
Published In
American Journal of Surgery
Volume
214
Issue
4
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
666
End Page
671
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2017.06.005

The American Society of Breast Surgeons and Quality Payment Programs: Ranking, Defining, and Benchmarking More Than 1 Million Patient Quality Measure Encounters.

To identify and remediate gaps in the quality of surgical care, the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) developed surgeon-specific quality measures (QMs), built a patient registry, and nominated itself to become a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR), thereby linking surgical performance to potential reimbursement and public reporting. This report provides a summary of the program development.Using a modified Delphi process, more than 100 measures of care quality were ranked. In compliance with CMS rules, selected QMs were specified with inclusion, exclusion, and exception criteria, then incorporated into an electronic patient registry. After surgeons entered QM data into the registry, the ASBrS provided real-time peer performance comparisons.After ranking, 9 of 144 measures of quality were chosen, submitted, and subsequently accepted by CMS as a QCDR in 2014. The measures selected were diagnosis of cancer by needle biopsy, surgical-site infection, mastectomy reoperation rate, and appropriateness of specimen imaging, intraoperative specimen orientation, sentinel node use, hereditary assessment, antibiotic choice, and antibiotic duration. More than 1 million patient-measure encounters were captured from 2010 to 2015. Benchmarking functionality with peer performance comparison was successful. In 2016, the ASBrS provided public transparency on its website for the 2015 performance reported by our surgeon participants.In an effort to improve quality of care and to participate in CMS quality payment programs, the ASBrS defined QMs, tracked compliance, provided benchmarking, and reported breast-specific QMs to the public.

Authors
Landercasper, J; Bailey, L; Buras, R; Clifford, E; Degnim, AC; Thanasoulis, L; Fayanju, OM; Tjoe, JA; Rao, R
MLA Citation
Landercasper, J, Bailey, L, Buras, R, Clifford, E, Degnim, AC, Thanasoulis, L, Fayanju, OM, Tjoe, JA, and Rao, R. "The American Society of Breast Surgeons and Quality Payment Programs: Ranking, Defining, and Benchmarking More Than 1 Million Patient Quality Measure Encounters." Annals of Surgical Oncology 24.10 (October 2017): 3093-3106.
PMID
28766206
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
24
Issue
10
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
3093
End Page
3106
DOI
10.1245/s10434-017-5940-1

Molecular prognostic factors for breast carcinoma

© 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Molecular genomic testing provides clinicians with prognostic and predictive information that can help individualize treatment, decrease the risk of over-or under-treatment, and, accordingly, improve outcomes. In this chapter, we describe several of the genomic tests that are currently available for clinical use in the management of breast cancer. We also discuss ongoing research related to validating and expanding their utility in different patient populations and explain why it is important for clinicians to incorporate these tools into their practice.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Lucci, A
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, and Lucci, A. "Molecular prognostic factors for breast carcinoma." The Breast: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases. August 24, 2017. 258-263.e2.
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
258
End Page
263.e2
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-323-35955-9.00019-2

Surgical procedures for advanced local and regional malignancies of the breast

© 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Surgery remains an integral part of the therapeutic plan for locally advanced breast cancer. Advances in systemic therapies have transformed the role of surgery for this population of patients from palliation to largely curative intent. Further, in the last decade, the integration of surgical care into the management algorithm of locally advanced breast cancer patients has also changed substantially with increasing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and more recently neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and targeted therapies for HER2-positive disease. Such neoadjuvant strategies have provided new opportunities to downsize the tumor burden and scope of surgical intervention. Advances in reconstructive techniques have also provided new opportunities to improve on quality of life of these heavily treated patients, although the need for radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer remains an area of particular challenge for optimal timing of reconstruction.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Garvey, PB; Karuturi, MS; Hunt, KK; Bedrosian, I
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Garvey, PB, Karuturi, MS, Hunt, KK, and Bedrosian, I. "Surgical procedures for advanced local and regional malignancies of the breast." The Breast: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases. August 24, 2017. 778-801.e4.
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
778
End Page
801.e4
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-323-35955-9.00059-3

A population-based analysis of treatment and outcomes in 2,500 meta plastic breast cancer patients.

Authors
Ong, CT; Thomas, SM; Campbell, BM; Greenup, RA; Plichta, JK; Rosenberger, LH; Force, JM; Hyslop, T; Hwang, E-SS; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Ong, CT, Thomas, SM, Campbell, BM, Greenup, RA, Plichta, JK, Rosenberger, LH, Force, JM, Hyslop, T, Hwang, E-SS, and Fayanju, OM. "A population-based analysis of treatment and outcomes in 2,500 meta plastic breast cancer patients." May 20, 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
35
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2017.35.15_suppl.532

The epidemiology of metaplastic breast cancer: A review of 2,500 cases from the national cancer database.

