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Fish, Laura Jane

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Community and Family Medicine

Community and Family Medicine, Prevention Research
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.P.H. 1992

M.P.H. — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2006

Ph.D. — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

Addressing Tobacco Use Disparities through an Innovative Mobile Phone Intervention: The textto4gosmokelesstobacco

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2015
End Date
July 31, 2018

SMS scheduled gradual reduction text messages to help pregnant smokers quit

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
July 15, 2013
End Date
June 30, 2018

En Pareja: A Latino couples intervention to help expectant fathers quit smoking

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Intervention Coordinator
Start Date
September 01, 2008
End Date
July 31, 2014

Smoking Resumption-Prevention in Postpartum Women

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Intervention Coordinator
Start Date
April 15, 2008
End Date
March 31, 2014

IPA - Laura Jane Fish

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
October 01, 2009
End Date
July 31, 2011

Quit-smoking program for lung cancer patients' families

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
May 10, 2003
End Date
April 30, 2010

IPA-Laura Fish

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Clinical Research Manager
Start Date
October 01, 2007
End Date
September 30, 2009

Testing Pharmacological Therapies for Pregnant Smokers

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Health Educator
Start Date
May 01, 2002
End Date
April 30, 2008
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Publications:

Patient experiences of acute myeloid leukemia: A qualitative study about diagnosis, illness understanding, and treatment decision-making.

Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) face a unique, difficult situation characterized by sudden changes in health, complex information, and pressure to make quick treatment decisions amid sizeable tradeoffs. Yet, little is known about patients' experiences with AML. We used qualitative methods to learn about their experiences with diagnosis and treatment decision-making to identify areas for improvement.We recruited hospitalized patients with AML to participate in semi-structured qualitative interviews about their experiences being diagnosed with AML, receiving information, and making a treatment decision. Interviews were conducted during their hospitalization for induction chemotherapy. We analyzed data by using a constant comparison approach.Thirty-two patients completed an interview. Four main themes emerged: (a) shock and suddenness, (b) difficulty processing information, (c) poor communication, and (d) uncertainty. Patients frequently described their diagnosis as shocking. They also felt that the amount of information was too great and too difficult to process, which negatively impacted their understanding. Patients frequently described a lack of emotional support from clinicians and described uncertainty about their prognosis, the number and nature of available treatments, and what to expect from treatment.Acute myeloid leukemia poses a sudden, emotionally challenging, information-laden situation, where little time is available to make important decisions. This results in difficulty processing information and is sometimes complicated by a lack of emotive communication from clinicians. Results indicate a need for targeted interventions to improve AML patients' understanding of illness and treatment options and to address their traumatic experiences around diagnosis.

Authors
LeBlanc, TW; Fish, LJ; Bloom, CT; El-Jawahri, A; Davis, DM; Locke, SC; Steinhauser, KE; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
LeBlanc, TW, Fish, LJ, Bloom, CT, El-Jawahri, A, Davis, DM, Locke, SC, Steinhauser, KE, and Pollak, KI. "Patient experiences of acute myeloid leukemia: A qualitative study about diagnosis, illness understanding, and treatment decision-making." November 15, 2016.
PMID
27862591
Source
epmc
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Publish Date
2016
DOI
10.1002/pon.4309

Efficacy of a Nurse-Delivered Intervention to Prevent and Delay Postpartum Return to Smoking: The Quit for Two Trial.

Most pregnant women who quit smoking return to smoking postpartum. Trials to prevent this return have been unsuccessful. We tested the efficacy of a nurse-delivered intervention in maintaining smoking abstinence after delivery among pregnant women who quit smoking that was tailored on their high risk of relapse (eg, had strong intentions to return).We recruited 382 English-speaking spontaneous pregnant quitters from 14 prenatal clinics and randomized them to receive either a smoking abstinence booklet plus newsletters about parenting and stress (control) or a nurse-delivered smoking abstinence intervention that differed in intensity for the high and low risk groups. Our primary outcome was smoking abstinence at 12 months postpartum.Using intent-to-treat analyses, there was a high rate of biochemically validated smoking abstinence at 12 months postpartum but no arm differences (36% [95% confidence interval [CI]: 29-43] vs.35% [95% CI: 28-43], P = .81). Among women at low risk of returning to smoking, the crude abstinence rate was significantly higher in the control arm (46%) than in the intervention arm (33%); among women at high risk of returning to smoking, the crude abstinence rate was slightly lower but not different in the control arm (31%) than in the intervention arm (37%).Low-risk women fared better with a minimal intervention that focused on parenting skills and stress than when they received an intensive smoking abstinence intervention. The opposite was true for women who were at high risk of returning to smoking. Clinicians might need to tailor their approach based on whether women are at high or low risk of returning to smoking.Results suggest that high-risk and low-risk women might benefit from different types of smoking relapse interventions. Those who are lower risk of returning to smoking might benefit from stress reduction that is devoid of smoking content, whereas those who are higher risk might benefit from smoking relapse prevention.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Fish, LJ; Lyna, P; Peterson, BL; Myers, ER; Gao, X; Swamy, GK; Brown-Johnson, A; Whitecar, P; Bilheimer, AK; Pletsch, PK
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Fish, LJ, Lyna, P, Peterson, BL, Myers, ER, Gao, X, Swamy, GK, Brown-Johnson, A, Whitecar, P, Bilheimer, AK, and Pletsch, PK. "Efficacy of a Nurse-Delivered Intervention to Prevent and Delay Postpartum Return to Smoking: The Quit for Two Trial." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 18.10 (October 2016): 1960-1966.
PMID
27091830
Source
epmc
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
18
Issue
10
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1960
End Page
1966
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntw108

Unintended Effects of a Smoking Cessation Intervention on Latino Fathers' Binge Drinking In Early Postpartum.

Authors
Noonan, D; Lyna, P; Fish, LJ; Bilheimer, AK; Gordon, KC; Roberson, P; Gonzalez, A; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Lyna, P, Fish, LJ, Bilheimer, AK, Gordon, KC, Roberson, P, Gonzalez, A, and Pollak, KI. "Unintended Effects of a Smoking Cessation Intervention on Latino Fathers' Binge Drinking In Early Postpartum." Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine 50.4 (August 2016): 622-627.
PMID
26868270
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
50
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
622
End Page
627
DOI
10.1007/s12160-016-9781-0

Randomized trial of DVD, telephone, and usual care for increasing mammography adherence.

The purpose of this study was to test an intervention to increase mammography screening in women 51-75 years of age who had not received a mammogram in the last 15 months. A total of 1681 women were randomized to (1) a mailed tailored interactive DVD, (2) a computer-tailored telephone counseling, or (3) usual care. Women with income below US$75,000 who were in the interactive DVD group had significantly more mammograms than women in usual care. Women with income above US$75,000 had significantly fewer mammograms than women with income less than US$75,000 regardless of group. Further investigation is needed to understand why women with income above US$75,000 did not show the same benefit of the intervention.

Authors
Champion, VL; Rawl, SM; Bourff, SA; Champion, KM; Smith, LG; Buchanan, AH; Fish, LJ; Monahan, PO; Stump, TE; Springston, JK; Gathirua-Mwangi, WG; Skinner, CS
MLA Citation
Champion, VL, Rawl, SM, Bourff, SA, Champion, KM, Smith, LG, Buchanan, AH, Fish, LJ, Monahan, PO, Stump, TE, Springston, JK, Gathirua-Mwangi, WG, and Skinner, CS. "Randomized trial of DVD, telephone, and usual care for increasing mammography adherence." Journal of health psychology 21.6 (June 2016): 916-926.
PMID
25070967
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Health Psychology
Volume
21
Issue
6
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
916
End Page
926
DOI
10.1177/1359105314542817

Impact of Smoking Cessation on Subsequent Pain Intensity Among Chronically Ill Veterans Enrolled in a Smoking Cessation Trial.

