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Hall, Allison Haberstroh Sandler

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

MD./PhD. 2007

MD./PhD. — Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Culturally appropriate screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer in East Africa

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2015
End Date
July 31, 2020

Targeting precursor neural (N)-cadherin to eliminate chemotherapy-resistant triple-negative breast tumor cells

Administered By
Pathology
AwardedBy
Department of Defense
Role
Pathologist
Start Date
March 01, 2017
End Date
February 29, 2020

(PQC3) Genomic Diversity and Microenvironment as Drivers of Metastasis in DCIS

Administered By
Surgery, Advanced Oncologic and Gastrointestinal Surgery
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2014
End Date
July 31, 2018

Molecular and Radiologic Predictors of Invasion in a DCIS Active Surveillance Cohort

Administered By
Surgery, Advanced Oncologic and Gastrointestinal Surgery
AwardedBy
Breast Cancer Research Foundation
Role
Investigator
Start Date
October 01, 2016
End Date
September 30, 2017

Anti-HPV RNA Interference Using Modified RNA's

Administered By
Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Research Assistant
Start Date
August 11, 2004
End Date
November 14, 2005
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Publications:

Maternal CD4+ T cells protect against severe congenital cytomegalovirus disease in a novel nonhuman primate model of placental cytomegalovirus transmission.

Elucidation of maternal immune correlates of protection against congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is necessary to inform future vaccine design. Here, we present a novel rhesus macaque model of placental rhesus CMV (rhCMV) transmission and use it to dissect determinants of protection against congenital transmission following primary maternal rhCMV infection. In this model, asymptomatic intrauterine infection was observed following i.v. rhCMV inoculation during the early second trimester in two of three rhCMV-seronegative pregnant females. In contrast, fetal loss or infant CMV-associated sequelae occurred in four rhCMV-seronegative pregnant macaques that were CD4(+) T-cell depleted at the time of inoculation. Animals that received the CD4(+) T-cell-depleting antibody also exhibited higher plasma and amniotic fluid viral loads, dampened virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses, and delayed production of autologous neutralizing antibodies compared with immunocompetent monkeys. Thus, maternal CD4(+) T-cell immunity during primary rhCMV infection is important for controlling maternal viremia and inducing protective immune responses that prevent severe CMV-associated fetal disease.

Authors
Bialas, KM; Tanaka, T; Tran, D; Varner, V; Cisneros De La Rosa, E; Chiuppesi, F; Wussow, F; Kattenhorn, L; Macri, S; Kunz, EL; Estroff, JA; Kirchherr, J; Yue, Y; Fan, Q; Lauck, M; O'Connor, DH; Hall, AHS; Xavier, A; Diamond, DJ; Barry, PA; Kaur, A; Permar, SR
MLA Citation
Bialas, KM, Tanaka, T, Tran, D, Varner, V, Cisneros De La Rosa, E, Chiuppesi, F, Wussow, F, Kattenhorn, L, Macri, S, Kunz, EL, Estroff, JA, Kirchherr, J, Yue, Y, Fan, Q, Lauck, M, O'Connor, DH, Hall, AHS, Xavier, A, Diamond, DJ, Barry, PA, Kaur, A, and Permar, SR. "Maternal CD4+ T cells protect against severe congenital cytomegalovirus disease in a novel nonhuman primate model of placental cytomegalovirus transmission." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112.44 (November 2015): 13645-13650.
PMID
26483473
Source
epmc
Published In
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA
Volume
112
Issue
44
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
13645
End Page
13650
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1511526112

Cystic fibrosis involving the cervix, mimicking a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma: A case report