Authors
Campbell, BM; Thomas, SM; Ong, CT; Greenup, RA; Plichta, JK; Rosenberger, LH; Force, JM; Hyslop, T; Hwang, E-SS; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Campbell, BM, Thomas, SM, Ong, CT, Greenup, RA, Plichta, JK, Rosenberger, LH, Force, JM, Hyslop, T, Hwang, E-SS, and Fayanju, OM. "The epidemiology of metaplastic breast cancer: A review of 2,500 cases from the national cancer database." May 20, 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
35
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2017.35.15_suppl.1570

Temporal associations between prognostic indicators and overall survival after breast cancer.

Authors
Plichta, JK; Thomas, SM; Fayanju, OM; Rosenberger, LH; Park, TS; Hyslop, T; Greenup, RA; Hwang, E-SS
MLA Citation
Plichta, JK, Thomas, SM, Fayanju, OM, Rosenberger, LH, Park, TS, Hyslop, T, Greenup, RA, and Hwang, E-SS. "Temporal associations between prognostic indicators and overall survival after breast cancer." May 20, 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
35
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2017.35.15_suppl.e18144

Impact of insurance status on treatment for stage 0-IV breast cancer.

Authors
Greenup, RA; Thomas, SM; Fayanju, OM; Hyslop, T; Hwang, E-SS
MLA Citation
Greenup, RA, Thomas, SM, Fayanju, OM, Hyslop, T, and Hwang, E-SS. "Impact of insurance status on treatment for stage 0-IV breast cancer." May 20, 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
35
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2017.35.15_suppl.6532

Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy: Aligning Patient Preferences and Provider Recommendations.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Hwang, ES
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, and Hwang, ES. "Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy: Aligning Patient Preferences and Provider Recommendations." Jama Surgery 152.3 (March 2017): 282-283.
PMID
28002558
Source
epmc
Published In
Jama Surgery
Volume
152
Issue
3
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
282
End Page
283
DOI
10.1001/jamasurg.2016.4750

Surgical Education and Health Care Reform: Defining the Role and Value of Trainees in an Evolving Medical Landscape.

Health care reform and surgical education are often separated functionally. However, especially in surgery, where resident trainees often spend twice as much time in residency and fellowship than in undergraduate medical education, one must consider their contributions to health care.In this short commentary, we briefly review the status of health care in the United States as well as some of the recent and current changes in graduate medical education that pertain to surgical trainees.This is a perspective piece that draws on the interests and varied background of the multiinstitutional and international group of authors.The authors propose 3 main areas of focus for research and practice- (1) accurately quantifying the care provided currently by trainees, (2) determining impact to trainees and hospital systems of training parameters, focusing on long-term outcomes rather than short-term outcomes, and (3) determining practice models of education that work best for both health care delivery and trainees.The authors propose that surgical education must align itself with rather than separate itself from overall health care reform measures and even individual hospital financial pressures. This should not be seen as additional burden of service, but rather practical education in training as to the pressures trainees will face as future employees. Rethinking the contributions and training of residents and fellows may also synergistically work to impress to hospital administrators that providing better, more focused and applicable education to residents and fellows may have long-term, strategic, positive impacts on institutions.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Aggarwal, R; Baucom, RB; Ferrone, CR; Massaro, D; Terhune, KP
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Aggarwal, R, Baucom, RB, Ferrone, CR, Massaro, D, and Terhune, KP. "Surgical Education and Health Care Reform: Defining the Role and Value of Trainees in an Evolving Medical Landscape." Annals of Surgery 265.3 (March 2017): 459-460.
PMID
27906761
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgery
Volume
265
Issue
3
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
459
End Page
460
DOI
10.1097/sla.0000000000002021

Measures of Appropriateness and Value for Breast Surgeons and Their Patients: The American Society of Breast Surgeons Choosing Wisely (®) Initiative.

Current breast cancer care is based on high-level evidence from randomized, controlled trials. Despite these data, there continues to be variability of breast cancer care, including overutilization of some tests and operations. To reduce overutilization, the American Board of Internal Medicine Choosing Wisely (®) Campaign recommends that professional organizations provide patients and providers with a list of care practices that may not be necessary. Shared decision making regarding these services is encouraged.The Patient Safety and Quality Committee of the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) solicited candidate measures for the Choosing Wisely (®) Campaign. The resulting list of "appropriateness" measures of care was ranked by a modified Delphi appropriateness methodology. The highest-ranked measures were submitted to and later approved by the ASBrS Board of Directors. They are listed below.(1) Don't routinely order breast magnetic resonance imaging in new breast cancer patients. (2) Don't routinely excise all the lymph nodes beneath the arm in patients having lumpectomy for breast cancer. (3) Don't routinely order specialized tumor gene testing in all new breast cancer patients. (4) Don't routinely reoperate on patients with invasive cancer if the cancer is close to the edge of the excised lumpectomy tissue. (5) Don't routinely perform a double mastectomy in patients who have a single breast with cancer.The ASBrS list for the Choosing Wisely (®) campaign is easily accessible to breast cancer patients online. These measures provide surgeons and their patients with a starting point for shared decision making regarding potentially unnecessary testing and operations.

