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Hendrix, Cristina Cu

Overview:

Dr. Hendrix’ program of research deals with the older adult population. Her dissertation investigated improving ways to assess for elderly depression in institutionalized settings. During her doctoral work, Dr. Hendrix was also involved in providing for an experiential training program for Alzheimer’s caregivers. In her present pilot, Dr. Hendrix investigates the feasibility of offering the individualized experiential training approach to enhance self-efficacy in symptom management skills of caregivers of older cancer patients. Dr. Hendrix is also a co-investigator in a study investigating the effects of interdisciplinary geriatric-based interventions on older cancer patients.

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, with tenure

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S.N. 1987

B.S.N. — University of Santo Tomas (Philippines)

M.S.N. 1996

M.S.N. — University of Alabama at Birmingham

D.N.Sc. 2001

D.N.Sc. — Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

News:

Grants:

Behavioral and Physiology in Aging

Administered By
Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
September 01, 2015
End Date
August 31, 2020

Advanced Nursing Education Program

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Health Resources and Service Administration
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2013
End Date
June 30, 2017

Outcomes of Nursing Management Practice in Nursing Homes

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Safety Coordinator
Start Date
September 01, 1994
End Date
June 30, 2017

Cultural Influences on the Needs of Older Informal Cancer Caregivers

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
The Reed Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
June 01, 2014
End Date
August 31, 2015

Behavior And Physiology In Aging

Administered By
Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
July 01, 1999
End Date
August 31, 2015

IPA - Andrew Shiloh

Administered By
Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
AwardedBy
Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2013
End Date
September 30, 2014

IPA - Loretta Matters

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
February 01, 2013
End Date
September 30, 2013

Palliative and End-of-Life Care in Advanced Nursing Practice

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Health Resources and Service Administration
Role
Education Coordinator
Start Date
July 01, 2008
End Date
December 31, 2011

Informal Caregiver Training in Cancer Symptom Management

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
March 01, 2006
End Date
August 31, 2009

Evidence Based Nursing Practice in Geriatric Settings

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Department of Health and Human Services
Role
Adjunct Investigator
Start Date
September 01, 2003
End Date
June 30, 2006
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Publications:

Assessment of Research Capacity Among Nursing Faculty in a Clinical Intensive University in The Philippines.

Many nursing studies are conducted in the United States, Europe, and Australia, where only a fourth of the world's population resides. There is a need to promote nursing research in Asia to enhance the contextual relevance of their evidence-based nursing interventions. A first step toward this goal is to determine the perceived research capacity among nursing faculty in academic settings in the Philippines.This study described the perceived research capacity among nursing faculty of the University of Santo Tomas - College of Nursing, Manila, Philippines. The study used a survey that contained four sections: subject demographics; knowledge and skill on research designs and research process; research involvement, services, and incentives; and factors affecting research involvement. Chi-square test of homogeneity and MANOVA analyzed the gathered data.Findings showed that the faculty perceived themselves as knowledgeable and skillful in conducting research. However, current teaching assignments hindered their capacity to conduct research. University-sponsored incentives and college-based research services had also remained underutilized despite their availability. Overall, heavy teaching load was the greatest hindrance to research endeavors.Actions must be taken to reconfigure effort allocations with careful consideration of existing university and institutional bylaws.

Authors
Torres, GCS; Estrada, MG; Sumile, EFR; Macindo, JRB; Maravilla, SN; Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Torres, GCS, Estrada, MG, Sumile, EFR, Macindo, JRB, Maravilla, SN, and Hendrix, CC. "Assessment of Research Capacity Among Nursing Faculty in a Clinical Intensive University in The Philippines." Nursing forum (December 13, 2016).
PMID
27958652
Source
epmc
Published In
Nursing Forum: an independent voice for nursing
Publish Date
2016
DOI
10.1111/nuf.12192

Reducing Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing for Adults With Acute Bronchitis in an Urgent Care Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

Acute bronchitis is a predominantly viral illness and, according to clinical practice guidelines, should not be treated with antibiotics. Despite clear guidelines, acute bronchitis continues to be the most common acute respiratory illness for which antibiotics are incorrectly prescribed. Although the national benchmark for antibiotic prescribing for adults with acute bronchitis is 0%, a preliminary record review before implementing the intervention at the project setting showed that 96% (N = 30) of adults with acute bronchitis in this setting were prescribed an antibiotic. This quality improvement project utilized a single-group, pre-post design. The setting for this project was a large urgent care network with numerous locations in central North Carolina. The purpose was to determine whether nurse practitioners and physician assistants, after participating in a multifaceted provider education session, would reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for healthy adults with acute uncomplicated bronchitis. Twenty providers attended 1 of 4 training sessions offered in October and November 2015. The face-to-face interactive training sessions focused on factors associated with inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, current clinical practice guidelines, and patient communication skills. Retrospective medical record review of 217 pretraining and 335 posttraining encounters for acute bronchitis by 19 eligible participating providers demonstrated a 61.9% reduction in immediate antibiotic prescribing from 91.7% to 29.8%. Delayed prescribing, which accounted for a small percentage of the total prescriptions given, had a small but significant increase of 9.3% after training. Overall, this multifaceted, interactive provider training resulted in significant reductions in inappropriate prescriptions.

Authors
Link, TL; Townsend, ML; Leung, E; Kommu, S; Vega, RY; Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Link, TL, Townsend, ML, Leung, E, Kommu, S, Vega, RY, and Hendrix, CC. "Reducing Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing for Adults With Acute Bronchitis in an Urgent Care Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative." Advanced emergency nursing journal 38.4 (October 2016): 327-335.
PMID
27792075
Source
epmc
Published In
Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal
Volume
38
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
327
End Page
335

Implementation of a Delirium Assessment Protocol in an Inpatient Hospice Setting

Authors
Harrison, A; Smith, R; Champagne, M; Martin, B; Pursley, J; Hendrix, C
MLA Citation
Harrison, A, Smith, R, Champagne, M, Martin, B, Pursley, J, and Hendrix, C. "Implementation of a Delirium Assessment Protocol in an Inpatient Hospice Setting." Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing 18.3 (June 2016): 227-232.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing
Volume
18
Issue
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
227
End Page
232
DOI
10.1097/NJH.0000000000000237

Effects of enhanced caregiver training program on cancer caregiver's self-efficacy, preparedness, and psychological well-being.

