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Gosselin, Tracy Karen

Positions:

Clinical Associate in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1993

B.S. — Northeastern University

M.S.N. 1997

M.S.N. — Duke University

Staff Nurse, Hematology And Gynecology Oncology Unit

Duke University

Assistant Nurse Manager, Hematology Oncology

Duke University

Grants:

Tailored Intervention Protocol for Oral Chemotherapy Adherence

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
April 09, 2009
End Date
March 31, 2012

Publications:

The Symptom Experience in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

As the number of rectal cancer survivors grows, it is important to understand the symptom experience after treatment. Although data show that rectal cancer survivors experience a variety of symptoms after diagnosis, little has been done to study the way these symptoms are grouped and associated.To determine symptom prevalence and intensity in rectal cancer survivors and if clusters of survivors exist, who share similar symptom-defined survivor subgroups that may vary based on antecedent variables.A secondary analysis of the Cancer Care and Outcomes Research and Surveillance database was undertaken. Cluster analysis was performed on 15-month postdiagnosis data to form post-treatment survivor subgroups, and these were examined for differences in demographic and clinical characteristics. Data were analyzed using cluster analysis, chi-square, and analysis of variance.A total of 275 rectal cancer survivors were included who had undergone chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. Most frequently reported symptoms included feeling "worn out" (87%), feeling "tired" (85%), and "trouble sleeping" (66%). Four symptom-defined survivor subgroups (minimally symptomatic n = 40, tired and trouble sleeping n = 138, moderate symptoms n = 42, and highly symptomatic n = 55) were identified with symptom differences existing among each subgroup. Age and being married/partnered were the only two antecedents found to differ across subgroups.This study documents differences in the symptom experience after treatment. The identification of survivor subgroups allows researchers to further investigate tailored, supportive care strategies to minimize ongoing symptoms in those with the greatest symptom burden.

Authors
Gosselin, TK; Beck, S; Abbott, DH; Grambow, SC; Provenzale, D; Berry, P; Kahn, KL; Malin, JL
MLA Citation
Gosselin, TK, Beck, S, Abbott, DH, Grambow, SC, Provenzale, D, Berry, P, Kahn, KL, and Malin, JL. "The Symptom Experience in Rectal Cancer Survivors." Journal of pain and symptom management 52.5 (November 2016): 709-718.
PMID
27697567
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume
52
Issue
5
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
709
End Page
718
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.05.027

The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the Academic Setting.

To explore how advanced practice nurses implement practice change in academic medical centers to support optimal patient and staff outcomes.Published peer reviewed literature, web-based resources, and professional society materials.Cancer care is rapidly evolving and advanced practice nurses can shape the future of how care is delivered as well as the setting it is delivered in.Advanced practice oncology nurses (Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Nurse Specialists) have an opportunity to significantly shape the patient experience by implementing programmatic changes across the continuum of care by engaging stakeholders in project design. Knowledge of change management and implementation science is critical to success.

Authors
Gosselin, TK; Dalton, KA; Penne, K
MLA Citation
Gosselin, TK, Dalton, KA, and Penne, K. "The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the Academic Setting." Seminars in oncology nursing 31.4 (November 2015): 290-297. (Review)
PMID
26525729
Source
epmc
Published In
Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Volume
31
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
290
End Page
297
DOI
10.1016/j.soncn.2015.08.005

A prospective randomized, placebo-controlled skin care study in women diagnosed with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of three different skin care products versus a placebo in reducing the incidence of radiation therapy-induced skin reactions prophylactically. DESIGN: Prospective randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. SETTING: A radiation oncology department at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the southeastern United States. SAMPLE: 208 women with breast cancer who were to receive whole breast radiation therapy. METHODS: Patients were invited to participate after radiation therapy was documented as part of their treatment plan. Patients applied a skin care product starting on the first day of treatment and were assessed weekly by their radiation oncology nurse. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Skin reaction score and skin product. FINDINGS: None of the products were statistically better than placebo in preventing skin reactions. Increases in skin reaction over time did not vary with treatment group for the linear (p = 0.16) and nonlinear (p = 0.94) effects of time and for both time components tested together (p = 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: Ninety-five percent of women participating in this study experienced a radiation therapy-induced skin reaction. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: The development of guidelines to support safe patient care is encouraged because patients prefer to take action rather than do nothing. However, the findings do not demonstrate improved clinical outcomes with the use of skin care products. Healthcare providers should proactively educate patients about acute skin reactions and self-care strategies to minimize skin breakdown.