Authors
Landercasper, J; Bailey, L; Berry, TS; Buras, RR; Degnim, AC; Fayanju, OM; Froman, J; Gass, J; Greenberg, C; Mautner, SK; Krontiras, H; Rao, R; Sowden, M; Tjoe, JA; Wexelman, B; Wilke, L; Chen, SL
MLA Citation
Landercasper, J, Bailey, L, Berry, TS, Buras, RR, Degnim, AC, Fayanju, OM, Froman, J, Gass, J, Greenberg, C, Mautner, SK, Krontiras, H, Rao, R, Sowden, M, Tjoe, JA, Wexelman, B, Wilke, L, and Chen, SL. "Measures of Appropriateness and Value for Breast Surgeons and Their Patients: The American Society of Breast Surgeons Choosing Wisely (®) Initiative." Annals of Surgical Oncology 23.10 (October 2016): 3112-3118.
PMID
27334216
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
23
Issue
10
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
3112
End Page
3118
DOI
10.1245/s10434-016-5327-8

Value-Based Breast Cancer Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach for Defining Patient-Centered Outcomes.

Value in healthcare-i.e., patient-centered outcomes achieved per healthcare dollar spent-can define quality and unify performance improvement goals with health outcomes of importance to patients across the entire cycle of care. We describe the process through which value-based measures for breast cancer patients and dynamic capture of these metrics via our new electronic health record (EHR) were developed at our institution.Contemporary breast cancer literature on treatment options, expected outcomes, and potential complications was extensively reviewed. Patient perspective was obtained via focus groups. Multidisciplinary physician teams met to inform a 3-phase process of (1) concept development, (2) measure specification, and (3) implementation via EHR integration.Outcomes were divided into 3 tiers that reflect the entire cycle of care: (1) health status achieved, (2) process of recovery, and (3) sustainability of health. Within these tiers, 22 patient-centered outcomes were defined with inclusion/exclusion criteria and specifications for reporting. Patient data sources will include the Epic Systems EHR and validated patient-reported outcome questionnaires administered via our institution's patient portal.As healthcare costs continue to rise in the United States and around the world, a value-based approach with explicit, transparently reported patient outcomes will not only create opportunities for performance improvement but will also enable benchmarking across providers, healthcare systems, and even countries. Similar value-based breast cancer care frameworks are also being pursued internationally.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Mayo, TL; Spinks, TE; Lee, S; Barcenas, CH; Smith, BD; Giordano, SH; Hwang, RF; Ehlers, RA; Selber, JC; Walters, R; Tripathy, D; Hunt, KK; Buchholz, TA; Feeley, TW; Kuerer, HM
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Mayo, TL, Spinks, TE, Lee, S, Barcenas, CH, Smith, BD, Giordano, SH, Hwang, RF, Ehlers, RA, Selber, JC, Walters, R, Tripathy, D, Hunt, KK, Buchholz, TA, Feeley, TW, and Kuerer, HM. "Value-Based Breast Cancer Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach for Defining Patient-Centered Outcomes." Annals of Surgical Oncology 23.8 (August 2016): 2385-2390.
PMID
26979306
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
23
Issue
8
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
2385
End Page
2390
DOI
10.1245/s10434-016-5184-5

Postmastectomy Radiation Treatment Rates as a Quality Measure: An Opportunity for Compliance Through Collaboration.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Buchholz, TA; Hunt, KK
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Buchholz, TA, and Hunt, KK. "Postmastectomy Radiation Treatment Rates as a Quality Measure: An Opportunity for Compliance Through Collaboration." Annals of Surgical Oncology 23.8 (August 2016): 2377-2379.
PMID
27160527
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
23
Issue
8
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
2377
End Page
2379
DOI
10.1245/s10434-016-5258-4

The Impact of Body Mass Index on the Prognostic Power of Circulating Tumor Cells and Pathologic Complete Response Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

Authors
Fayanju, O; Hall, C; Bauldry, J; Karhade, M; Valad, L; Kuerer, H; DeSnyder, S; Barcenas, C; Lucci, A
MLA Citation
Fayanju, O, Hall, C, Bauldry, J, Karhade, M, Valad, L, Kuerer, H, DeSnyder, S, Barcenas, C, and Lucci, A. "The Impact of Body Mass Index on the Prognostic Power of Circulating Tumor Cells and Pathologic Complete Response Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer." 17th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Breast-Surgeons. April 13, 2016 - April 17, 2016. Dallas, TX.: SPRINGER, April 1, 2016.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
23
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
71
End Page
72