We describe clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of an unusual case of cystic fibrosis manifesting in the cervix as a mass lesion, mimicking cervical adenocarcinoma. A 24-year-old nulligravida with cystic fibrosis developed heavy postcoital vaginal bleeding 4 months after starting oral contraceptives and was found to have a cervical mass. She underwent a loop electrosurgical excision of the mass, and microscopic examination revealed a florid endocervical proliferation, extending to the margins. This lesion was initially interpreted as an invasive, well-differentiated endocervical adenocarcinoma. However, on subsequent review, the lesion was found to have a low rate of proliferation, no evidence of an infiltrative growth pattern, and abundant acute inflammation. Given these findings and the absence of any residual endocervical lesion on a subsequent cold knife conization, we determined that this was a benign, likely reactive, lesion. This case, together with previous studies, suggests that women with cystic fibrosis can develop proliferative endocervical lesions and that oral contraceptives may contribute to their development. © 2013 International Society of Gynecological Pathologists.

Authors
Previs, RA; Edwards, JM; Secord, AA; Nucci, MR; Bentley, RC; Hall, AHS
MLA Citation
Previs, RA, Edwards, JM, Secord, AA, Nucci, MR, Bentley, RC, and Hall, AHS. "Cystic fibrosis involving the cervix, mimicking a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma: A case report." International Journal of Gynecological Pathology 33.1 (January 1, 2014): 100-104.
Source
scopus
Published In
International Journal of Gynecological Pathology
Volume
33
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
100
End Page
104
DOI
10.1097/PGP.0b013e318278b832

Cystic fibrosis involving the cervix, mimicking a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma: a case report.

We describe clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of an unusual case of cystic fibrosis manifesting in the cervix as a mass lesion, mimicking cervical adenocarcinoma. A 24-year-old nulligravida with cystic fibrosis developed heavy postcoital vaginal bleeding 4 months after starting oral contraceptives and was found to have a cervical mass. She underwent a loop electrosurgical excision of the mass, and microscopic examination revealed a florid endocervical proliferation, extending to the margins. This lesion was initially interpreted as an invasive, well-differentiated endocervical adenocarcinoma. However, on subsequent review, the lesion was found to have a low rate of proliferation, no evidence of an infiltrative growth pattern, and abundant acute inflammation. Given these findings and the absence of any residual endocervical lesion on a subsequent cold knife conization, we determined that this was a benign, likely reactive, lesion. This case, together with previous studies, suggests that women with cystic fibrosis can develop proliferative endocervical lesions and that oral contraceptives may contribute to their development.

Authors
Previs, RA; Edwards, JM; Secord, AA; Nucci, MR; Bentley, RC; Hall, AHS
MLA Citation
Previs, RA, Edwards, JM, Secord, AA, Nucci, MR, Bentley, RC, and Hall, AHS. "Cystic fibrosis involving the cervix, mimicking a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma: a case report." International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists 33.1 (January 2014): 100-104.
PMID
24300542
Source
epmc
Published In
International Journal of Gynecological Pathology
Volume
33
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
100
End Page
104
DOI
10.1097/pgp.0b013e318278b832

Genes with bimodal expression are robust diagnostic targets that define distinct subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer with different overall survival.

In some cancer types, certain genes behave as molecular switches, with on and off expression states. These genes tend to define tumor subtypes associated with different treatments and different patient survival. We hypothesized that clinically relevant molecular switch genes exist in epithelial ovarian cancer. To test this hypothesis, we applied a bimodal discovery algorithm to a publicly available ovarian cancer expression microarray data set, GSE9891 [285 tumors: 246 malignant serous (MS), 20 endometrioid (EM), and 18 low malignant potential (LMP) ovarian carcinomas]. Genes with robust bimodal expression patterns were identified across all ovarian tumor types and also within selected subtypes: 73 bimodal genes demonstrated differential expression between LMP versus MS and EM; 22 bimodal genes distinguished MS from EM; and 14 genes had significant association with survival among MS tumors. When these genes were combined into a single survival score, the median survival for patients with a favorable versus unfavorable score was 65 versus 29 months (P < 0.0001, hazard ratio = 0.4221). Two independent data sets [high-grade, advanced-stage serous (n = 53) and advanced-stage (n = 119) ovarian tumors] validated the survival score performance. We conclude that genes with bimodal expression patterns not only define clinically relevant molecular subtypes of ovarian carcinoma but also provide ideal targets for translation into the clinical laboratory.