Prior cross-sectional studies have reported greater pain intensity among persistent smokers compared with nonsmokers or former smokers; yet, few prospective studies have examined how smoking abstinence affects pain intensity.To determine the impact of smoking cessation on subsequent pain intensity in smokers with chronic illness enrolled in a smoking cessation trial.We recruited veteran smokers with chronic illness (heart disease, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or hypertension) for a randomized controlled smoking cessation trial and prospectively examined pain intensity and smoking status. Participants (n = 380) were asked to rate their pain in the past week from 0 to 10 at baseline and the five-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was self-reported pain intensity at the five-month follow-up survey. Self-reported smoking status was categorized as an abstainer if patients reported no cigarettes in the seven days before the follow-up survey.In unadjusted analyses, abstainers reported significantly lower pain levels at the five-month follow-up compared with patients who continued to smoke (parameter estimate = -1.07; 95% CI = -1.77, -0.36). In multivariable modeling, abstaining from cigarettes was not associated with subsequent pain intensity at five-month follow-up (parameter estimate = -0.27; 95% CI = -0.79, 0.25).Participants who were classified as abstainers did not report significantly different levels of pain intensity than patients who continued to smoke. Future studies should expand on our findings and monitor pain intensity in smoking cessation trials.ClinicalTrials.govNCT00448344.

Authors
Bastian, LA; Fish, LJ; Gierisch, JM; Stechuchak, KM; Grambow, SC; Keefe, FJ
MLA Citation
Bastian, LA, Fish, LJ, Gierisch, JM, Stechuchak, KM, Grambow, SC, and Keefe, FJ. "Impact of Smoking Cessation on Subsequent Pain Intensity Among Chronically Ill Veterans Enrolled in a Smoking Cessation Trial." Journal of pain and symptom management 50.6 (December 2015): 822-829.
PMID
26210348
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume
50
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
822
End Page
829
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2015.06.012

Relationships among spousal communication, self-efficacy, and motivation among expectant Latino fathers who smoke.

Cigarette smoking is a prevalent problem among Latinos, yet little is known about what factors motivate them to quit smoking or make them feel more confident that they can. Given cultural emphases on familial bonds among Latinos (e.g., familismo), it is possible that communication processes among Latino spouses play an important role. The present study tested a mechanistic model in which perceived spousal constructive communication patterns predicted changes in level of motivation for smoking cessation through changes in self-efficacy among Latino expectant fathers.Latino males (n = 173) and their pregnant partners participated in a couple-based intervention targeting males' smoking. Couples completed self-report measures of constructive communication, self-efficacy (male partners only), and motivation to quit (male partners only) at 4 time points throughout the intervention.Higher levels of perceived constructive communication among Latino male partners predicted subsequent increases in male partners' self-efficacy and, to a lesser degree, motivation to quit smoking; however, self-efficacy did not mediate associations between constructive communication and motivation to quit smoking. Furthermore, positive relationships with communication were only significant at measurements taken after completion of the intervention. Female partners' level of perceived constructive communication did not predict male partners' outcomes.These results provide preliminary evidence to support the utility of couple-based interventions for Latino men who smoke. Findings also suggest that perceptions of communication processes among Latino partners (particularly male partners) may be an important target for interventions aimed at increasing desire and perceived ability to quit smoking among Latino men. (PsycINFO Database Record

Authors
Khaddouma, A; Gordon, KC; Fish, LJ; Bilheimer, A; Gonzalez, A; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Khaddouma, A, Gordon, KC, Fish, LJ, Bilheimer, A, Gonzalez, A, and Pollak, KI. "Relationships among spousal communication, self-efficacy, and motivation among expectant Latino fathers who smoke." Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association 34.10 (October 2015): 1038-1042.
PMID
25844907
Source
epmc
Published In
Health Psychology
Volume
34
Issue
10
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1038
End Page
1042
DOI
10.1037/hea0000224

Predictors of pregnant quitters' intention to return to smoking postpartum.

Although many pregnant women quit smoking, most return to smoking postpartum. Returning to smoking is strongly related to women's stated intention about smoking during pregnancy. We examined factors related to women's intention to return to smoking to improve intervention trials.We report cross-sectional baseline data from a randomized controlled trial to prevent postpartum return to smoking. Women (n = 382; 98% consent rate) were English-speaking women who smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetimes and at least 5 cigarettes a day prior to becoming pregnant. We fit logistic regression models to test whether women's intention to return to smoking was associated with demographic and smoking factors such as race, parity, and smoker self-identity.Forty-three percent of women had a strong intention of returning to smoking. Factors independently associated with intending to return to smoking were: stating they did not want to be currently pregnant (OR = 2.1, CI = 1.1-3.9), reporting being abstinent for fewer days (OR = 0.8, CI = 0.7-0.9), being less concerned about the harmful effects of smoking to themselves (OR = 1.6, CI = 0.9-2.8), viewing quit as temporary (OR = 2.1, CI = 1.2-3.6), and self-identifying selves as smokers (OR = 8.7, CI = 5.0-15.2).Although some factors related to intention to return to smoking were unchangeable, it might be possible to attempt to change women's attribution of why they quit to be more permanent and to have them change their self-identity to be a "nonsmoker" from a "smoker who is not currently smoking." Helping women have stronger intentions to stay quit could promote less return to smoking postpartum.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Fish, LJ; Lyna, P; Peterson, BL; Swamy, GK; Levine, MD
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Fish, LJ, Lyna, P, Peterson, BL, Swamy, GK, and Levine, MD. "Predictors of pregnant quitters' intention to return to smoking postpartum." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 17.6 (June 2015): 742-745.
PMID
25542912
Source
epmc
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
17
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
742
End Page
745
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntu270

Comparison of native light daily smokers and light daily smokers who were former heavy smokers.

INTRODUCTION: An increasing proportion of daily smokers are light smokers (≤10 cigarettes per day). Some light smokers have never smoked more than 10 cigarettes per day (native light smokers) and others smoked at higher levels but have cut down (converted light smokers). It is important that we expand our understanding of these distinct subgroups of light smokers in order to develop effective interventions. METHODS: Data for this report come from a larger sample of smokers who completed a cross-sectional survey administered through an online panel survey service. The sample of 522 light smokers included 256 native light smokers and 266 as converted light smokers. The goal of the analysis was to examine demographic, smoking, and psychosocial factors that differentiate between native and converted light smokers. RESULTS: Multivariable logistic regression results showed 4 variables that differentiated between native and converted light smokers. Native light smokers were more likely to be Black than White, smoke fewer cigarettes per day, smoked fewer total years, and had higher perceived risk of heart disease than converted light smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Native and converted light smokers are similar in many ways and also differ on some important characteristics. Further exploration of group difference is needed and could help to inform for cessation strategies for daily light smokers.

Authors
Fish, LJ; Pollak, KI; Scheuermann, TS; Cox, LS; Mathur, C; Ahluwalia, JS
MLA Citation
Fish, LJ, Pollak, KI, Scheuermann, TS, Cox, LS, Mathur, C, and Ahluwalia, JS. "Comparison of native light daily smokers and light daily smokers who were former heavy smokers." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 17.5 (May 2015): 546-551.
PMID
25180075
Source
epmc
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
17
Issue
5
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
546
End Page
551
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntu169

Efficacy of a couple-based randomized controlled trial to help Latino fathers quit smoking during pregnancy and postpartum: the Parejas trial.