Body Mass Index, Pathologic Complete Response, and Circulating Tumor Cells After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Hall, C; Bauldry, J; Karhade, M; Valad, L; Kuerer, HM; DeSnyder, SM; Barcenas, CH; Lucci, A
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Hall, C, Bauldry, J, Karhade, M, Valad, L, Kuerer, HM, DeSnyder, SM, Barcenas, CH, and Lucci, A. "Body Mass Index, Pathologic Complete Response, and Circulating Tumor Cells After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer." 69th Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology. March 2, 2016 - March 5, 2016. Boston, MA.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2016.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
23
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
S73
End Page
S73

Influence of tumour stage at breast cancer detection on survival in modern times: Population based study in 173-797 patients Saadatmand S, Bretveld R, Siesling S, et al (Erasmus Univ Med Centre - Cancer Inst, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization, Utrecht; Et al) BMJ 351:h4901, 2015

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Thompson, AM
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, and Thompson, AM. "Influence of tumour stage at breast cancer detection on survival in modern times: Population based study in 173-797 patients Saadatmand S, Bretveld R, Siesling S, et al (Erasmus Univ Med Centre - Cancer Inst, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization, Utrecht; Et al) BMJ 351:h4901, 2015." Breast Diseases 27.2 (January 1, 2016): 120-121.
Source
scopus
Published In
Breast Diseases
Volume
27
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
120
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.breastdis.2016.04.021

Occult metastases in node-negative breast cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–based analysis

Authors
Fayanju, O; Lucci, A
MLA Citation
Fayanju, O, and Lucci, A. "Occult metastases in node-negative breast cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–based analysis." Breast Diseases: A Year Book Quarterly 27.1 (2016): 34-36.
Source
crossref
Published In
Breast Diseases
Volume
27
Issue
1
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
34
End Page
36
DOI
10.1016/j.breastdis.2016.01.028

Predictors of pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer: The impact of chemotherapeutic regimen

Authors
NWAOGU, IY; FAYANJU, OM; JEFFE, DB; MARGENTHALER, JA
MLA Citation
NWAOGU, IY, FAYANJU, OM, JEFFE, DB, and MARGENTHALER, JA. "Predictors of pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer: The impact of chemotherapeutic regimen." Molecular and Clinical Oncology 3.5 (September 2015): 1117-1122.
Source
crossref
Published In
Molecular and Clinical Oncology
Volume
3
Issue
5
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1117
End Page
1122
DOI
10.3892/mco.2015.579

Pathological complete response in breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: The natural history of an elusive prognosticator

Authors
FAYANJU, OM; NWAOGU, I; JEFFE, DB; MARGENTHALER, JA
MLA Citation
FAYANJU, OM, NWAOGU, I, JEFFE, DB, and MARGENTHALER, JA. "Pathological complete response in breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: The natural history of an elusive prognosticator." Molecular and Clinical Oncology 3.4 (July 2015): 775-780.
Source
crossref
Published In
Molecular and Clinical Oncology
Volume
3
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
775
End Page
780
DOI
10.3892/mco.2015.535

Novel Program Identifies Individual and Class-wide Strengths and Weaknesses in Human Anatomy

Authors
Orsbon, CP; Fayanju, OA; Newcomb, JA; Greenwald, ML; Ross, CF
MLA Citation
Orsbon, CP, Fayanju, OA, Newcomb, JA, Greenwald, ML, and Ross, CF. "Novel Program Identifies Individual and Class-wide Strengths and Weaknesses in Human Anatomy." Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Integrative-and-Comparative-Biology (SICB). January 3, 2015 - January 7, 2015. West Palm Beach, FL.: OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, April 1, 2015.
Source
wos
Published In
Integrative and Comparative Biology
Volume
55
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
E310
End Page
E310

Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after unilateral breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