Authors
Kernagis, DN; Hall, AHS; Datto, MB
MLA Citation
Kernagis, DN, Hall, AHS, and Datto, MB. "Genes with bimodal expression are robust diagnostic targets that define distinct subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer with different overall survival." J Mol Diagn 14.3 (May 2012): 214-222.
PMID
22490445
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of molecular diagnostics : JMD
Volume
14
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
214
End Page
222
DOI
10.1016/j.jmoldx.2012.01.007

Bimodally Expressed Genes in Ovarian Carcinoma.

Authors
Hall, AHS; Kernagis, DN; Datto, MB
MLA Citation
Hall, AHS, Kernagis, DN, and Datto, MB. "Bimodally Expressed Genes in Ovarian Carcinoma." February 2011.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Laboratory Investigation
Volume
91
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
443A
End Page
443A

Bimodally Expressed Genes in Ovarian Carcinoma.

Authors
Hall, AHS; Kernagis, DN; Datto, MB
MLA Citation
Hall, AHS, Kernagis, DN, and Datto, MB. "Bimodally Expressed Genes in Ovarian Carcinoma." February 2011.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Modern Pathology
Volume
24
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
443A
End Page
443A

Minocycline-induced black thyroid.

Authors
Hall, AHS; Bean, SM
MLA Citation
Hall, AHS, and Bean, SM. "Minocycline-induced black thyroid." Diagn Cytopathol 38.8 (August 2010): 579-580.
PMID
19890835
Source
pubmed
Published In
Diagnostic Cytopathology
Volume
38
Issue
8
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
579
End Page
580
DOI
10.1002/dc.21227

Colonic schwannoma visualized on FDG PET/CT.

Authors
Wang, CL; Neville, AM; Wong, TZ; Hall, AH; Paulson, EK; Bentley, RC
MLA Citation
Wang, CL, Neville, AM, Wong, TZ, Hall, AH, Paulson, EK, and Bentley, RC. "Colonic schwannoma visualized on FDG PET/CT." Clinical nuclear medicine 35.3 (March 2010): 181-183.
PMID
20173452
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume
35
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
181
End Page
183
DOI
10.1097/rlu.0b013e3181cc632a

High potency silencing by single-stranded boranophosphate siRNA.

In RNA interference (RNAi), double-stranded short interfering RNA (ds-siRNA) inhibits expression from complementary mRNAs. Recently, it was demonstrated that short, single-stranded antisense RNA (ss-siRNA) can also induce RNAi. While ss-siRNA may offer several advantages in both clinical and research applications, its overall poor activity compared with ds-siRNA has prevented its widespread use. In contrast to the poor gene silencing activity of native ss-siRNA, we found that the silencing activity of boranophosphate-modified ss-siRNA is comparable with that of unmodified ds-siRNA. Boranophosphate ss-siRNA has excellent maximum silencing activity and is highly effective at low concentrations. The silencing activity of boranophosphate ss-siRNA is also durable, with significant silencing up to 1 week after transfection. Thus, we have demonstrated that boranophosphate-modified ss-siRNA can silence gene expression as well as native ds-siRNA, suggesting that boranophosphate-modified ss-siRNAs should be investigated as a potential new class of therapeutic agents.

Authors
Hall, AHS; Wan, J; Spesock, A; Sergueeva, Z; Shaw, BR; Alexander, KA
MLA Citation
Hall, AHS, Wan, J, Spesock, A, Sergueeva, Z, Shaw, BR, and Alexander, KA. "High potency silencing by single-stranded boranophosphate siRNA. (Published online)" Nucleic Acids Res 34.9 (2006): 2773-2781.
PMID
16717282
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nucleic Acids Research
Volume
34
Issue
9
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
2773
End Page
2781
DOI
10.1093/nar/gkl339
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