Although many Latinos in the United States smoke, they receive assistance to quit less often than non-Latinos. To address this disparity, we recruited Latino couples into a randomized controlled trial and provided a smoking cessation program during a teachable moment, when men's partners were pregnant.We compared two interventions: (i) written materials plus nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to (ii) materials, NRT, and couple-based counseling that addressed smoking cessation and couples communication. We recruited 348 expectant fathers who smoked via their pregnant partners from county health departments. Our primary outcome was 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence and was collected from November 2010 through April 2013 and analyzed in February 2014.We found high rates of cessation but no arm differences in smoking rates at the end of pregnancy (0.31 vs. 0.30, materials only vs. counseling, respectively) and 12 months after randomization (postpartum: 0.39 vs. 0.38). We found high quit rates among nondaily smokers but no arm differences (0.43 vs. 0.46 in pregnancy and 0.52 vs. 0.48 postpartum). Among daily smokers, we found lower quit rates with no arm differences but effects favoring the intervention arm (0.13 vs. 0.16 in pregnancy and 0.17 vs. 0.24 postpartum).A less intensive intervention promoted cessation equal to more intensive counseling. Postpartum might be a more powerful time to promote cessation among Latino men.Less intensive interventions when delivered during teachable moments for Latino men could result in a high smoking cessation rate and could reduce disparities.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Lyna, P; Bilheimer, AK; Gordon, KC; Peterson, BL; Gao, X; Swamy, GK; Denman, S; Gonzalez, A; Rocha, P; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Lyna, P, Bilheimer, AK, Gordon, KC, Peterson, BL, Gao, X, Swamy, GK, Denman, S, Gonzalez, A, Rocha, P, and Fish, LJ. "Efficacy of a couple-based randomized controlled trial to help Latino fathers quit smoking during pregnancy and postpartum: the Parejas trial." Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology 24.2 (February 2015): 379-385.
PMID
25406226
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
24
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
379
End Page
385
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.epi-14-0841

Relationships among spousal communication, self-efficacy, and motivation among expectant Latino fathers who smoke

© 2015 American Psychological Association.Objective: Cigarette smoking is a prevalent problem among Latinos, yet little is known about what factors motivate them to quit smoking or make them feel more confident that they can. Given cultural emphases on familial bonds among Latinos (e.g., familismo), it is possible that communication processes among Latino spouses play an important role. The present study tested a mechanistic model in which perceived spousal constructive communication patterns predicted changes in level of motivation for smoking cessation through changes in self-efficacy among Latino expectant fathers. Methods: Latino males (n = 173) and their pregnant partners participated in a couple-based intervention targeting males' smoking. Couples completed self-report measures of constructive communication, self-efficacy (male partners only), and motivation to quit (male partners only) at 4 time points throughout the intervention. Results: Higher levels of perceived constructive communication among Latino male partners predicted subsequent increases in male partners' self-efficacy and, to a lesser degree, motivation to quit smoking; however, self-efficacy did not mediate associations between constructive communication and motivation to quit smoking. Furthermore, positive relationships with communication were only significant at measurements taken after completion of the intervention. Female partners' level of perceived constructive communication did not predict male partners' outcomes. Conclusion: These results provide preliminary evidence to support the utility of couple-based interventions for Latino men who smoke. Findings also suggest that perceptions of communication processes among Latino partners (particularly male partners) may be an important target for interventions aimed at increasing desire and perceived ability to quit smoking among Latino men.

Authors
Khaddouma, A; Gordon, KC; Fish, LJ; Bilheimer, A; Gonzalez, A; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Khaddouma, A, Gordon, KC, Fish, LJ, Bilheimer, A, Gonzalez, A, and Pollak, KI. "Relationships among spousal communication, self-efficacy, and motivation among expectant Latino fathers who smoke." Health Psychology 34.10 (2015): 1038-1042.
Source
scival
Published In
Health Psychology
Volume
34
Issue
10
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1038
End Page
1042

Factors Associated With Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

Background Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose To examine the relationship between knowledge about HPV and adherence to scheduled colposcopic evaluation and variables related to lack of knowledge among women with abnormal Pap tests. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted with women who attended their scheduled appointments (adherers) and women who did not attend their appointments (nonadherers). Results The multivariable analyses indicate that lower HPV knowledge was independently associated with nonadherence to follow-up, controlling for race and education level. Factors related to lower knowledge scores included non-white race, lower education, and lack of health insurance at the time of the scheduled appointment. Conclusion Lack of knowledge of HPV was related to nonadherence among women scheduled for colposcopic evaluation. Translation to Health Education Practice Health education interventions that deliver complex information about HPV and cervical cancer should be in a format that is accessible and understandable to the women who are most at risk of being nonadherent. © 2013 AAHPERD.

Authors
Fish, LJ; Moorman, PG; Wordlaw-Stintson, L; Vidal, A; Smith, JS; Hoyo, C
MLA Citation
Fish, LJ, Moorman, PG, Wordlaw-Stintson, L, Vidal, A, Smith, JS, and Hoyo, C. "Factors Associated With Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy." American Journal of Health Education 44.6 (November 1, 2013): 293-298.
PMID
24991653
Source
scopus
Published In
Evaluation
Volume
44
Issue
6
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
293
End Page
298
DOI
10.1080/19325037.2013.838881

Capsule commentary on Katz et al., Implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans: effects on nurse attitudes and performance.

Authors
Gierisch, JM; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Gierisch, JM, and Fish, LJ. "Capsule commentary on Katz et al., Implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans: effects on nurse attitudes and performance." J Gen Intern Med 28.11 (November 2013): 1493-.
PMID
23739811
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Volume
28
Issue
11
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1493
DOI
10.1007/s11606-013-2503-4

A pilot study testing SMS text delivered scheduled gradual reduction to pregnant smokers.

INTRODUCTION: Smoking during pregnancy causes multiple perinatal complications; yet, the smoking rate among pregnant women has remained relatively stagnant. Most interventions to help pregnant smokers quit or reduce their smoking are not easily disseminable. Innovative and disseminable interventions are needed. METHODS: We recruited 31 pregnant smokers in their second trimester from prenatal clinics. We assessed feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an SMS text-based intervention in a 2-arm design. We compared SMS-delivered support messages to an intervention that provided support messages plus a scheduled gradual reduction (SGR) to help women reduce their smoking more than 3 weeks. We sent women in the SGR arm "alert texts" at times to instruct them to smoke. We asked women not to smoke unless they received an alert text. RESULTS: Most women (86%) reported reading most or all of the texts. Women in both arms rated the program as helpful (M = 6, SD = 1 vs. M = 5, SD = 2, SGR vs. support only, respectively). Women in the SGR arm had a higher rate of biochemically validated 7-day point prevalence at the end of pregnancy 13.4% versus 7.5%. Of those still smoking, women reduced their smoking substantially with more reduction in the SGR arm (SGR arm: M = 16, SD = 11 vs. support messages only: M = 12, SD = 7). CONCLUSIONS: We developed an easily disseminable intervention that could possibly promote cessation and reduction among pregnant women with SMS texting ability. Women in this pilot were enthusiastic about the program, particularly those in the SGR arm. This program needs further examination.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Lyna, P; Bilheimer, A; Farrell, D; Gao, X; Swamy, GK; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Lyna, P, Bilheimer, A, Farrell, D, Gao, X, Swamy, GK, and Fish, LJ. "A pilot study testing SMS text delivered scheduled gradual reduction to pregnant smokers." Nicotine Tob Res 15.10 (October 2013): 1773-1776.
PMID
23569007
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
15
Issue
10
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1773
End Page
1776
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntt045

Assessment of the impact of adjunctive proactive telephone counseling to promote smoking cessation among lung cancer patients' social networks.

PURPOSE: When a patient is diagnosed with lung cancer, members of his/her social network may be more likely to engage in smoking cessation efforts. Proactive telephone counseling combined with a tailored self-directed intervention may be more effective at promoting smoking cessation than a tailored self-directed intervention alone. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Four clinical sites. SUBJECTS: Current smokers who are family members and close friends of patients with lung cancer. INTERVENTION: Six counselor-initiated counseling calls using motivational interviewing techniques and focusing on teaching adaptive coping skills based on the transactional model of stress and coping along with tailored self-directed materials (including nicotine patches, if not contraindicated) (n  =  245) vs. tailored self-directed materials (including nicotine patches, if not contraindicated) (n  =  251). MEASURES: Participants were surveyed at baseline and at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postintervention. The outcome was 7-day point prevalent abstinence. ANALYSIS: The objective of this study was to test for arm differences in smoking cessation rates at 2 weeks and 6 months postintervention (primary) and at 12 months postintervention (secondary). RESULTS: We found no overall effect of the proactive intervention on cessation rates. Among younger participants (age <50), the cessation rate in the intervention group was higher than in the control group at 2 weeks postintervention (16% vs. 4%, p  =  .046). For older participants (age >50), there were no group differences. CONCLUSION: Proactive telephone counseling focusing on adaptive coping skills was difficult to implement among smokers in lung cancer patients' social network. Although this study did not demonstrate any added benefit to cessation rates, this null finding may be a result of an intervention that was weaker than intended, owing to difficulties in completing the counseling phone calls. We discuss lessons learned and areas for future research in this special population.