We examined the effects of an enhanced informal caregiver training (Enhanced-CT) protocol in cancer symptom and caregiver stress management to caregivers of hospitalized cancer patients.We recruited adult patients in oncology units and their informal caregivers. We utilized a two-armed, randomized controlled trial design with data collected at baseline, post-training, and at 2 and 4 weeks after hospital discharge. Primary outcomes were self-efficacy for managing patients' cancer symptoms and caregiver stress and preparedness for caregiving. Secondary outcomes were caregiver depression, anxiety, and burden. The education comparison (EDUC) group received information about community resources. We used general linear models to test for differences in the Enhanced-CT relative to the EDUC group.We consented and randomized 138 dyads: Enhanced-CT = 68 and EDUC = 70. The Enhanced-CT group had a greater increase in caregiver self-efficacy for cancer symptom management and stress management and preparation for caregiving at the post-training assessment compared to the EDUC group but not at 2- and 4-week post-discharge assessments. There were no intervention group differences in depression, anxiety, and burden.An Enhanced-CT protocol resulted in short-term improvements in self-efficacy for managing patients' cancer symptoms and caregiver stress and preparedness for caregiving but not in caregivers' psychological well-being. The lack of sustained effects may be related to the single-dose nature of our intervention and the changing needs of informal caregivers after hospital discharge.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Bailey, DE; Steinhauser, KE; Olsen, MK; Stechuchak, KM; Lowman, SG; Schwartz, AJ; Riedel, RF; Keefe, FJ; Porter, LS; Tulsky, JA
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Bailey, DE, Steinhauser, KE, Olsen, MK, Stechuchak, KM, Lowman, SG, Schwartz, AJ, Riedel, RF, Keefe, FJ, Porter, LS, and Tulsky, JA. "Effects of enhanced caregiver training program on cancer caregiver's self-efficacy, preparedness, and psychological well-being." Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer 24.1 (January 2016): 327-336.
PMID
26062925
Source
epmc
Published In
Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume
24
Issue
1
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
327
End Page
336
DOI
10.1007/s00520-015-2797-3

Integrating Mental Health Concepts in the Care of Adults With Chronic Illnesses: A Curricular Enhancement.

In the United States, inadequate attention has been given to the mental health needs of chronically ill adults, and the attempts to integrate mental health in primary care have fallen short.This article describes the beginning efforts of the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing to integrate mental health concepts into its adult-gerontological nurse practitioner and family nurse practitioner curricula.Competency and course content mapping activities revealed opportunities for mental health enhancement. Five mental health concepts were identified for module development: spectrum of emotions, validation skills, self-management, resilience, and diversity. Mental health modules will be integrated in the nurse practitioner Physical Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning course, as well as in various clinical courses.Challenges and lessons learned, including efforts to foster active interprofessional learning among medical, physician assistant, and nurse practitioner students, are described.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Pereira, K; Bowers, M; Brown, J; Eisbach, S; Briggs, ME; Fitzgerald, K; Matters, L; Luddy, C; Braxton, L
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Pereira, K, Bowers, M, Brown, J, Eisbach, S, Briggs, ME, Fitzgerald, K, Matters, L, Luddy, C, and Braxton, L. "Integrating Mental Health Concepts in the Care of Adults With Chronic Illnesses: A Curricular Enhancement." The Journal of nursing education 54.11 (November 2015): 645-649.
PMID
26517077
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of nursing education
Volume
54
Issue
11
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
645
End Page
649
DOI
10.3928/01484834-20151016-06

Implementation of a smart pump champions program to decrease potential patient harm.

Compliance with safety features on smart pumps with drug libraries is a challenge for health care systems. Noncompliance and workarounds heighten the risk for adverse drug events and subsequent costs of patient care. This quality improvement project describes a pump champion innovation implemented over a 6-month period. There was a significant increase in nurses' compliance to drug library software in smart pumps and a decrease in severe harms averted.

Authors
Orto, V; Hendrix, CC; Griffith, B; Shaikewitz, ST
MLA Citation
Orto, V, Hendrix, CC, Griffith, B, and Shaikewitz, ST. "Implementation of a smart pump champions program to decrease potential patient harm." Journal of nursing care quality 30.2 (April 2015): 138-143.
PMID
25390367
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Nursing Care Quality
Volume
30
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
138
End Page
143
DOI
10.1097/ncq.0000000000000090

Discharge information and support for veterans Receiving Outpatient Care in the Emergency Department: study design and methods.

An explicit goal of Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACTs) within the Veterans Health Administration is to promote continuity of care in primary care clinics and thereby reduce Emergency Department (ED) utilization; however, there has been little research to guide PACTs on how to accomplish this.The overall goal of this study is to examine the impact of a primary care-based nurse telephone support program [DISPO ED] on Veterans treated and released from the ED who are at high risk for repeat visits.This study is a two group randomized, controlled trial to evaluate DISPO ED for Veterans treated and released from the ED who are at high risk for repeat visits. We define high risk as those who have had an ED visit or hospitalization during the 6 month period before the index ED visit and have ≥2 chronic conditions. Veterans are randomized to nurse telephone support or usual care. The primary outcome is repeat ED use within 30 days; secondary outcomes are patient satisfaction with care and total costs.The results of this randomized, controlled trial with an Effectiveness-Implementation Type I Hybrid design will be directly relevant to the care of more than 500,000 high risk patients seen in Veterans' Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) EDs annually. Results will also be informative to health systems outside VA aiming to reduce ED use through accountable care organizations.

Authors
Hastings, SN; Betts, E; Schmader, KE; Weinberger, M; Van Houtven, CH; Hendrix, CC; Coffman, CJ; Stechuchak, KM; Weiner, M; Morris, K; Kessler, C; Oddone, EZ
MLA Citation
Hastings, SN, Betts, E, Schmader, KE, Weinberger, M, Van Houtven, CH, Hendrix, CC, Coffman, CJ, Stechuchak, KM, Weiner, M, Morris, K, Kessler, C, and Oddone, EZ. "Discharge information and support for veterans Receiving Outpatient Care in the Emergency Department: study design and methods." Contemporary clinical trials 39.2 (November 3, 2014): 342-350.
PMID
25445314
Source
epmc
Published In
Contemporary Clinical Trials
Volume
39
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
342
End Page
350
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2014.10.008

Helping Invested Families Improve Veterans' Experiences Study (HI-FIVES): study design and methodology.