To examine whether contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is associated with improved survival, incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC), and recurrence in patients with unilateral breast cancer (UBC).Despite conflicting data, CPM rates continue to increase. Here we present the first meta-analysis to assess post-CPM outcomes in women with UBC.We searched 5 databases and retrieved papers' bibliographies for relevant studies published through March 2012. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analyses were conducted on the basis of tests of study heterogeneity. We examined potential confounding via stratification and meta-regression. We report pooled relative risks (RRs) and risk differences (RDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) at 2-tailed P < 0.05 significance.Of 93 studies reviewed, 14 were included in meta-analyses. Compared with nonrecipients, CPM recipients had higher rates of overall survival [OS; RR = 1.09 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.11)] and lower rates of breast cancer-specific mortality [BCM; RR = 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56, 0.85)] but saw no absolute reduction in risk of metachronous CBC (MCBC). Among patients with elevated familial/genetic risk (FGR, ie, BRCA carrier status and/or family history of breast cancer), both relative and absolute risks of MCBC were significantly decreased among CPM recipients [RR = 0.04 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.09); RD = -24.0% (95% CI: -35.6%, -12.4%)], but there was no improvement in OS or BCM.CPM is associated with decreased MCBC incidence but not improved survival among patients with elevated FGR. The superior outcomes observed when comparing CPM recipients with nonrecipients in the general population are likely not attributable to a CPM-derived decrease in MCBC incidence. UBC patients without known FGR should not be advised to undergo CPM.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Stoll, CRT; Fowler, S; Colditz, GA; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Stoll, CRT, Fowler, S, Colditz, GA, and Margenthaler, JA. "Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after unilateral breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis." Annals of Surgery 260.6 (December 2014): 1000-1010. (Review)
PMID
24950272
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgery
Volume
260
Issue
6
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1000
End Page
1010
DOI
10.1097/sla.0000000000000769

Perceived barriers to mammography among underserved women in a Breast Health Center Outreach Program.

To investigate perceived barriers to mammography among underserved women, we asked participants in the Siteman Cancer Center Mammography Outreach Registry-developed in 2006 to evaluate mobile mammography's effectiveness among the underserved-why they believed women did not get mammograms.The responses of approximately 9,000 registrants were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We report adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) significant at 2-tailed P values less than .05.Fears of cost (40%), mammogram-related pain (13%), and bad news (13%) were the most commonly reported barriers. Having insurance was associated with not perceiving cost as a barrier (OR .44, 95% CI .40 to .49), but with perceiving fear of both mammogram-related pain (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.60) and receiving bad news (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.60) as barriers.Despite free services, underserved women continue to report experiential and psychological obstacles to mammography, suggesting the need for more targeted education and outreach in this population.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Kraenzle, S; Drake, BF; Oka, M; Goodman, MS
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Kraenzle, S, Drake, BF, Oka, M, and Goodman, MS. "Perceived barriers to mammography among underserved women in a Breast Health Center Outreach Program." American journal of surgery 208.3 (September 2014): 425-434.
PMID
24908357
Source
epmc
Published In
American Journal of Surgery
Volume
208
Issue
3
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
425
End Page
434
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.03.005

Breast cancer patients' experiences within and outside the safety net.

Following reforms to the breast-cancer referral process for our city's health Safety Net (SN), we compared the experiences from first abnormality to definitive diagnosis of breast-cancer patients referred to Siteman Cancer Center from SN and non-SN (NSN) providers.SN-referred patients with any stage (0-IV) and NSN-referred patients with late-stage (IIB-IV) breast cancer were prospectively identified after diagnosis during cancer center consultations conducted between September 2008 and June 2010. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim; transcripts were independently coded by two raters using inductive methods to identify themes.Of 82 eligible patients, 57 completed interviews (33/47 SN [70%] and 24/35 NSN [69%]). Eighteen SN-referred patients (52%) had late-stage disease at diagnosis, as did all NSN patients (by design). A higher proportion of late-stage SN patients (67%) than either early-stage SN (47%) or NSN (33%) patients reported feelings of fear and avoidance that deterred them from pursuing care for concerning breast findings. A higher proportion of SN late-stage patients than NSN patient reported behaviors concerning for poor health knowledge or behavior (33% versus 8%), but reported receipt of timely, consistent communication from health care providers once they received care (50% versus 17%). Half of late-stage SN patients reported improper clinical or administrative conduct by health care workers that delayed referral and/or diagnosis.Although SN patients reported receipt of compassionate care once connected with health services, they presented with higher-than-expected rates of late-stage disease. Psychological barriers, life stressors, and provider or clinic delays affected access to and navigation of the health care system and represent opportunities for intervention.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Jeffe, DB; Elmore, L; Ksiazek, DN; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Jeffe, DB, Elmore, L, Ksiazek, DN, and Margenthaler, JA. "Breast cancer patients' experiences within and outside the safety net." The Journal of surgical research 190.1 (July 2014): 126-133.
PMID
24768022
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Surgical Research
Volume
190
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
126
End Page
133
DOI
10.1016/j.jss.2014.03.030

Under your nose.

Authors
Fayanju, O
MLA Citation
Fayanju, O. "Under your nose." Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons 99.1 Suppl (June 2014): 8-.
PMID
24956901
Source
epmc
Published In
Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons
Volume
99
Issue
1 Suppl
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
8

A method for achieving reciprocity of funding in community-based participatory research.