Authors
Bastian, LA; Fish, LJ; Peterson, BL; Biddle, AK; Garst, J; Lyna, P; Molner, S; Bepler, G; Kelley, M; Keefe, FJ; McBride, CM
MLA Citation
Bastian, LA, Fish, LJ, Peterson, BL, Biddle, AK, Garst, J, Lyna, P, Molner, S, Bepler, G, Kelley, M, Keefe, FJ, and McBride, CM. "Assessment of the impact of adjunctive proactive telephone counseling to promote smoking cessation among lung cancer patients' social networks." Am J Health Promot 27.3 (January 2013): 181-190.
PMID
23286595
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Health Promotion
Volume
27
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
181
End Page
190
DOI
10.4278/ajhp.101122-QUAN-387

Capsule commentary on Katz et al., implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans: Effects on nurse attitudes and performance

Authors
Gierisch, JM; Fish, LJ
MLA Citation
Gierisch, JM, and Fish, LJ. "Capsule commentary on Katz et al., implementing smoking cessation guidelines for hospitalized veterans: Effects on nurse attitudes and performance." Journal of General Internal Medicine 28.11 (2013): 1493--.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Volume
28
Issue
11
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1493-
DOI
10.1007/s11606-013-2503-4

Correlates of expected positive and negative support for smoking cessation among a sample of chronically ill veterans.

OBJECTIVE: To examine demographic, relationship, and smoking history factors related to expected positive and negative support for quitting smoking among chronically ill veterans. METHODS: Data for this report comes from baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of a support-based smoking cessation intervention for veterans with chronic diseases (cancer, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). We used separate multiple linear regression models to analyze relationships between positive and negative support and variables selected for model entry. RESULTS: Veterans in our sample expected high positive and negative support for quitting. Veterans who were married/living as married, had some college education, were female, or named a female support person expected higher levels of positive support. Veterans who named a female or a nonsmoker as a support person expected higher levels of negative support. Males and non-Caucasians also reported higher levels of expected negative support. CONCLUSIONS: Individual differences that influence perceptions of expected support are likely to influence intervention participation and engagement. Thus, understanding factors associated with expected positive and negative support is necessary to optimize future implementation of support-based cessation interventions through better treatment matching.

Authors
Fish, LJ; Gierisch, JM; Stechuchak, KM; Grambow, SC; Rohrer, LD; Bastian, LA
MLA Citation
Fish, LJ, Gierisch, JM, Stechuchak, KM, Grambow, SC, Rohrer, LD, and Bastian, LA. "Correlates of expected positive and negative support for smoking cessation among a sample of chronically ill veterans." Addict Behav 37.1 (January 2012): 135-138.
PMID
21978930
Source
pubmed
Published In
Addictive Behaviors
Volume
37
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
135
End Page
138
DOI
10.1016/j.addbeh.2011.08.013

Proactive recruitment of cancer patients' social networks into a smoking cessation trial.

BACKGROUND: This report describes the characteristics associated with successful enrollment of smokers in the social networks (i.e., family and close friends) of patients with lung cancer into a smoking cessation intervention. METHODS: Lung cancer patients from four clinical sites were asked to complete a survey enumerating their family members and close friends who smoke, and provide permission to contact these potential participants. Family members and close friends identified as smokers were interviewed and offered participation in a smoking cessation intervention. Repeated measures logistic regression model examined characteristics associated with enrollment. RESULTS: A total of 1062 eligible lung cancer patients were identified and 516 patients consented and completed the survey. These patients identified 1325 potentially eligible family and close friends. Of these, 496 consented and enrolled in the smoking cessation program. Network enrollment was highest among patients who were white and had late-stage disease. Social network members enrolled were most likely to be female, a birth family, immediate family, or close friend, and live in close geographic proximity to the patient. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive recruitment of smokers in the social networks of lung cancer patients is challenging. In this study, the majority of family members and friends declined to participate. Enlisting immediate female family members and friends, who live close to the patient as agents to proactively recruit other network members into smoking cessation trials could be used to extend reach of cessation interventions to patients' social networks. Moreover, further consideration should be given to the appropriate timing of approaching network smokers to consider cessation.

Authors
Bastian, LA; Fish, LJ; Peterson, BL; Biddle, AK; Garst, J; Lyna, P; Molner, S; Bepler, G; Kelley, M; Keefe, FJ; McBride, CM
MLA Citation
Bastian, LA, Fish, LJ, Peterson, BL, Biddle, AK, Garst, J, Lyna, P, Molner, S, Bepler, G, Kelley, M, Keefe, FJ, and McBride, CM. "Proactive recruitment of cancer patients' social networks into a smoking cessation trial." Contemp Clin Trials 32.4 (July 2011): 498-504.
PMID
21382509
Source
pubmed
Published In
Contemporary Clinical Trials
Volume
32
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
498
End Page
504
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2011.03.006

A five-step guide for moving from observational studies to interventional research for women veterans.

Authors
Rohrer, LD; Gierisch, JM; Fish, LJ; Blakeney, JK; Bastian, LA
MLA Citation
Rohrer, LD, Gierisch, JM, Fish, LJ, Blakeney, JK, and Bastian, LA. "A five-step guide for moving from observational studies to interventional research for women veterans." Womens Health Issues 21.4 Suppl (July 2011): S98-102.
PMID
21724150
Source
pubmed
Published In
Women's Health Issues
Volume
21
Issue
4 Suppl
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
S98
End Page
102
DOI
10.1016/j.whi.2011.05.004

COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS TRIAL OF FAMILY-SUPPORTED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION VERSUS STANDARD TELEPHONE COUNSELING FOR CHRONICALLY ILL VETERANS

Authors
Bastian, LA; Fish, LJ; Gierisch, JM; Rohrer, L; Stechuchak, KM; Grambow, S
MLA Citation
Bastian, LA, Fish, LJ, Gierisch, JM, Rohrer, L, Stechuchak, KM, and Grambow, S. "COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS TRIAL OF FAMILY-SUPPORTED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION VERSUS STANDARD TELEPHONE COUNSELING FOR CHRONICALLY ILL VETERANS." JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE 26 (May 2011): S297-S297.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Volume
26
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
S297
End Page
S297

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF LATINOS IN A COUPLES-BASED SMOKING CESSATION TRIAL

Authors
Fish, LJ; Lyna, P; Denman, S; Gordon, K; Rocha, P; Pollak, K
MLA Citation
Fish, LJ, Lyna, P, Denman, S, Gordon, K, Rocha, P, and Pollak, K. "RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF LATINOS IN A COUPLES-BASED SMOKING CESSATION TRIAL." ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE 41 (April 2011): S118-S118.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
41
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
S118
End Page
S118

NEW PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS TO RELYING ON CELL PHONES FOR BEHAVIORAL TRIALS

Authors
Fish, LJ; Lyna, P; Myers, E; Pollak, K
MLA Citation
Fish, LJ, Lyna, P, Myers, E, and Pollak, K. "NEW PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS TO RELYING ON CELL PHONES FOR BEHAVIORAL TRIALS." ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE 41 (April 2011): S118-S118.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
41
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
S118
End Page
S118

Smoking cessation and adherence

This chapter addresses the problem of adherence to smoking cessation. Several types of interventions targeting smokers have been successful at promoting cessation. In this review, we will provide examples of successful interventions for primary and secondary prevention and provide recommendations to improve adherence to smoking cessation among patients in their clinical practice. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Authors
Rohrer, L; Lynn, B; Hill, M; Fish, LJ; Bastian, LA
MLA Citation
Rohrer, L, Lynn, B, Hill, M, Fish, LJ, and Bastian, LA. "Smoking cessation and adherence." (December 1, 2010): 97-122. (Chapter)
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
97
End Page
122
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4419-5866-2_5

Is pregnancy a teachable moment for smoking cessation among US Latino expectant fathers? A pilot study.

