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McLendon, Roger Edwin

Overview:

Brain tumors are diagnosed in more than 20,000 Americans annually. The most malignant neoplasm, glioblastoma, is also the most common. Similarly, brain tumors constitute the most common solid neoplasm in children and include astrocytomas of the cerebellum, brain stem and cerebrum as well as medulloblastomas of the cerebellum.  My colleagues and I have endeavored to translate the bench discoveries of genetic mutations and aberrant protein expressions found in brain tumors to better understand the processes involved in the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of brain tumors.  Using the resources of the Preston Robert Brain Tumor Biorepository at Duke, our team, consisting of Henry Friedman, Allan Friedman, and Hai Yan and lead by Darell Bigner, have helped to identify mutations in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH1 and IDH2) as a marker of good prognosis in gliomas of adults.  This test is now offered at Duke as a clinical test.  Working with the Molecular Pathology Laboratory at Duke, we have also brought testing for TERT promoter region mutations as another major test for classifying gliomas in adults.  Our collaboration with the Toronto Sick Kids Hospital has resulted in prognostic testing for childhood medulloblastomas, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and ependymomas at Duke.

Positions:

Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 1979

B.A. — Emory University

M.D. 1982

M.D. — Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine

Resident, Pathology

Duke University

Fellow in Neuropathology, Pathology

Duke University

Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology, Pathology

Mercer University

Assistant Professor of Pathology, Part-time, Pathology

Mercer University

Publications:

Molecular profiling of different glioma specimens from an Ollier disease patient suggests a multifocal disease process in the setting of IDH mosaicism.

Ollier disease (OD) and Maffucci syndrome are rare conditions due to a post-zygotic somatic mutation that results in mosaicism. In addition to enchondromas and hemangiomas, some of these patients also develop other unrelated tumors, such as gliomas, that harbor IDH mutations, suggesting that an IDH mutation is a common genetic event in the tumorigenesis in this group of patients. We illustrate an interesting case of multifocal IDH-mutant astrocytomas in an OD patient with 8 years of follow-up. We first demonstrated identical IDH mutations in the brain tumor samples from various locations in this patient, but different 1p,19q results by fluorescent in-situ hybridization, different whole genome copy number profiles by OncoScan analysis, and a discrepant IDH2M131I mutation unique to one tumor, supporting a multifocal disease process in the setting of somatic IDH mosaicism.

Authors
Tan, CL; Vellayappan, B; Wu, B; Yeo, TT; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Tan, CL, Vellayappan, B, Wu, B, Yeo, TT, and McLendon, RE. "Molecular profiling of different glioma specimens from an Ollier disease patient suggests a multifocal disease process in the setting of IDH mosaicism." Brain Tumor Pathology (August 29, 2018).
PMID
30159860
Source
epmc
Published In
Brain Tumor Pathology
Publish Date
2018
DOI
10.1007/s10014-018-0327-y

A Rationally Designed Fully Human EGFRvIII:CD3-Targeted Bispecific Antibody Redirects Human T Cells to Treat Patient-derived Intracerebral Malignant Glioma.

Purpose: Conventional therapy for malignant glioma fails to specifically target tumor cells. In contrast, substantial evidence indicates that if appropriately redirected, T cells can precisely eradicate tumors. Here we report the rational development of a fully human bispecific antibody (hEGFRvIII-CD3 bi-scFv) that redirects human T cells to lyse malignant glioma expressing a tumor-specific mutation of the EGFR (EGFRvIII).Experimental Design: We generated a panel of bispecific single-chain variable fragments and optimized design through successive rounds of screening and refinement. We tested the ability of our lead construct to redirect naïve T cells and induce target cell-specific lysis. To test for efficacy, we evaluated tumor growth and survival in xenogeneic and syngeneic models of glioma. Tumor penetrance following intravenous drug administration was assessed in highly invasive, orthotopic glioma models.Results: A highly expressed bispecific antibody with specificity to CD3 and EGFRvIII was generated (hEGFRvIII-CD3 bi-scFv). Antibody-induced T-cell activation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and proliferation was robust and occurred exclusively in the presence of target antigen. hEGFRvIII-CD3 bi-scFv was potent and target-specific, mediating significant lysis of multiple malignant glioma cell lines and patient-derived malignant glioma samples that heterogeneously express EGFRvIII. In both subcutaneous and orthotopic models, well-engrafted, patient-derived malignant glioma was effectively treated despite heterogeneity of EGFRvIII expression; intravenous hEGFRvIII-CD3 bi-scFv administration caused significant regression of tumor burden (P < 0.0001) and significantly extended survival (P < 0.0001). Similar efficacy was obtained in highly infiltrative, syngeneic glioma models, and intravenously administered hEGFRvIII-CD3 bi-scFv localized to these orthotopic tumors.Conclusions: We have developed a clinically translatable bispecific antibody that redirects human T cells to safely and effectively treat malignant glioma. On the basis of these results, we have developed a clinical study of hEGFRvIII-CD3 bi-scFv for patients with EGFRvIII-positive malignant glioma. Clin Cancer Res; 24(15); 3611-31. ©2018 AACR.

Authors
Gedeon, PC; Schaller, TH; Chitneni, SK; Choi, BD; Kuan, C-T; Suryadevara, CM; Snyder, DJ; Schmittling, RJ; Szafranski, SE; Cui, X; Healy, PN; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Keir, ST; Archer, GE; Reap, EA; Sanchez-Perez, L; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Gedeon, PC, Schaller, TH, Chitneni, SK, Choi, BD, Kuan, C-T, Suryadevara, CM, Snyder, DJ, Schmittling, RJ, Szafranski, SE, Cui, X, Healy, PN, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Keir, ST, Archer, GE, Reap, EA, Sanchez-Perez, L, Bigner, DD, and Sampson, JH. "A Rationally Designed Fully Human EGFRvIII:CD3-Targeted Bispecific Antibody Redirects Human T Cells to Treat Patient-derived Intracerebral Malignant Glioma." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 24.15 (August 2018): 3611-3631.
PMID
29703821
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
24
Issue
15
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
3611
End Page
3631
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-17-0126

Heterogeneity within the PF-EPN-B ependymoma subgroup.

Posterior fossa ependymoma comprise three distinct molecular variants, termed PF-EPN-A (PFA), PF-EPN-B (PFB), and PF-EPN-SE (subependymoma). Clinically, they are very disparate and PFB tumors are currently being considered for a trial of radiation avoidance. However, to move forward, unraveling the heterogeneity within PFB would be highly desirable. To discern the molecular heterogeneity within PFB, we performed an integrated analysis consisting of DNA methylation profiling, copy-number profiling, gene expression profiling, and clinical correlation across a cohort of 212 primary posterior fossa PFB tumors. Unsupervised spectral clustering and t-SNE analysis of genome-wide methylation data revealed five distinct subtypes of PFB tumors, termed PFB1-5, with distinct demographics, copy-number alterations, and gene expression profiles. All PFB subtypes were distinct from PFA and posterior fossa subependymomas. Of the five subtypes, PFB4 and PFB5 are more discrete, consisting of younger and older patients, respectively, with a strong female-gender enrichment in PFB5 (age: p = 0.011, gender: p = 0.04). Broad copy-number aberrations were common; however, many events such as chromosome 2 loss, 5 gain, and 17 loss were enriched in specific subtypes and 1q gain was enriched in PFB1. Late relapses were common across all five subtypes, but deaths were uncommon and present in only two subtypes (PFB1 and PFB3). Unlike the case in PFA ependymoma, 1q gain was not a robust marker of poor progression-free survival; however, chromosome 13q loss may represent a novel marker for risk stratification across the spectrum of PFB subtypes. Similar to PFA ependymoma, there exists a significant intertumoral heterogeneity within PFB, with distinct molecular subtypes identified. Even when accounting for this heterogeneity, extent of resection remains the strongest predictor of poor outcome. However, this biological heterogeneity must be accounted for in future preclinical modeling and personalized therapies.

Authors
Cavalli, FMG; Hübner, J-M; Sharma, T; Luu, B; Sill, M; Zapotocky, M; Mack, SC; Witt, H; Lin, T; Shih, DJH; Ho, B; Santi, M; Emery, L; Hukin, J; Dunham, C; McLendon, RE; Lipp, ES; Gururangan, S; Grossbach, A; French, P; Kros, JM; van Veelen, M-LC; Rao, AAN; Giannini, C; Leary, S; Jung, S; Faria, CC; Mora, J; Schüller, U; Alonso, MM; Chan, JA; Klekner, A; Chambless, LB; Hwang, EI; Massimino, M; Eberhart, CG; Karajannis, MA; Lu, B; Liau, LM; Zollo, M; Ferrucci, V; Carlotti, C; Tirapelli, DPC; Tabori, U; Bouffet, E; Ryzhova, M; Ellison, DW; Merchant, TE; Gilbert, MR; Armstrong, TS; Korshunov, A; Pfister, SM; Taylor, MD; Aldape, K; Pajtler, KW; Kool, M; Ramaswamy, V
MLA Citation
Cavalli, FMG, Hübner, J-M, Sharma, T, Luu, B, Sill, M, Zapotocky, M, Mack, SC, Witt, H, Lin, T, Shih, DJH, Ho, B, Santi, M, Emery, L, Hukin, J, Dunham, C, McLendon, RE, Lipp, ES, Gururangan, S, Grossbach, A, French, P, Kros, JM, van Veelen, M-LC, Rao, AAN, Giannini, C, Leary, S, Jung, S, Faria, CC, Mora, J, Schüller, U, Alonso, MM, Chan, JA, Klekner, A, Chambless, LB, Hwang, EI, Massimino, M, Eberhart, CG, Karajannis, MA, Lu, B, Liau, LM, Zollo, M, Ferrucci, V, Carlotti, C, Tirapelli, DPC, Tabori, U, Bouffet, E, Ryzhova, M, Ellison, DW, Merchant, TE, Gilbert, MR, Armstrong, TS, Korshunov, A, Pfister, SM, Taylor, MD, Aldape, K, Pajtler, KW, Kool, M, and Ramaswamy, V. "Heterogeneity within the PF-EPN-B ependymoma subgroup." Acta Neuropathologica 136.2 (August 2018): 227-237.
PMID
30019219
Source
epmc
Published In
Acta Neuropathologica
Volume
136
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
227
End Page
237
DOI
10.1007/s00401-018-1888-x

Novel case of recurrent intraventricular atypical central neurocytoma with prominent gangliogliomatous differentiation in a 10-year-old boy with 10 years of follow up.

Central neurocytoma is a rare neuronal tumor that typically occurs in young adults. Infrequently, these tumors exhibit advanced neuronal maturation and glial differentiation, giving rise to a histologically diverse tumor, in contrast to a typical central neurocytoma. We present a novel case of intraventricular central neurocytoma with prominent gangliogliomatous differentiation that developed atypical features upon recurrence after 10 years of follow up in a 10-year-old boy. Our case provides insight into the divergent differentiation capability of a neurocytic tumor and illustrates the diverse histological features of this rare entity.

Authors
Tan, C-L; Landi, D; Fuchs, H; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Tan, C-L, Landi, D, Fuchs, H, and McLendon, RE. "Novel case of recurrent intraventricular atypical central neurocytoma with prominent gangliogliomatous differentiation in a 10-year-old boy with 10 years of follow up." Neuropathology : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Neuropathology (July 24, 2018).
PMID
30039530
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuropathology : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Neuropathology
Publish Date
2018
DOI
10.1111/neup.12502

Hyaluronic acid based low viscosity hydrogel as a novel carrier for Convection Enhanced Delivery of CAR T cells.

Convection Enhanced Delivery (CED) infuses therapeutic agents directly into the intracranial area continuously under pressure. The convection improves the distribution of therapeutics such as those aimed at brain tumors. Although CED successfully delivers small therapeutic agents, this technique fails to effectively deliver cells largely due to cell sedimentation during delivery. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a low viscosity hydrogel (LVHydrogel), which is capable of retaining cells in suspension. In this study, we evaluated whether LVHydrogel can effectively act as a carrier for the CED of tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. CAR T cells were resuspended in saline or LVHydrogel carriers, loaded into syringes, and passed through the CED system for 5 h. CAR T cells submitted to CED were counted and the efficiency of delivery was determined. In addition to delivery, the ability of CAR T cells to migrate and induce cytotoxicity was evaluated. Our studies demonstrate that LVHydrogel is a superior carrier for CED in comparison to saline. The efficiency of cell delivery in saline carrier was only ∼3-5% of the total cells whereas delivery by the LVHydrogel carrier was much higher, reaching ∼45-75%. Migration and Cytotoxicity was similar in both carriers in non-infused samples but we found superior cytotoxicity in LVHydrogel group post-infusion. We demonstrate that LVHydrogel, a biodegradable biomaterial which does not cause acute toxicity on preclinical animal models, prevents cellular sedimentation during CED and presents itself as a superior carrier to the current carrier, saline, for the CED of CAR T cells.

Authors
Atik, AF; Suryadevara, CM; Schweller, RM; West, JL; Healy, P; Herndon Ii, JE; Congdon, KL; Sanchez-Perez, L; McLendon, RE; Archer, GE; Fecci, P; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Atik, AF, Suryadevara, CM, Schweller, RM, West, JL, Healy, P, Herndon Ii, JE, Congdon, KL, Sanchez-Perez, L, McLendon, RE, Archer, GE, Fecci, P, and Sampson, JH. "Hyaluronic acid based low viscosity hydrogel as a novel carrier for Convection Enhanced Delivery of CAR T cells." Journal of Clinical Neuroscience : Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia (July 21, 2018).
PMID
30041899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Neuroscience : Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Publish Date
2018
DOI
10.1016/j.jocn.2018.06.005

Recurrent Glioblastoma Treated with Recombinant Poliovirus.

The prognosis of patients with recurrent World Health Organization (WHO) grade IV malignant glioma is dismal, and there is currently no effective therapy. We conducted a dose-finding and toxicity study in this population of patients, evaluating convection-enhanced, intratumoral delivery of the recombinant nonpathogenic polio-rhinovirus chimera (PVSRIPO). PVSRIPO recognizes the poliovirus receptor CD155, which is widely expressed in neoplastic cells of solid tumors and in major components of the tumor microenvironment.We enrolled consecutive adult patients who had recurrent supratentorial WHO grade IV malignant glioma, confirmed on histopathological testing, with measurable disease (contrast-enhancing tumor of ≥1 cm and ≤5.5 cm in the greatest dimension). The study evaluated seven doses, ranging between 107 and 1010 50% tissue-culture infectious doses (TCID50), first in a dose-escalation phase and then in a dose-expansion phase.From May 2012 through May 2017, a total of 61 patients were enrolled and received a dose of PVSRIPO. Dose level -1 (5.0×107 TCID50) was identified as the phase 2 dose. One dose-limiting toxic effect was observed; a patient in whom dose level 5 (1010 TCID50) was administered had a grade 4 intracranial hemorrhage immediately after the catheter was removed. To mitigate locoregional inflammation of the infused tumor with prolonged glucocorticoid use, dose level 5 was deescalated to reach the phase 2 dose. In the dose-expansion phase, 19% of the patients had a PVSRIPO-related adverse event of grade 3 or higher. Overall survival among the patients who received PVSRIPO reached a plateau of 21% (95% confidence interval, 11 to 33) at 24 months that was sustained at 36 months.Intratumoral infusion of PVSRIPO in patients with recurrent WHO grade IV malignant glioma confirmed the absence of neurovirulent potential. The survival rate among patients who received PVSRIPO immunotherapy was higher at 24 and 36 months than the rate among historical controls. (Funded by the Brain Tumor Research Charity and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01491893 .).

Authors
Desjardins, A; Gromeier, M; Herndon, JE; Beaubier, N; Bolognesi, DP; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; McSherry, F; Muscat, AM; Nair, S; Peters, KB; Randazzo, D; Sampson, JH; Vlahovic, G; Harrison, WT; McLendon, RE; Ashley, D; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Desjardins, A, Gromeier, M, Herndon, JE, Beaubier, N, Bolognesi, DP, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, McSherry, F, Muscat, AM, Nair, S, Peters, KB, Randazzo, D, Sampson, JH, Vlahovic, G, Harrison, WT, McLendon, RE, Ashley, D, and Bigner, DD. "Recurrent Glioblastoma Treated with Recombinant Poliovirus." The New England Journal of Medicine 379.2 (July 2018): 150-161.
PMID
29943666
Source
epmc
Published In
The New England Journal of Medicine
Volume
379
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
150
End Page
161
DOI
10.1056/NEJMoa1716435

The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma

Authors
Ricketts, CJ; De Cubas, AA; Fan, H; Smith, CC; Lang, M; Reznik, E; Bowlby, R; Gibb, EA; Akbani, R; Beroukhim, R; Bottaro, DP; Choueiri, TK; Gibbs, RA; Godwin, AK; Haake, S; Hakimi, AA; Henske, EP; Hsieh, JJ; Ho, TH; Kanchi, RS; Krishnan, B; Kwiatkowski, DJ; Lui, W; Merino, MJ; Mills, GB; Myers, J; Nickerson, ML; Reuter, VE; Schmidt, LS; Shelley, CS; Shen, H; Shuch, B; Signoretti, S; Srinivasan, R; Tamboli, P; Thomas, G; Vincent, BG; Vocke, CD; Wheeler, DA; Yang, L; Kim, WY; Robertson, AG; Spellman, PT; Rathmell, WK; Linehan, WM; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R et al.
MLA Citation
Ricketts, CJ, De Cubas, AA, Fan, H, Smith, CC, Lang, M, Reznik, E, Bowlby, R, Gibb, EA, Akbani, R, Beroukhim, R, Bottaro, DP, Choueiri, TK, Gibbs, RA, Godwin, AK, Haake, S, Hakimi, AA, Henske, EP, Hsieh, JJ, Ho, TH, Kanchi, RS, Krishnan, B, Kwiatkowski, DJ, Lui, W, Merino, MJ, Mills, GB, Myers, J, Nickerson, ML, Reuter, VE, Schmidt, LS, Shelley, CS, Shen, H, Shuch, B, Signoretti, S, Srinivasan, R, Tamboli, P, Thomas, G, Vincent, BG, Vocke, CD, Wheeler, DA, Yang, L, Kim, WY, Robertson, AG, Spellman, PT, Rathmell, WK, Linehan, WM, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, and Kefford, R et al.. "The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma." Cell Reports 23.12 (June 2018): 3698-3698.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
12
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
3698
End Page
3698
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.06.032

The genomic landscape of TERT promoter wildtype-IDH wildtype glioblastoma.

The majority of glioblastomas can be classified into molecular subgroups based on mutations in the TERT promoter (TERTp) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH). These molecular subgroups utilize distinct genetic mechanisms of telomere maintenance, either TERTp mutation leading to telomerase activation or ATRX-mutation leading to an alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype (ALT). However, about 20% of glioblastomas lack alterations in TERTp and IDH. These tumors, designated TERTpWT-IDHWT glioblastomas, do not have well-established genetic biomarkers or defined mechanisms of telomere maintenance. Here we report the genetic landscape of TERTpWT-IDHWT glioblastoma and identify SMARCAL1 inactivating mutations as a novel genetic mechanism of ALT. Furthermore, we identify a novel mechanism of telomerase activation in glioblastomas that occurs via chromosomal rearrangements upstream of TERT. Collectively, our findings define novel molecular subgroups of glioblastoma, including a telomerase-positive subgroup driven by TERT-structural rearrangements (IDHWT-TERTSV), and an ALT-positive subgroup (IDHWT-ALT) with mutations in ATRX or SMARCAL1.