The St. Louis Komen Project was conceived to address disparities in breast cancer treatment and outcomes between African-American and White women in St. Louis, Missouri. Our goal was to apportion tasks and funding through a process to which all researcher partners had input and to which all could agree, thus eliminating institutionalized inequalities.This paper describes the collaborative process and resulting division of responsibilities, determination of costs, and ultimate allocation of funds and resources, as well as the documentation employed to achieve funding reciprocity and equal accountability.Both communication and documentation are critical. Although the Memoranda of Understanding employed are not a panacea, they codify roles and expectations and promote trust. The process of developing financial transparency set the tone for subsequent steps in the research process.The exhaustive planning process and project-specific procedures developed by its partners have helped the project foster reciprocity, facilitate participation, and equitably distribute resources.

Authors
Gehlert, S; Fayanju, OM; Jackson, S; Kenkel, S; McCullough, IC; Oliver, C; Sanford, M
MLA Citation
Gehlert, S, Fayanju, OM, Jackson, S, Kenkel, S, McCullough, IC, Oliver, C, and Sanford, M. "A method for achieving reciprocity of funding in community-based participatory research." Progress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action 8.4 (January 2014): 561-570.
PMID
25727989
Source
epmc
Published In
Progress in Community Health Partnerships : Research, Education, and Action
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
561
End Page
570
DOI
10.1353/cpr.2014.0054

Occult primary breast cancer at a comprehensive cancer center.

Management of occult primary breast cancer (OPBC), that is, breast cancer that first presents through regional nodal or distant disease without clinical or mammographic evidence of disease in the breast, has been controversial and inconsistent. Here, we review OPBC patients treated at our institution.We conducted a retrospective review of women diagnosed with a first primary breast cancer between March 1999 and September 2010 to identify patients who presented with isolated axillary lymphadenopathy proven to be histologically consistent with primary breast malignancy but had no evidence of a breast mass on physical examination, mammography, or ultrasound. Descriptions of treatments received, recurrence, morbidity, and mortality as of October 2012 are reported.Of 5533 patients reviewed, seven (0.1%) patients were identified. The median age was 65 y old (range, 40-72), and the median length of follow-up was 86 mo (range, 42-124). Four patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, one patient had a lumpectomy and axillary lymph node dissection, and two patients had axillary lymph node dissection without breast surgery. Four patients received adjuvant radiation therapy. All seven patients received chemotherapy. Three patients received endocrine therapy, and two patients received anti-HER2 therapy. At the last follow-up, all seven patients were alive with no evidence of disease.Although there was some variation in the management of OPBC at our institution, our patients had excellent outcomes after multimodal treatment. Our results support a curative intent approach to the treatment of OPBC and illustrate the need for individualized treatment algorithms based on tumor biology and extent of the disease at diagnosis.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Jeffe, DB; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Jeffe, DB, and Margenthaler, JA. "Occult primary breast cancer at a comprehensive cancer center." The Journal of Surgical Research 185.2 (December 2013): 684-689.
PMID
23890400
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Surgical Research
Volume
185
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
684
End Page
689
DOI
10.1016/j.jss.2013.06.020

Geographic and temporal trends in the management of occult primary breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Management of occult primary breast cancer (OPBC), including the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is controversial. We conducted a pooled analysis of OPBC patients and a meta-analysis of MRI accuracy in OPBC in order to elucidate current practices.A literature search yielded 201 studies. Patient-level data for clinically/mammographically OPBC from studies published after 1993 and from our institution were pooled; logistic regression examined associations between patient/study data and outcomes, including treatments and recurrence. We report adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) significant at 2-tailed p < 0.05. Meta-analysis included data for patients who received MRIs for workup of clinically/mammographically OPBC. We report pooled sensitivity and specificity with 95 % CIs.The pooled analysis included 92 patients (15 studies [n = 85] plus our institution [n = 7]). Patients from Asia were more likely to receive breast surgery (OR = 5.98, 95 % CI = 2.02-17.65) but not chemotherapy (OR = 0.32, 95 % CI = 0.13-0.82); patients from the United States were more likely to receive chemotherapy (OR = 13.08, 95 % CI = 2.64-64.78). Patients from studies published after 2003 were more likely to receive radiotherapy (OR = 3.86, 95 % CI = 1.41-10.55). Chemotherapy recipients were more likely to have distant recurrence (OR = 9.77, 95 % CI = 1.10-87.21). More patients with positive MRIs received chemotherapy than patients with negative MRIs (10 of 12 [83.3 %] vs 5 of 13 [38.5 %]; p = 0.0414). In the MRI-accuracy meta-analysis (10 studies, n = 262), pooled sensitivity and specificity were 96 % (95 % CI = 91-98 %) and 63 % (95 % CI = 42-81 %), respectively.OPBC management varied geographically and over time. We recommend establishing an international OPBC patient registry to facilitate longitudinal study and develop global treatment standards.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Stoll, CRT; Fowler, S; Colditz, GA; Jeffe, DB; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Stoll, CRT, Fowler, S, Colditz, GA, Jeffe, DB, and Margenthaler, JA. "Geographic and temporal trends in the management of occult primary breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis." Annals of surgical oncology 20.10 (October 2013): 3308-3316. (Review)
PMID
23975301
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
20
Issue
10
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
3308
End Page
3316
DOI
10.1245/s10434-013-3157-5