Authors
Gosselin, TK; Schneider, SM; Plambeck, MA; Rowe, K
MLA Citation
Gosselin, TK, Schneider, SM, Plambeck, MA, and Rowe, K. "A prospective randomized, placebo-controlled skin care study in women diagnosed with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy." Oncol Nurs Forum 37.5 (September 2010): 619-626.
PMID
20797953
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
37
Issue
5
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
619
End Page
626
DOI
10.1188/10.ONF.619-626

Assessing the need for a dietitian in radiation oncology.

Nutritional care is an integral component of quality cancer treatment. Patients undergoing cancer therapy are at risk for developing a variety of side effects that impact their intake, absorption, and nutritional status. The issue becomes compounded in newly diagnosed patients who have preexisting poor nutritional status, comorbid diseases, mechanical obstruction, and metabolic abnormalities. Standards related to the role of dietitians are well defined in the literature and by the Joint Commission. The quality improvement project illustrated in this article clearly demonstrated the need for a dietitian in the radiation oncology clinic by using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment.

Authors
Gosselin, TK; Gilliard, L; Tinnen, R
MLA Citation
Gosselin, TK, Gilliard, L, and Tinnen, R. "Assessing the need for a dietitian in radiation oncology." Clin J Oncol Nurs 12.5 (October 2008): 781-787.
PMID
18842534
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
12
Issue
5
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
781
End Page
787
DOI
10.1188/08.CJON.781-787

Nursing advocacy in North Carolina.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To identify the ways oncology nurses in one state advocate for patients, as well as the resources they use to do so. DESIGN: Descriptive, cross-sectional survey. SETTING: North Carolina. SAMPLE: 141 RNs in North Carolina who were members of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS). METHODS: Subjects completed a two-page, self-administered questionnaire comprised of fixed-choice and open-ended questions. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Demographics, frequency of advocating for patient services, and awareness of ONS resources. FINDINGS: Nurses in North Carolina advocate for patients in a variety of ways. A need exists to develop ongoing methods to keep nurses up to date on advocacy issues, as well as to establish mentoring opportunities for them. Nurses believe that they are most challenged in addressing patients' financial and insurance concerns. CONCLUSIONS: Oncology nurses frequently advocate for patients' needs. The findings provide direction for future initiatives to educate nurses about their role in patient advocacy and available resources. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Ongoing education and research are needed to enhance the role of oncology nurses as patient advocates.

Authors
Gosselin-Acomb, TK; Schneider, SM; Clough, RW; Veenstra, BA
MLA Citation
Gosselin-Acomb, TK, Schneider, SM, Clough, RW, and Veenstra, BA. "Nursing advocacy in North Carolina." Oncol Nurs Forum 34.5 (September 2007): 1070-1074.
PMID
17878134
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
34
Issue
5
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
1070
End Page
1074
DOI
10.1188/07.ONF.1070-1074

Thermal wounds following heating pad use.

Authors
Gosselin, TK
MLA Citation
Gosselin, TK. "Thermal wounds following heating pad use." Clin J Oncol Nurs 7.1 (January 2003): 87-88.
PMID
12629940
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
7
Issue
1
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
87
End Page
88
DOI
10.1188/03.CJON.87-88

Amifostine as a radioprotectant.

Authors
Gosselin, TK; Mautner, B
MLA Citation
Gosselin, TK, and Mautner, B. "Amifostine as a radioprotectant." Clin J Oncol Nurs 6.3 (May 2002): 175-180.
PMID
11998614
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
6
Issue
3
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
175
End Page
180
DOI
10.1188/02.CJON.175-176
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