Authors
Diplas, BH; He, X; Brosnan-Cashman, JA; Liu, H; Chen, LH; Wang, Z; Moure, CJ; Killela, PJ; Loriaux, DB; Lipp, ES; Greer, PK; Yang, R; Rizzo, AJ; Rodriguez, FJ; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Wang, S; He, Y; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Jiao, Y; Waitkus, MS; Meeker, AK; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Diplas, BH, He, X, Brosnan-Cashman, JA, Liu, H, Chen, LH, Wang, Z, Moure, CJ, Killela, PJ, Loriaux, DB, Lipp, ES, Greer, PK, Yang, R, Rizzo, AJ, Rodriguez, FJ, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Wang, S, He, Y, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Jiao, Y, Waitkus, MS, Meeker, AK, and Yan, H. "The genomic landscape of TERT promoter wildtype-IDH wildtype glioblastoma." Nature Communications 9.1 (May 25, 2018): 2087-null.
PMID
29802247
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature Communications
Volume
9
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
2087
DOI
10.1038/s41467-018-04448-6

Comparative Molecular Analysis of Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas.

We analyzed 921 adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum to examine shared and distinguishing molecular characteristics of gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas (GIACs). Hypermutated tumors were distinct regardless of cancer type and comprised those enriched for insertions/deletions, representing microsatellite instability cases with epigenetic silencing of MLH1 in the context of CpG island methylator phenotype, plus tumors with elevated single-nucleotide variants associated with mutations in POLE. Tumors with chromosomal instability were diverse, with gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas harboring fragmented genomes associated with genomic doubling and distinct mutational signatures. We identified a group of tumors in the colon and rectum lacking hypermutation and aneuploidy termed genome stable and enriched in DNA hypermethylation and mutations in KRAS, SOX9, and PCBP1.

Authors
Liu, Y; Sethi, NS; Hinoue, T; Schneider, BG; Cherniack, AD; Sanchez-Vega, F; Seoane, JA; Farshidfar, F; Bowlby, R; Islam, M; Kim, J; Chatila, W; Akbani, R; Kanchi, RS; Rabkin, CS; Willis, JE; Wang, KK; McCall, SJ; Mishra, L; Ojesina, AI; Bullman, S; Pedamallu, CS; Lazar, AJ; Sakai, R; Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, ; Thorsson, V; Bass, AJ; Laird, PW
MLA Citation
Liu, Y, Sethi, NS, Hinoue, T, Schneider, BG, Cherniack, AD, Sanchez-Vega, F, Seoane, JA, Farshidfar, F, Bowlby, R, Islam, M, Kim, J, Chatila, W, Akbani, R, Kanchi, RS, Rabkin, CS, Willis, JE, Wang, KK, McCall, SJ, Mishra, L, Ojesina, AI, Bullman, S, Pedamallu, CS, Lazar, AJ, Sakai, R, Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, , Thorsson, V, Bass, AJ, and Laird, PW. "Comparative Molecular Analysis of Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas." Cancer Cell 33.4 (April 2, 2018): 721-735.e8.
PMID
29622466
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
721
End Page
735.e8
DOI
10.1016/j.ccell.2018.03.010

The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma

Authors
Ricketts, CJ; De Cubas, AA; Fan, H; Smith, CC; Lang, M; Reznik, E; Bowlby, R; Gibb, EA; Akbani, R; Beroukhim, R; Bottaro, DP; Choueiri, TK; Gibbs, RA; Godwin, AK; Haake, S; Hakimi, AA; Henske, EP; Hsieh, JJ; Ho, TH; Kanchi, RS; Krishnan, B; Kwiatkowski, DJ; Lui, W; Merino, MJ; Mills, GB; Myers, J; Nickerson, ML; Reuter, VE; Schmidt, LS; Shelley, CS; Shen, H; Shuch, B; Signoretti, S; Srinivasan, R; Tamboli, P; Thomas, G; Vincent, BG; Vocke, CD; Wheeler, DA; Yang, L; Kim, WY; Robertson, AG; Spellman, PT; Rathmell, WK; Linehan, WM; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R et al.
MLA Citation
Ricketts, CJ, De Cubas, AA, Fan, H, Smith, CC, Lang, M, Reznik, E, Bowlby, R, Gibb, EA, Akbani, R, Beroukhim, R, Bottaro, DP, Choueiri, TK, Gibbs, RA, Godwin, AK, Haake, S, Hakimi, AA, Henske, EP, Hsieh, JJ, Ho, TH, Kanchi, RS, Krishnan, B, Kwiatkowski, DJ, Lui, W, Merino, MJ, Mills, GB, Myers, J, Nickerson, ML, Reuter, VE, Schmidt, LS, Shelley, CS, Shen, H, Shuch, B, Signoretti, S, Srinivasan, R, Tamboli, P, Thomas, G, Vincent, BG, Vocke, CD, Wheeler, DA, Yang, L, Kim, WY, Robertson, AG, Spellman, PT, Rathmell, WK, Linehan, WM, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, and Kefford, R et al.. "The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 313-326.e5.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
313
End Page
326.e5
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.075

Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context

Authors
Chiu, H-S; Somvanshi, S; Patel, E; Chen, T-W; Singh, VP; Zorman, B; Patil, SL; Pan, Y; Chatterjee, SS; Sood, AK; Gunaratne, PH; Sumazin, P; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S et al.
MLA Citation
Chiu, H-S, Somvanshi, S, Patel, E, Chen, T-W, Singh, VP, Zorman, B, Patil, SL, Pan, Y, Chatterjee, SS, Sood, AK, Gunaratne, PH, Sumazin, P, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, and Singer, S et al.. "Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 297-312.e12.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
297
End Page
312.e12
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.064

Driver Fusions and Their Implications in the Development and Treatment of Human Cancers

Authors
Gao, Q; Liang, W-W; Foltz, SM; Mutharasu, G; Jayasinghe, RG; Cao, S; Liao, W-W; Reynolds, SM; Wyczalkowski, MA; Yao, L; Yu, L; Sun, SQ; Chen, K; Lazar, AJ; Fields, RC; Wendl, MC; Van Tine, BA; Vij, R; Chen, F; Nykter, M; Shmulevich, I; Ding, L; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J et al.
MLA Citation
Gao, Q, Liang, W-W, Foltz, SM, Mutharasu, G, Jayasinghe, RG, Cao, S, Liao, W-W, Reynolds, SM, Wyczalkowski, MA, Yao, L, Yu, L, Sun, SQ, Chen, K, Lazar, AJ, Fields, RC, Wendl, MC, Van Tine, BA, Vij, R, Chen, F, Nykter, M, Shmulevich, I, Ding, L, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, and Wilmott, J et al.. "Driver Fusions and Their Implications in the Development and Treatment of Human Cancers." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 227-238.e3.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
227
End Page
238.e3
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.050

Perspective on Oncogenic Processes at the End of the Beginning of Cancer Genomics

Authors
Ding, L; Bailey, MH; Porta-Pardo, E; Thorsson, V; Colaprico, A; Bertrand, D; Gibbs, DL; Weerasinghe, A; Huang, K-L; Tokheim, C; Cortés-Ciriano, I; Jayasinghe, R; Chen, F; Yu, L; Sun, S; Olsen, C; Kim, J; Taylor, AM; Cherniack, AD; Akbani, R; Suphavilai, C; Nagarajan, N; Stuart, JM; Mills, GB; Wyczalkowski, MA; Vincent, BG; Hutter, CM; Zenklusen, JC; Hoadley, KA; Wendl, MC; Shmulevich, L; Lazar, AJ; Wheeler, DA; Getz, G; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Heiman, DI; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Zhang, W; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J et al.
MLA Citation
Ding, L, Bailey, MH, Porta-Pardo, E, Thorsson, V, Colaprico, A, Bertrand, D, Gibbs, DL, Weerasinghe, A, Huang, K-L, Tokheim, C, Cortés-Ciriano, I, Jayasinghe, R, Chen, F, Yu, L, Sun, S, Olsen, C, Kim, J, Taylor, AM, Cherniack, AD, Akbani, R, Suphavilai, C, Nagarajan, N, Stuart, JM, Mills, GB, Wyczalkowski, MA, Vincent, BG, Hutter, CM, Zenklusen, JC, Hoadley, KA, Wendl, MC, Shmulevich, L, Lazar, AJ, Wheeler, DA, Getz, G, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Heiman, DI, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Zhang, W, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, and Stretch, J et al.. "Perspective on Oncogenic Processes at the End of the Beginning of Cancer Genomics." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 305-320.e10.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
305
End Page
320.e10
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.033

Cell-of-Origin Patterns Dominate the Molecular Classification of 10,000 Tumors from 33 Types of Cancer

Authors
Hoadley, KA; Yau, C; Hinoue, T; Wolf, DM; Lazar, AJ; Drill, E; Shen, R; Taylor, AM; Cherniack, AD; Thorsson, V; Akbani, R; Bowlby, R; Wong, CK; Wiznerowicz, M; Sanchez-Vega, F; Robertson, AG; Schneider, BG; Lawrence, MS; Noushmehr, H; Malta, TM; Stuart, JM; Benz, CC; Laird, PW; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, O; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV; Broudy, T; Mirsaidi, C et al.
MLA Citation
Hoadley, KA, Yau, C, Hinoue, T, Wolf, DM, Lazar, AJ, Drill, E, Shen, R, Taylor, AM, Cherniack, AD, Thorsson, V, Akbani, R, Bowlby, R, Wong, CK, Wiznerowicz, M, Sanchez-Vega, F, Robertson, AG, Schneider, BG, Lawrence, MS, Noushmehr, H, Malta, TM, Stuart, JM, Benz, CC, Laird, PW, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, O, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, Tien, NV, Broudy, T, and Mirsaidi, C et al.. "Cell-of-Origin Patterns Dominate the Molecular Classification of 10,000 Tumors from 33 Types of Cancer." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 291-304.e6.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
291
End Page
304.e6
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.022

Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

Authors
Saltz, J; Gupta, R; Hou, L; Kurc, T; Singh, P; Nguyen, V; Samaras, D; Shroyer, KR; Zhao, T; Batiste, R; Van Arnam, J; Shmulevich, I; Rao, AUK; Lazar, AJ; Sharma, A; Thorsson, V; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, O; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA et al.
MLA Citation
Saltz, J, Gupta, R, Hou, L, Kurc, T, Singh, P, Nguyen, V, Samaras, D, Shroyer, KR, Zhao, T, Batiste, R, Van Arnam, J, Shmulevich, I, Rao, AUK, Lazar, AJ, Sharma, A, Thorsson, V, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, O, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, and Levine, DA et al.. "Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 181-193.e7.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
181
End Page
193.e7
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.086

Pathogenic Germline Variants in 10,389 Adult Cancers

Authors
Huang, K-L; Mashl, RJ; Wu, Y; Ritter, DI; Wang, J; Oh, C; Paczkowska, M; Reynolds, S; Wyczalkowski, MA; Oak, N; Scott, AD; Krassowski, M; Cherniack, AD; Houlahan, KE; Jayasinghe, R; Wang, L-B; Zhou, DC; Liu, D; Cao, S; Kim, YW; Koire, A; McMichael, JF; Hucthagowder, V; Kim, T-B; Hahn, A; Wang, C; McLellan, MD; Al-Mulla, F; Johnson, KJ; Lichtarge, O; Boutros, PC; Raphael, B; Lazar, AJ; Zhang, W; Wendl, MC; Govindan, R; Jain, S; Wheeler, D; Kulkarni, S; Dipersio, JF; Reimand, J; Meric-Bernstam, F; Chen, K; Shmulevich, I; Plon, SE; Chen, F; Ding, L; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Thorsson, V; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P et al.
MLA Citation
Huang, K-L, Mashl, RJ, Wu, Y, Ritter, DI, Wang, J, Oh, C, Paczkowska, M, Reynolds, S, Wyczalkowski, MA, Oak, N, Scott, AD, Krassowski, M, Cherniack, AD, Houlahan, KE, Jayasinghe, R, Wang, L-B, Zhou, DC, Liu, D, Cao, S, Kim, YW, Koire, A, McMichael, JF, Hucthagowder, V, Kim, T-B, Hahn, A, Wang, C, McLellan, MD, Al-Mulla, F, Johnson, KJ, Lichtarge, O, Boutros, PC, Raphael, B, Lazar, AJ, Zhang, W, Wendl, MC, Govindan, R, Jain, S, Wheeler, D, Kulkarni, S, Dipersio, JF, Reimand, J, Meric-Bernstam, F, Chen, K, Shmulevich, I, Plon, SE, Chen, F, Ding, L, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Thorsson, V, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, and Troncoso, P et al.. "Pathogenic Germline Variants in 10,389 Adult Cancers." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 355-370.e14.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
355
End Page
370.e14
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.039

Molecular Characterization and Clinical Relevance of Metabolic Expression Subtypes in Human Cancers

Authors
Peng, X; Chen, Z; Farshidfar, F; Xu, X; Lorenzi, PL; Wang, Y; Cheng, F; Tan, L; Mojumdar, K; Du, D; Ge, Z; Li, J; Thomas, GV; Birsoy, K; Liu, L; Zhang, H; Zhao, Z; Marchand, C; Weinstein, JN; Bathe, OF; Liang, H; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA et al.
MLA Citation
Peng, X, Chen, Z, Farshidfar, F, Xu, X, Lorenzi, PL, Wang, Y, Cheng, F, Tan, L, Mojumdar, K, Du, D, Ge, Z, Li, J, Thomas, GV, Birsoy, K, Liu, L, Zhang, H, Zhao, Z, Marchand, C, Weinstein, JN, Bathe, OF, Liang, H, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, and Chan, TA et al.. "Molecular Characterization and Clinical Relevance of Metabolic Expression Subtypes in Human Cancers." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 255-269.e4.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
255
End Page
269.e4
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.077

Genomic, Pathway Network, and Immunologic Features Distinguishing Squamous Carcinomas

Authors
Campbell, JD; Yau, C; Bowlby, R; Liu, Y; Brennan, K; Fan, H; Taylor, AM; Wang, C; Walter, V; Akbani, R; Byers, LA; Creighton, CJ; Coarfa, C; Shih, J; Cherniack, AD; Gevaert, O; Prunello, M; Shen, H; Anur, P; Chen, J; Cheng, H; Hayes, DN; Bullman, S; Pedamallu, CS; Ojesina, AI; Sadeghi, S; Mungall, KL; Robertson, AG; Benz, C; Schultz, A; Kanchi, RS; Gay, CM; Hegde, A; Diao, L; Wang, J; Ma, W; Sumazin, P; Chiu, H-S; Chen, T-W; Gunaratne, P; Donehower, L; Rader, JS; Zuna, R; Al-Ahmadie, H; Lazar, AJ; Flores, ER; Tsai, KY; Zhou, JH; Rustgi, AK; Drill, E; Shen, R; Wong, CK; Stuart, JM; Laird, PW; Hoadley, KA; Weinstein, JN; Peto, M; Pickering, CR; Chen, Z; Van Waes, C; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Spellman, P; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Hinoue, T; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I et al.
MLA Citation
Campbell, JD, Yau, C, Bowlby, R, Liu, Y, Brennan, K, Fan, H, Taylor, AM, Wang, C, Walter, V, Akbani, R, Byers, LA, Creighton, CJ, Coarfa, C, Shih, J, Cherniack, AD, Gevaert, O, Prunello, M, Shen, H, Anur, P, Chen, J, Cheng, H, Hayes, DN, Bullman, S, Pedamallu, CS, Ojesina, AI, Sadeghi, S, Mungall, KL, Robertson, AG, Benz, C, Schultz, A, Kanchi, RS, Gay, CM, Hegde, A, Diao, L, Wang, J, Ma, W, Sumazin, P, Chiu, H-S, Chen, T-W, Gunaratne, P, Donehower, L, Rader, JS, Zuna, R, Al-Ahmadie, H, Lazar, AJ, Flores, ER, Tsai, KY, Zhou, JH, Rustgi, AK, Drill, E, Shen, R, Wong, CK, Stuart, JM, Laird, PW, Hoadley, KA, Weinstein, JN, Peto, M, Pickering, CR, Chen, Z, Van Waes, C, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Spellman, P, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Hinoue, T, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, and Wistuba, I et al.. "Genomic, Pathway Network, and Immunologic Features Distinguishing Squamous Carcinomas." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 194-212.e6.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
194
End Page
212.e6
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.063

The Immune Landscape of Cancer

Authors
Thorsson, V; Gibbs, DL; Brown, SD; Wolf, D; Bortone, DS; Ou Yang, T-H; Porta-Pardo, E; Gao, GF; Plaisier, CL; Eddy, JA; Ziv, E; Culhane, AC; Paull, EO; Sivakumar, IKA; Gentles, AJ; Malhotra, R; Farshidfar, F; Colaprico, A; Parker, JS; Mose, LE; Vo, NS; Liu, J; Liu, Y; Rader, J; Dhankani, V; Reynolds, SM; Bowlby, R; Califano, A; Cherniack, AD; Anastassiou, D; Bedognetti, D; Rao, A; Chen, K; Krasnitz, A; Hu, H; Malta, TM; Noushmehr, H; Pedamallu, CS; Bullman, S; Ojesina, AI; Lamb, A; Zhou, W; Shen, H; Choueiri, TK; Weinstein, JN; Guinney, J; Saltz, J; Holt, RA; Rabkin, CE; Lazar, AJ; Serody, JS; Demicco, EG; Disis, ML; Vincent, BG; Shmulevich, L; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P et al.
MLA Citation
Thorsson, V, Gibbs, DL, Brown, SD, Wolf, D, Bortone, DS, Ou Yang, T-H, Porta-Pardo, E, Gao, GF, Plaisier, CL, Eddy, JA, Ziv, E, Culhane, AC, Paull, EO, Sivakumar, IKA, Gentles, AJ, Malhotra, R, Farshidfar, F, Colaprico, A, Parker, JS, Mose, LE, Vo, NS, Liu, J, Liu, Y, Rader, J, Dhankani, V, Reynolds, SM, Bowlby, R, Califano, A, Cherniack, AD, Anastassiou, D, Bedognetti, D, Rao, A, Chen, K, Krasnitz, A, Hu, H, Malta, TM, Noushmehr, H, Pedamallu, CS, Bullman, S, Ojesina, AI, Lamb, A, Zhou, W, Shen, H, Choueiri, TK, Weinstein, JN, Guinney, J, Saltz, J, Holt, RA, Rabkin, CE, Lazar, AJ, Serody, JS, Demicco, EG, Disis, ML, Vincent, BG, Shmulevich, L, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, and Tamboli, P et al.. "The Immune Landscape of Cancer." Immunity 48.4 (April 2018): 812-830.e14.
Source
crossref
Published In
Immunity
Volume
48
Issue
4
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
812
End Page
830.e14
DOI
10.1016/j.immuni.2018.03.023