Within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the largest integrated health care system in the US, approximately 8.5 million Veteran patients receive informal care. Despite a need for training, half of VHA caregivers report that they have not received training that they deemed necessary. Rigorous study is needed to identify effective ways of providing caregivers with the skills they need. This paper describes the Helping Invested Families Improve Veterans' Experience Study (HI-FIVES), an ongoing randomized controlled trial that is evaluating a skills training program designed to support caregivers of cognitively and/or functionally impaired, community-dwelling Veterans who have been referred to receive additional formal home care services. This two-arm randomized controlled trial will enroll a total of 240 caregiver-patient dyads. For caregivers in the HI-FIVES group, weekly individual phone training occurs for 3 weeks, followed by 4 weekly group training sessions, and two additional individual phone training calls. Caregivers in usual care receive information about the VA Caregiver Support Services Program services, including a hotline number. The primary outcome is the number of days a Veteran patient spends at home in the 12 months following randomization (e.g. not in the emergency department, inpatient or nursing home setting). Secondary outcomes include patient VHA health care costs, patient and caregiver satisfaction with VHA health care, and caregiver depressive symptoms. Outcomes from HI-FIVES have the potential to improve our knowledge of how to maximize the ability to maintain patients safely at home for caregivers while preventing poor mental health outcomes among caregivers.

Authors
Van Houtven, CH; Oddone, EZ; Hastings, SN; Hendrix, C; Olsen, M; Neelon, B; Lindquist, J; Weidenbacher, H; Boles, J; Chapman, J; Weinberger, M
MLA Citation
Van Houtven, CH, Oddone, EZ, Hastings, SN, Hendrix, C, Olsen, M, Neelon, B, Lindquist, J, Weidenbacher, H, Boles, J, Chapman, J, and Weinberger, M. "Helping Invested Families Improve Veterans' Experiences Study (HI-FIVES): study design and methodology." Contemporary clinical trials 38.2 (July 2014): 260-269.
PMID
24837544
Source
epmc
Published In
Contemporary Clinical Trials
Volume
38
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
260
End Page
269
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2014.05.003

Effects of nurse-managed protocols in the outpatient management of adults with chronic conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BACKGROUND: Changes in federal health policy are providing more access to medical care for persons with chronic disease. Providing quality care may require a team approach, which the American College of Physicians calls the "medical home." One new model may involve nurse-managed protocols. PURPOSE: To determine whether nurse-managed protocols are effective for outpatient management of adults with diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, and CINAHL from January 1980 through January 2014. STUDY SELECTION: Two reviewers used eligibility criteria to assess all titles, abstracts, and full texts and resolved disagreements by discussion or by consulting a third reviewer. DATA EXTRACTION: One reviewer did data abstractions and quality assessments, which were confirmed by a second reviewer. DATA SYNTHESIS: From 2954 studies, 18 were included. All studies used a registered nurse or equivalent who titrated medications by following a protocol. In a meta-analysis, hemoglobin A1c level decreased by 0.4% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.7%) (n = 8); systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 3.68 mm Hg (CI, 1.05 to 6.31 mm Hg) and 1.56 mm Hg (CI, 0.36 to 2.76 mm Hg), respectively (n = 12); total cholesterol level decreased by 0.24 mmol/L (9.37 mg/dL) (CI, 0.54-mmol/L decrease to 0.05-mmol/L increase [20.77-mg/dL decrease to 2.02-mg/dL increase]) (n = 9); and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol level decreased by 0.31 mmol/L (12.07 mg/dL) (CI, 0.73-mmol/L decrease to 0.11-mmol/L increase [28.27-mg/dL decrease to 4.13-mg/dL increase]) (n = 6). LIMITATION: Studies had limited descriptions of the interventions and protocols used. CONCLUSION: A team approach that uses nurse-managed protocols may have positive effects on the outpatient management of adults with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Authors
Shaw, RJ; McDuffie, JR; Hendrix, CC; Edie, A; Lindsey-Davis, L; Nagi, A; Kosinski, AS; Williams, JW
MLA Citation
Shaw, RJ, McDuffie, JR, Hendrix, CC, Edie, A, Lindsey-Davis, L, Nagi, A, Kosinski, AS, and Williams, JW. "Effects of nurse-managed protocols in the outpatient management of adults with chronic conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis." Annals of internal medicine 161.2 (July 2014): 113-121.
PMID
25023250
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of internal medicine
Volume
161
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
113
End Page
121
DOI
10.7326/m13-2567

Management of patients with Parkinson disease.

Patients with Parkinson disease have prolonged motor and nonmotor symptoms affecting their ability to perform activities of daily living. Providers are tasked not only to provide quality care to afflicted patients but also to offer assistance to their informal caregivers who play a critical supportive role along the illness trajectory.

Authors
Shin, JY; Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Shin, JY, and Hendrix, CC. "Management of patients with Parkinson disease." Nurse Pract 38.10 (October 10, 2013): 34-43.
PMID
24048348
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nurse Practitioner
Volume
38
Issue
10
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
34
End Page
43
DOI
10.1097/01.NPR.0000434090.96229.5c

Management of patients with Parkinson disease.

Authors
Shin, JY; Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Shin, JY, and Hendrix, CC. "Management of patients with Parkinson disease." Nurs Manage (August 29, 2013).
PMID
23995337
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nursing Management
Publish Date
2013
DOI
10.1097/01.NPR.0000434090.96229.5c

Transitional Care Partners: a hospital-to-home support for older adults and their caregivers.

PURPOSE: To describe the development, implementation, and preliminary results of the Transitional Care (TLC) Partners, a clinical demonstration program that supports the transition from hospital to home of older veterans. DATA SOURCES: Hospital records of TLC patients to track their hospital and emergency department visits before and after the TLC Partners enrollment. Caregivers of patients completed Preparedness in Caregiving and the Short Form Zarit Burden Scale during the first week of the TLC Partners enrollment and on the week when the services ended. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of patients with one or more emergency department visits and rehospitalization is consistently lower among TLC patients compared to non-TLC patients at 30 and 60 days of hospital discharge. The mean preparedness and burden scores before and after the program essentially remained the same. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The description of the implementation of the TLC Partners offers an example of how nurse practitioner-led interprofessional care models can be adapted to the needs of specific healthcare systems, and how they can be monitored to evaluate their reach, effectiveness, and fidelity to the core components of proved care models.