Geographic and Temporal Trends in the Management of Occult Primary Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Authors
Fayanju, O; Stoll, C; Colditz, G; Jeffe, D; Margenthaler, J
MLA Citation
Fayanju, O, Stoll, C, Colditz, G, Jeffe, D, and Margenthaler, J. "Geographic and Temporal Trends in the Management of Occult Primary Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis." 14th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Breast-Surgeons. May 1, 2013 - May 5, 2013. Chicago, IL.: SPRINGER, April 1, 2013.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
20
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
41
End Page
42

Management of Occult Primary Breast Cancer at a National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

Authors
Fayanju, O; Jeffe, D; Margenthaler, J
MLA Citation
Fayanju, O, Jeffe, D, and Margenthaler, J. "Management of Occult Primary Breast Cancer at a National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center." 14th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Breast-Surgeons. May 1, 2013 - May 5, 2013. Chicago, IL.: SPRINGER, April 1, 2013.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
20
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
40
End Page
40

Patient and process factors associated with late-stage breast cancer diagnosis in Safety-Net patients: a pilot prospective study.

Following reforms to our city's Safety-Net (SN) breast cancer referral process, we investigated whether factors often associated with late-stage diagnosis would differ by referral source--SN versus non-Safety-Net (NSN)--or, among SN patients, by stage at diagnosis.From September 2008 to June 2010, SN patients with any-stage (0-IV) and NSN patients with late-stage (IIB-IV) breast cancer were identified prospectively during initial cancer-center consultations. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, chi-square, and t tests; two-tailed P < 0.05 was considered significant.Fifty-seven women completed interviews (33 SN, 24 NSN); 52% of SN-referred patients were diagnosed with late-stage disease. Compared with NSN late-stage patients, SN late-stage patients were more likely to be African-American (83% vs. 21%, P < 0.001), to have an annual household income <$25,000 (89% vs. 38%, P < 0.001), and to report having a health problem in the preceding year but not being able to see a doctor because of cost (67% vs. 25%, P = 0.012); they were less likely to be married/partnered (22% vs. 79%, P < 0.001) and to have post-college education (0% vs. 25%, P < 0.03), any insurance (61% vs. 96%, P < 0.005), and to have sought medical attention within 1 week of realizing they had concerning breast findings (50% vs. 79%, P = 0.047). Married/partnered patients were more likely to delay medical care by >1 week (odds ratio = 9.9, P = 0.038).SN patients presented with higher-than-expected rates of late-stage disease despite improvements in mammography rates and the referral process. Efforts to further facilitate access to care for this vulnerable SN patient population are needed.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Jeffe, DB; Elmore, L; Ksiazek, DN; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Jeffe, DB, Elmore, L, Ksiazek, DN, and Margenthaler, JA. "Patient and process factors associated with late-stage breast cancer diagnosis in Safety-Net patients: a pilot prospective study." Annals of surgical oncology 20.3 (March 2013): 723-732.
PMID
23070783
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
20
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
723
End Page
732
DOI
10.1245/s10434-012-2558-1

Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy after Unilateral Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Stoll, C; Colditz, GA; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Stoll, C, Colditz, GA, and Margenthaler, JA. "Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy after Unilateral Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis." 66th Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology (SSO). March 6, 2013 - March 9, 2013. National Harbor, MD.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2013.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
20
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
S65
End Page
S66

High Tumor Grade Predicts Pathologic Complete Response in Breast Cancer Patients after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Yan, Y; Jeffe, DB; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Yan, Y, Jeffe, DB, and Margenthaler, JA. "High Tumor Grade Predicts Pathologic Complete Response in Breast Cancer Patients after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy." 66th Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology (SSO). March 6, 2013 - March 9, 2013. National Harbor, MD.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2013.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
20
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
S46
End Page
S46

Breast cancer presentation in an urban health care Safety Net system.

We examined the Safety-Net referral process for breast diseases to identify factors contributing to delays within it. Each record was mapped to a time line beginning with first abnormality and concluding with definitive diagnosis/treatment. The median interval between first sign and definitive diagnosis/treatment was 93 days. Need for repeat imaging and missed visits prolonged the interval. System- and patient-specific factors were associated with delayed diagnosis/ treatment in breast patients referred through the Safety-Net specialty clinic.