OBJECTIVE: Pregnancy may be a time when US Latino expectant fathers consider quitting smoking. A 'teachable moment' is theorized to increase motivation to change a behavior through increased risk perceptions, emotional responses, and changes in self-image. DESIGN: We recruited 30 Spanish-speaking expectant fathers through their pregnant partners. We assessed expectant fathers' diet, exercise, and smoking and teachable moment constructs (risk perceptions, emotional responses, and self-image).We also tested correlations between teachable moment constructs and motivation to change behaviors. RESULTS: Latino expectant fathers had high-risk perceptions that their smoking harmed the pregnancy (M=4.4, SD=0.5 on five-point scale) and strong emotional responses about their smoking during pregnancy (M=3.9, SD=1.1). They also felt it was their role to make the pregnancy healthy (M=4.4, SD=0.8). They felt less strongly that their diet and exercise affected the pregnancy. The teachable moment constructs for smoking were strongly correlated with motivation to quit smoking; the same was not true for diet and exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Latino expectant fathers seem aware that their smoking could harm the pregnancy but seem less concerned about the effect of their diet and exercise on the pregnancy. Pregnancy may be a time to help Latino expectant fathers quit smoking.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Denman, S; Gordon, KC; Lyna, P; Rocha, P; Brouwer, RN; Fish, L; Baucom, DH
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Denman, S, Gordon, KC, Lyna, P, Rocha, P, Brouwer, RN, Fish, L, and Baucom, DH. "Is pregnancy a teachable moment for smoking cessation among US Latino expectant fathers? A pilot study." Ethn Health 15.1 (2010): 47-59.
PMID
20013439
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ethnicity & Health
Volume
15
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
47
End Page
59
DOI
10.1080/13557850903398293

Is pregnancy a teachable moment for smoking cessation among US Latino expectant fathers? A pilot study.

Objective. Pregnancy may be a time when US Latino expectant fathers consider quitting smoking. A 'teachable moment' is theorized to increase motivation to change a behavior through increased risk perceptions, emotional responses, and changes in self-image. Design. We recruited 30 Spanish-speaking expectant fathers through their pregnant partners. We assessed expectant fathers' diet, exercise, and smoking and teachable moment constructs (risk perceptions, emotional responses, and self-image). We also tested correlations between teachable moment constructs and motivation to change behaviors. Results. Latino expectant fathers had high-risk perceptions that their smoking harmed the pregnancy (M=4.4, SD=0.5 on five-point scale) and strong emotional responses about their smoking during pregnancy (M=3.9, SD=1.1). They also felt it was their role to make the pregnancy healthy (M=4.4, SD=0.8). They felt less strongly that their diet and exercise affected the pregnancy. The teachable moment constructs for smoking were strongly correlated with motivation to quit smoking; the same was not true for diet and exercise. Conclusions. Latino expectant fathers seem aware that their smoking could harm the pregnancy but seem less concerned about the effect of their diet and exercise on the pregnancy. Pregnancy may be a time to help Latino expectant fathers quit smoking.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Denman, S; Gordon, KC; Lyna, P; Rocha, P; Brouwer, RN; Fish, L; Baucom, DH
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Denman, S, Gordon, KC, Lyna, P, Rocha, P, Brouwer, RN, Fish, L, and Baucom, DH. "Is pregnancy a teachable moment for smoking cessation among US Latino expectant fathers? A pilot study." Ethnicity & health (December 2009): 1-13. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Ethnicity & Health
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1
End Page
13

Predictors of adverse events among pregnant smokers exposed in a nicotine replacement therapy trial.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of randomization to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), sociodemographic and psychosocial factors, and pregnancy and medical history to serious perinatal adverse events among pregnant smokers. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a retrospective review of all medical records for participants in the Baby Steps Trial. Data that were abstracted from 157 records were combined with baseline characteristics for logistic regression modeling of serious adverse events and adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: Serious adverse events occurred in 17% (9/52 pregnancies) and 31% (33/105 pregnancies) of participants in the control and NRT arms, respectively. Black race, adverse pregnancy history, and use of analgesic medication during pregnancy were significant predictors (P = .02, .04, and .01, respectively). Remaining covariates, which included randomization to NRT, were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Although race, poor pregnancy history, and use of analgesics were associated with serious adverse events, randomization to NRT during pregnancy was not a significant factor. Further research is needed to examine the safety of analgesic medications during pregnancy.

Authors
Swamy, GK; Roelands, JJ; Peterson, BL; Fish, LJ; Oncken, CA; Pletsch, PK; Myers, ER; Whitecar, PW; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Swamy, GK, Roelands, JJ, Peterson, BL, Fish, LJ, Oncken, CA, Pletsch, PK, Myers, ER, Whitecar, PW, and Pollak, KI. "Predictors of adverse events among pregnant smokers exposed in a nicotine replacement therapy trial." Am J Obstet Gynecol 201.4 (October 2009): 354.e1-354.e7.
PMID
19664750
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Volume
201
Issue
4
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
354.e1
End Page
354.e7
DOI
10.1016/j.ajog.2009.06.006

Adherence to nicotine replacement therapy among pregnant smokers.

INTRODUCTION: This secondary analysis examined the association between adherence to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and smoking cessation among pregnant smokers enrolled in Baby Steps, an open-label randomized controlled trial testing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) versus CBT plus NRT. METHOD: The analysis included only women who received NRT for whom we had complete data (N = 104). Data came from daily calendars created from recordings of counseling sessions and from telephone surveys at baseline and 38 weeks gestation. RESULTS: Overall, 29% of the 104 women used NRT for the recommended 6 weeks and 41% used NRT as directed in the first 48 hr after a quit attempt. Ordinal logistic regression modeling indicated that using NRT as directed in the first 48 hr and having made a previous quit attempt were the strongest predictors of longer NRT use. Univariate analyses suggested that primigravid women and women who used NRT longer were more likely to report quitting at 38 weeks gestation. DISCUSSION: Findings indicated that adherence to NRT is low among pregnant smokers, but adherence was a predictor of cessation. Future trials should emphasize adherence, particularly more days on NRT, to promote cessation during pregnancy.

Authors
Fish, LJ; Peterson, BL; Namenek Brouwer, RJ; Lyna, P; Oncken, CA; Swamy, GK; Myers, ER; Pletsch, PK; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Fish, LJ, Peterson, BL, Namenek Brouwer, RJ, Lyna, P, Oncken, CA, Swamy, GK, Myers, ER, Pletsch, PK, and Pollak, KI. "Adherence to nicotine replacement therapy among pregnant smokers." Nicotine Tob Res 11.5 (May 2009): 514-518.
PMID
19351783
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
11
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
514
End Page
518
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntp032

Factors associated with African Americans' enrollment in a national cancer genetics registry.

This study explored whether reactions to the Cancer Genetics Network (CGN) or CGN enrollment differed by receipt of a standard informational brochure versus a targeted version addressing factors previously associated with African Americans' health behavior decisions and research participation. The 262 participants, identified through tumor registries or clinic contacts, were mailed brochures and completed phone interviews. When asked whether - based on the brochure - they were or were not 'leaning toward' CGN enrollment, about 75% of both standard and targeted groups reported leaning toward. When given the opportunity at the end of the interview, 68% enrolled in the CGN. Trust was strongly related to enrollment. Less education, less satisfaction with cancer care, and individualistic rather than collective orientation were associated with lower trust. Education was also bivariately associated with enrollment, but mediation analysis indicated that the operational mechanism of education's influence on enrollment was through trust.