Authors
Hendrix, C; Tepfer, S; Forest, S; Ziegler, K; Fox, V; Stein, J; McConnell, ES; Hastings, SN; Schmader, K; Colon-Emeric, C
MLA Citation
Hendrix, C, Tepfer, S, Forest, S, Ziegler, K, Fox, V, Stein, J, McConnell, ES, Hastings, SN, Schmader, K, and Colon-Emeric, C. "Transitional Care Partners: a hospital-to-home support for older adults and their caregivers." Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners 25.8 (August 2013): 407-414.
PMID
24170636
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners
Volume
25
Issue
8
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
407
End Page
414
DOI
10.1111/j.1745-7599.2012.00803.x

Effects of an individualized caregiver training intervention on self-efficacy of cancer caregivers.

Caring for older cancer patients after hospital discharge is challenging and many of their caregivers lack confidence to do so. This study investigated the effects of an individualized caregiver training program on self-efficacy in home care and symptom management. A total of 120 patient-caregiver dyads were randomly assigned to either the treatment (n = 60) or control group (n = 60). The training focused on prevention of infection, pain control, maintenance of nutrition and adequate elimination, and specific care issues identified by the caregiver. Control group received information about community-based resources. Results revealed a significant increase in self-efficacy after the training in the treatment group but not in the control group. No intervention effect was seen on caregiver's psychological well-being (depression, anxiety, and quality of life) and patient's physical symptoms.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Landerman, R; Abernethy, AP
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Landerman, R, and Abernethy, AP. "Effects of an individualized caregiver training intervention on self-efficacy of cancer caregivers." West J Nurs Res 35.5 (May 2013): 590-610.
PMID
21949091
Source
pubmed
Published In
Western Journal of Nursing Research
Volume
35
Issue
5
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
590
End Page
610
DOI
10.1177/0193945911420742

Implementing a home-based exercise prescription for older patients with peripheral arterial disease and intermittent claudication: A quality improvement project

A Nurse Practitioner-led quality improvement project was implemented in a vascular surgical care clinic to facilitate home-based exercise for patients diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC). The primary goal of the project was to develop an information brochure about PAD and the benefits of exercise, as well as, a written prescription for home-based exercise program. These materials are used in the care of patients with PAD and IC to augment verbal recommendations normally provided by the healthcare provider. The project's secondary goal was to determine the impact of these materials on the frequency of home-based exercises among participating patients.After implementation of the project, 70% of the patients who received the exercise brochure and prescription reported exercising at least four times per week. Prior to implementing the project, 7 (47%) of the patients in the project reported exercising at least four times a week. Additionally, on the follow-up survey 16 (94%) patients reported participating in some form of exercise and only 1 (6%) patient did not report exercising. Before the project was implemented, 7 (41%) patients reported no regular exercise, and 10 (59%) patients reported exercise. After the project, there was a 35% increase in reported exercise among the patient population. This was a statistically significant finding in the project. This suggests the prescription could have caused the change in the patient reports. © 2013 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc.

Authors
Simmons, KR; Sinning, MA; Pearson, JA; Hendrix, C
MLA Citation
Simmons, KR, Sinning, MA, Pearson, JA, and Hendrix, C. "Implementing a home-based exercise prescription for older patients with peripheral arterial disease and intermittent claudication: A quality improvement project." Journal of Vascular Nursing 31.1 (2013): 2-8.
PMID
23481875
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Vascular Nursing
Volume
31
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
2
End Page
8
DOI
10.1016/j.jvn.2012.06.005

Supporting older veterans after hospital discharge: The TransitionaL Care (TLC) Partners Program.

Although only about 13% of the U.S. population is aged ≥ 65 years, people in this age group account for about 37% of all hospital discharges and 43% of hospital days.1 Similarly, veterans who are aged ≥ 65 years are more than twice as likely to be hospitalized than those aged

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Tepfer, S; Forest, S; Fox, V; Stein, J; Schmader, K
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Tepfer, S, Forest, S, Fox, V, Stein, J, and Schmader, K. "Supporting older veterans after hospital discharge: The TransitionaL Care (TLC) Partners Program." Federal Practitioner 29.8 (August 2012): 17-21. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Federal Practitioner
Volume
29
Issue
8
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
17
End Page
21

Fall prevention through patient partnerships.

Falls in community-dwelling older adults are often preventable, yet remain the leading cause of deaths due to injury and a major cost to the healthcare system. Primary care nurse practitioners who care for older adults can minimize the risk for falls by using specific assessment and prevention strategies.

Authors
Day, JR; Ramos, LC; Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Day, JR, Ramos, LC, and Hendrix, CC. "Fall prevention through patient partnerships." Nurse Pract 37.7 (July 10, 2012): 14-19.
PMID
22653429
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nurse Practitioner
Volume
37
Issue
7
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
14
End Page
19
DOI
10.1097/01.NPR.0000415241.08343.1c

Pillars for the care of older persons in the Caribbean.

Pillars for the Care of Older Persons in the Caribbean: A Comprehensive Community-Based Framework (Pillars) is a hybrid of multiple public health frameworks developed through community-based participatory research processes. Health and social service professionals, governmental organizations, elderly persons, and others from across the English-speaking Caribbean countries developed the Pillars framework to address the growing elderly population and with an aim to increase the number of healthy and active years of life. The Pillars framework consists of four interrelated pillars organized across multiple sectors of society: primary care with care management; integrated services coordination; population-based health promotion and disease prevention; and planning and accountability. Pillars is enabled by an envisioned integrated system of information technology that will increase community-based services delivery, interprofessional communication and coordination, and will aggregate data with all identifiers removed for surveillance, planning, forecasting, policy making, evaluation, and research.

Authors
Powell, DL; Price, AJ; Burns, FA; McConnell, ES; Hendrix, CC; McWhinney-Dehaney, L; Lombardi, MM
MLA Citation
Powell, DL, Price, AJ, Burns, FA, McConnell, ES, Hendrix, CC, McWhinney-Dehaney, L, and Lombardi, MM. "Pillars for the care of older persons in the Caribbean." Public Health Nurs 29.1 (January 2012): 80-90.
PMID
22211755
Source
pubmed
Published In
Public Health Nursing
Volume
29
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
80
End Page
90
DOI
10.1111/j.1525-1446.2011.00963.x

Pilot study: individualized training for caregivers of hospitalized older veterans.

