Jenny Hoang

Overview:

Dr. Jenny K. Hoang MBBS is a neuroradiologist and Associate Professor in Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Duke University, NC USA where she is the Director of Head and Neck Radiology and Chair of the Grand Rounds Committee. Her career is accentuated by her strong involvement in research and education. She led the American College of Radiology (ACR) efforts in producing a White Paper on Incidental Thyroid Findings and was a core member of the ACR TI-RADS committee for thyroid ultrasound. She also serves on the National Cancer Institute PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board.

She has published more than 110 peer-reviewed articles with a focus on thyroid and parathyroid imaging. Dr. Hoang was the recipient of GE-Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF) Program (2010-2012) and ACR Innovations Grant (2017). She is a popular a faculty lecturer at national and international meetings. She is also actively educating and advocating on Twitter. Connect with her at @JennyKHoang.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiology

Radiology, Neuroradiology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.B.B.S. 1999

University of Melbourne (Australia)

Grants:

From ACR White Papers to National Guidelines: Formalizing the Consensus Process for Algorithm-Based Recommendations

Administered By
Radiology, Neuroradiology
Awarded By
American College of Radiology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Incidental Thyroid Nodules Detected in the National Lung Screening Trial:

Administered By
Radiology
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Update in Parathyroid Imaging.

Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is characterized by excessive, dysregulated production of parathyroid hormone (PTH) by 1 or more abnormal parathyroid glands. Minimally invasive surgical techniques have created a need for more precise localization of the parathyroid lesion by imaging. A variety of imaging protocols and techniques have been used for this purpose, but no one modality is clearly superior. Nuclear medicine scintigraphy and ultrasound imaging are established modalities, although multiphase or 4-dimensional computed tomography is an emerging modality with several advantages. This review provides a background regarding PHPT and key anatomy, and discusses these alternative parathyroid imaging modalities with updates.
Authors
Kuzminski, SJ; Sosa, JA; Hoang, JK
MLA Citation
Kuzminski, Samuel J., et al. “Update in Parathyroid Imaging..” Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am, vol. 26, no. 1, Feb. 2018, pp. 151–66. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.mric.2017.08.009.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1282440
PMID
29128002
Source
pubmed
Published In
Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
151
End Page
166
DOI
10.1016/j.mric.2017.08.009

Parathyroid 4D-CT: Multi-institutional International Survey of Use and Trends.

Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is a new modality for preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas. We performed a survey study to describe the role and trends in the utilization of 4D-CT. Of 361 radiologists, 200 (55%) reported that 4D-CT was used in their practices. Nineteen (10%) used 4D-CT as the first-line imaging study; 155 (76%) reported that 4D-CT played a secondary role; and 26 (13%) reported that it is performed routinely in combination with ultrasound and scintigraphy. Early adopters of 4D-CT (use for >3 years) were 3 times more likely to use 4D-CT in a first-line role (18%) when compared with radiologists who used 4D-CT for ≤3 years (6%; P < .05). In conclusion, more than half of radiologists perform 4D-CT, and a majority reported that 4D-CT plays a secondary role. However, this role may change, as utilization is increasing and radiologists may follow early adopters, who are more likely to use it as a first-line study.
Authors
Hoang, JK; Williams, K; Gaillard, F; Dixon, A; Sosa, JA
MLA Citation
Hoang, Jenny K., et al. “Parathyroid 4D-CT: Multi-institutional International Survey of Use and Trends..” Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, vol. 155, no. 6, Dec. 2016, pp. 956–60. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/0194599816655311.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1134777
PMID
27329424
Source
pubmed
Published In
Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Volume
155
Published Date
Start Page
956
End Page
960
DOI
10.1177/0194599816655311

Incidental Thyroid Nodules on CT or MRI: Discordance Between What We Report and What Receives Workup.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of incidental thyroid nodules (ITNs) reported on CT or MRI that receive additional workup and the factors that influence workup. A secondary aim was to evaluate the effect of the American College of Radiology (ACR) white paper recommendations for reporting of ITNs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients with ITNs reported on CT or MRI studies over 12 months. We identified patients with ITNs that underwent workup and the factors associated with workup. The ACR white paper recommendations were retrospectively applied to estimate how their use would have changed the number of nodules reported in the impression section of radiology reports and the number of cancers diagnosed. The recommendations are based on suspicious imaging features, patient age, and nodule size. RESULTS: A total of 375 patients had ITNs reported. For 138 of these patients (37%), ITNs were reported by radiologists in the impression section of their reports; 26 patients (19%) received workup. Patients with ITNs reported in the impression section were 14 times more likely to undergo workup than were patients with ITNs reported only in the findings section of the radiology report. On multivariate analysis, the only factors associated with workup were younger patient age and larger nodule size (p ≤ 0.002). The ACR recommendations resulted in a 54% reduction in the number of ITNs reported in the impression section and one missed papillary cancer (TNM classification T1bN0M0). CONCLUSION: Only one in five patients with ITNs reported in the impression section of CT or MRI reports underwent additional workup, and this decision was influenced by younger patient age and larger nodule size. These factors are components of the ACR recommendations, which have the potential to reduce the number of reported ITNs and improve the standardization of radiology reporting.
Authors
Tanpitukpongse, TP; Grady, AT; Sosa, JA; Eastwood, JD; Choudhury, KR; Hoang, JK
MLA Citation
Tanpitukpongse, Teerath P., et al. “Incidental Thyroid Nodules on CT or MRI: Discordance Between What We Report and What Receives Workup..” Ajr Am J Roentgenol, vol. 205, no. 6, Dec. 2015, pp. 1281–87. Pubmed, doi:10.2214/AJR.15.14929.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1108040
PMID
26587935
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ajr. American Journal of Roentgenology
Volume
205
Published Date
Start Page
1281
End Page
1287
DOI
10.2214/AJR.15.14929

Imaging Thyroid Disease. Updates, Imaging Approach, and Management Pearls.