Authors
Skinner, CS; Schildkraut, JM; Calingaert, B; Hoyo, C; Crankshaw, SS; Fish, L; Susswein, L; Jasper, C; Reid, L
MLA Citation
Skinner, CS, Schildkraut, JM, Calingaert, B, Hoyo, C, Crankshaw, SS, Fish, L, Susswein, L, Jasper, C, and Reid, L. "Factors associated with African Americans' enrollment in a national cancer genetics registry." Community Genet 11.4 (2008): 224-233.
PMID
18417970
Source
pubmed
Published In
Community genetics
Volume
11
Issue
4
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
224
End Page
233
DOI
10.1159/000116883

THEORETICAL EXAMINATION OF THE IMPACT OF A LUNG CANCER DIAGNOSIS ON DESIRE TO QUIT AMONG FAMILY MEMBERS OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS

Authors
Fish, LJ; Bastian, L; Lyna, P
MLA Citation
Fish, LJ, Bastian, L, and Lyna, P. "THEORETICAL EXAMINATION OF THE IMPACT OF A LUNG CANCER DIAGNOSIS ON DESIRE TO QUIT AMONG FAMILY MEMBERS OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS." ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE 33 (December 2007): S138-S138.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
33
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
S138
End Page
S138

Nicotine replacement and behavioral therapy for smoking cessation in pregnancy.

BACKGROUND: This study examines whether adding nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pregnant smokers increases rates of smoking cessation. METHODS: An open-label randomized trial (Baby Steps, n=181) of CBT-only versus CBT+NRT (choice of patch, gum, or lozenge; 1:2 randomization) was used. Data were collected from 2003 through 2005; analyses were conducted in 2006 and 2007. Outcomes were biochemically validated self-reported smoking status at 7 weeks post-randomization, 38 weeks gestation, and 3 months postpartum. RESULTS: Women in the CBT+NRT arm were almost three times more likely than women in the CBT-only arm to have biochemically validated cessation at both pregnancy time points (after 7 weeks: 24% vs 8%, p=0.02; at 38 weeks gestation: 18% vs 7%, p=0.04), but not at 3 months postpartum (20% vs 14%, p=0.55). Recruitment was suspended early by an Independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board when an interim analysis found a higher rate of negative birth outcomes in the CBT+NRT arm than in the CBT-only arm. In the final analysis, the difference between the arms in rate of negative birth outcomes was 0.09 (p=0.26), when adjusted for previous history of preterm birth. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of NRT to CBT promoted smoking cessation in pregnant women. This effect did not persist postpartum. More data are needed to determine safety parameters and to confirm the efficacy of NRT use during pregnancy.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Oncken, CA; Lipkus, IM; Lyna, P; Swamy, GK; Pletsch, PK; Peterson, BL; Heine, RP; Brouwer, RJN; Fish, L; Myers, ER
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Oncken, CA, Lipkus, IM, Lyna, P, Swamy, GK, Pletsch, PK, Peterson, BL, Heine, RP, Brouwer, RJN, Fish, L, and Myers, ER. "Nicotine replacement and behavioral therapy for smoking cessation in pregnancy." Am J Prev Med 33.4 (October 2007): 297-305.
PMID
17888856
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
297
End Page
305
DOI
10.1016/j.amepre.2007.05.006

Challenges and solutions for recruiting pregnant smokers into a nicotine replacement therapy trial.

Improvements in smoking cessation interventions for pregnant smokers are needed. One major step is to examine the potential effectiveness of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). The potential benefits of providing pregnant women with NRT to help them quit smoking are still unknown; early interventions to test the effectiveness and efficacy are vital to advancing the field. This paper describes recruitment efforts for a multiclinic trial to test the effectiveness of NRT use in addition to behavioral therapy in promoting cessation during pregnancy. The biggest challenge is recruiting sufficient numbers of pregnant women. This paper discusses specific obstacles for recruitment and solutions. Knowing the potential pitfalls to recruiting pregnant women into these trials can lead to better studies and thus improved outcomes.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Oncken, CA; Lipkus, IM; Peterson, BL; Swamy, GK; Pletsch, PK; Lyna, P; Namenek Brouwer, RJ; Fish, LJ; Myers, ER
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Oncken, CA, Lipkus, IM, Peterson, BL, Swamy, GK, Pletsch, PK, Lyna, P, Namenek Brouwer, RJ, Fish, LJ, and Myers, ER. "Challenges and solutions for recruiting pregnant smokers into a nicotine replacement therapy trial." Nicotine Tob Res 8.4 (August 2006): 547-554.
PMID
16920652
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
547
End Page
554
DOI
10.1080/14622200600789882

Prospective trial of a video educational tool for radiation oncology patients.

OBJECTIVES: Prospective assessment of the informational needs of radiation oncology patients and efficacy of an educational video in meeting them. METHODS: Subjects completed baseline self-administered questionnaires and subsequently viewed the patient education video. Post-testing was performed after initiation of therapy and subjects rated their satisfaction with the video, its relevance, and their emotional response. Analyses were performed with respect to patient and disease characteristics. RESULTS: Fifty-three subjects were enrolled and completed both before and after video measures. The mean age of participants was 58 years (range, 33 to 83). Pretreatment, >90% of patients reported specific information needs. One hundred percent of patients watched the video and 77% rated it as highly relevant. High levels of satisfaction (>90%) were reported with video information describing radiation and simulation. Older subjects (58 years and older) found video information significantly more relevant than those younger (55% versus 27%, P = 0.04) and rated greater satisfaction with side effect information (78% versus 41%, P = 0.006). Subjects with breast cancer exhibited a trend towards feeling better informed by the video. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation oncology patients reported informational needs unmet by standard educational measures. High levels of satisfaction were reported with video education. It promoted better understanding of radiotherapy. Older patients found the video to be significantly more relevant and informative.

Authors
Hahn, CA; Fish, LJ; Dunn, RH; Halperin, EC
MLA Citation
Hahn, CA, Fish, LJ, Dunn, RH, and Halperin, EC. "Prospective trial of a video educational tool for radiation oncology patients." American journal of clinical oncology 28.6 (December 2005): 609-612. (Academic Article)
PMID
16317273
Source
manual
Published In
American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume
28
Issue
6
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
609
End Page
612

Smoking cessation and adherence

Authors
Bastian, LA; Molner, SL; Fish, LJ; McBride, CM
MLA Citation
Bastian, LA, Molner, SL, Fish, LJ, and McBride, CM. "Smoking cessation and adherence." (August 21, 2005): 125-146. (Chapter)
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
125
End Page
146
DOI
10.4324/9781410615626

Initiation and discontinuation of hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms: results from a community sample.

Factors related to initiation and discontinuation of hormonal therapy (HT) for treatment of menopausal symptoms were examined in a community sample of 533 peri/postmenopausal women aged 45-54 by telephone three times. Over 40 variables including: sociodemographic characteristics, clinical reasons to start HT use, HT contraindications, HT attitudes/knowledge, and health behaviors were examined in logistic regression models comparing women who discontinued HT to women who continued using HT over 9 months (discontinuers) and women who initiated HT versus women who never used HT over 9 months (initiators). Increased understanding of HT, confidence, mental health symptoms, perception that menopause is natural, and having gynecological surgery were related to decreased likelihood of HT discontinuation. Increased understanding about risks of HT, vasomotor symptoms, mood symptoms, and having gynecological surgery were related to increased likelihood of HT Initiation. These findings highlight the importance of physicians discussing HT with their patients, particularly because of recent clinical trial developments.