Integrated Genomic Analysis of the Ubiquitin Pathway across Cancer Types

Authors
Ge, Z; Leighton, JS; Wang, Y; Peng, X; Chen, Z; Chen, H; Sun, Y; Yao, F; Li, J; Zhang, H; Liu, J; Shriver, CD; Hu, H; Piwnica-Worms, H; Ma, L; Liang, H; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V et al.
MLA Citation
Ge, Z, Leighton, JS, Wang, Y, Peng, X, Chen, Z, Chen, H, Sun, Y, Yao, F, Li, J, Zhang, H, Liu, J, Shriver, CD, Hu, H, Piwnica-Worms, H, Ma, L, Liang, H, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, and Reuter, V et al.. "Integrated Genomic Analysis of the Ubiquitin Pathway across Cancer Types." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 213-226.e3.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
213
End Page
226.e3
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.047

Machine Learning Detects Pan-cancer Ras Pathway Activation in The Cancer Genome Atlas

Authors
Way, GP; Sanchez-Vega, F; La, K; Armenia, J; Chatila, WK; Luna, A; Sander, C; Cherniack, AD; Mina, M; Ciriello, G; Schultz, N; Sanchez, Y; Greene, CS; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Chakravarty, D; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; Ladanyi, M; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV; Broudy, T; Mirsaidi, C; Nair, P; Drwiega, P; Miller, J et al.
MLA Citation
Way, GP, Sanchez-Vega, F, La, K, Armenia, J, Chatila, WK, Luna, A, Sander, C, Cherniack, AD, Mina, M, Ciriello, G, Schultz, N, Sanchez, Y, Greene, CS, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Chakravarty, D, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, Ladanyi, M, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, Tien, NV, Broudy, T, Mirsaidi, C, Nair, P, Drwiega, P, and Miller, J et al.. "Machine Learning Detects Pan-cancer Ras Pathway Activation in The Cancer Genome Atlas." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 172-180.e3.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
172
End Page
180.e3
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.046

lncRNA Epigenetic Landscape Analysis Identifies EPIC1 as an Oncogenic lncRNA that Interacts with MYC and Promotes Cell-Cycle Progression in Cancer

Authors
Wang, Z; Yang, B; Zhang, M; Guo, W; Wu, Z; Wang, Y; Jia, L; Li, S; Xie, W; Yang, D; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV et al.
MLA Citation
Wang, Z, Yang, B, Zhang, M, Guo, W, Wu, Z, Wang, Y, Jia, L, Li, S, Xie, W, Yang, D, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, and Tien, NV et al.. "lncRNA Epigenetic Landscape Analysis Identifies EPIC1 as an Oncogenic lncRNA that Interacts with MYC and Promotes Cell-Cycle Progression in Cancer." Cancer Cell 33.4 (April 2018): 706-720.e9.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
706
End Page
720.e9
DOI
10.1016/j.ccell.2018.03.006

A Pan-Cancer Analysis of Enhancer Expression in Nearly 9000 Patient Samples

Authors
Chen, H; Li, C; Peng, X; Zhou, Z; Weinstein, JN; Liang, H; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV; Broudy, T; Mirsaidi, C; Nair, P; Drwiega, P; Miller, J; Smith, J et al.
MLA Citation
Chen, H, Li, C, Peng, X, Zhou, Z, Weinstein, JN, Liang, H, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, Tien, NV, Broudy, T, Mirsaidi, C, Nair, P, Drwiega, P, Miller, J, and Smith, J et al.. "A Pan-Cancer Analysis of Enhancer Expression in Nearly 9000 Patient Samples." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 386-399.e12.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
386
End Page
399.e12
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.027

Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in The Cancer Genome Atlas

Authors
Sanchez-Vega, F; Mina, M; Armenia, J; Chatila, WK; Luna, A; La, KC; Dimitriadoy, S; Liu, DL; Kantheti, HS; Saghafinia, S; Chakravarty, D; Daian, F; Gao, Q; Bailey, MH; Liang, W-W; Foltz, SM; Shmulevich, I; Ding, L; Heins, Z; Ochoa, A; Gross, B; Gao, J; Zhang, H; Kundra, R; Kandoth, C; Bahceci, I; Dervishi, L; Dogrusoz, U; Zhou, W; Shen, H; Laird, PW; Way, GP; Greene, CS; Liang, H; Xiao, Y; Wang, C; Iavarone, A; Berger, AH; Bivona, TG; Lazar, AJ; Hammer, GD; Giordano, T; Kwong, LN; McArthur, G; Huang, C; Tward, AD; Frederick, MJ; McCormick, F; Meyerson, M; Van Allen, EM; Cherniack, AD; Ciriello, G; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; de Bruijn, I; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Nissan, MG; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V et al.
MLA Citation
Sanchez-Vega, F, Mina, M, Armenia, J, Chatila, WK, Luna, A, La, KC, Dimitriadoy, S, Liu, DL, Kantheti, HS, Saghafinia, S, Chakravarty, D, Daian, F, Gao, Q, Bailey, MH, Liang, W-W, Foltz, SM, Shmulevich, I, Ding, L, Heins, Z, Ochoa, A, Gross, B, Gao, J, Zhang, H, Kundra, R, Kandoth, C, Bahceci, I, Dervishi, L, Dogrusoz, U, Zhou, W, Shen, H, Laird, PW, Way, GP, Greene, CS, Liang, H, Xiao, Y, Wang, C, Iavarone, A, Berger, AH, Bivona, TG, Lazar, AJ, Hammer, GD, Giordano, T, Kwong, LN, McArthur, G, Huang, C, Tward, AD, Frederick, MJ, McCormick, F, Meyerson, M, Van Allen, EM, Cherniack, AD, Ciriello, G, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, de Bruijn, I, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Nissan, MG, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, and Jakrot, V et al.. "Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in The Cancer Genome Atlas." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 321-337.e10.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
321
End Page
337.e10
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.035

Machine Learning Identifies Stemness Features Associated with Oncogenic Dedifferentiation

Authors
Malta, TM; Sokolov, A; Gentles, AJ; Burzykowski, T; Poisson, L; Weinstein, JN; Kamińska, B; Huelsken, J; Omberg, L; Gevaert, O; Colaprico, A; Czerwińska, P; Mazurek, S; Mishra, L; Heyn, H; Krasnitz, A; Godwin, AK; Lazar, AJ; Stuart, JM; Hoadley, KA; Laird, PW; Noushmehr, H; Wiznerowicz, M; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R et al.
MLA Citation
Malta, TM, Sokolov, A, Gentles, AJ, Burzykowski, T, Poisson, L, Weinstein, JN, Kamińska, B, Huelsken, J, Omberg, L, Gevaert, O, Colaprico, A, Czerwińska, P, Mazurek, S, Mishra, L, Heyn, H, Krasnitz, A, Godwin, AK, Lazar, AJ, Stuart, JM, Hoadley, KA, Laird, PW, Noushmehr, H, Wiznerowicz, M, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, and Ghossein, R et al.. "Machine Learning Identifies Stemness Features Associated with Oncogenic Dedifferentiation." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 338-354.e15.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
338
End Page
354.e15
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.034

An Integrated TCGA Pan-Cancer Clinical Data Resource to Drive High-Quality Survival Outcome Analytics

Authors
Liu, J; Lichtenberg, T; Hoadley, KA; Poisson, LM; Lazar, AJ; Cherniack, AD; Kovatich, AJ; Benz, CC; Levine, DA; Lee, AV; Omberg, L; Wolf, DM; Shriver, CD; Thorsson, V; Hu, H; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbro, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Angulo Gonzalez, AM; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV; Broudy, T et al.
MLA Citation
Liu, J, Lichtenberg, T, Hoadley, KA, Poisson, LM, Lazar, AJ, Cherniack, AD, Kovatich, AJ, Benz, CC, Levine, DA, Lee, AV, Omberg, L, Wolf, DM, Shriver, CD, Thorsson, V, Hu, H, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbro, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Angulo Gonzalez, AM, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, Tien, NV, and Broudy, T et al.. "An Integrated TCGA Pan-Cancer Clinical Data Resource to Drive High-Quality Survival Outcome Analytics." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 400-416.e11.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
400
End Page
416.e11
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.02.052

Genomic and Functional Approaches to Understanding Cancer Aneuploidy

Authors
Taylor, AM; Shih, J; Ha, G; Gao, GF; Zhang, X; Berger, AC; Schumacher, SE; Wang, C; Hu, H; Liu, J; Lazar, AJ; Cherniack, AD; Beroukhim, R; Meyerson, M; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Angulo Gonzalez, AM; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV; Broudy, T; Mirsaidi, C; Nair, P; Drwiega, P; Miller, J; Smith, J et al.
MLA Citation
Taylor, AM, Shih, J, Ha, G, Gao, GF, Zhang, X, Berger, AC, Schumacher, SE, Wang, C, Hu, H, Liu, J, Lazar, AJ, Cherniack, AD, Beroukhim, R, Meyerson, M, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Angulo Gonzalez, AM, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, Tien, NV, Broudy, T, Mirsaidi, C, Nair, P, Drwiega, P, Miller, J, and Smith, J et al.. "Genomic and Functional Approaches to Understanding Cancer Aneuploidy." Cancer Cell 33.4 (April 2018): 676-689.e3.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
676
End Page
689.e3
DOI
10.1016/j.ccell.2018.03.007

A Comprehensive Pan-Cancer Molecular Study of Gynecologic and Breast Cancers

Authors
Berger, AC; Korkut, A; Kanchi, RS; Hegde, AM; Lenoir, W; Liu, W; Liu, Y; Fan, H; Shen, H; Ravikumar, V; Rao, A; Schultz, A; Li, X; Sumazin, P; Williams, C; Mestdagh, P; Gunaratne, PH; Yau, C; Bowlby, R; Robertson, AG; Tiezzi, DG; Wang, C; Cherniack, AD; Godwin, AK; Kuderer, NM; Rader, JS; Zuna, RE; Sood, AK; Lazar, AJ; Ojesina, AI; Adebamowo, C; Adebamowo, SN; Baggerly, KA; Chen, T-W; Chiu, H-S; Lefever, S; Liu, L; MacKenzie, K; Orsulic, S; Roszik, J; Shelley, CS; Song, Q; Vellano, CP; Wentzensen, N; Weinstein, JN; Mills, GB; Levine, DA; Akbani, R; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Broom, BM; Ju, Z; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Lu, Y; Ng, K-S; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Angulo Gonzalez, AM; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R et al.
MLA Citation
Berger, AC, Korkut, A, Kanchi, RS, Hegde, AM, Lenoir, W, Liu, W, Liu, Y, Fan, H, Shen, H, Ravikumar, V, Rao, A, Schultz, A, Li, X, Sumazin, P, Williams, C, Mestdagh, P, Gunaratne, PH, Yau, C, Bowlby, R, Robertson, AG, Tiezzi, DG, Wang, C, Cherniack, AD, Godwin, AK, Kuderer, NM, Rader, JS, Zuna, RE, Sood, AK, Lazar, AJ, Ojesina, AI, Adebamowo, C, Adebamowo, SN, Baggerly, KA, Chen, T-W, Chiu, H-S, Lefever, S, Liu, L, MacKenzie, K, Orsulic, S, Roszik, J, Shelley, CS, Song, Q, Vellano, CP, Wentzensen, N, Weinstein, JN, Mills, GB, Levine, DA, Akbani, R, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Broom, BM, Ju, Z, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Lu, Y, Ng, K-S, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Angulo Gonzalez, AM, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, and Kefford, R et al.. "A Comprehensive Pan-Cancer Molecular Study of Gynecologic and Breast Cancers." Cancer Cell 33.4 (April 2018): 690-705.e9.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
690
End Page
705.e9
DOI
10.1016/j.ccell.2018.03.014

Comprehensive Characterization of Cancer Driver Genes and Mutations

Authors
Bailey, MH; Tokheim, C; Porta-Pardo, E; Sengupta, S; Bertrand, D; Weerasinghe, A; Colaprico, A; Wendl, MC; Kim, J; Reardon, B; Ng, PK-S; Jeong, KJ; Cao, S; Wang, Z; Gao, J; Gao, Q; Wang, F; Liu, EM; Mularoni, L; Rubio-Perez, C; Nagarajan, N; Cortés-Ciriano, I; Zhou, DC; Liang, W-W; Hess, JM; Yellapantula, VD; Tamborero, D; Gonzalez-Perez, A; Suphavilai, C; Ko, JY; Khurana, E; Park, PJ; Van Allen, EM; Liang, H; Lawrence, MS; Godzik, A; Lopez-Bigas, N; Stuart, J; Wheeler, D; Getz, G; Chen, K; Lazar, AJ; Mills, GB; Karchin, R; Ding, L; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Heiman, DI; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I et al.
MLA Citation
Bailey, MH, Tokheim, C, Porta-Pardo, E, Sengupta, S, Bertrand, D, Weerasinghe, A, Colaprico, A, Wendl, MC, Kim, J, Reardon, B, Ng, PK-S, Jeong, KJ, Cao, S, Wang, Z, Gao, J, Gao, Q, Wang, F, Liu, EM, Mularoni, L, Rubio-Perez, C, Nagarajan, N, Cortés-Ciriano, I, Zhou, DC, Liang, W-W, Hess, JM, Yellapantula, VD, Tamborero, D, Gonzalez-Perez, A, Suphavilai, C, Ko, JY, Khurana, E, Park, PJ, Van Allen, EM, Liang, H, Lawrence, MS, Godzik, A, Lopez-Bigas, N, Stuart, J, Wheeler, D, Getz, G, Chen, K, Lazar, AJ, Mills, GB, Karchin, R, Ding, L, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Heiman, DI, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, and Wistuba, I et al.. "Comprehensive Characterization of Cancer Driver Genes and Mutations." Cell 173.2 (April 2018): 371-385.e18.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell
Volume
173
Issue
2
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
371
End Page
385.e18
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2018.02.060

Somatic Mutational Landscape of Splicing Factor Genes and Their Functional Consequences across 33 Cancer Types

Authors
Seiler, M; Peng, S; Agrawal, AA; Palacino, J; Teng, T; Zhu, P; Smith, PG; Buonamici, S; Yu, L; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Angulo Gonzalez, AM; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV; Broudy, T et al.
MLA Citation
Seiler, M, Peng, S, Agrawal, AA, Palacino, J, Teng, T, Zhu, P, Smith, PG, Buonamici, S, Yu, L, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Angulo Gonzalez, AM, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, Tien, NV, and Broudy, T et al.. "Somatic Mutational Landscape of Splicing Factor Genes and Their Functional Consequences across 33 Cancer Types." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 282-296.e4.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
282
End Page
296.e4
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.01.088

Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

Authors
Jayasinghe, RG; Cao, S; Gao, Q; Wendl, MC; Vo, NS; Reynolds, SM; Zhao, Y; Climente-González, H; Chai, S; Wang, F; Varghese, R; Huang, M; Liang, W-W; Wyczalkowski, MA; Sengupta, S; Li, Z; Payne, SH; Fenyö, D; Miner, JH; Walter, MJ; Vincent, B; Eyras, E; Chen, K; Shmulevich, I; Chen, F; Ding, L; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K et al.
MLA Citation
Jayasinghe, RG, Cao, S, Gao, Q, Wendl, MC, Vo, NS, Reynolds, SM, Zhao, Y, Climente-González, H, Chai, S, Wang, F, Varghese, R, Huang, M, Liang, W-W, Wyczalkowski, MA, Sengupta, S, Li, Z, Payne, SH, Fenyö, D, Miner, JH, Walter, MJ, Vincent, B, Eyras, E, Chen, K, Shmulevich, I, Chen, F, Ding, L, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, and Shannon, K et al.. "Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 270-281.e3.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
270
End Page
281.e3
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.052

Genomic and Molecular Landscape of DNA Damage Repair Deficiency across The Cancer Genome Atlas

Authors
Knijnenburg, TA; Wang, L; Zimmermann, MT; Chambwe, N; Gao, GF; Cherniack, AD; Fan, H; Shen, H; Way, GP; Greene, CS; Liu, Y; Akbani, R; Feng, B; Donehower, LA; Miller, C; Shen, Y; Karimi, M; Chen, H; Kim, P; Jia, P; Shinbrot, E; Zhang, S; Liu, J; Hu, H; Bailey, MH; Yau, C; Wolf, D; Zhao, Z; Weinstein, JN; Li, L; Ding, L; Mills, GB; Laird, PW; Wheeler, DA; Shmulevich, I; Monnat, RJ; Xiao, Y; Wang, C; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Hinoue, T; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Wang, M; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Gonzalez, AMA; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J et al.
MLA Citation
Knijnenburg, TA, Wang, L, Zimmermann, MT, Chambwe, N, Gao, GF, Cherniack, AD, Fan, H, Shen, H, Way, GP, Greene, CS, Liu, Y, Akbani, R, Feng, B, Donehower, LA, Miller, C, Shen, Y, Karimi, M, Chen, H, Kim, P, Jia, P, Shinbrot, E, Zhang, S, Liu, J, Hu, H, Bailey, MH, Yau, C, Wolf, D, Zhao, Z, Weinstein, JN, Li, L, Ding, L, Mills, GB, Laird, PW, Wheeler, DA, Shmulevich, I, Monnat, RJ, Xiao, Y, Wang, C, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Hinoue, T, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Wang, M, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Gonzalez, AMA, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, and Thompson, J et al.. "Genomic and Molecular Landscape of DNA Damage Repair Deficiency across The Cancer Genome Atlas." Cell Reports 23.1 (April 2018): 239-254.e6.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
23
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
239
End Page
254.e6
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.076

Pan-cancer Alterations of the MYC Oncogene and Its Proximal Network across the Cancer Genome Atlas

Authors
Schaub, FX; Dhankani, V; Berger, AC; Trivedi, M; Richardson, AB; Shaw, R; Zhao, W; Zhang, X; Ventura, A; Liu, Y; Ayer, DE; Hurlin, PJ; Cherniack, AD; Eisenman, RN; Bernard, B; Grandori, C; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Getz, G; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Saksena, G; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Chambwe, N; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, JS; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Beroukhim, R; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Hess, J; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Ding, L; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Kandoth, C; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Angulo Gonzalez, AM; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B et al.
MLA Citation
Schaub, FX, Dhankani, V, Berger, AC, Trivedi, M, Richardson, AB, Shaw, R, Zhao, W, Zhang, X, Ventura, A, Liu, Y, Ayer, DE, Hurlin, PJ, Cherniack, AD, Eisenman, RN, Bernard, B, Grandori, C, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Getz, G, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Saksena, G, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Chambwe, N, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, JS, Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Beroukhim, R, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Hess, J, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Ding, L, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Kandoth, C, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Angulo Gonzalez, AM, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, and Singh, B et al.. "Pan-cancer Alterations of the MYC Oncogene and Its Proximal Network across the Cancer Genome Atlas." Cell Systems 6.3 (March 2018): 282-300.e2.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Systems
Volume
6
Issue
3
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
282
End Page
300.e2
DOI
10.1016/j.cels.2018.03.003