BACKGROUND: : The hospital-to-home transition represents a vulnerable time for older veterans who are more medically and socioeconomically challenged than the general population of older adults. OBJECTIVES: : The aim of this study was examine the feasibility of delivering an individualized caregiver training program before hospital discharge of older veterans. As an exploratory aim, the impact of this training on caregiver self-efficacy and preparedness was determined. METHODS: : The sample consisted 50 caregiver-patient dyads. Training included medication management, identification of medical red flags, identification of Veterans Affairs community-based resources, and specific caregiver concerns about home care. Program feasibility was determined by whether caregivers could be recruited and could complete the training before patients were discharged from the hospital. Caregiver self-efficacy (using modified Lorig's self-efficacy scale) and preparedness (using Preparedness in Caregiving Scale) were assessed before the training (T1), immediately after the training (T2), and 1 week (T3) and 4 weeks (T4) after hospital discharge. RESULTS: : One thousand six hundred ninety inpatients were screened, 252 of whom (15%) met study eligibility criteria. Of these, 112 were approached, and 50 dyads (44.6%) agreed to participate. Of the 50 consented dyads, 40 caregivers (80%) received the training. The mean self-efficacy among caregivers improved at T2, and the improvement was sustained at T3 and T4 (T1, 783.86; T2, 903.64; T3, 867.85; T4, 877.02). The same trend was observed in caregiving preparedness (T1, 26. 95; T2, 30.55; T3, 28.88; T4, 28.91). DISCUSSION: : Providing an individualized training program to informal caregivers of hospitalized older veterans was not only feasible but was also associated with increased self-efficacy and caregiving preparedness. This study has the potential to assist caregivers in their home care of older veterans after hospital discharge.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Hastings, SN; Van Houtven, C; Steinhauser, K; Chapman, J; Ervin, T; Sanders, L; Weinberger, M
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Hastings, SN, Van Houtven, C, Steinhauser, K, Chapman, J, Ervin, T, Sanders, L, and Weinberger, M. "Pilot study: individualized training for caregivers of hospitalized older veterans." Nurs Res 60.6 (November 2011): 436-441.
PMID
22067595
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nursing Research
Volume
60
Issue
6
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
436
End Page
441
DOI
10.1097/NNR.0b013e31823583c7

The Duke-NICHE program: an academic-practice collaboration to enhance geriatric nursing care.

The Duke-Nurses Improving Care of Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) is an example of an academic-practice partnership between a university-based school of nursing and a health system that aims to improve care of older adults by simultaneously enhancing the expertise of frontline nursing staff, accelerating the implementation of evidence-based care approaches, and generating scientific knowledge at the point of care. This article describes the processes used to develop the partnership, and reports initial outcomes and lessons learned. Although challenging to develop and sustain, academic-health system partnerships hold potential to improve care through both improved implementation of evidence and stimulating new research at the point of care.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Matters, L; West, Y; Stewart, B; McConnell, ES
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Matters, L, West, Y, Stewart, B, and McConnell, ES. "The Duke-NICHE program: an academic-practice collaboration to enhance geriatric nursing care." Nurs Outlook 59.3 (May 2011): 149-157.
PMID
21565590
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nursing Outlook
Volume
59
Issue
3
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
149
End Page
157
DOI
10.1016/j.outlook.2011.02.007

Pairing Self-Management with Palliative Care: Intervening in Life-Limiting Illness.

Authors
Bailey, DE; Steinhauser, K; Hendrix, C; Tulsky, JA
MLA Citation
Bailey, DE, Steinhauser, K, Hendrix, C, and Tulsky, JA. "Pairing Self-Management with Palliative Care: Intervening in Life-Limiting Illness." J Nurs Healthc Chronic Illn 3.1 (March 2011): 1-3.
PMID
21643547
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness: an international interdisciplinary journal
Volume
3
Issue
1
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
1
End Page
3
DOI
10.1111/j.1752-9824.2011.01083.x

Supportive approaches for Alzheimer disease.

Alzheimer disease (AD) accounts for most dementia diagnoses. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and antipsychotics are first-line drug therapies for cognitive decline and to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms, respectively. Because AD is relentlessly progressive, NPs will need to provide long-term support to patients and their caregivers.

Authors
Davis, NJ; Hendrix, CC; Superville, JG
MLA Citation
Davis, NJ, Hendrix, CC, and Superville, JG. "Supportive approaches for Alzheimer disease." The Nurse practitioner 36.8 (2011): 22-29.
PMID
21747305
Source
scival
Published In
Nurse Practitioner
Volume
36
Issue
8
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
22
End Page
29
DOI
10.1097/01.NPR.0000399724.54519.ae

Clinical trial recruitment challenges with older adults with cancer.

Older adults continue to be disproportionately represented in research studies and cancer-related clinical trials. As survival rates for patients with cancer continue to increase, it is critical that we begin to gather data on how to provide the best care to the patient population where cancer is most prevalent. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of barriers encountered during recruitment to clinical trials of older patients with cancer. Two clinical trials involving older patients with cancer are presented to describe strategies used by the principal investigators to enhance recruitment and enrollment to their clinical research trials. These two exemplars suggest that planning and regular meetings by the research team and transparent communication are essential for successful clinical trial recruitment of older patients with cancer.

Authors
Payne, JK; Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Payne, JK, and Hendrix, CC. "Clinical trial recruitment challenges with older adults with cancer." Appl Nurs Res 23.4 (November 2010): 233-237.
PMID
21035034
Source
pubmed
Published In
Applied Nursing Research
Volume
23
Issue
4
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
233
End Page
237
DOI
10.1016/j.apnr.2008.12.004

The Connected Learning Model for disseminating evidence-based care practices in clinical settings.

Clinical practice guidelines have been developed to improve patient care and outcomes. Guideline implementation is often stymied by the complexity of patients' conditions, complex care environments, and limited advanced clinical training of nursing staff. To translate key elements of heart failure guidelines into practice in a nursing home, the Connected Learning Model was developed based on the diffusion of innovations framework. An advanced practice nurse in geriatrics fostered greater interaction and collaboration among key administrative, medical, and nursing staff to promote awareness of heart failure guidelines and to translate key practices from those guidelines into the nursing home setting. Direct care staff skills for early recognition and reporting of signs and symptoms of acute heart failure were enhanced through a learner-centered educational program which included classroom and unit-based instruction and bedside clinical teaching. The Connected Learning Model is a promising method to mobilize advanced nursing expertise to bridge research/practice gaps through implementation of clinical practice guidelines that are systematically adapted to accommodate diverse health care contexts.