Authors
Bosworth, HB; Bastian, LA; Grambow, SC; McBride, CM; Skinner, CS; Fish, L; Rimer, BK; Siegler, IC
MLA Citation
Bosworth, HB, Bastian, LA, Grambow, SC, McBride, CM, Skinner, CS, Fish, L, Rimer, BK, and Siegler, IC. "Initiation and discontinuation of hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms: results from a community sample." J Behav Med 28.1 (February 2005): 105-114.
PMID
15887880
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
28
Issue
1
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
105
End Page
114

Factors associated with condom use among at-risk women students and nonstudents seen in managed care.

OBJECTIVES: Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) research has focused on high-risk populations such as STD clinic patients and college students. This report examines predictors of unprotected sex among nonstudent women seen in primary care. STUDY DESIGN: Data are taken from the baseline survey of an intervention trial testing tailored print materials to encourage condom use. POPULATION: Eligible women were identified from automated databases of two managed care organizations and were ages 18-25, unmarried, heterosexually active in the prior 6 months, and not in a long-term monogamous relationship. OUTCOMES: The frequency of and relative contribution of risk behaviors to occurrences of unprotected vaginal sex were compared among non-full-time students (n=711) and full-time students (n=390). RESULTS: STD risk behaviors were prevalent and had similar associations with unprotected sex in both subsamples. Older age, using hormonal or no usual contraception, and having a "primary" partner increased unprotected sex; partner approval of condoms and having bought or carried condoms decreased unprotected sex. CONCLUSION: While sexually active single women seen in primary care perceive themselves at low STD risk, their risk profiles are similar to those of higher risk populations. Clinic-based interventions that include proactive identification of at-risk women and systems for encouraging safer sex practices are needed.

Authors
Yarnall, KSH; McBride, CM; Lyna, P; Fish, LJ; Civic, D; Grothaus, L; Scholes, D
MLA Citation
Yarnall, KSH, McBride, CM, Lyna, P, Fish, LJ, Civic, D, Grothaus, L, and Scholes, D. "Factors associated with condom use among at-risk women students and nonstudents seen in managed care." Prev Med 37.2 (August 2003): 163-170.
PMID
12855216
Source
pubmed
Published In
Preventive Medicine
Volume
37
Issue
2
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
163
End Page
170

A tailored minimal self-help intervention to promote condom use in young women: results from a randomized trial.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a theory-based tailored minimal self-help intervention to increase condom use among young women at risk for HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD). DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial on an intent-to-treat basis in two managed care plans, in Washington state and North Carolina, with follow-up at 3 and 6 months. PARTICIPANTS: A proactively recruited sample of 1210 heterosexually active, non-monogamous, non-pregnant women, aged 18-24 years recruited June 1999-April 2000; 85% completed the 6-month follow-up. METHOD: Arm 1 received usual care. Arm 2 received a mailed computer-generated self-help magazine, individually tailored on survey items including stage of readiness to use condoms, barriers to condom use, partner type; condom samples and a condom-carrying case were included in the packet; this was followed 3 months later by a tailored 'booster' newsletter. The a priori 6-month main outcomes were percentage of women using condoms during the previous 3 months (overall and by partner type) and proportion of total episodes of intercourse during which condoms were used in the previous 3 months. RESULTS: Relative to usual care, intervention group women reported significantly more condom use overall [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 1.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32-2.65; P = 0.0005] and with recent primary partners (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.37-2.86; P = 0.0003). They also reported using condoms for a higher proportion of intercourse episodes (52.7% versus 47.9%; P = 0.05). Significantly more intervention women carried condoms, discussed condoms with partners, and had higher self-efficacy to use condoms with primary partners. CONCLUSIONS: Tailored cognitive/behavioral minimal self-help interventions hold promise as HIV/STD prevention strategies for diverse populations of young at-risk women.

Authors
Scholes, D; McBride, CM; Grothaus, L; Civic, D; Ichikawa, LE; Fish, LJ; Yarnall, KS
MLA Citation
Scholes, D, McBride, CM, Grothaus, L, Civic, D, Ichikawa, LE, Fish, LJ, and Yarnall, KS. "A tailored minimal self-help intervention to promote condom use in young women: results from a randomized trial." AIDS 17.10 (July 4, 2003): 1547-1556.
PMID
12824793
Source
pubmed
Published In
AIDS
Volume
17
Issue
10
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
1547
End Page
1556
DOI
10.1097/01.aids.0000076280.54156.51

Barriers to the participation of African-American patients with cancer in clinical trials: a pilot study.

BACKGROUND: African-American patients have been under-represented in oncology clinical trials. Better understanding barriers to African-American participation may help increase the accrual of African-American patients onto clinical trials. METHODS: Two hundred eighteen patients with malignant disease (72 African-American patients and 146 white patients) were recruited from the Duke Cancer Clinic and from Duke Oncology Outreach Clinics (DOORS). Patients were interviewed using a standardized survey. Questions included patients' knowledge of cancer, religious/spiritual beliefs, satisfaction with medical care, knowledge of clinical trials, reasons for participating or refusing to participate in a clinical trial, financial/transportation issues, and demographic factors, such as age and education. Data on attitudes and belief were analyzed for group differences between African-American patients and white patients as well as between patients who were treated at the Duke Cancer Clinic and patients who were treated at DOORS clinics. RESULTS: Willingness to participate in a clinical trial depended on both race and clinic site. Forty-five percent of white patients, compared with 31% of African-American patients, were willing to participate in a clinical trial (P = 0.05). white and African-American patients who were treated at the Duke Cancer Clinic were more willing to participate in a trial compared with their counterparts who were treated at DOORS clinics (47% vs. 37%, respectively; P = 0.09). The greatest differences between groups (African-American patients vs. white patients and Duke Cancer Clinic patients vs. DOORS patients) were education and income: Much greater percentages of African-American patients and DOORS patients did not complete high school and had annual incomes < $15,000. In addition, more African-American patients than white patients believed that God would determine whether they would be cured or would die from their disease. In a multivariate analysis, education, income, and belief that God would determine the patient's outcome also were correlated with a decreased willingness to participate in clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS: Factors associated with religion, education, and income, rather than race, may be major barriers to clinical trial participation. Interventions that target education and income may increase the recruitment of African-American oncology patients onto clinical trials.

Authors
Advani, AS; Atkeson, B; Brown, CL; Peterson, BL; Fish, L; Johnson, JL; Gockerman, JP; Gautier, M
MLA Citation
Advani, AS, Atkeson, B, Brown, CL, Peterson, BL, Fish, L, Johnson, JL, Gockerman, JP, and Gautier, M. "Barriers to the participation of African-American patients with cancer in clinical trials: a pilot study." Cancer 97.6 (March 15, 2003): 1499-1506.
PMID
12627515
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
97
Issue
6
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
1499
End Page
1506
DOI
10.1002/cncr.11213

Distress and motivation for smoking cessation among lung cancer patients' relatives who smoke.

BACKGROUND: Heightened distress at the time of a loved one's lung cancer diagnosis may motivate relatives to quit smoking or could undermine cessation. METHODS: Relatives of new lung cancer patients at Duke were surveyed by telephone to assess diagnosis-related depression, distress, and motivation for smoking cessation. RESULTS: Relatives who reported above average avoidant and intrusive thinking patterns, depressive symptoms or worry were more likely to report that the patient's diagnosis increased their intentions to quit than the less distressed. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed that encourage smoking cessation as a strategy for adaptively coping with a loved ones' lung cancer diagnosis.

Authors
McBride, CM; Pollak, KI; Garst, J; Keefe, F; Lyna, P; Fish, L; Hood, L
MLA Citation
McBride, CM, Pollak, KI, Garst, J, Keefe, F, Lyna, P, Fish, L, and Hood, L. "Distress and motivation for smoking cessation among lung cancer patients' relatives who smoke." J Cancer Educ 18.3 (2003): 150-156.
PMID
14512262
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Cancer Education
Volume
18
Issue
3
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
150
End Page
156
DOI
10.1207/S15430154JCE1803_08

Ineffective use of condoms among young women in managed care.