Scalable Open Science Approach for Mutation Calling of Tumor Exomes Using Multiple Genomic Pipelines

Authors
Ellrott, K; Bailey, MH; Saksena, G; Covington, KR; Kandoth, C; Stewart, C; Hess, J; Ma, S; Chiotti, KE; McLellan, M; Sofia, HJ; Hutter, C; Getz, G; Wheeler, D; Ding, L; Caesar-Johnson, SJ; Demchok, JA; Felau, I; Kasapi, M; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Zhang, JJ; Chudamani, S; Liu, J; Lolla, L; Naresh, R; Pihl, T; Sun, Q; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Cho, J; DeFreitas, T; Frazer, S; Gehlenborg, N; Heiman, DI; Kim, J; Lawrence, MS; Lin, P; Meier, S; Noble, MS; Voet, D; Zhang, H; Bernard, B; Chambwe, N; Dhankani, V; Knijnenburg, T; Kramer, R; Leinonen, K; Liu, Y; Miller, M; Reynolds, S; Shmulevich, I; Thorsson, V; Zhang, W; Akbani, R; Broom, BM; Hegde, AM; Ju, Z; Kanchi, RS; Korkut, A; Li, J; Liang, H; Ling, S; Liu, W; Lu, Y; Mills, GB; Ng, K-S; Rao, A; Ryan, M; Wang, J; Weinstein, JN; Zhang, J; Abeshouse, A; Armenia, J; Chakravarty, D; Chatila, WK; de Bruijn, I; Gao, J; Gross, BE; Heins, ZJ; Kundra, R; La, K; Ladanyi, M; Luna, A; Nissan, MG; Ochoa, A; Phillips, SM; Reznik, E; Sanchez-Vega, F; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Sheridan, R; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Taylor, BS; Wang, J; Zhang, H; Anur, P; Peto, M; Spellman, P; Benz, C; Stuart, JM; Wong, CK; Yau, C; Hayes, DN; Parker, ; Wilkerson, MD; Ally, A; Balasundaram, M; Bowlby, R; Brooks, D; Carlsen, R; Chuah, E; Dhalla, N; Holt, R; Jones, SJM; Kasaian, K; Lee, D; Ma, Y; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, K; Robertson, AG; Sadeghi, S; Schein, JE; Sipahimalani, P; Tam, A; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Berger, AC; Beroukhim, R; Cherniack, AD; Cibulskis, C; Gabriel, SB; Gao, GF; Ha, G; Meyerson, M; Schumacher, SE; Shih, J; Kucherlapati, MH; Kucherlapati, RS; Baylin, S; Cope, L; Danilova, L; Bootwalla, MS; Lai, PH; Maglinte, DT; Van Den Berg, DJ; Weisenberger, DJ; Auman, JT; Balu, S; Bodenheimer, T; Fan, C; Hoadley, KA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, CD; Meng, S; Mieczkowski, PA; Mose, LE; Perou, AH; Perou, CM; Roach, J; Shi, Y; Simons, JV; Skelly, T; Soloway, MG; Tan, D; Veluvolu, U; Fan, H; Hinoue, T; Laird, PW; Shen, H; Zhou, W; Bellair, M; Chang, K; Covington, K; Creighton, CJ; Dinh, H; Doddapaneni, H; Donehower, LA; Drummond, J; Gibbs, RA; Glenn, R; Hale, W; Han, Y; Hu, J; Korchina, V; Lee, S; Lewis, L; Li, W; Liu, X; Morgan, M; Morton, D; Muzny, D; Santibanez, J; Sheth, M; Shinbrot, E; Wang, L; Wang, M; Wheeler, DA; Xi, L; Zhao, F; Appelbaum, EL; Bailey, M; Cordes, MG; Fronick, CC; Fulton, LA; Fulton, RS; Mardis, ER; McLellan, MD; Miller, CA; Schmidt, HK; Wilson, RK; Crain, D; Curley, E; Gardner, J; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, C; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Thompson, E; Yena, P; Bowen, J; Gastier-Foster, JM; Gerken, M; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Ramirez, NC; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Corcoran, N; Costello, T; Hovens, C; Carvalho, AL; de Carvalho, AC; Fregnani, JH; Longatto-Filho, A; Reis, RM; Scapulatempo-Neto, C; Silveira, HCS; Vidal, DO; Burnette, A; Eschbacher, J; Hermes, B; Noss, A; Singh, R; Anderson, ML; Castro, PD; Ittmann, M; Huntsman, D; Kohl, B; Le, X; Thorp, R; Andry, C; Duffy, ER; Lyadov, V; Paklina, O; Setdikova, G; Shabunin, A; Tavobilov, M; McPherson, C; Warnick, R; Berkowitz, R; Cramer, D; Feltmate, C; Horowitz, N; Kibel, A; Muto, M; Raut, CP; Malykh, A; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Barrett, W; Devine, K; Fulop, J; Ostrom, QT; Shimmel, K; Wolinsky, Y; Sloan, AE; De Rose, A; Giuliante, F; Goodman, M; Karlan, BY; Hagedorn, CH; Eckman, J; Harr, J; Myers, J; Tucker, K; Zach, LA; Deyarmin, B; Hu, H; Kvecher, L; Larson, C; Mural, RJ; Somiari, S; Vicha, A; Zelinka, T; Bennett, J; Iacocca, M; Rabeno, B; Swanson, P; Latour, M; Lacombe, L; Têtu, B; Bergeron, A; McGraw, M; Staugaitis, SM; Chabot, J; Hibshoosh, H; Sepulveda, A; Su, T; Wang, T; Potapova, O; Voronina, O; Desjardins, L; Mariani, O; Roman-Roman, S; Sastre, X; Stern, M-H; Cheng, F; Signoretti, S; Berchuck, A; Bigner, D; Lipp, E; Marks, J; McCall, S; McLendon, R; Secord, A; Sharp, A; Behera, M; Brat, DJ; Chen, A; Delman, K; Force, S; Khuri, F; Magliocca, K; Maithel, S; Olson, JJ; Owonikoko, T; Pickens, A; Ramalingam, S; Shin, DM; Sica, G; Van Meir, EG; Zhang, H; Eijckenboom, W; Gillis, A; Korpershoek, E; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, W; Stoop, H; van Kessel, KE; Zwarthoff, EC; Calatozzolo, C; Cuppini, L; Cuzzubbo, S; DiMeco, F; Finocchiaro, G; Mattei, L; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Chen, C; Houck, J; Lohavanichbutr, P; Hartmann, A; Stoehr, C; Stoehr, R; Taubert, H; Wach, S; Wullich, B; Kycler, W; Murawa, D; Wiznerowicz, M; Chung, K; Edenfield, WJ; Martin, J; Baudin, E; Bubley, G; Bueno, R; De Rienzo, A; Richards, WG; Kalkanis, S; Mikkelsen, T; Noushmehr, H; Scarpace, L; Girard, N; Aymerich, M; Campo, E; Giné, E; Guillermo, AL; Van Bang, N; Hanh, PT; Phu, BD; Tang, Y; Colman, H; Evason, K; Dottino, PR; Martignetti, JA; Gabra, H; Juhl, H; Akeredolu, T; Stepa, S; Hoon, D; Ahn, K; Kang, KJ; Beuschlein, F; Breggia, A; Birrer, M; Bell, D; Borad, M; Bryce, AH; Castle, E; Chandan, V; Cheville, J; Copland, JA; Farnell, M; Flotte, T; Giama, N; Ho, T; Kendrick, M; Kocher, J-P; Kopp, K; Moser, C; Nagorney, D; O’Brien, D; O’Neill, BP; Patel, T; Petersen, G; Que, F; Rivera, M; Roberts, L; Smallridge, R; Smyrk, T; Stanton, M; Thompson, RH; Torbenson, M; Yang, JD; Zhang, L; Brimo, F; Ajani, JA; Angulo Gonzalez, AM; Behrens, C; Bondaruk, J; Broaddus, R; Czerniak, B; Esmaeli, B; Fujimoto, J; Gershenwald, J; Guo, C; Lazar, AJ; Logothetis, C; Meric-Bernstam, F; Moran, C; Ramondetta, L; Rice, D; Sood, A; Tamboli, P; Thompson, T; Troncoso, P; Tsao, A; Wistuba, I; Carter, C; Haydu, L; Hersey, P; Jakrot, V; Kakavand, H; Kefford, R; Lee, K; Long, G; Mann, G; Quinn, M; Saw, R; Scolyer, R; Shannon, K; Spillane, A; Stretch, J; Synott, M; Thompson, J; Wilmott, J; Al-Ahmadie, H; Chan, TA; Ghossein, R; Gopalan, A; Levine, DA; Reuter, V; Singer, S; Singh, B; Tien, NV; Broudy, T et al.
MLA Citation
Ellrott, K, Bailey, MH, Saksena, G, Covington, KR, Kandoth, C, Stewart, C, Hess, J, Ma, S, Chiotti, KE, McLellan, M, Sofia, HJ, Hutter, C, Getz, G, Wheeler, D, Ding, L, Caesar-Johnson, SJ, Demchok, JA, Felau, I, Kasapi, M, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Zhang, JJ, Chudamani, S, Liu, J, Lolla, L, Naresh, R, Pihl, T, Sun, Q, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Cho, J, DeFreitas, T, Frazer, S, Gehlenborg, N, Heiman, DI, Kim, J, Lawrence, MS, Lin, P, Meier, S, Noble, MS, Voet, D, Zhang, H, Bernard, B, Chambwe, N, Dhankani, V, Knijnenburg, T, Kramer, R, Leinonen, K, Liu, Y, Miller, M, Reynolds, S, Shmulevich, I, Thorsson, V, Zhang, W, Akbani, R, Broom, BM, Hegde, AM, Ju, Z, Kanchi, RS, Korkut, A, Li, J, Liang, H, Ling, S, Liu, W, Lu, Y, Mills, GB, Ng, K-S, Rao, A, Ryan, M, Wang, J, Weinstein, JN, Zhang, J, Abeshouse, A, Armenia, J, Chakravarty, D, Chatila, WK, de Bruijn, I, Gao, J, Gross, BE, Heins, ZJ, Kundra, R, La, K, Ladanyi, M, Luna, A, Nissan, MG, Ochoa, A, Phillips, SM, Reznik, E, Sanchez-Vega, F, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Sheridan, R, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Taylor, BS, Wang, J, Zhang, H, Anur, P, Peto, M, Spellman, P, Benz, C, Stuart, JM, Wong, CK, Yau, C, Hayes, DN, Parker, , Wilkerson, MD, Ally, A, Balasundaram, M, Bowlby, R, Brooks, D, Carlsen, R, Chuah, E, Dhalla, N, Holt, R, Jones, SJM, Kasaian, K, Lee, D, Ma, Y, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, K, Robertson, AG, Sadeghi, S, Schein, JE, Sipahimalani, P, Tam, A, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Berger, AC, Beroukhim, R, Cherniack, AD, Cibulskis, C, Gabriel, SB, Gao, GF, Ha, G, Meyerson, M, Schumacher, SE, Shih, J, Kucherlapati, MH, Kucherlapati, RS, Baylin, S, Cope, L, Danilova, L, Bootwalla, MS, Lai, PH, Maglinte, DT, Van Den Berg, DJ, Weisenberger, DJ, Auman, JT, Balu, S, Bodenheimer, T, Fan, C, Hoadley, KA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, CD, Meng, S, Mieczkowski, PA, Mose, LE, Perou, AH, Perou, CM, Roach, J, Shi, Y, Simons, JV, Skelly, T, Soloway, MG, Tan, D, Veluvolu, U, Fan, H, Hinoue, T, Laird, PW, Shen, H, Zhou, W, Bellair, M, Chang, K, Covington, K, Creighton, CJ, Dinh, H, Doddapaneni, H, Donehower, LA, Drummond, J, Gibbs, RA, Glenn, R, Hale, W, Han, Y, Hu, J, Korchina, V, Lee, S, Lewis, L, Li, W, Liu, X, Morgan, M, Morton, D, Muzny, D, Santibanez, J, Sheth, M, Shinbrot, E, Wang, L, Wang, M, Wheeler, DA, Xi, L, Zhao, F, Appelbaum, EL, Bailey, M, Cordes, MG, Fronick, CC, Fulton, LA, Fulton, RS, Mardis, ER, McLellan, MD, Miller, CA, Schmidt, HK, Wilson, RK, Crain, D, Curley, E, Gardner, J, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, C, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Thompson, E, Yena, P, Bowen, J, Gastier-Foster, JM, Gerken, M, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Ramirez, NC, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Corcoran, N, Costello, T, Hovens, C, Carvalho, AL, de Carvalho, AC, Fregnani, JH, Longatto-Filho, A, Reis, RM, Scapulatempo-Neto, C, Silveira, HCS, Vidal, DO, Burnette, A, Eschbacher, J, Hermes, B, Noss, A, Singh, R, Anderson, ML, Castro, PD, Ittmann, M, Huntsman, D, Kohl, B, Le, X, Thorp, R, Andry, C, Duffy, ER, Lyadov, V, Paklina, O, Setdikova, G, Shabunin, A, Tavobilov, M, McPherson, C, Warnick, R, Berkowitz, R, Cramer, D, Feltmate, C, Horowitz, N, Kibel, A, Muto, M, Raut, CP, Malykh, A, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Barrett, W, Devine, K, Fulop, J, Ostrom, QT, Shimmel, K, Wolinsky, Y, Sloan, AE, De Rose, A, Giuliante, F, Goodman, M, Karlan, BY, Hagedorn, CH, Eckman, J, Harr, J, Myers, J, Tucker, K, Zach, LA, Deyarmin, B, Hu, H, Kvecher, L, Larson, C, Mural, RJ, Somiari, S, Vicha, A, Zelinka, T, Bennett, J, Iacocca, M, Rabeno, B, Swanson, P, Latour, M, Lacombe, L, Têtu, B, Bergeron, A, McGraw, M, Staugaitis, SM, Chabot, J, Hibshoosh, H, Sepulveda, A, Su, T, Wang, T, Potapova, O, Voronina, O, Desjardins, L, Mariani, O, Roman-Roman, S, Sastre, X, Stern, M-H, Cheng, F, Signoretti, S, Berchuck, A, Bigner, D, Lipp, E, Marks, J, McCall, S, McLendon, R, Secord, A, Sharp, A, Behera, M, Brat, DJ, Chen, A, Delman, K, Force, S, Khuri, F, Magliocca, K, Maithel, S, Olson, JJ, Owonikoko, T, Pickens, A, Ramalingam, S, Shin, DM, Sica, G, Van Meir, EG, Zhang, H, Eijckenboom, W, Gillis, A, Korpershoek, E, Looijenga, L, Oosterhuis, W, Stoop, H, van Kessel, KE, Zwarthoff, EC, Calatozzolo, C, Cuppini, L, Cuzzubbo, S, DiMeco, F, Finocchiaro, G, Mattei, L, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Chen, C, Houck, J, Lohavanichbutr, P, Hartmann, A, Stoehr, C, Stoehr, R, Taubert, H, Wach, S, Wullich, B, Kycler, W, Murawa, D, Wiznerowicz, M, Chung, K, Edenfield, WJ, Martin, J, Baudin, E, Bubley, G, Bueno, R, De Rienzo, A, Richards, WG, Kalkanis, S, Mikkelsen, T, Noushmehr, H, Scarpace, L, Girard, N, Aymerich, M, Campo, E, Giné, E, Guillermo, AL, Van Bang, N, Hanh, PT, Phu, BD, Tang, Y, Colman, H, Evason, K, Dottino, PR, Martignetti, JA, Gabra, H, Juhl, H, Akeredolu, T, Stepa, S, Hoon, D, Ahn, K, Kang, KJ, Beuschlein, F, Breggia, A, Birrer, M, Bell, D, Borad, M, Bryce, AH, Castle, E, Chandan, V, Cheville, J, Copland, JA, Farnell, M, Flotte, T, Giama, N, Ho, T, Kendrick, M, Kocher, J-P, Kopp, K, Moser, C, Nagorney, D, O’Brien, D, O’Neill, BP, Patel, T, Petersen, G, Que, F, Rivera, M, Roberts, L, Smallridge, R, Smyrk, T, Stanton, M, Thompson, RH, Torbenson, M, Yang, JD, Zhang, L, Brimo, F, Ajani, JA, Angulo Gonzalez, AM, Behrens, C, Bondaruk, J, Broaddus, R, Czerniak, B, Esmaeli, B, Fujimoto, J, Gershenwald, J, Guo, C, Lazar, AJ, Logothetis, C, Meric-Bernstam, F, Moran, C, Ramondetta, L, Rice, D, Sood, A, Tamboli, P, Thompson, T, Troncoso, P, Tsao, A, Wistuba, I, Carter, C, Haydu, L, Hersey, P, Jakrot, V, Kakavand, H, Kefford, R, Lee, K, Long, G, Mann, G, Quinn, M, Saw, R, Scolyer, R, Shannon, K, Spillane, A, Stretch, J, Synott, M, Thompson, J, Wilmott, J, Al-Ahmadie, H, Chan, TA, Ghossein, R, Gopalan, A, Levine, DA, Reuter, V, Singer, S, Singh, B, Tien, NV, and Broudy, T et al.. "Scalable Open Science Approach for Mutation Calling of Tumor Exomes Using Multiple Genomic Pipelines." Cell Systems 6.3 (March 2018): 271-281.e7.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cell Systems
Volume
6
Issue
3
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
271
End Page
281.e7
DOI
10.1016/j.cels.2018.03.002

Dendritic Cells Enhance Polyfunctionality of Adoptively Transferred T Cells That Target Cytomegalovirus in Glioblastoma.

Median survival for glioblastoma (GBM) remains <15 months. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigens have been identified in GBM but not normal brain, providing an unparalleled opportunity to subvert CMV antigens as tumor-specific immunotherapy targets. A recent trial in recurrent GBM patients demonstrated the potential clinical benefit of adoptive T-cell therapy (ATCT) of CMV phosphoprotein 65 (pp65)-specific T cells. However, ex vivo analyses from this study found no change in the capacity of CMV pp65-specific T cells to gain multiple effector functions or polyfunctionality, which has been associated with superior antitumor efficacy. Previous studies have shown that dendritic cells (DC) could further enhance tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell polyfunctionality in vivo when administered as a vaccine. Therefore, we hypothesized that vaccination with CMV pp65 RNA-loaded DCs would enhance the frequency of polyfunctional CMV pp65-specific CD8+ T cells after ATCT. Here, we report prospective results of a pilot trial in which 22 patients with newly diagnosed GBM were initially enrolled, of which 17 patients were randomized to receive CMV pp65-specific T cells with CMV-DC vaccination (CMV-ATCT-DC) or saline (CMV-ATCT-saline). Patients who received CMV-ATCT-DC vaccination experienced a significant increase in the overall frequencies of IFNγ+, TNFα+, and CCL3+ polyfunctional, CMV-specific CD8+ T cells. These increases in polyfunctional CMV-specific CD8+ T cells correlated (R = 0.7371, P = 0.0369) with overall survival, although we cannot conclude this was causally related. Our data implicate polyfunctional T-cell responses as a potential biomarker for effective antitumor immunotherapy and support a formal assessment of this combination approach in a larger randomized study.Significance: A randomized pilot trial in patients with GBM implicates polyfunctional T-cell responses as a biomarker for effective antitumor immunotherapy. Cancer Res; 78(1); 256-64. ©2017 AACR.