Authors
Lekan, D; Hendrix, CC; McConnell, ES; White, H
MLA Citation
Lekan, D, Hendrix, CC, McConnell, ES, and White, H. "The Connected Learning Model for disseminating evidence-based care practices in clinical settings." Nurse Educ Pract 10.4 (July 2010): 243-248.
PMID
20100666
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nurse Education in Practice
Volume
10
Issue
4
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
243
End Page
248
DOI
10.1016/j.nepr.2009.11.013

PROMOTING SELF-EFFICACY AND PREPAREDNESS IN CAREGIVERS OF OLDER CANCER PATIENTS BEFORE HOSPITAL DISCHARGE

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Abernethy, A; Landerman, LR
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Abernethy, A, and Landerman, LR. "PROMOTING SELF-EFFICACY AND PREPAREDNESS IN CAREGIVERS OF OLDER CANCER PATIENTS BEFORE HOSPITAL DISCHARGE." GERONTOLOGIST 49 (October 2009): 110-110.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
The Gerontologist
Volume
49
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
110
End Page
110

The Veterans Learning to Improve Fitness and Function in Elders Study: a randomized trial of primary care-based physical activity counseling for older men.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of primary care-based, multicomponent physical activity counseling (PAC) promoting physical activity (PA) guidelines on gait speed and related measures of PA and function in older veterans. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Veterans Affairs Medical Center of Durham, North Carolina. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred ninety-eight male veterans aged 70 and older. INTERVENTION: Twelve months of usual care (UC) or multicomponent PAC consisting of baseline in-person and every other week and then monthly telephone counseling by a lifestyle counselor, one-time clinical endorsement of PA, monthly automated telephone messaging from the primary care provider, and quarterly tailored mailings of progress in PA. MEASUREMENTS: Gait speed (usual and rapid), self-reported PA, function, and disability at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: Although no between-group differences were noted for usual gait speed, rapid gait speed improved significantly more for the PAC group (1.56 +/- 0.41 m/s to 1.68 +/- 0.44 m/s) than with UC (1.57 +/- 0.40 m/sec to 1.59 +/- 0.42 m/sec, P=.04). Minutes of moderate/vigorous PA increased significantly in the PAC group (from 57.1 +/- 99.3 to 126.6 +/- 142.9 min/wk) but not in the UC group (from 60.2 +/- 116.1 to 69.6 +/- 116.1 min/wk, P<.001). Changes in other functional/disability outcomes were small. CONCLUSION: In this group of older male veterans, multicomponent PA significantly improved rapid gait and PA. Translation from increased PA to overall functioning was not observed. Integration with primary care was successful.

Authors
Morey, MC; Peterson, MJ; Pieper, CF; Sloane, R; Crowley, GM; Cowper, PA; McConnell, ES; Bosworth, HB; Ekelund, CC; Pearson, MP
MLA Citation
Morey, MC, Peterson, MJ, Pieper, CF, Sloane, R, Crowley, GM, Cowper, PA, McConnell, ES, Bosworth, HB, Ekelund, CC, and Pearson, MP. "The Veterans Learning to Improve Fitness and Function in Elders Study: a randomized trial of primary care-based physical activity counseling for older men." J Am Geriatr Soc 57.7 (July 2009): 1166-1174.
PMID
19467149
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of American Geriatrics Society
Volume
57
Issue
7
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1166
End Page
1174
DOI
10.1111/j.1532-5415.2009.02301.x

A pilot study on the influence of an individualized and experiential training on cancer caregiver's self-efficacy in home care and symptom management.

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate if an individualized and experiential training can promote family caregiver's confidence (self-efficacy) in home care and symptom management. The study was conducted in a hematology/oncology unit in a southeastern regional medical center. Twenty informal cancer caregivers participated in the study. The individualized and experiential training was conducted at the bedside prior to patient's hospital discharge. Self-efficacy in home care and cancer symptom management was measured using the Cancer Caregiver Self-Efficacy Measure before and after training, and at 1 week after hospital discharge of cancer patients. Results of the study showed mean Cancer Caregiver Self-Efficacy Measure increased by 41.1 points immediately after the training (z = 4.49, p < 0.001) and was 31.7 points higher at 1-week follow-up (z = 3.22, p < 0.01). The findings of this study suggest that individualized and experiential training may be another avenue for nurses, including home care nurses, to support family home caregiving. By helping family members in home care, favorable patient outcomes may be achieved, enabling older patients with cancer to stay longer in the comfort of their homes.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Abernethy, A; Sloane, R; Misuraca, J; Moore, J
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Abernethy, A, Sloane, R, Misuraca, J, and Moore, J. "A pilot study on the influence of an individualized and experiential training on cancer caregiver's self-efficacy in home care and symptom management." Home Healthc Nurse 27.5 (May 2009): 271-278.
PMID
19448494
Source
pubmed
Published In
Home Healthcare Nurse
Volume
27
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
271
End Page
278

Teaching evidence-based nursing practice in geriatric care settings: the geriatric nursing innovations through education institute.

Evidence-based practice holds tremendous potential to optimize care outcomes for older adults, yet many nurses are ill prepared to identify, interpret, and apply the best evidence to their practice. The Geriatric Nursing Innovations through Education (GNIE) Institute is a 39-contact-hour, hybrid distance learning continuing education model designed to strengthen RNs'clinical knowledge, leadership skills, and capacity for implementing evidence-based geriatric care. The GNIE Institute combines reflective, learner-centered instructional approaches with a practicum during which evidence-based guidelines are implemented.The experiences of 128 RNs suggest that the GNIE Institute supports the implementation of a variety of best practices, including management of acute pain, dehydration, delirium, oral hygiene, urinary incontinence, and falls prevention. Participant feedback has shown low initial awareness of practice guidelines but high satisfaction with their use. The GNIE Institute thus represents a viable model for building the capacity of practicing RNs to implement evidence-based approaches to the care of geriatric syndromes across the care continuum.