Condoms must be used effectively in order to prevent pregnancy and the spread of HIV/STD. This study investigated two types of ineffective condom use, delayed condom use (initiated after penetration has occurred) and condom slippage and/or breakage. We estimated prevalence and identified predictors of ineffective condom use among young women at risk of STDs. The study used baseline survey data from a randomized trial of women 18-24 years old at two managed care sites; 779 participants who were recent condom users were included in this analysis. Forty-four per cent of the sample reported delayed condom use in the past three months and 19% reported condom slippage and/or breakage. In multivariate logistic regression, younger age, primary partner, lack of partner support, multiple recent sexual partners and using condoms for contraception were positively associated with delayed condom use. Correlates of condom slippage and/or breakage were non-white race/ethnicity and history of any STD. Greater frequency of condom use independently predicted both outcomes. Ineffective condom use was common in this sample of experienced condom users and predictors were different for each outcome. HIV/STD prevention interventions must address more specific aspects of condom use than have previously been their focus, especially when condom use is already high.

Authors
Civic, D; Scholes, D; Ichikawa, L; Grothaus, L; McBride, CM; Yarnall, KSH; Fish, L
MLA Citation
Civic, D, Scholes, D, Ichikawa, L, Grothaus, L, McBride, CM, Yarnall, KSH, and Fish, L. "Ineffective use of condoms among young women in managed care." AIDS Care 14.6 (December 2002): 779-788.
PMID
12511211
Source
pubmed
Published In
AIDS Care
Volume
14
Issue
6
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
779
End Page
788
DOI
10.1080/0954012021000031859

Evaluating participants' use of a hormone replacement therapy decision-making intervention.

BACKGROUND: Associations between optimal use of a tailored decision-aid and levels of accuracy of perceived breast cancer risk, confidence in decision-making, and satisfaction with decisions about HRT were evaluated in a randomized intervention trial with a community sample of women aged 45-54. METHODS: Data are from 289 women randomized to receive a computer-tailored three-step decision-aid. RESULTS: Forty-seven percent of participants reported optimal use of the intervention materials. African American women and those with low confidence in decision-making were less likely to use the intervention optimally than white women and those with higher confidence (P<0.05). Optimal use of the decision-aid was associated with increased accuracy of perceived risk and confidence to make a decision. DISCUSSION: When used optimally, self-directed decision-aids can improve women's ability to make decisions about HRT. Additional refinement of these aids is needed. For some subgroups of women, adjuncts such as telephone counseling also might be considered.

Authors
Bastian, LA; McBride, CM; Fish, L; Lyna, P; Farrell, D; Lipkus, IM; Rimer, BK; Siegler, IC
MLA Citation
Bastian, LA, McBride, CM, Fish, L, Lyna, P, Farrell, D, Lipkus, IM, Rimer, BK, and Siegler, IC. "Evaluating participants' use of a hormone replacement therapy decision-making intervention." Patient Educ Couns 48.3 (December 2002): 283-291.
PMID
12477613
Source
pubmed
Published In
Patient Education and Counseling
Volume
48
Issue
3
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
283
End Page
291

Perceptions of patients' self-efficacy for managing pain and lung cancer symptoms: correspondence between patients and family caregivers.

This study examined the degree of correspondence between lung cancer patients and their family caregivers in their perceptions of the patients' self-efficacy for managing pain and other symptoms of lung cancer, and the association of this correspondence to demographic, disease, and psychosocial variables. Thirty patients who were newly diagnosed with lung cancer and their primary family caregivers completed telephone interviews assessing the patient's symptoms, the patient's self-efficacy for managing symptoms, the quality of the relationship between the patient and caregiver, patient and caregiver psychological distress, and caregiver strain. Although patients and their caregivers showed a moderate degree of agreement in their perceptions of the patient's self-efficacy for managing pain and other symptoms, there was considerable variability in the degree of congruence. Factors that contributed to lower levels of congruence included low patient-rated self-efficacy, female gender of the patient, high patient psychological distress, and high caregiver strain. Caregivers were about evenly split in their tendency to overestimate versus underestimate the patient's self-efficacy. A poorer quality of relationship between the caregiver and the patient (as rated by the patient), high levels of patient-rated symptoms, and high levels of caregiver strain were associated with caregivers overestimating patient self-efficacy.

Authors
Porter, LS; Keefe, FJ; McBride, CM; Pollak, K; Fish, L; Garst, J
MLA Citation
Porter, LS, Keefe, FJ, McBride, CM, Pollak, K, Fish, L, and Garst, J. "Perceptions of patients' self-efficacy for managing pain and lung cancer symptoms: correspondence between patients and family caregivers." Pain 98.1-2 (July 2002): 169-178.
PMID
12098629
Source
pubmed
Published In
PAIN
Volume
98
Issue
1-2
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
169
End Page
178

A tailored intervention to aid decision-making about hormone replacement therapy.

Authors
McBride, CM; Bastian, LA; Halabi, S; Fish, L; Lipkus, IM; Bosworth, HB; Rimer, BK; Siegler, IC
MLA Citation
McBride, CM, Bastian, LA, Halabi, S, Fish, L, Lipkus, IM, Bosworth, HB, Rimer, BK, and Siegler, IC. "A tailored intervention to aid decision-making about hormone replacement therapy." Am J Public Health 92.7 (July 2002): 1112-1114.
PMID
12084693
Source
pubmed
Published In
American journal of public health
Volume
92
Issue
7
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
1112
End Page
1114

Relationships among breast cancer perceived absolute risk, comparative risk, and worries.

When trying to predict breast cancer screening, it may be important to understand the relationships between perceived breast cancer risks and worries about getting breast cancer. This study examines the extent to which women's worries about breast cancer correlate with perceptions of both absolute (assessment of own) and comparative (self versus other) 10-year and lifetime risks. As part of a larger randomized intervention trial concerning hormone replacement therapy, 581 women participated in a telephone baseline survey to assess their perceptions of breast cancer risks and worries. Worries about getting breast cancer in the next 10 years and in one's lifetime were related positively to both absolute and comparative 10-year and lifetime risks. The magnitude of these relationships did not differ by time frame. Worry about breast cancer is a function of both how a woman views her own risk and how she compares her risk with that of other women. Some practitioners may encourage women to get screened for breast cancer by using emotional appeals, such as heightening women's worries about breast cancer by using risk information. Our data suggest that they should give careful consideration how best to combine, if at all, information about absolute and comparative risks. For example, if the motivation to screen is based on a sequential assessment of risk beginning with comparative and then absolute risk, creating communications that heighten perceived risk on both of these risk dimensions may be needed to evoke sufficient worry to initiate breast cancer screening.

Authors
Lipkus, IM; Kuchibhatla, M; McBride, CM; Bosworth, HB; Pollak, KI; Siegler, IC; Rimer, BK
MLA Citation
Lipkus, IM, Kuchibhatla, M, McBride, CM, Bosworth, HB, Pollak, KI, Siegler, IC, and Rimer, BK. "Relationships among breast cancer perceived absolute risk, comparative risk, and worries." Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 9.9 (September 2000): 973-975.
PMID
11008917
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
9
Issue
9
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
973
End Page
975

Attitudes and knowledge associated with being undecided about hormone replacement therapy: Results from a community sample

Authors
Bastian, LA; McBride, CM; Halabi, S; Fish, LJ; Skinner, CS; Kaplan, EB; Bosworth, HB; Rimer, BK; Siegler, IC
MLA Citation
Bastian, LA, McBride, CM, Halabi, S, Fish, LJ, Skinner, CS, Kaplan, EB, Bosworth, HB, Rimer, BK, and Siegler, IC. "Attitudes and knowledge associated with being undecided about hormone replacement therapy: Results from a community sample." WOMENS HEALTH ISSUES 9.6 (1999): 330-337.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Women's Health Issues
Volume
9
Issue
6
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
330
End Page
337
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