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Jeffe, DB; Tappenden, JR; Beers, CE; Drake, BF; Gao, F; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Jeffe, DB, Tappenden, JR, Beers, CE, Drake, BF, Gao, F, and Margenthaler, JA. "Breast cancer presentation in an urban health care Safety Net system." Missouri medicine 109.5 (September 2012): 405-411.
PMID
23097949
Source
epmc
Published In
Missouri Medicine
Volume
109
Issue
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
405
End Page
411

Patient and Process Factors Associated with Late-stage Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Safety Net Patients

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Jeffe, DB; Elmore, L; Ksiazek, DN; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Jeffe, DB, Elmore, L, Ksiazek, DN, and Margenthaler, JA. "Patient and Process Factors Associated with Late-stage Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Safety Net Patients." 65th Annual Cancer Symposium of the Society-of-Surgical-Oncology (SSO). March 21, 2012 - March 24, 2012. Orlando, FL.: SPRINGER, February 1, 2012.
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
19
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
S59
End Page
S59

Withdrawal of care in a potentially curable patient.

Authors
Murphy, J; Fayanju, O; Brown, D; Kodner, IJ
MLA Citation
Murphy, J, Fayanju, O, Brown, D, and Kodner, IJ. "Withdrawal of care in a potentially curable patient." Surgery 147.3 (March 2010): 441-445. (Review)
PMID
20176245
Source
epmc
Published In
Surgery
Volume
147
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
441
End Page
445
DOI
10.1016/j.surg.2010.01.012

Therapeutic management of intracystic papillary carcinoma of the breast: the roles of radiation and endocrine therapy.

BACKGROUND: The role of radiation and endocrine therapy in the treatment of intracystic papillary carcinoma (IPC) remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to review the management of IPC in order to determine factors associated with use of adjuvant therapies. METHODS: A retrospective review of our surgical and pathology databases from 1995-2006 identified 45 women with IPC. These patients were further divided into those with pure IPC (n = 21), IPC with associated ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (n = 18), and IPC with associated microinvasion with or without DCIS (n = 6). Patient characteristics were compared between groups using the chi-square test. RESULTS: Patients with IPC and microinvasion were more likely to undergo an axillary staging procedure (6/6, 100%) compared to patients with pure IPC (6/21, 29%) or IPC with DCIS (5/18, 28%) (P < .001). Patients with pure IPC were less likely to have radiation therapy than patients with IPC and DCIS or microinvasion (P < .001). However, within the subset of patients with pure IPC, women less than 50 years of age were more likely to have radiation therapy than those older than 50 years (P < .001). Patients with IPC and DCIS or microinvasion had significantly increased use of endocrine therapy versus patients with pure IPC (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: In our patient population, those patients with IPC and associated DCIS or microinvasion are treated with adjuvant radiation and endocrine therapy on the basis of this associated pathology. The use of adjuvant radiation and/or endocrine therapy should be considered in patients with pure IPC who are of young age (<50 years).

Authors
Fayanju, OM; Ritter, J; Gillanders, WE; Eberlein, TJ; Dietz, JR; Aft, R; Margenthaler, JA
MLA Citation
Fayanju, OM, Ritter, J, Gillanders, WE, Eberlein, TJ, Dietz, JR, Aft, R, and Margenthaler, JA. "Therapeutic management of intracystic papillary carcinoma of the breast: the roles of radiation and endocrine therapy." American Journal of Surgery 194.4 (October 2007): 497-500.
PMID
17826064
Source
manual
Published In
American Journal of Surgery
Volume
194
Issue
4
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
497
End Page
500
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.06.016

Select Choices in Benign Breast Disease: An Initiative of the American Society of Breast Surgeons for the American Board of Internal Medicine Choosing Wisely® Campaign

Authors
Rao, R; Ludwig, K; Bailey, L; Berry, TS; Buras, R; Degnim, A; Fayanju, OM; Froman, J; Golesorkhi, N; Greenburg, C; Ma, AT; Mautner, SK; Krontiras, H; Sowden, M; Wexelman, B; Landercasper, J
MLA Citation
Rao, R, Ludwig, K, Bailey, L, Berry, TS, Buras, R, Degnim, A, Fayanju, OM, Froman, J, Golesorkhi, N, Greenburg, C, Ma, AT, Mautner, SK, Krontiras, H, Sowden, M, Wexelman, B, and Landercasper, J. "Select Choices in Benign Breast Disease: An Initiative of the American Society of Breast Surgeons for the American Board of Internal Medicine Choosing Wisely® Campaign(Published online)." Annals of Surgical Oncology.
Source
crossref
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
DOI
10.1245/s10434-018-6584-5
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