Authors
McConnell, ES; Lekan, D; Bunn, M; Egerton, E; Corazzini, KN; Hendrix, CD; Bailey, DE
MLA Citation
McConnell, ES, Lekan, D, Bunn, M, Egerton, E, Corazzini, KN, Hendrix, CD, and Bailey, DE. "Teaching evidence-based nursing practice in geriatric care settings: the geriatric nursing innovations through education institute." J Gerontol Nurs 35.4 (April 2009): 26-33.
PMID
19452736
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of gerontological nursing
Volume
35
Issue
4
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
26
End Page
33

Cross communication. Avoiding device interference in pacemakers and ICDs.

Authors
Gray, A; Hendrix, C
MLA Citation
Gray, A, and Hendrix, C. "Cross communication. Avoiding device interference in pacemakers and ICDs." Advance for nurse practitioners 17.2 (2009): 57-58.
PMID
19999427
Source
scival
Published In
Advance for nurse practitioners
Volume
17
Issue
2
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
57
End Page
58

In pursuit for a more perfect union between nursing academia and practice: a reflection from a nursing faculty.

Authors
Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC. "In pursuit for a more perfect union between nursing academia and practice: a reflection from a nursing faculty." Nursing forum 44.4 (2009): 283-285.
PMID
19954468
Source
scival
Published In
Nursing Forum: an independent voice for nursing
Volume
44
Issue
4
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
283
End Page
285
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6198.2009.00154.x

Post-hospital clinic for older patients and their family caregivers

As a complementary service to our Geriatric Evaluation and Management Clinic, the geriatrics Post-Hospital Clinic (PHC) was recently established for prompt follow-up assessment and care of our geriatric patients and their caregivers after hospital discharge. This article describes the initial benefits of the PHC, which include early medical evaluation that prevented worsening of patient's condition, medication reconciliation that prevented adverse patient outcomes, referrals to community services that augmented delivery of care, and caregiver support and education that mitigated caregiver stress.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Heflin, MT; Twersky, J; Knight, C; Payne, J; Bradford, JY; Schmader, KE
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Heflin, MT, Twersky, J, Knight, C, Payne, J, Bradford, JY, and Schmader, KE. "Post-hospital clinic for older patients and their family caregivers." Annals of Long-Term Care 16.5 (2008): 20-24.
Source
scival
Published In
The annals of long-term care : the official journal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume
16
Issue
5
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
20
End Page
24

Preparing junior investigators to develop gerontological research.

Authors
Holston, EC; Schweitzer, R; Meeker, ME; Hendrix, CC; Gaspar, PM; Kossman, S; Piamjariyakul, U
MLA Citation
Holston, EC, Schweitzer, R, Meeker, ME, Hendrix, CC, Gaspar, PM, Kossman, S, and Piamjariyakul, U. "Preparing junior investigators to develop gerontological research." Nurs Outlook 54.5 (September 2006): 287-293.
PMID
17027606
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nursing Outlook
Volume
54
Issue
5
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
287
End Page
293
DOI
10.1016/j.outlook.2006.01.002

Informal caregiver training on home care and cancer symptom management prior to hospital discharge: A feasibility study

Purpose/Objectives: To determine the feasibility of individualized caregiver training for home care and symptom management conducted at the bedside of older patients with cancer prior to hospital discharge. Design: Pilot study. Setting: The Extended Care Rehabilitation Center at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center in North Carolina. Sample: 7 female informal caregivers with a mean age of 56 (range = 26-76). More than half were African American. Most commonly, caregivers were spouses of the patients with cancer. Methods: Individualized and experiential training on home care and cancer symptom management was conducted at the bedside of patients before hospital discharge. Caregiver demographic data were collected. An informal interview at the end of the training asked about the usefulness of the training in preparing for home caregiving. Main Research Variables: Feasibility of the training. Findings: Individualized bedside training to caregivers prior to hospital discharge is feasible. All caregivers noted the relevance of the content as well as the approach to the training. Conclusions: When given an opportunity for training on symptom management and home care, informal caregivers were very interested in participating. The individualized approach gave caregivers an opportunity to have their particular needs met. The flexibility of when to conduct the training proved to be crucial when soliciting attendance. The biggest challenge was in recruiting caregiver subjects through patients with cancer. Implications for Nursing: The impetus now is to look at the effects of the training on caregiver-patient variables as well as the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of such an approach to caregiver training.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Ray, C
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, and Ray, C. "Informal caregiver training on home care and cancer symptom management prior to hospital discharge: A feasibility study." Oncology Nursing Forum 33.4 (2006): 793-798.
PMID
16858461
Source
scival
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
793
End Page
798
DOI
10.1188/06.ONF.793-798

Palliative sedation in end-of-life care

The goals for care at the end of life include relief of pain and suffering. Despite excellent palliative care, some patients continue to experience intolerable, unrelieved pain and suffering from refractory symptoms. Palliative sedation, although controversial, is an accepted option for relieving pain and suffering at the end of life and can spark a great deal of emotion and debate for all involved. Hospice and palliative care nurses play a critical role in symptom management at the end of life and need to have a basic understanding of the principles of palliative sedation. Nurses must continue to advocate for their patients and provide education to other members of the healthcare team who are less knowledgeable about palliative sedation. This article explores these principles and some of the challenges associated with providing palliative sedation. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Authors
Bruce, SD; Hendrix, CC; Gentry, JH
MLA Citation
Bruce, SD, Hendrix, CC, and Gentry, JH. "Palliative sedation in end-of-life care." Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing 8.6 (2006): 320-327.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing
Volume
8
Issue
6
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
320
End Page
327
DOI
10.1097/00129191-200611000-00004

Providing end-of-life palliative care for the developmentally disabled and their families

The life span of developmentally disabled individuals has been greatly extended as a result of continued advances in medical technology and life-prolonging treatments. Consequently, this special population now faces many of the same chronic or terminal illnesses as the general population. Hospitals and healthcare providers are experiencing an upsurge of patients with developmental disabilities facing end-of-life care issues in acute care settings. Therefore, it is imperative for acute care providers to become proficient in the delivery of palliative care to this unique population and their families. Copyright © Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Authors
Goldsmith, B; Hendrix, CC; Gentry, J
MLA Citation
Goldsmith, B, Hendrix, CC, and Gentry, J. "Providing end-of-life palliative care for the developmentally disabled and their families." Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing 8.5 (2006): 270-275.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing
Volume
8
Issue
5
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
270
End Page
275
DOI
10.1097/00129191-200609000-00012

Chronic care management for the elderly: an opportunity for gerontological nurse practitioners.