Authors
Reap, EA; Suryadevara, CM; Batich, KA; Sanchez-Perez, L; Archer, GE; Schmittling, RJ; Norberg, PK; Herndon, JE; Healy, P; Congdon, KL; Gedeon, PC; Campbell, OC; Swartz, AM; Riccione, KA; Yi, JS; Hossain-Ibrahim, MK; Saraswathula, A; Nair, SK; Dunn-Pirio, AM; Broome, TM; Weinhold, KJ; Desjardins, A; Vlahovic, G; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Bigner, DD; Fecci, PE; Mitchell, DA; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Reap, EA, Suryadevara, CM, Batich, KA, Sanchez-Perez, L, Archer, GE, Schmittling, RJ, Norberg, PK, Herndon, JE, Healy, P, Congdon, KL, Gedeon, PC, Campbell, OC, Swartz, AM, Riccione, KA, Yi, JS, Hossain-Ibrahim, MK, Saraswathula, A, Nair, SK, Dunn-Pirio, AM, Broome, TM, Weinhold, KJ, Desjardins, A, Vlahovic, G, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Bigner, DD, Fecci, PE, Mitchell, DA, and Sampson, JH. "Dendritic Cells Enhance Polyfunctionality of Adoptively Transferred T Cells That Target Cytomegalovirus in Glioblastoma." Cancer research 78.1 (January 2018): 256-264.
PMID
29093005
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
78
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
256
End Page
264
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.can-17-0469

Adaptive Evolution of the GDH2 Allosteric Domain Promotes Gliomagenesis by Resolving IDH1R132H-Induced Metabolic Liabilities.

Hotspot mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene occur in a number of human cancers and confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate (αKG) to the oncometabolite D-(2)-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG). In malignant gliomas, IDH1R132H expression induces widespread metabolic reprogramming, possibly requiring compensatory mechanisms to sustain the normal biosynthetic requirements of actively proliferating tumor cells. We used genetically engineered mouse models of glioma and quantitative metabolomics to investigate IDH1R132H-dependent metabolic reprogramming and its potential to induce biosynthetic liabilities that can be exploited for glioma therapy. In gliomagenic neural progenitor cells, IDH1R132H expression increased the abundance of dipeptide metabolites, depleted key tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites, and slowed progression of murine gliomas. Notably, expression of glutamate dehydrogenase GDH2, a hominoid-specific enzyme with relatively restricted expression to the brain, was critically involved in compensating for IDH1R132H-induced metabolic alterations and promoting IDH1R132H glioma growth. Indeed, we found that recently evolved amino acid substitutions in the GDH2 allosteric domain conferred its nonredundant, glioma-promoting properties in the presence of IDH1 mutation. Our results indicate that among the unique roles for GDH2 in the human forebrain is its ability to limit IDH1R132H-mediated metabolic liabilities, thus promoting glioma growth in this context. Results from this study raise the possibility that GDH2-specific inhibition may be a viable therapeutic strategy for gliomas with IDH mutations.Significance: These findings show that the homonid-specific brain enzyme GDH2 may be essential to mitigate metabolic liabilities created by IDH1 mutations in glioma, with possible implications to leverage its therapeutic management by IDH1 inhibitors. Cancer Res; 78(1); 36-50. ©2017 AACR.

Authors
Waitkus, MS; Pirozzi, CJ; Moure, CJ; Diplas, BH; Hansen, LJ; Carpenter, AB; Yang, R; Wang, Z; Ingram, BO; Karoly, ED; Mohney, RP; Spasojevic, I; McLendon, RE; Friedman, HS; He, Y; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Waitkus, MS, Pirozzi, CJ, Moure, CJ, Diplas, BH, Hansen, LJ, Carpenter, AB, Yang, R, Wang, Z, Ingram, BO, Karoly, ED, Mohney, RP, Spasojevic, I, McLendon, RE, Friedman, HS, He, Y, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "Adaptive Evolution of the GDH2 Allosteric Domain Promotes Gliomagenesis by Resolving IDH1R132H-Induced Metabolic Liabilities." Cancer Research 78.1 (January 2018): 36-50.
PMID
29097607
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
78
Issue
1
Publish Date
2018
Start Page
36
End Page
50
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.can-17-1352

Validation of an Immunohistochemistry Assay for Detection of CD155, the Poliovirus Receptor, in Malignant Gliomas.

- The oncolytic polio-rhinovirus recombinant (PVSRIPO) has demonstrated promise in currently ongoing phase I/II clinical trials against recurrent glioblastoma and was granted breakthrough therapy designation by the Food and Drug Administration/Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. A reliable clinical assay to document expression of the poliovirus receptor, CD155, in routinely available patient tumor samples is needed for continued clinical development of PVSRIPO oncolytic immunotherapy in primary brain tumors and beyond.- To validate a novel anti-CD155 antibody for immunohistochemistry and develop a robust, reliable, and specific protocol for detecting CD155 expression in glioblastoma formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples. To characterize the expression of CD155 in human glioblastoma cells as well as to evaluate the influence of CD155 expression levels on tumor cell susceptibility to PVSRIPO infection and killing.- Immunohistochemical staining on glioblastoma FFPE tissue sections and immunoblot of corresponding frozen tissues were performed. Positive controls were confirmed sites of poliovirus propagation, spinal cord anterior horn, and tonsils; negative controls were vascular smooth muscle in patient samples and FFPE sections from a confirmed CD155-negative Burkitt lymphoma line (Raji).- We succeeded in developing a reliable assay to specifically detect CD155 by immunohistochemistry in glioblastoma FFPE sections. Our data suggest widespread, virtually universal expression of CD155 in glioblastoma cells at levels commensurate with susceptibility to PVSRIPO infection and killing.- Anti-CD155 antibody D3G7H achieves monospecific detection of CD155 in immunoblots of tumor homogenates and immunohistochemistry of tumor FFPE sections. Our assay has utility in defining appropriate use of PVSRIPO in oncolytic immunotherapy against malignant glioma and other cancer histotypes.

Authors
Chandramohan, V; Bryant, JD; Piao, H; Keir, ST; Lipp, ES; Lefaivre, M; Perkinson, K; Bigner, DD; Gromeier, M; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Chandramohan, V, Bryant, JD, Piao, H, Keir, ST, Lipp, ES, Lefaivre, M, Perkinson, K, Bigner, DD, Gromeier, M, and McLendon, RE. "Validation of an Immunohistochemistry Assay for Detection of CD155, the Poliovirus Receptor, in Malignant Gliomas." Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine 141.12 (December 2017): 1697-1704.
PMID
28829151
Source
epmc
Published In
Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Volume
141
Issue
12
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1697
End Page
1704
DOI
10.5858/arpa.2016-0580-oa

Cic Loss Promotes Gliomagenesis via Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

Inactivating mutations in the transcriptional repression factor Capicua (CIC) occur in approximately 50% of human oligodendrogliomas, but mechanistic links to pathogenesis are unclear. To address this question, we generated Cic-deficient mice and human oligodendroglioma cell models. Genetic deficiency in mice resulted in a partially penetrant embryonic or perinatal lethal phenotype, with the production of an aberrant proliferative neural population in surviving animals. In vitro cultured neural stem cells derived from Cic conditional knockout mice bypassed an EGF requirement for proliferation and displayed a defect in their potential for oligodendrocyte differentiation. Cic is known to participate in gene suppression that can be relieved by EGFR signal, but we found that cic also activated expression of a broad range of EGFR-independent genes. In an orthotopic mouse model of glioma, we found that Cic loss potentiated the formation and reduced the latency in tumor development. Collectively, our results define an important role for Cic in regulating neural cell proliferation and lineage specification, and suggest mechanistic explanations for how CIC mutations may impact the pathogenesis and therapeutic targeting of oligodendroglioma. Cancer Res; 77(22); 6097-108. ©2017 AACR.

Authors
Yang, R; Chen, LH; Hansen, LJ; Carpenter, AB; Moure, CJ; Liu, H; Pirozzi, CJ; Diplas, BH; Waitkus, MS; Greer, PK; Zhu, H; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; He, Y; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Yang, R, Chen, LH, Hansen, LJ, Carpenter, AB, Moure, CJ, Liu, H, Pirozzi, CJ, Diplas, BH, Waitkus, MS, Greer, PK, Zhu, H, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, He, Y, and Yan, H. "Cic Loss Promotes Gliomagenesis via Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation." Cancer Research 77.22 (November 2017): 6097-6108.
PMID
28939681
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
77
Issue
22
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
6097
End Page
6108
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.can-17-1018

Histone H3.3K27M Represses p16 to Accelerate Gliomagenesis in a Murine Model of DIPG.

Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a highly aggressive pediatric brainstem tumor genetically distinguished from adult GBM by the high prevalence of the K27M mutation in the histone H3 variant H3.3 (H3F3A). This mutation reprograms the H3K27me3 epigenetic landscape of DIPG by inhibiting the H3K27-specific histone methyltransferase EZH2. This globally reduces H3K27me2/3, critical repressive marks responsible for cell fate decisions, and also causes focal gain of H3K27me3 throughout the epigenome. To date, the tumor-driving effects of H3.3K27M remain largely unknown. Here, it is demonstrated that H3.3K27M cooperates with PDGF-B in vivo, enhancing gliomagenesis and reducing survival of p53 wild-type (WT) and knockout murine models of DIPG. H3.3K27M expression drives increased proliferation of tumor-derived murine neurospheres, suggesting that cell-cycle deregulation contributes to increased malignancy in mutant tumors. RNA sequencing on tumor tissue from H3.3K27M-expressing mice indicated global upregulation of PRC2 target genes, and a subset of newly repressed genes enriched in regulators of development and cell proliferation. Strikingly, H3.3K27M induced targeted repression of the p16/ink4a (CDKN2A) locus, a critical regulator of the G0-G1 to S-phase transition. Increased levels of H3K27me3 were observed at the p16 promoter; however, pharmacologic reduction of methylation at this promoter did not rescue p16 expression. Although DNA methylation is also present at this promoter, it is not K27M dependent. Intriguingly, inhibition of DNA methylation restores p16 levels and is cytotoxic against murine tumor cells. Importantly, these data reveal that H3.3K27M-mediated p16 repression is an important mechanism underlying the proliferation of H3.3K27M tumor cells, as in vivo cdkn2a knockout eliminates the survival difference between H3.3K27M and H3.3WT tumor-bearing mice.Implications: This study shows that H3.3K27M mutation and PDGF signaling act in concert to accelerate gliomagenesis in a genetic mouse model and identifies repression of p16 tumor suppressor as a target of H3.3K27M, highlighting the G1-S cell-cycle transition as a promising therapeutic avenue. Mol Cancer Res; 15(9); 1243-54. ©2017 AACR.

Authors
Cordero, FJ; Huang, Z; Grenier, C; He, X; Hu, G; McLendon, RE; Murphy, SK; Hashizume, R; Becher, OJ
MLA Citation
Cordero, FJ, Huang, Z, Grenier, C, He, X, Hu, G, McLendon, RE, Murphy, SK, Hashizume, R, and Becher, OJ. "Histone H3.3K27M Represses p16 to Accelerate Gliomagenesis in a Murine Model of DIPG." Molecular Cancer Research : Mcr 15.9 (September 2017): 1243-1254.
PMID
28522693
Source
epmc
Published In
Molecular Cancer Research : Mcr
Volume
15
Issue
9
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1243
End Page
1254
DOI
10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-16-0389

Epilepsy in neurofibromatosis type 1.

To describe the characteristics of epilepsy in patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).Analysis of a cohort of consecutive NF1 patients seen in our NF1 clinic during a three-year period.Of the 184 NF1 patients seen during that period, 26 had epilepsy and three had febrile seizures. Of the 26, 17 (65%) had localization-related epilepsy, seven of whom (41%) were drug resistant. Six (23%) had apparently primary generalized epilepsy (0/6 drug resistant), two (8%) Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and one (4%) West syndrome (all three were drug-resistant). As compared to the patients with no epilepsy, those with epilepsy were more likely to have MRI findings of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) (23% vs. 5%, p=0.0064), and cerebral hemisphere tumors (31% vs. 10%, p=0.0079), but not of the other MRI findings including neurofibromatosis bright objects, or optic gliomas. Three of the six patients with MTS underwent temporal lobectomy with subsequent control of their seizures with confirmation of MTS on pathology in 3/3 and presence of coexisting focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in 2/3. We also have observed three additional patients outside the above study with the association of NF1, MTS, and intractable epilepsy.Epilepsy is relatively common in NF1, often occurs in patients with brain tumors or with MTS which can coexist with FCD, can be associated with multiple types of epilepsy syndromes, and when localization-related is often drug-resistant. Patients with NF1 and MTS can respond to medial temporal lobectomy and may have coexisting medial temporal lobe cortical dysplasia.

Authors
Pecoraro, A; Arehart, E; Gallentine, W; Radtke, R; Smith, E; Pizoli, C; Kansagra, S; Abdelnour, E; McLendon, R; Mikati, MA
MLA Citation
Pecoraro, A, Arehart, E, Gallentine, W, Radtke, R, Smith, E, Pizoli, C, Kansagra, S, Abdelnour, E, McLendon, R, and Mikati, MA. "Epilepsy in neurofibromatosis type 1." Epilepsy & Behavior : E&B 73 (August 2017): 137-141.
PMID
28633092
Source
epmc
Published In
Epilepsy & Behavior : E&B
Volume
73
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
137
End Page
141
DOI
10.1016/j.yebeh.2017.05.011

The whole-genome landscape of medulloblastoma subtypes.

Current therapies for medulloblastoma, a highly malignant childhood brain tumour, impose debilitating effects on the developing child, and highlight the need for molecularly targeted treatments with reduced toxicity. Previous studies have been unable to identify the full spectrum of driver genes and molecular processes that operate in medulloblastoma subgroups. Here we analyse the somatic landscape across 491 sequenced medulloblastoma samples and the molecular heterogeneity among 1,256 epigenetically analysed cases, and identify subgroup-specific driver alterations that include previously undiscovered actionable targets. Driver mutations were confidently assigned to most patients belonging to Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma subgroups, greatly enhancing previous knowledge. New molecular subtypes were differentially enriched for specific driver events, including hotspot in-frame insertions that target KBTBD4 and 'enhancer hijacking' events that activate PRDM6. Thus, the application of integrative genomics to an extensive cohort of clinical samples derived from a single childhood cancer entity revealed a series of cancer genes and biologically relevant subtype diversity that represent attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of patients with medulloblastoma.

Authors
Northcott, PA; Buchhalter, I; Morrissy, AS; Hovestadt, V; Weischenfeldt, J; Ehrenberger, T; Gröbner, S; Segura-Wang, M; Zichner, T; Rudneva, VA; Warnatz, H-J; Sidiropoulos, N; Phillips, AH; Schumacher, S; Kleinheinz, K; Waszak, SM; Erkek, S; Jones, DTW; Worst, BC; Kool, M; Zapatka, M; Jäger, N; Chavez, L; Hutter, B; Bieg, M; Paramasivam, N; Heinold, M; Gu, Z; Ishaque, N; Jäger-Schmidt, C; Imbusch, CD; Jugold, A; Hübschmann, D; Risch, T; Amstislavskiy, V; Gonzalez, FGR; Weber, UD; Wolf, S; Robinson, GW; Zhou, X; Wu, G; Finkelstein, D; Liu, Y; Cavalli, FMG; Luu, B; Ramaswamy, V; Wu, X; Koster, J; Ryzhova, M; Cho, Y-J; Pomeroy, SL; Herold-Mende, C; Schuhmann, M; Ebinger, M; Liau, LM; Mora, J; McLendon, RE; Jabado, N; Kumabe, T; Chuah, E; Ma, Y; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Mungall, KL; Thiessen, N; Tse, K; Wong, T; Jones, SJM; Witt, O; Milde, T; Von Deimling, A; Capper, D; Korshunov, A; Yaspo, M-L; Kriwacki, R; Gajjar, A; Zhang, J; Beroukhim, R; Fraenkel, E; Korbel, JO; Brors, B; Schlesner, M; Eils, R; Marra, MA; Pfister, SM; Taylor, MD; Lichter, P
MLA Citation
Northcott, PA, Buchhalter, I, Morrissy, AS, Hovestadt, V, Weischenfeldt, J, Ehrenberger, T, Gröbner, S, Segura-Wang, M, Zichner, T, Rudneva, VA, Warnatz, H-J, Sidiropoulos, N, Phillips, AH, Schumacher, S, Kleinheinz, K, Waszak, SM, Erkek, S, Jones, DTW, Worst, BC, Kool, M, Zapatka, M, Jäger, N, Chavez, L, Hutter, B, Bieg, M, Paramasivam, N, Heinold, M, Gu, Z, Ishaque, N, Jäger-Schmidt, C, Imbusch, CD, Jugold, A, Hübschmann, D, Risch, T, Amstislavskiy, V, Gonzalez, FGR, Weber, UD, Wolf, S, Robinson, GW, Zhou, X, Wu, G, Finkelstein, D, Liu, Y, Cavalli, FMG, Luu, B, Ramaswamy, V, Wu, X, Koster, J, Ryzhova, M, Cho, Y-J, Pomeroy, SL, Herold-Mende, C, Schuhmann, M, Ebinger, M, Liau, LM, Mora, J, McLendon, RE, Jabado, N, Kumabe, T, Chuah, E, Ma, Y, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Mungall, KL, Thiessen, N, Tse, K, Wong, T, Jones, SJM, Witt, O, Milde, T, Von Deimling, A, Capper, D, Korshunov, A, Yaspo, M-L, Kriwacki, R, Gajjar, A, Zhang, J, Beroukhim, R, Fraenkel, E, Korbel, JO, Brors, B, Schlesner, M, Eils, R, Marra, MA, Pfister, SM, Taylor, MD, and Lichter, P. "The whole-genome landscape of medulloblastoma subtypes." Nature 547.7663 (July 2017): 311-317.
PMID
28726821
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature
Volume
547
Issue
7663
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
311
End Page
317
DOI
10.1038/nature22973

Mutant IDH1 Disrupts the Mouse Subventricular Zone and Alters Brain Tumor Progression.