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.. There are many disorders that can occur in the thyroid gland, ranging from benign to malignant entities. This article focuses on 5 common problems of the thyroid that require special consideration with regard to optimizing imaging strategies in a multidisciplinary and collaborative platform. These problems are the incidental thyroid nodule, preoperative evaluation of goiter, hyperthyroidism, invasive thyroid cancer, and recurrent thyroid cancer. For each problem essential facts, interesting updates, imaging approach, and management pearls are reviewed.
Authors
Hoang, JK; Sosa, JA; Nguyen, XV; Galvin, PL; Oldan, JD
MLA Citation
Hoang, J. K., et al. “Imaging Thyroid Disease. Updates, Imaging Approach, and Management Pearls..” Radiologic Clinics of North America, vol. 53, no. 1, Jan. 2015, pp. 145–61. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.rcl.2014.09.002.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1054565
Source
scopus
Published In
Radiologic Clinics of North America
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
145
End Page
161
DOI
10.1016/j.rcl.2014.09.002

Applying the society of radiologists in ultrasound recommendations for fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules: Effect on workup and malignancy detection

OBJECTIVE. The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound (SRU) recommendations on thyroid nodules are intended to "diagnose thyroid cancers that have reached clinical significance, while avoiding unnecessary tests and surgery in patients with benign nodules." The aim of our study was to determine the proportion of thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) that do not meet SRU recommendations. MATERIALS AND METHODS. This study is a retrospective study of 400 consecutive ultrasound-guided thyroid FNA encounters from July 2010 through June 2011. An encounter was defined as presentation to the department of radiology on a given date for FNA of one or more thyroid nodules. The criteria for performing biopsy of a nodule were determined by the referring clinicians. Nodules were categorized on the basis of sonographic findings as meeting SRU recommendations for biopsy, which we refer to as "SRU-positive," or not, which we refer to as "SRU-negative." Patients without a definitive pathology diagnosis of Bethesda class benign or malignant nodules were excluded. The characteristics of malignancies were compared for SRU-positive and SRU-negative encounters. RESULTS. The final study group consisted of 360 biopsy encounters for 350 patients and 29 malignancies (8%). Of the 360 biopsy encounters, 86 (24%) were SRU-negative encounters. Malignancy rates in SRU-positive and SRU-negative encounters were 9% (24/274) and 6% (5/86), respectively, and were not significantly different ( p = 0.5). Eighteen malignancies (75%) in the SRU-positive group were localized, whereas the others had nodal metastases (4/24) or distant metastases (2/24). SRU-positive encounters included medullary carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, and melanoma metastasis in addition to papillary carcinoma. All SRU-negative malignancies were localized papillary carcinomas. CONCLUSION. One in four thyroid biopsy encounters at our institution did not meet SRU recommendations for biopsy. The application of SRU recommendations reduces the number of benign nodules that undergo workup. Potentially missed malignancies in SRU-negative nodules are less aggressive by histologic type and stage compared with SRU-positive malignancies. © American Roentgen Ray Society.
Authors
Hobbs, HA; Bahl, M; Nelson, RC; Eastwood, JD; Esclamado, RM; Hoang, JK
MLA Citation
Hobbs, H. A., et al. “Applying the society of radiologists in ultrasound recommendations for fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules: Effect on workup and malignancy detection.” American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 202, no. 3, Mar. 2014, pp. 602–07. Scopus, doi:10.2214/AJR.13.11219.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1027383
Source
scopus
Published In
Ajr. American Journal of Roentgenology
Volume
202
Published Date
Start Page
602
End Page
607
DOI
10.2214/AJR.13.11219

Research Areas:

Abscess
Academic Medical Centers
Age Distribution
Anesthetics, Local
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiography
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Aorta, Thoracic
Aortography
Arteries
Biopsy, Fine-Needle
Body Burden
Brain Ischemia
Brain Neoplasms
Calcinosis
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating
Carcinoma, Papillary
Carcinoma, Renal Cell
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Carotid Artery, Internal
Case-Control Studies
Cervical Vertebrae
Chemoradiotherapy
Circle of Willis
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease
Documentation
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Electrocardiography
Eponyms
Fibromuscular Dysplasia
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography
Frontal Bone
Gallstones
Glioma
Glucose
Guideline Adherence
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Health Care Surveys
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary
Hyperthyroidism
Image Enhancement
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Immunohistochemistry
Incidental Findings
Injections
Injections, Epidural
Injections, Intra-Arterial
Injections, Intralesional
Injections, Intravenous
Jugular Veins
Kidney Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Lymphatic Metastasis
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Mammography
Mastoiditis
Myelography
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms
Neck
Nerve Block
Observer Variation
Oligodendroglioma
Organ Size
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parathyroid Neoplasms
Parotid Gland
Patient Safety
Petrous Bone
Phantoms, Imaging
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pneumonectomy
Positron-Emission Tomography
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Pulmonary Artery
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection
Radiculopathy
Radiographic Image Enhancement
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Radiology
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques
Retropharyngeal Abscess
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Spinal Nerve Roots
Staphylococcal Infections
Statistics, Nonparametric
Streptococcal Infections
Stroke
Syndrome
Thrombophlebitis
Thyroid Diseases
Thyroid Gland
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroid Nodule
Thyroidectomy
Tomography, Spiral Computed
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Triiodobenzoic Acids
Tumor Burden
Ultrasonography
Young Adult