PURPOSE: To discuss the role that gerontological nurse practitioners (GNPs) may play in providing chronic care management for the elderly. DATA SOURCES: Review of recent literature on chronic care management, personal experience of the authors in caring for older adults under the chronic care management model, and a case study. CONCLUSIONS: GNPs are the most appropriate practitioners to provide and coordinate chronic care management to the population that needs it most--the elderly. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Demographic shifts in the United States have increased the number of people with chronic illnesses; however, the nation's healthcare delivery system has not significantly evolved to meet the changing needs of its population. As a result, many people, especially older adults, suffer needlessly, and healthcare costs continue to rise. Chronic care management may alleviate older adults' chronic health problems, reduce expenditures for their health care, and promote their satisfaction and quality of life.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Wojciechowski, CW
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, and Wojciechowski, CW. "Chronic care management for the elderly: an opportunity for gerontological nurse practitioners." J Am Acad Nurse Pract 17.7 (July 2005): 263-267. (Review)
PMID
15982246
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
Volume
17
Issue
7
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
263
End Page
267
DOI
10.111/j.1745-7599.2005.0044.x

The use of the Minimum Data Set to identify depression in the elderly.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether depression in the elderly in institutionalized settings could be identified using the mood indicators in the Minimum Data Set (MDS) 2.0 (Section E1, Items A-P). DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Three nursing homes in the southeastern part of the country. PARTICIPANTS: Residents aged 65 and above. MEASUREMENTS: The items in "Indicators of Depression, Anxiety and Sad Mood" on the MDS 2.0 were used to identify observable features of depression in the elderly. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) was used to validate the MDS indicators. Consensus analysis, which controls raters' bias, raters' ability, and item difficulty, was used to analyze data. RESULTS: No depressive patterns were detected using the MDS indicators. On the CSDD, distinct depressive features were identified: anxiety, sadness, lack of reaction to pleasant events, irritability, agitation, multiple physical complaints, loss of interest, appetite loss, and lack of energy. CONCLUSION: The incongruent findings on the MDS indicators the CSDD may be reflective of the assessment process used with the MDS rather than its ability to identify features of elderly depression. The practice of allowing nondirect caregivers to complete the MDS may have serious implications for the accuracy of the data collected.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Sakauye, KM; Karabatsos, G; Daigle, D
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Sakauye, KM, Karabatsos, G, and Daigle, D. "The use of the Minimum Data Set to identify depression in the elderly." J Am Med Dir Assoc 4.6 (November 2003): 308-312.
PMID
14613597
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume
4
Issue
6
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
308
End Page
312
DOI
10.1097/01.JAM.0000094065.05310.FB

Teaching elderly individuals on computer use.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Sakauye, KM
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, and Sakauye, KM. "Teaching elderly individuals on computer use." J Gerontol Nurs 27.6 (June 2001): 47-53.
PMID
11915119
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of gerontological nursing
Volume
27
Issue
6
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
47
End Page
53

Computer use among elderly people.

This study investigates the literature on the state of knowledge on computer use among elderly people. Results of this review suggest that benefits may ensue if computer use is advocated. Functional limitations secondary to visual, hearing, and mobility changes; financial inadequacy; and cognitive limitation related to memory use are identified as barriers that may inhibit this population from learning how to use the computer. Methods and techniques dealing with these barriers are presented. Finally, teaching strategies that may be implemented to facilitate the learning process among elderly population on computer use are discussed and elucidated.

Authors
Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC. "Computer use among elderly people." Comput Nurs 18.2 (March 2000): 62-68. (Review)
PMID
10740912
Source
pubmed
Published In
Computers in nursing
Volume
18
Issue
2
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
62
End Page
68

Validation of the Impact of Event Scale on a sample of American Vietnam veterans.

The goal of the present report is to validate the Impact of Event Scale for use as a measure of the enduring nature of reactions to combat stress by 60 American Vietnam veterans. Validity was supported through significant correlations with measures of abusive violence and combat exposure. From factor analysis a single factor (general level of distress) supported the validity of the scale and thereby further use with Vietnam veterans.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Jurich, AP; Schumm, WR
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Jurich, AP, and Schumm, WR. "Validation of the Impact of Event Scale on a sample of American Vietnam veterans." Psychol Rep 75.1 Pt 1 (August 1994): 321-322.
PMID
7984745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychological Reports
Volume
75
Issue
1 Pt 1
Publish Date
1994
Start Page
321
End Page
322
DOI
10.2466/pr0.1994.75.1.321

Validation of the Purdue Post-Traumatic Stress Scale on a sample of Vietnam veterans.

The Purdue Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Scale is a 15-item self-report instrument based on the DSM-III diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. This scale is a quick, easily administered, measure of psychological reactions to a traumatic event. The goal of the present report is to validate this instrument for use as a measure of long-lasting combat stress reactions of American Vietnam veterans. The PPS demonstrated a high degree of internal consistency with a Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.94. The PPS demonstrated construct validity through significant correlations with other self-report measures of combat experience and residual psychological distress, and through a factor analysis yielding three factors, labeled as arousal, avoidance, and the global perception of distress. Results support further use of the Purdue Post-traumatic Stress Scale as a research instrument for assessing the long-term impact of a traumatic event.

Authors
Hendrix, CC; Anelli, LM; Gibbs, JP; Fournier, DG
MLA Citation
Hendrix, CC, Anelli, LM, Gibbs, JP, and Fournier, DG. "Validation of the Purdue Post-Traumatic Stress Scale on a sample of Vietnam veterans." J Trauma Stress 7.2 (April 1994): 311-318.
PMID
8012750
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Traumatic Stress
Volume
7
Issue
2
Publish Date
1994
Start Page
311
End Page
318

The Stressors of Clergy Children Inventory: reliability and validity.

The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the Stressors of Clergy Children Inventory. The initial self-report survey was tested for internal consistency reliability. Tests for construct validity, concurrent validity, and internal consistency reliability indicated the inventory could be used in research. Recommendations for refinement and use were presented.

Authors
Ostrander, DL; Henry, CS; Hendrix, CC
MLA Citation
Ostrander, DL, Henry, CS, and Hendrix, CC. "The Stressors of Clergy Children Inventory: reliability and validity." Psychol Rep 67.3 Pt 1 (December 1990): 787-794.
PMID
2287672
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychological Reports
Volume
67
Issue
3 Pt 1
Publish Date
1990
Start Page
787
End Page
794
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