IDH1 mutations occur in the majority of low-grade gliomas and lead to the production of the oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). To understand the effects of tumor-associated mutant IDH1 (IDH1-R132H) on both the neural stem cell (NSC) population and brain tumorigenesis, genetically faithful cell lines and mouse model systems were generated. Here, it is reported that mouse NSCs expressing Idh1-R132H displayed reduced proliferation due to p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest as well as a decreased ability to undergo neuronal differentiation. In vivo, Idh1-R132H expression reduced proliferation of cells within the germinal zone of the subventricular zone (SVZ). The NSCs within this area were dispersed and disorganized in mutant animals, suggesting that Idh1-R132H perturbed the NSCs and the microenvironment from which gliomas arise. In addition, tumor-bearing animals expressing mutant Idh1 displayed a prolonged survival and also overexpressed Olig2, features consistent with IDH1-mutated human gliomas. These data indicate that mutant Idh1 disrupts the NSC microenvironment and the candidate cell-of-origin for glioma; thus, altering the progression of tumorigenesis. In addition, this study provides a mutant Idh1 brain tumor model that genetically recapitulates human disease, laying the foundation for future investigations on mutant IDH1-mediated brain tumorigenesis and targeted therapy.Implications: Through the use of a conditional mutant mouse model that confers a less aggressive tumor phenotype, this study reveals that mutant Idh1 impacts the candidate cell-of-origin for gliomas. Mol Cancer Res; 15(5); 507-20. ©2017 AACR.

Authors
Pirozzi, CJ; Carpenter, AB; Waitkus, MS; Wang, CY; Zhu, H; Hansen, LJ; Chen, LH; Greer, PK; Feng, J; Wang, Y; Bock, CB; Fan, P; Spasojevic, I; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; He, Y; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Pirozzi, CJ, Carpenter, AB, Waitkus, MS, Wang, CY, Zhu, H, Hansen, LJ, Chen, LH, Greer, PK, Feng, J, Wang, Y, Bock, CB, Fan, P, Spasojevic, I, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, He, Y, and Yan, H. "Mutant IDH1 Disrupts the Mouse Subventricular Zone and Alters Brain Tumor Progression." Molecular Cancer Research : Mcr 15.5 (May 2017): 507-520.
PMID
28148827
Source
epmc
Published In
Molecular Cancer Research : Mcr
Volume
15
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
507
End Page
520
DOI
10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-16-0485

Long-term Survival in Glioblastoma with Cytomegalovirus pp65-Targeted Vaccination.

Purpose: Patients with glioblastoma have less than 15-month median survival despite surgical resection, high-dose radiation, and chemotherapy with temozolomide. We previously demonstrated that targeting cytomegalovirus pp65 using dendritic cells (DC) can extend survival and, in a separate study, that dose-intensified temozolomide (DI-TMZ) and adjuvant granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) potentiate tumor-specific immune responses in patients with glioblastoma. Here, we evaluated pp65-specific cellular responses following DI-TMZ with pp65-DCs and determined the effects on long-term progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).Experimental Design: Following standard-of-care, 11 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma received DI-TMZ (100 mg/m2/d × 21 days per cycle) with at least three vaccines of pp65 lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein mRNA-pulsed DCs admixed with GM-CSF on day 23 ± 1 of each cycle. Thereafter, monthly DI-TMZ cycles and pp65-DCs were continued if patients had not progressed.Results: Following DI-TMZ cycle 1 and three doses of pp65-DCs, pp65 cellular responses significantly increased. After DI-TMZ, both the proportion and proliferation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased and remained elevated with serial DI-TMZ cycles. Median PFS and OS were 25.3 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 11.0-∞] and 41.1 months (95% CI, 21.6-∞), exceeding survival using recursive partitioning analysis and matched historical controls. Four patients remained progression-free at 59 to 64 months from diagnosis. No known prognostic factors [age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), IDH-1/2 mutation, and MGMT promoter methylation] predicted more favorable outcomes for the patients in this cohort.Conclusions: Despite increased Treg proportions following DI-TMZ, patients receiving pp65-DCs showed long-term PFS and OS, confirming prior studies targeting cytomegalovirus in glioblastoma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(8); 1898-909. ©2017 AACR.

Authors
Batich, KA; Reap, EA; Archer, GE; Sanchez-Perez, L; Nair, SK; Schmittling, RJ; Norberg, P; Xie, W; Herndon, JE; Healy, P; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Bigner, D; Vlahovic, G; Mitchell, DA; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Batich, KA, Reap, EA, Archer, GE, Sanchez-Perez, L, Nair, SK, Schmittling, RJ, Norberg, P, Xie, W, Herndon, JE, Healy, P, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Bigner, D, Vlahovic, G, Mitchell, DA, and Sampson, JH. "Long-term Survival in Glioblastoma with Cytomegalovirus pp65-Targeted Vaccination." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 23.8 (April 2017): 1898-1909.
PMID
28411277
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
23
Issue
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1898
End Page
1909
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-16-2057

The Utility of Expert Diagnosis in Surgical Neuropathology: Analysis of Consultations Reviewed at 5 National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions.

The aim of this study was to characterize the type and degree of discrepancies between non-expert and expert diagnoses of CNS tumors to identify the value of consultations in surgical neuropathology. Neuropathology experts from 5 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions participated in the review of 1281 consultations selected based on inclusion criteria. The consultation cases were re-reviewed at the NCCN headquarters to determine concordance with the original diagnoses. Among all consultations, 249 (19.4%) were submitted for expert diagnoses without final diagnoses from the submitting institution. Within the remaining 1032 patients, the serious/major discrepancy rate was 4.8%, and less serious and minor discrepancies were seen in 19.4% of the cases. The discrepancy rate was higher among patients who were referred to NCCN institutions for consultation compared to those who were referred for treatment only. The discrepancy rates, patient demographics, type of consultations and submitting institutions varied among participating NCCN institutions. Expert consultations identified a subset of cases with significant diagnostic discrepancies, and constituted the initial diagnoses in some cases. These data indicate that expert consultations in glial tumors and all types of pediatric CNS tumors can improve accurate diagnosis and enable appropriate management.

Authors
Bruner, JM; Louis, DN; McLendon, R; Rosenblum, MK; Archambault, WT; Most, S; Tihan, T
MLA Citation
Bruner, JM, Louis, DN, McLendon, R, Rosenblum, MK, Archambault, WT, Most, S, and Tihan, T. "The Utility of Expert Diagnosis in Surgical Neuropathology: Analysis of Consultations Reviewed at 5 National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions." Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology 76.3 (March 2017): 189-194.
PMID
28395084
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
Volume
76
Issue
3
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
189
End Page
194
DOI
10.1093/jnen/nlw122

Morphological and molecular features of astroblastoma, including BRAFV600E mutations, suggest an ontological relationship to other cortical-based gliomas of children and young adults.

Astroblastomas (ABs) are rare glial tumors showing overlapping features with astrocytomas, ependymomas, and sometimes other glial neoplasms, and may be challenging to diagnose.We examined clinical, histopathological, and molecular features in 28 archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded AB cases and performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards and Kaplan-Meier methods.Unlike ependymomas and angiocentric gliomas, ABs demonstrate abundant distinctive astroblastic pseudorosettes and are usually Olig2 immunopositive. They also frequently exhibit rhabdoid cells, multinucleated cells, and eosinophilic granular material. They retain immunoreactivity to alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked, are immunonegative to isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 R132H mutation, and only occasionally show MGMT promoter hypermethylation differentiating them from many diffuse gliomas. Like pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, ganglioglioma, supratentorial pilocytic astrocytoma, and other predominantly cortical-based glial tumors, ABs often harbor the BRAFV600E mutation, present in 38% of cases tested (n = 21), further distinguishing those tumors from ependymomas and angiocentric gliomas. Factors correlating with longer patient survival included age less than 30 years, female gender, absent BRAFV600E , and mitotic index less than 5 mitoses/10 high-power fields; however, only the latter was significant by Cox and Kaplan-Meier analyses (n = 24; P = .024 and .012, respectively). This mitotic cutoff is therefore currently the best criterion to stratify tumors into low-grade ABs and higher-grade anaplastic ABs.In addition to their own characteristic histological features, ABs share some molecular and histological findings with other, possibly ontologically related, cortical-based gliomas of mostly children and young adults. Importantly, the presence of BRAFV600E mutations in a subset of ABs suggests potential clinical utility of targeted anti-BRAF therapy.

Authors
Lehman, NL; Hattab, EM; Mobley, BC; Usubalieva, A; Schniederjan, MJ; McLendon, RE; Paulus, W; Rushing, EJ; Georgescu, M-M; Couce, M; Dulai, MS; Cohen, ML; Pierson, CR; Raisanen, JM; Martin, SE; Lehman, TD; Lipp, ES; Bonnin, JM; Al-Abbadi, MA; Kenworthy, K; Zhao, K; Mohamed, N; Zhang, G; Zhao, W
MLA Citation
Lehman, NL, Hattab, EM, Mobley, BC, Usubalieva, A, Schniederjan, MJ, McLendon, RE, Paulus, W, Rushing, EJ, Georgescu, M-M, Couce, M, Dulai, MS, Cohen, ML, Pierson, CR, Raisanen, JM, Martin, SE, Lehman, TD, Lipp, ES, Bonnin, JM, Al-Abbadi, MA, Kenworthy, K, Zhao, K, Mohamed, N, Zhang, G, and Zhao, W. "Morphological and molecular features of astroblastoma, including BRAFV600E mutations, suggest an ontological relationship to other cortical-based gliomas of children and young adults." Neuro Oncology 19.1 (January 2017): 31-42.
PMID
27416954
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
19
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
31
End Page
42
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/now118

Deubiquitinase USP13 maintains glioblastoma stem cells by antagonizing FBXL14-mediated Myc ubiquitination.

Glioblastoma is the most lethal brain tumor and harbors glioma stem cells (GSCs) with potent tumorigenic capacity. The function of GSCs in tumor propagation is maintained by several core transcriptional regulators including c-Myc. c-Myc protein is tightly regulated by posttranslational modification. However, the posttranslational regulatory mechanisms for c-Myc in GSCs have not been defined. In this study, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinase USP13 stabilizes c-Myc by antagonizing FBXL14-mediated ubiquitination to maintain GSC self-renewal and tumorigenic potential. USP13 was preferentially expressed in GSCs, and its depletion potently inhibited GSC proliferation and tumor growth by promoting c-Myc ubiquitination and degradation. In contrast, overexpression of the ubiquitin E3 ligase FBXL14 induced c-Myc degradation, promoted GSC differentiation, and inhibited tumor growth. Ectopic expression of the ubiquitin-insensitive mutant T58A-c-Myc rescued the effects caused by FBXL14 overexpression or USP13 disruption. These data suggest that USP13 and FBXL14 play opposing roles in the regulation of GSCs through reversible ubiquitination of c-Myc.

Authors
Fang, X; Zhou, W; Wu, Q; Huang, Z; Shi, Y; Yang, K; Chen, C; Xie, Q; Mack, SC; Wang, X; Carcaboso, AM; Sloan, AE; Ouyang, G; McLendon, RE; Bian, X-W; Rich, JN; Bao, S
MLA Citation
Fang, X, Zhou, W, Wu, Q, Huang, Z, Shi, Y, Yang, K, Chen, C, Xie, Q, Mack, SC, Wang, X, Carcaboso, AM, Sloan, AE, Ouyang, G, McLendon, RE, Bian, X-W, Rich, JN, and Bao, S. "Deubiquitinase USP13 maintains glioblastoma stem cells by antagonizing FBXL14-mediated Myc ubiquitination." The Journal of Experimental Medicine 214.1 (January 2017): 245-267.
PMID
27923907
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Experimental Medicine
Volume
214
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
245
End Page
267
DOI
10.1084/jem.20151673

Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion: Long-Term Experience of the Duke University Medical Center's Pathology Department.

This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department's 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%). The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP) committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

Authors
Robboy, SJ; McLendon, R
MLA Citation
Robboy, SJ, and McLendon, R. "Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion: Long-Term Experience of the Duke University Medical Center's Pathology Department." Academic Pathology 4 (January 2017): 2374289516689471-null.
PMID
28725786
Source
epmc
Published In
Academic Pathology
Volume
4
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
2374289516689471
DOI
10.1177/2374289516689471

HIV-1 Envelope Mimicry of Host Enzyme Kynureninase Does Not Disrupt Tryptophan Metabolism.

The HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) has evolved to subvert the host immune system, hindering viral control by the host. The tryptophan metabolic enzyme kynureninase (KYNU) is mimicked by a portion of the HIV Env gp41 membrane proximal region (MPER) and is cross-reactive with the HIV broadly neutralizing Ab (bnAb) 2F5. Molecular mimicry of host proteins by pathogens can lead to autoimmune disease. In this article, we demonstrate that neither the 2F5 bnAb nor HIV MPER-KYNU cross-reactive Abs elicited by immunization with an MPER peptide-liposome vaccine in 2F5 bnAb VHDJH and VLJL knock-in mice and rhesus macaques modified KYNU activity or disrupted tissue tryptophan metabolism. Thus, molecular mimicry by HIV-1 Env that promotes the evasion of host anti-HIV-1 Ab responses can be directed toward nonfunctional host protein epitopes that do not impair host protein function. Therefore, the 2F5 HIV Env gp41 region is a key and safe target for HIV-1 vaccine development.

Authors
Bradley, T; Yang, G; Ilkayeva, O; Holl, TM; Zhang, R; Zhang, J; Santra, S; Fox, CB; Reed, SG; Parks, R; Bowman, CM; Bouton-Verville, H; Sutherland, LL; Scearce, RM; Vandergrift, N; Kepler, TB; Moody, MA; Liao, H-X; Alam, SM; McLendon, R; Everitt, JI; Newgard, CB; Verkoczy, L; Kelsoe, G; Haynes, BF
MLA Citation
Bradley, T, Yang, G, Ilkayeva, O, Holl, TM, Zhang, R, Zhang, J, Santra, S, Fox, CB, Reed, SG, Parks, R, Bowman, CM, Bouton-Verville, H, Sutherland, LL, Scearce, RM, Vandergrift, N, Kepler, TB, Moody, MA, Liao, H-X, Alam, SM, McLendon, R, Everitt, JI, Newgard, CB, Verkoczy, L, Kelsoe, G, and Haynes, BF. "HIV-1 Envelope Mimicry of Host Enzyme Kynureninase Does Not Disrupt Tryptophan Metabolism." Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) 197.12 (December 2016): 4663-4673.
PMID
27849170
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Immunology
Volume
197
Issue
12
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
4663
End Page
4673
DOI
10.4049/jimmunol.1601484

Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Atypical or Malignant Meningiomas Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Single-Institution Retrospective Analysis

Authors
Kent, CL; Mowery, YM; Wright, AO; Kim, GJ; Desjardins, A; Peters, KB; Vlahovic, G; Friedman, HS; Cummings, TJ; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Sampson, JH; Kirkpatrick, JP
MLA Citation
Kent, CL, Mowery, YM, Wright, AO, Kim, GJ, Desjardins, A, Peters, KB, Vlahovic, G, Friedman, HS, Cummings, TJ, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, Sampson, JH, and Kirkpatrick, JP. "Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Atypical or Malignant Meningiomas Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Single-Institution Retrospective Analysis." October 1, 2016.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
96
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
E83
End Page
E84
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2016.06.802

Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Atypical or Malignant Meningiomas Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Single-Institution Retrospective Analysis.

Authors
Kent, CL; Mowery, YM; Wright, AO; Kim, GJ; Desjardins, A; Peters, KB; Vlahovic, G; Friedman, HS; Cummings, TJ; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Sampson, JH; Kirkpatrick, JP
MLA Citation
Kent, CL, Mowery, YM, Wright, AO, Kim, GJ, Desjardins, A, Peters, KB, Vlahovic, G, Friedman, HS, Cummings, TJ, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, Sampson, JH, and Kirkpatrick, JP. "Long-Term Outcomes for Patients With Atypical or Malignant Meningiomas Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Single-Institution Retrospective Analysis." International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 96.2S (October 2016): E83-E84.
PMID
27675478
Source
epmc
Published In
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume
96
Issue
2S
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
E83
End Page
E84
DOI
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2016.06.802

Single-Agent Carboplatin for a Rare Case of Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma of the Spinal Cord in an Adult with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a rare and more aggressive variant of pilocytic astrocytoma, which usually affects young children and is most often located in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region. The association of PMA with underlying genetic disorders is not well known.We identified a 23-year-old woman with a PMA of the spinal cord who was simultaneously diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1. Diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 was made clinically and confirmed with genetic testing that revealed a heterozygous one-amino-acid deletion (c.2970-2972 delAAT) in exon 17 of the NF1 gene, which is correlated with a milder phenotype. The patient underwent a partial surgical resection of the spinal cord tumor followed by adjuvant carboplatin 560 mg/m2 every 4 weeks. Radiation was avoided due to risks associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.At the 11-month follow-up, the patient maintained a partial radiographic response as well as complete resolution of her neurologic deficits.To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an adult patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 and a spinal cord PMA. Single-agent carboplatin was effective and well-tolerated.

Authors
Dunn-Pirio, AM; Howell, E; McLendon, RE; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Dunn-Pirio, AM, Howell, E, McLendon, RE, and Peters, KB. "Single-Agent Carboplatin for a Rare Case of Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma of the Spinal Cord in an Adult with Neurofibromatosis Type 1." Case reports in oncology 9.3 (September 2016): 568-573.
PMID
27920686
Source
epmc
Published In
Case Reports in Oncology
Volume
9
Issue
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
568
End Page
573
DOI
10.1159/000449406

Therapeutic Impact of Cytoreductive Surgery and Irradiation of Posterior Fossa Ependymoma in the Molecular Era: A Retrospective Multicohort Analysis.

Posterior fossa ependymoma comprises two distinct molecular variants termed EPN_PFA and EPN_PFB that have a distinct biology and natural history. The therapeutic value of cytoreductive surgery and radiation therapy for posterior fossa ependymoma after accounting for molecular subgroup is not known.Four independent nonoverlapping retrospective cohorts of posterior fossa ependymomas (n = 820) were profiled using genome-wide methylation arrays. Risk stratification models were designed based on known clinical and newly described molecular biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses.Molecular subgroup is a powerful independent predictor of outcome even when accounting for age or treatment regimen. Incompletely resected EPN_PFA ependymomas have a dismal prognosis, with a 5-year progression-free survival ranging from 26.1% to 56.8% across all four cohorts. Although first-line (adjuvant) radiation is clearly beneficial for completely resected EPN_PFA, a substantial proportion of patients with EPN_PFB can be cured with surgery alone, and patients with relapsed EPN_PFB can often be treated successfully with delayed external-beam irradiation.The most impactful biomarker for posterior fossa ependymoma is molecular subgroup affiliation, independent of other demographic or treatment variables. However, both EPN_PFA and EPN_PFB still benefit from increased extent of resection, with the survival rates being particularly poor for subtotally resected EPN_PFA, even with adjuvant radiation therapy. Patients with EPN_PFB who undergo gross total resection are at lower risk for relapse and should be considered for inclusion in a randomized clinical trial of observation alone with radiation reserved for those who experience recurrence.

