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Goetz, Sarah Catherine

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor of Cell Biology

Cell Biology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 2001

B.A. — Macalester College

Ph.D. 2007

Ph.D. — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

Characterizing the role of TTBK proteins in ciliogenesis and neural function

Administered By
Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 09, 2013
End Date
March 31, 2018

Publications:

The Spinocerebellar Ataxia-Associated Gene Tau Tubulin Kinase 2 Controls the Initiation of Ciliogenesis

Authors
Goetz, SC; Liem, KF; Anderson, KV
MLA Citation
Goetz, SC, Liem, KF, and Anderson, KV. "The Spinocerebellar Ataxia-Associated Gene Tau Tubulin Kinase 2 Controls the Initiation of Ciliogenesis." Cell 151.4 (November 2012): 847-858.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
151
Issue
4
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
847
End Page
858
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2012.10.010

The primary cilium: a signalling centre during vertebrate development

Authors
Goetz, SC; Anderson, KV
MLA Citation
Goetz, SC, and Anderson, KV. "The primary cilium: a signalling centre during vertebrate development." Nature Reviews Genetics 11.5 (May 2010): 331-344.
Source
crossref
Published In
Nature Reviews Genetics
Volume
11
Issue
5
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
331
End Page
344
DOI
10.1038/nrg2774

The primary cilium as a Hedgehog signal transduction machine.

The Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction pathway is essential for the development and patterning of numerous organ systems, and has important roles in a variety of human cancers. Genetic screens for mouse embryonic patterning mutants first showed a connection between mammalian Hh signaling and intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process required for construction of the primary cilium, a small cellular projection found on most vertebrate cells. Additional genetic and cell biological studies have provided very strong evidence that mammalian Hh signaling depends on the primary cilium. Here, we review the evidence that defines the integral roles that IFT proteins and cilia play in the regulation of the Hh signal transduction pathway in vertebrates. We discuss the mechanisms that control localization of Hh pathway proteins to the cilium, focusing on the transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo), which moves into the cilium in response to Hh ligand. The phenotypes caused by loss of cilia-associated proteins are complex, which suggests that cilia and IFT play active roles in mediating Hh signaling rather than serving simply as a compartment in which pathway components are concentrated. Hh signaling in Drosophila does not depend on cilia, but there appear to be ancient links between cilia and components of the Hh pathway that may reveal how this fundamental difference between the Drosophila and mammalian Hh pathways arose in evolution. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Authors
Goetz, SC; Ocbina, PJR; Anderson, KV
MLA Citation
Goetz, SC, Ocbina, PJR, and Anderson, KV. "The primary cilium as a Hedgehog signal transduction machine." Methods in cell biology 94 (2009): 199-222.
Source
scival
Published In
Methods in cell biology
Volume
94
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
199
End Page
222
DOI
10.1016/S0091-679X(08)94010-3

SHP-2 is required for the maintenance of cardiac progenitors

Authors
Langdon, YG; Goetz, SC; Berg, AE; Swanik, JT; Conlon, FL
MLA Citation
Langdon, YG, Goetz, SC, Berg, AE, Swanik, JT, and Conlon, FL. "SHP-2 is required for the maintenance of cardiac progenitors." Development 134.22 (October 17, 2007): 4119-4130.
Source
crossref
Published In
Development (Cambridge)
Volume
134
Issue
22
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
4119
End Page
4130
DOI
10.1242/dev.009290

Cardiac progenitors and the embryonic cell cycle

Despite the critical importance of proper cell cycle regulation in establishing the correct morphology of organs and tissues during development, relatively little is known about how cell proliferation is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. The control of cell proliferation within the developing heart is of considerable interest, given the high prevalence of congenital cardiac abnormalities among humans, and recent interest in the isolation of cardiac progenitor populations. We therefore review studies exploring the contribution of cell proliferation to overall cardiac morphology and the molecular mechanisms regulating this process. In addition, we also review recent studies that have identified progenitor cell populations within the adult myocardium, as well as those exploring the capability of differentiated myocardial cells to proliferate post-natally. Thus, the exploration of cardiomyoctye cell cycle regulation, both during development as well as in the adult heart, promises to yield many exciting and important discoveries over the coming years. ©2007 Landes Bioscience.

Authors
Goetz, SC; Conlon, FL
MLA Citation
Goetz, SC, and Conlon, FL. "Cardiac progenitors and the embryonic cell cycle." Cell Cycle 6.16 (2007): 1974-1981.
Source
scival
Published In
Cell Cycle
Volume
6
Issue
16
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
1974
End Page
1981

TBX5 is required for embryonic cardiac cell cycle progression

Authors
Goetz, SC
MLA Citation
Goetz, SC. "TBX5 is required for embryonic cardiac cell cycle progression." Development 133.13 (July 1, 2006): 2575-2584.
Source
crossref
Published In
Development (Cambridge)
Volume
133
Issue
13
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
2575
End Page
2584
DOI
10.1242/dev.02420

Tbx5 and Tbx20 act synergistically to control vertebrate heart morphogenesis

Authors
Brown, DD
MLA Citation
Brown, DD. "Tbx5 and Tbx20 act synergistically to control vertebrate heart morphogenesis." Development 132.3 (January 5, 2005): 553-563.
Source
crossref
Published In
Development (Cambridge)
Volume
132
Issue
3
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
553
End Page
563
DOI
10.1242/dev.01596
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