Authors
Ramaswamy, V; Hielscher, T; Mack, SC; Lassaletta, A; Lin, T; Pajtler, KW; Jones, DTW; Luu, B; Cavalli, FMG; Aldape, K; Remke, M; Mynarek, M; Rutkowski, S; Gururangan, S; McLendon, RE; Lipp, ES; Dunham, C; Hukin, J; Eisenstat, DD; Fulton, D; van Landeghem, FKH; Santi, M; van Veelen, M-LC; Van Meir, EG; Osuka, S; Fan, X; Muraszko, KM; Tirapelli, DPC; Oba-Shinjo, SM; Marie, SKN; Carlotti, CG; Lee, JY; Rao, AAN; Giannini, C; Faria, CC; Nunes, S; Mora, J; Hamilton, RL; Hauser, P; Jabado, N; Petrecca, K; Jung, S; Massimi, L; Zollo, M; Cinalli, G; Bognár, L; Klekner, A; Hortobágyi, T; Leary, S; Ermoian, RP; Olson, JM; Leonard, JR; Gardner, C; Grajkowska, WA; Chambless, LB; Cain, J; Eberhart, CG; Ahsan, S; Massimino, M; Giangaspero, F; Buttarelli, FR; Packer, RJ; Emery, L; Yong, WH; Soto, H; Liau, LM; Everson, R; Grossbach, A; Shalaby, T; Grotzer, M; Karajannis, MA; Zagzag, D; Wheeler, H; von Hoff, K; Alonso, MM; Tuñon, T; Schüller, U; Zitterbart, K; Sterba, J; Chan, JA; Guzman, M; Elbabaa, SK; Colman, H; Dhall, G; Fisher, PG; Fouladi, M; Gajjar, A; Goldman, S; Hwang, E; Kool, M; Ladha, H; Vera-Bolanos, E; Wani, K; Lieberman, F; Mikkelsen, T; Omuro, AM; Pollack, IF; Prados, M; Robins, HI; Soffietti, R; Wu, J; Metellus, P; Tabori, U; Bartels, U; Bouffet, E; Hawkins, CE; Rutka, JT; Dirks, P; Pfister, SM; Merchant, TE; Gilbert, MR; Armstrong, TS; Korshunov, A; Ellison, DW; Taylor, MD
MLA Citation
Ramaswamy, V, Hielscher, T, Mack, SC, Lassaletta, A, Lin, T, Pajtler, KW, Jones, DTW, Luu, B, Cavalli, FMG, Aldape, K, Remke, M, Mynarek, M, Rutkowski, S, Gururangan, S, McLendon, RE, Lipp, ES, Dunham, C, Hukin, J, Eisenstat, DD, Fulton, D, van Landeghem, FKH, Santi, M, van Veelen, M-LC, Van Meir, EG, Osuka, S, Fan, X, Muraszko, KM, Tirapelli, DPC, Oba-Shinjo, SM, Marie, SKN, Carlotti, CG, Lee, JY, Rao, AAN, Giannini, C, Faria, CC, Nunes, S, Mora, J, Hamilton, RL, Hauser, P, Jabado, N, Petrecca, K, Jung, S, Massimi, L, Zollo, M, Cinalli, G, Bognár, L, Klekner, A, Hortobágyi, T, Leary, S, Ermoian, RP, Olson, JM, Leonard, JR, Gardner, C, Grajkowska, WA, Chambless, LB, Cain, J, Eberhart, CG, Ahsan, S, Massimino, M, Giangaspero, F, Buttarelli, FR, Packer, RJ, Emery, L, Yong, WH, Soto, H, Liau, LM, Everson, R, Grossbach, A, Shalaby, T, Grotzer, M, Karajannis, MA, Zagzag, D, Wheeler, H, von Hoff, K, Alonso, MM, Tuñon, T, Schüller, U, Zitterbart, K, Sterba, J, Chan, JA, Guzman, M, Elbabaa, SK, Colman, H, Dhall, G, Fisher, PG, Fouladi, M, Gajjar, A, Goldman, S, Hwang, E, Kool, M, Ladha, H, Vera-Bolanos, E, Wani, K, Lieberman, F, Mikkelsen, T, Omuro, AM, Pollack, IF, Prados, M, Robins, HI, Soffietti, R, Wu, J, Metellus, P, Tabori, U, Bartels, U, Bouffet, E, Hawkins, CE, Rutka, JT, Dirks, P, Pfister, SM, Merchant, TE, Gilbert, MR, Armstrong, TS, Korshunov, A, Ellison, DW, and Taylor, MD. "Therapeutic Impact of Cytoreductive Surgery and Irradiation of Posterior Fossa Ependymoma in the Molecular Era: A Retrospective Multicohort Analysis." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 34.21 (July 2016): 2468-2477.
PMID
27269943
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
34
Issue
21
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
2468
End Page
2477
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2015.65.7825

Histologically benign, clinically aggressive: Progressive non-optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas in adults with NF1.

Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8 ± 4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n = 3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4 ± 1 vs. 14 ± 8.3 months, P = 0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n = 2), chemotherapy (n = 2), and targeted, biologic agents (n = 2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6-30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Strowd, RE; Rodriguez, FJ; McLendon, RE; Vredenburgh, JJ; Chance, AB; Jallo, G; Olivi, A; Ahn, ES; Blakeley, JO
MLA Citation
Strowd, RE, Rodriguez, FJ, McLendon, RE, Vredenburgh, JJ, Chance, AB, Jallo, G, Olivi, A, Ahn, ES, and Blakeley, JO. "Histologically benign, clinically aggressive: Progressive non-optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas in adults with NF1." American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A 170.6 (June 2016): 1455-1461.
PMID
26992069
Source
epmc
Published In
American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Volume
170
Issue
6
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1455
End Page
1461
DOI
10.1002/ajmg.a.37622

Preclinical toxicity evaluation of a novel immunotoxin, D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL, administered via intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery in rats.

D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL (D2C7-IT) is a novel immunotoxin that reacts with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRwt) and mutant EGFRvIII proteins overexpressed in glioblastomas. This study assessed the toxicity of intracerebral administration of D2C7-IT to support an initial Food and Drug Administration Investigational New Drug application. After the optimization of the formulation and administration, two cohorts (an acute and chronic cohort necropsied on study days 5 and 34) of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (four groups of 5 males and 5 females) were infused with the D2C7-IT formulation at total doses of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.4 μg (the acute cohort) and 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.35 μg (the chronic cohort) for approximately 72 h by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery using osmotic pumps. Mortality was observed in the 0.40 μg (5/10 rats) and 0.35 μg (4/10 rats) high-dose groups of each cohort. Body weight loss and abnormal behavior were only revealed in the rats treated with high doses of D2C7-IT. No dose-related effects were observed in clinical laboratory tests in either cohort. A gross pathologic examination of systemic tissues from the high-dose and control groups in both cohorts exhibited no dose-related or drug-related pathologic findings. Brain histopathology revealed the frequent occurrence of dose-related encephalomalacia, edema, and demyelination in the high-dose groups of both cohorts. In this study, the maximum tolerated dose of D2C7-IT was determined to be between 0.10 and 0.35 μg, and the no-observed-adverse-effect-level was 0.05 μg in SD rats. Both parameters were utilized to design the Phase I/II D2C7-IT clinical trial.

Authors
Bao, X; Chandramohan, V; Reynolds, RP; Norton, JN; Wetsel, WC; Rodriguiz, RM; Aryal, DK; McLendon, RE; Levin, ED; Petry, NA; Zalutsky, MR; Burnett, BK; Kuan, C-T; Pastan, IH; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Bao, X, Chandramohan, V, Reynolds, RP, Norton, JN, Wetsel, WC, Rodriguiz, RM, Aryal, DK, McLendon, RE, Levin, ED, Petry, NA, Zalutsky, MR, Burnett, BK, Kuan, C-T, Pastan, IH, and Bigner, DD. "Preclinical toxicity evaluation of a novel immunotoxin, D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL, administered via intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery in rats." Investigational new drugs 34.2 (April 2016): 149-158.
PMID
26728879
Source
epmc
Published In
Investigational New Drugs
Volume
34
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
149
End Page
158
DOI
10.1007/s10637-015-0318-3

A Three-Dimensional Organoid Culture System Derived from Human Glioblastomas Recapitulates the Hypoxic Gradients and Cancer Stem Cell Heterogeneity of Tumors Found In Vivo.

Many cancers feature cellular hierarchies that are driven by tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSC) and rely on complex interactions with the tumor microenvironment. Standard cell culture conditions fail to recapitulate the original tumor architecture or microenvironmental gradients and are not designed to retain the cellular heterogeneity of parental tumors. Here, we describe a three-dimensional culture system that supports the long-term growth and expansion of tumor organoids derived directly from glioblastoma specimens, including patient-derived primary cultures, xenografts, genetically engineered glioma models, or patient samples. Organoids derived from multiple regions of patient tumors retain selective tumorigenic potential. Furthermore, organoids could be established directly from brain metastases not typically amenable to in vitro culture. Once formed, tumor organoids grew for months and displayed regional heterogeneity with a rapidly dividing outer region of SOX2(+), OLIG2(+), and TLX(+) cells surrounding a hypoxic core of primarily non-stem senescent cells and diffuse, quiescent CSCs. Notably, non-stem cells within organoids were sensitive to radiotherapy, whereas adjacent CSCs were radioresistant. Orthotopic transplantation of patient-derived organoids resulted in tumors displaying histologic features, including single-cell invasiveness, that were more representative of the parental tumor compared with those formed from patient-derived sphere cultures. In conclusion, we present a new ex vivo model in which phenotypically diverse stem and non-stem glioblastoma cell populations can be simultaneously cultured to explore new facets of microenvironmental influences and CSC biology. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2465-77. ©2016 AACR.

Authors
Hubert, CG; Rivera, M; Spangler, LC; Wu, Q; Mack, SC; Prager, BC; Couce, M; McLendon, RE; Sloan, AE; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Hubert, CG, Rivera, M, Spangler, LC, Wu, Q, Mack, SC, Prager, BC, Couce, M, McLendon, RE, Sloan, AE, and Rich, JN. "A Three-Dimensional Organoid Culture System Derived from Human Glioblastomas Recapitulates the Hypoxic Gradients and Cancer Stem Cell Heterogeneity of Tumors Found In Vivo." Cancer Research 76.8 (April 2016): 2465-2477.
PMID
26896279
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
76
Issue
8
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
2465
End Page
2477
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-2402

Prognostic value of medulloblastoma extent of resection after accounting for molecular subgroup: a retrospective integrated clinical and molecular analysis.

Patients with incomplete surgical resection of medulloblastoma are controversially regarded as having a marker of high-risk disease, which leads to patients undergoing aggressive surgical resections, so-called second-look surgeries, and intensified chemoradiotherapy. All previous studies assessing the clinical importance of extent of resection have not accounted for molecular subgroup. We analysed the prognostic value of extent of resection in a subgroup-specific manner.We retrospectively identified patients who had a histological diagnosis of medulloblastoma and complete data about extent of resection and survival from centres participating in the Medulloblastoma Advanced Genomics International Consortium. We collected from resections done between April, 1997, and February, 2013, at 35 international institutions. We established medulloblastoma subgroup affiliation by gene expression profiling on frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. We classified extent of resection on the basis of postoperative imaging as gross total resection (no residual tumour), near-total resection (<1·5 cm(2) tumour remaining), or sub-total resection (≥1·5 cm(2) tumour remaining). We did multivariable analyses of overall survival and progression-free survival using the variables molecular subgroup (WNT, SHH, group 4, and group 3), age (<3 vs ≥3 years old), metastatic status (metastases vs no metastases), geographical location of therapy (North America/Australia vs rest of the world), receipt of chemotherapy (yes vs no) and receipt of craniospinal irradiation (<30 Gy or >30 Gy vs no craniospinal irradiation). The primary analysis outcome was the effect of extent of resection by molecular subgroup and the effects of other clinical variables on overall and progression-free survival.We included 787 patients with medulloblastoma (86 with WNT tumours, 242 with SHH tumours, 163 with group 3 tumours, and 296 with group 4 tumours) in our multivariable Cox models of progression-free and overall survival. We found that the prognostic benefit of increased extent of resection for patients with medulloblastoma is attenuated after molecular subgroup affiliation is taken into account. We identified a progression-free survival benefit for gross total resection over sub-total resection (hazard ratio [HR] 1·45, 95% CI 1·07-1·96, p=0·16) but no overall survival benefit (HR 1·23, 0·87-1·72, p=0·24). We saw no progression-free survival or overall survival benefit for gross total resection compared with near-total resection (HR 1·05, 0·71-1·53, p=0·8158 for progression-free survival and HR 1·14, 0·75-1·72, p=0·55 for overall survival). No significant survival benefit existed for greater extent of resection for patients with WNT, SHH, or group 3 tumours (HR 1·03, 0·67-1·58, p=0·89 for sub-total resection vs gross total resection). For patients with group 4 tumours, gross total resection conferred a benefit to progression-free survival compared with sub-total resection (HR 1·97, 1·22-3·17, p=0·0056), especially for those with metastatic disease (HR 2·22, 1·00-4·93, p=0·050). However, gross total resection had no effect on overall survival compared with sub-total resection in patients with group 4 tumours (HR 1·67, 0·93-2·99, p=0·084).The prognostic benefit of increased extent of resection for patients with medulloblastoma is attenuated after molecular subgroup affiliation is taken into account. Although maximum safe surgical resection should remain the standard of care, surgical removal of small residual portions of medulloblastoma is not recommended when the likelihood of neurological morbidity is high because there is no definitive benefit to gross total resection compared with near-total resection.Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute, Terry Fox Research Institute, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health, Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, and the Garron Family Chair in Childhood Cancer Research.

Authors
Thompson, EM; Hielscher, T; Bouffet, E; Remke, M; Luu, B; Gururangan, S; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Lipp, ES; Perreault, S; Cho, Y-J; Grant, G; Kim, S-K; Lee, JY; Rao, AAN; Giannini, C; Li, KKW; Ng, H-K; Yao, Y; Kumabe, T; Tominaga, T; Grajkowska, WA; Perek-Polnik, M; Low, DCY; Seow, WT; Chang, KTE; Mora, J; Pollack, IF; Hamilton, RL; Leary, S; Moore, AS; Ingram, WJ; Hallahan, AR; Jouvet, A; Fèvre-Montange, M; Vasiljevic, A; Faure-Conter, C; Shofuda, T; Kagawa, N; Hashimoto, N; Jabado, N; Weil, AG; Gayden, T; Wataya, T; Shalaby, T; Grotzer, M; Zitterbart, K; Sterba, J; Kren, L; Hortobágyi, T; Klekner, A; László, B; Pócza, T; Hauser, P; Schüller, U; Jung, S; Jang, W-Y; French, PJ; Kros, JM; van Veelen, M-LC; Massimi, L; Leonard, JR; Rubin, JB; Vibhakar, R; Chambless, LB; Cooper, MK; Thompson, RC; Faria, CC; Carvalho, A; Nunes, S; Pimentel, J; Fan, X; Muraszko, KM; López-Aguilar, E; Lyden, D; Garzia, L; Shih, DJH; Kijima, N; Schneider, C; Adamski, J; Northcott, PA; Kool, M; Jones, DTW; Chan, JA; Nikolic, A; Garre, ML; Van Meir, EG; Osuka, S; Olson, JJ; Jahangiri, A; Castro, BA; Gupta, N; Weiss, WA; Moxon-Emre, I; Mabbott, DJ; Lassaletta, A; Hawkins, CE; Tabori, U; Drake, J; Kulkarni, A; Dirks, P; Rutka, JT; Korshunov, A; Pfister, SM; Packer, RJ; Ramaswamy, V; Taylor, MD
MLA Citation
Thompson, EM, Hielscher, T, Bouffet, E, Remke, M, Luu, B, Gururangan, S, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Lipp, ES, Perreault, S, Cho, Y-J, Grant, G, Kim, S-K, Lee, JY, Rao, AAN, Giannini, C, Li, KKW, Ng, H-K, Yao, Y, Kumabe, T, Tominaga, T, Grajkowska, WA, Perek-Polnik, M, Low, DCY, Seow, WT, Chang, KTE, Mora, J, Pollack, IF, Hamilton, RL, Leary, S, Moore, AS, Ingram, WJ, Hallahan, AR, Jouvet, A, Fèvre-Montange, M, Vasiljevic, A, Faure-Conter, C, Shofuda, T, Kagawa, N, Hashimoto, N, Jabado, N, Weil, AG, Gayden, T, Wataya, T, Shalaby, T, Grotzer, M, Zitterbart, K, Sterba, J, Kren, L, Hortobágyi, T, Klekner, A, László, B, Pócza, T, Hauser, P, Schüller, U, Jung, S, Jang, W-Y, French, PJ, Kros, JM, van Veelen, M-LC, Massimi, L, Leonard, JR, Rubin, JB, Vibhakar, R, Chambless, LB, Cooper, MK, Thompson, RC, Faria, CC, Carvalho, A, Nunes, S, Pimentel, J, Fan, X, Muraszko, KM, López-Aguilar, E, Lyden, D, Garzia, L, Shih, DJH, Kijima, N, Schneider, C, Adamski, J, Northcott, PA, Kool, M, Jones, DTW, Chan, JA, Nikolic, A, Garre, ML, Van Meir, EG, Osuka, S, Olson, JJ, Jahangiri, A, Castro, BA, Gupta, N, Weiss, WA, Moxon-Emre, I, Mabbott, DJ, Lassaletta, A, Hawkins, CE, Tabori, U, Drake, J, Kulkarni, A, Dirks, P, Rutka, JT, Korshunov, A, Pfister, SM, Packer, RJ, Ramaswamy, V, and Taylor, MD. "Prognostic value of medulloblastoma extent of resection after accounting for molecular subgroup: a retrospective integrated clinical and molecular analysis." The Lancet. Oncology 17.4 (April 2016): 484-495.
PMID
26976201
Source
epmc
Published In
The Lancet. Oncology
Volume
17
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
484
End Page
495
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00581-1

The Duke glioma handbook: Pathology, diagnosis, and management

© Cambridge University Press 2016. All rights reserved. The management of patients with a glioma is challenging and best achieved by a team approach encompassing a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgical excision in a specialist Cancer Center - the balance of treatment depending on the site and grade of tumor. Survival rates are improving and care of patients with or recovering from gliomas is increasingly handled in the community under the care of local physicians. This book provides an authoritative, multi-disciplinary summary of glioma biology, genetics, management and social issues, based on the world-leading program at the Duke University Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, one of the world's largest and most successful Centers to offer brain cancer treatment and translational research. The text is written by specialists from this Center, giving it a consistent approach and style. This is an important educational resource for neurologists, neurosurgeons, oncologists, psychiatrists, neurohospitalists and ancillary members of neuro-oncology teams.

Authors
Sampson, JH; Bigner, DD; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; McLendon, R
MLA Citation
Sampson, JH, Bigner, DD, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, and McLendon, R. The Duke glioma handbook: Pathology, diagnosis, and management. March 31, 2016.
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1
End Page
210
DOI
10.1017/CBO9781107588721

Neuropathology of gliomas

Authors
McLendon, R; Cummings, TJ
MLA Citation
McLendon, R, and Cummings, TJ. "Neuropathology of gliomas." The Duke Glioma Handbook: Pathology, Diagnosis, and Management. March 31, 2016. 146-168.
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
146
End Page
168
DOI
10.1017/CBO9781107588721.008

Differential Immune Microenvironments and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade among Molecular Subtypes of Murine Medulloblastoma.

Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma, the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and group 3 medulloblastoma for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice.Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with group 3 tumors. However, murine group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8(+) PD-1(+) T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial group 3 tumors compared with SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1(+) peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3(+) T cells within the tumor microenvironment.This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment.

Authors
Pham, CD; Flores, C; Yang, C; Pinheiro, EM; Yearley, JH; Sayour, EJ; Pei, Y; Moore, C; McLendon, RE; Huang, J; Sampson, JH; Wechsler-Reya, R; Mitchell, DA
MLA Citation
Pham, CD, Flores, C, Yang, C, Pinheiro, EM, Yearley, JH, Sayour, EJ, Pei, Y, Moore, C, McLendon, RE, Huang, J, Sampson, JH, Wechsler-Reya, R, and Mitchell, DA. "Differential Immune Microenvironments and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade among Molecular Subtypes of Murine Medulloblastoma." Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 22.3 (February 2016): 582-595.
PMID
26405194
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
22
Issue
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
582
End Page
595
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-15-0713

MiR-215 Is Induced Post-transcriptionally via HIF-Drosha Complex and Mediates Glioma-Initiating Cell Adaptation to Hypoxia by Targeting KDM1B.

The hypoxic tumor microenvironment serves as a niche for maintaining the glioma-initiating cells (GICs) that are critical for glioblastoma (GBM) occurrence and recurrence. Here, we report that hypoxia-induced miR-215 is vital for reprograming GICs to fit the hypoxic microenvironment via suppressing the expression of an epigenetic regulator KDM1B and modulating activities of multiple pathways. Interestingly, biogenesis of miR-215 and several miRNAs is accelerated post-transcriptionally by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) through HIF-Drosha interaction. Moreover, miR-215 expression correlates inversely with KDM1B while correlating positively with HIF1α and GBM progression in patients. These findings reveal a direct role of HIF in regulating miRNA biogenesis and consequently activating the miR-215-KDM1B-mediated signaling required for GIC adaptation to hypoxia.

Authors
Hu, J; Sun, T; Wang, H; Chen, Z; Wang, S; Yuan, L; Liu, T; Li, H-R; Wang, P; Feng, Y; Wang, Q; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Keir, ST; Bigner, DD; Rathmell, J; Fu, X-D; Li, Q-J; Wang, H; Wang, X-F
MLA Citation
Hu, J, Sun, T, Wang, H, Chen, Z, Wang, S, Yuan, L, Liu, T, Li, H-R, Wang, P, Feng, Y, Wang, Q, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, Keir, ST, Bigner, DD, Rathmell, J, Fu, X-D, Li, Q-J, Wang, H, and Wang, X-F. "MiR-215 Is Induced Post-transcriptionally via HIF-Drosha Complex and Mediates Glioma-Initiating Cell Adaptation to Hypoxia by Targeting KDM1B." Cancer Cell 29.1 (January 2016): 49-60.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/11667
PMID
26766590
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
29
Issue
1
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
49
End Page
60
DOI
10.1016/j.ccell.2015.12.005

Gorlin syndrome and desmoplastic medulloblastoma: Report of 3 cases with unfavorable clinical course and novel mutations.

We present three cases of genetically confirmed Gorlin syndrome with desmoplastic medulloblastoma (DMB) in whom tumor recurred despite standard therapy. One patient was found to have a novel germline missense PTCH1 mutation. Molecular analysis of recurrent tumor using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed PTEN and/ or PTCH1 loss in 2 patients. Whole exome sequencing (WES) of tumor in one patient revealed loss of heterozygosity of PTCH1 and a mutation of GNAS gene in its non-coding 3' -untranslated region (UTR) with corresponding decreased protein expression. While one patient died despite high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) plus stem cell rescue (ASCR) and palliative radiotherapy, two patients are currently alive for 18+ and 120+ months respectively following retrieval therapy that did not include irradiation. Infants with DMB and GS should be treated aggressively with chemotherapy at diagnosis to prevent relapse but radiotherapy should be avoided. The use of molecular prognostic markers for DMB should be routinely used to identify the subset of tumors that might have an aggressive course.

Authors
Gururangan, S; Robinson, G; Ellison, DW; Wu, G; He, X; Lu, QR; McLendon, R; Grant, G; Driscoll, T; Neuberg, R
MLA Citation
Gururangan, S, Robinson, G, Ellison, DW, Wu, G, He, X, Lu, QR, McLendon, R, Grant, G, Driscoll, T, and Neuberg, R. "Gorlin syndrome and desmoplastic medulloblastoma: Report of 3 cases with unfavorable clinical course and novel mutations." Pediatric Blood & Cancer 62.10 (October 2015): 1855-1858.
PMID
25940061
Source
epmc
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
62
Issue
10
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1855
End Page
1858
DOI
10.1002/pbc.25560

Template for Reporting Results of Biomarker Testing of Specimens From Patients With Tumors of the Central Nervous System.

Authors
Brat, DJ; Cagle, PT; Dillon, DA; Hattab, EM; McLendon, RE; Miller, MA; Buckner, JC; Members of the Cancer Biomarker Reporting Committee, College of American Pathologists,
MLA Citation
Brat, DJ, Cagle, PT, Dillon, DA, Hattab, EM, McLendon, RE, Miller, MA, Buckner, JC, Members of the Cancer Biomarker Reporting Committee, and College of American Pathologists, . "Template for Reporting Results of Biomarker Testing of Specimens From Patients With Tumors of the Central Nervous System." Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine 139.9 (September 2015): 1087-1093.
PMID
25642959
Source
epmc
Published In
Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Volume
139
Issue
9
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1087
End Page
1093
DOI
10.5858/arpa.2014-0588-cp

Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas.

Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas.We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes.Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma.The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q codeletion or carried a TP53 mutation. Most lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation were molecularly and clinically similar to glioblastoma. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

Authors
Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, ; Brat, DJ; Verhaak, RGW; Aldape, KD; Yung, WKA; Salama, SR; Cooper, LAD; Rheinbay, E; Miller, CR; Vitucci, M; Morozova, O; Robertson, AG; Noushmehr, H; Laird, PW; Cherniack, AD; Akbani, R; Huse, JT; Ciriello, G; Poisson, LM; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Berger, MS; Brennan, C; Colen, RR; Colman, H; Flanders, AE; Giannini, C; Grifford, M; Iavarone, A; Jain, R; Joseph, I; Kim, J; Kasaian, K; Mikkelsen, T; Murray, BA; O'Neill, BP; Pachter, L; Parsons, DW; Sougnez, C; Sulman, EP; Vandenberg, SR; Van Meir, EG; von Deimling, A; Zhang, H; Crain, D; Lau, K; Mallery, D; Morris, S; Paulauskis, J; Penny, R; Shelton, T; Sherman, M; Yena, P; Black, A; Bowen, J; Dicostanzo, K; Gastier-Foster, J; Leraas, KM; Lichtenberg, TM; Pierson, CR; Ramirez, NC; Taylor, C; Weaver, S; Wise, L; Zmuda, E; Davidsen, T; Demchok, JA; Eley, G; Ferguson, ML; Hutter, CM; Mills Shaw, KR; Ozenberger, BA; Sheth, M; Sofia, HJ; Tarnuzzer, R; Wang, Z; Yang, L; Zenklusen, JC; Ayala, B; Baboud, J; Chudamani, S; Jensen, MA; Liu, J; Pihl, T; Raman, R; Wan, Y; Wu, Y; Ally, A; Auman, JT; Balasundaram, M; Balu, S; Baylin, SB; Beroukhim, R; Bootwalla, MS; Bowlby, R; Bristow, CA; Brooks, D; Butterfield, Y; Carlsen, R; Carter, S; Chin, L; Chu, A; Chuah, E; Cibulskis, K; Clarke, A; Coetzee, SG; Dhalla, N; Fennell, T; Fisher, S; Gabriel, S; Getz, G; Gibbs, R; Guin, R; Hadjipanayis, A; Hayes, DN; Hinoue, T; Hoadley, K; Holt, RA; Hoyle, AP; Jefferys, SR; Jones, S; Jones, CD; Kucherlapati, R; Lai, PH; Lander, E; Lee, S; Lichtenstein, L; Ma, Y; Maglinte, DT; Mahadeshwar, HS; Marra, MA; Mayo, M; Meng, S; Meyerson, ML; Mieczkowski, PA; Moore, RA; Mose, LE; Mungall, AJ; Pantazi, A; Parfenov, M; Park, PJ; Parker, JS; Perou, CM; Protopopov, A; Ren, X; Roach, J; Sabedot, TS; Schein, J; Schumacher, SE; Seidman, JG; Seth, S; Shen, H; Simons, JV; Sipahimalani, P; Soloway, MG; Song, X; Sun, H; Tabak, B; Tam, A; Tan, D; Tang, J; Thiessen, N; Triche, T; Van Den Berg, DJ; Veluvolu, U; Waring, S; Weisenberger, DJ; Wilkerson, MD; Wong, T; Wu, J; Xi, L; Xu, AW; Yang, L; Zack, TI; Zhang, J; Aksoy, BA; Arachchi, H; Benz, C; Bernard, B; Carlin, D; Cho, J; DiCara, D; Frazer, S; Fuller, GN; Gao, J; Gehlenborg, N; Haussler, D; Heiman, DI; Iype, L; Jacobsen, A; Ju, Z; Katzman, S; Kim, H; Knijnenburg, T; Kreisberg, RB; Lawrence, MS; Lee, W; Leinonen, K; Lin, P; Ling, S; Liu, W; Liu, Y; Liu, Y; Lu, Y; Mills, G; Ng, S; Noble, MS; Paull, E; Rao, A; Reynolds, S; Saksena, G; Sanborn, Z; Sander, C; Schultz, N; Senbabaoglu, Y; Shen, R; Shmulevich, I; Sinha, R; Stuart, J; Sumer, SO; Sun, Y; Tasman, N; Taylor, BS; Voet, D; Weinhold, N; Weinstein, JN; Yang, D; Yoshihara, K; Zheng, S; Zhang, W; Zou, L; Abel, T; Sadeghi, S; Cohen, ML; Eschbacher, J; Hattab, EM; Raghunathan, A; Schniederjan, MJ; Aziz, D; Barnett, G; Barrett, W; Bigner, DD; Boice, L; Brewer, C; Calatozzolo, C; Campos, B; Carlotti, CG; Chan, TA; Cuppini, L; Curley, E; Cuzzubbo, S; Devine, K; DiMeco, F; Duell, R; Elder, JB; Fehrenbach, A; Finocchiaro, G; Friedman, W; Fulop, J; Gardner, J; Hermes, B; Herold-Mende, C; Jungk, C; Kendler, A; Lehman, NL; Lipp, E; Liu, O; Mandt, R; McGraw, M; Mclendon, R; McPherson, C; Neder, L; Nguyen, P; Noss, A; Nunziata, R; Ostrom, QT; Palmer, C; Perin, A; Pollo, B; Potapov, A; Potapova, O; Rathmell, WK; Rotin, D; Scarpace, L; Schilero, C; Senecal, K; Shimmel, K; Shurkhay, V; Sifri, S; Singh, R; Sloan, AE; Smolenski, K; Staugaitis, SM; Steele, R; Thorne, L; Tirapelli, DPC; Unterberg, A; Vallurupalli, M; Wang, Y; Warnick, R; Williams, F; Wolinsky, Y; Bell, S; Rosenberg, M; Stewart, C; Huang, F; Grimsby, JL; Radenbaugh, AJ; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, , Brat, DJ, Verhaak, RGW, Aldape, KD, Yung, WKA, Salama, SR, Cooper, LAD, Rheinbay, E, Miller, CR, Vitucci, M, Morozova, O, Robertson, AG, Noushmehr, H, Laird, PW, Cherniack, AD, Akbani, R, Huse, JT, Ciriello, G, Poisson, LM, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Berger, MS, Brennan, C, Colen, RR, Colman, H, Flanders, AE, Giannini, C, Grifford, M, Iavarone, A, Jain, R, Joseph, I, Kim, J, Kasaian, K, Mikkelsen, T, Murray, BA, O'Neill, BP, Pachter, L, Parsons, DW, Sougnez, C, Sulman, EP, Vandenberg, SR, Van Meir, EG, von Deimling, A, Zhang, H, Crain, D, Lau, K, Mallery, D, Morris, S, Paulauskis, J, Penny, R, Shelton, T, Sherman, M, Yena, P, Black, A, Bowen, J, Dicostanzo, K, Gastier-Foster, J, Leraas, KM, Lichtenberg, TM, Pierson, CR, Ramirez, NC, Taylor, C, Weaver, S, Wise, L, Zmuda, E, Davidsen, T, Demchok, JA, Eley, G, Ferguson, ML, Hutter, CM, Mills Shaw, KR, Ozenberger, BA, Sheth, M, Sofia, HJ, Tarnuzzer, R, Wang, Z, Yang, L, Zenklusen, JC, Ayala, B, Baboud, J, Chudamani, S, Jensen, MA, Liu, J, Pihl, T, Raman, R, Wan, Y, Wu, Y, Ally, A, Auman, JT, Balasundaram, M, Balu, S, Baylin, SB, Beroukhim, R, Bootwalla, MS, Bowlby, R, Bristow, CA, Brooks, D, Butterfield, Y, Carlsen, R, Carter, S, Chin, L, Chu, A, Chuah, E, Cibulskis, K, Clarke, A, Coetzee, SG, Dhalla, N, Fennell, T, Fisher, S, Gabriel, S, Getz, G, Gibbs, R, Guin, R, Hadjipanayis, A, Hayes, DN, Hinoue, T, Hoadley, K, Holt, RA, Hoyle, AP, Jefferys, SR, Jones, S, Jones, CD, Kucherlapati, R, Lai, PH, Lander, E, Lee, S, Lichtenstein, L, Ma, Y, Maglinte, DT, Mahadeshwar, HS, Marra, MA, Mayo, M, Meng, S, Meyerson, ML, Mieczkowski, PA, Moore, RA, Mose, LE, Mungall, AJ, Pantazi, A, Parfenov, M, Park, PJ, Parker, JS, Perou, CM, Protopopov, A, Ren, X, Roach, J, Sabedot, TS, Schein, J, Schumacher, SE, Seidman, JG, Seth, S, Shen, H, Simons, JV, Sipahimalani, P, Soloway, MG, Song, X, Sun, H, Tabak, B, Tam, A, Tan, D, Tang, J, Thiessen, N, Triche, T, Van Den Berg, DJ, Veluvolu, U, Waring, S, Weisenberger, DJ, Wilkerson, MD, Wong, T, Wu, J, Xi, L, Xu, AW, Yang, L, Zack, TI, Zhang, J, Aksoy, BA, Arachchi, H, Benz, C, Bernard, B, Carlin, D, Cho, J, DiCara, D, Frazer, S, Fuller, GN, Gao, J, Gehlenborg, N, Haussler, D, Heiman, DI, Iype, L, Jacobsen, A, Ju, Z, Katzman, S, Kim, H, Knijnenburg, T, Kreisberg, RB, Lawrence, MS, Lee, W, Leinonen, K, Lin, P, Ling, S, Liu, W, Liu, Y, Liu, Y, Lu, Y, Mills, G, Ng, S, Noble, MS, Paull, E, Rao, A, Reynolds, S, Saksena, G, Sanborn, Z, Sander, C, Schultz, N, Senbabaoglu, Y, Shen, R, Shmulevich, I, Sinha, R, Stuart, J, Sumer, SO, Sun, Y, Tasman, N, Taylor, BS, Voet, D, Weinhold, N, Weinstein, JN, Yang, D, Yoshihara, K, Zheng, S, Zhang, W, Zou, L, Abel, T, Sadeghi, S, Cohen, ML, Eschbacher, J, Hattab, EM, Raghunathan, A, Schniederjan, MJ, Aziz, D, Barnett, G, Barrett, W, Bigner, DD, Boice, L, Brewer, C, Calatozzolo, C, Campos, B, Carlotti, CG, Chan, TA, Cuppini, L, Curley, E, Cuzzubbo, S, Devine, K, DiMeco, F, Duell, R, Elder, JB, Fehrenbach, A, Finocchiaro, G, Friedman, W, Fulop, J, Gardner, J, Hermes, B, Herold-Mende, C, Jungk, C, Kendler, A, Lehman, NL, Lipp, E, Liu, O, Mandt, R, McGraw, M, Mclendon, R, McPherson, C, Neder, L, Nguyen, P, Noss, A, Nunziata, R, Ostrom, QT, Palmer, C, Perin, A, Pollo, B, Potapov, A, Potapova, O, Rathmell, WK, Rotin, D, Scarpace, L, Schilero, C, Senecal, K, Shimmel, K, Shurkhay, V, Sifri, S, Singh, R, Sloan, AE, Smolenski, K, Staugaitis, SM, Steele, R, Thorne, L, Tirapelli, DPC, Unterberg, A, Vallurupalli, M, Wang, Y, Warnick, R, Williams, F, Wolinsky, Y, Bell, S, Rosenberg, M, Stewart, C, Huang, F, Grimsby, JL, Radenbaugh, AJ, and Zhang, J. "Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas." The New England Journal of Medicine 372.26 (June 10, 2015): 2481-2498.
PMID
26061751
Source
epmc
Published In
The New England Journal of Medicine
Volume
372
Issue
26
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
2481
End Page
2498
DOI
10.1056/NEJMoa1402121

Proteomic profiling of patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts identifies a subset with activated EGFR: implications for drug development.

The development of drugs to inhibit glioblastoma (GBM) growth requires reliable pre-clinical models. To date, proteomic level validation of widely used patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts (PDGX) has not been performed. In the present study, we characterized 20 PDGX models according to subtype classification based on The Cancer Genome Atlas criteria, TP53, PTEN, IDH 1/2, and TERT promoter genetic analysis, EGFR amplification status, and examined their proteomic profiles against those of their parent tumors. The 20 PDGXs belonged to three of four The Cancer Genome Atlas subtypes: eight classical, eight mesenchymal, and four proneural; none neural. Amplification of EGFR gene was observed in 9 of 20 xenografts, and of these, 3 harbored the EGFRvIII mutation. We then performed proteomic profiling of PDGX, analyzing expression/activity of several proteins including EGFR. Levels of EGFR phosphorylated at Y1068 vary considerably between PDGX samples, and this pattern was also seen in primary GBM. Partitioning of 20 PDGX into high (n = 5) and low (n = 15) groups identified a panel of proteins associated with high EGFR activity. Thus, PDGX with high EGFR activity represent an excellent pre-clinical model to develop therapies for a subset of GBM patients whose tumors are characterized by high EGFR activity. Further, the proteins found to be associated with high EGFR activity can be monitored to assess the effectiveness of targeting EGFR. The development of drugs to inhibit glioblastoma (GBM) growth requires reliable pre-clinical models. We validated proteomic profiles using patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts (PDGX), characterizing 20 PDGX models according to subtype classification based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) criteria, TP53, PTEN, IDH 1/2, and TERT promoter genetic analysis, EGFR amplification status, and examined their proteomic profiles against those of their parent tumors. Proteins found to be associated with high EGFR activity represent potential biomarkers for GBM monitoring.

Authors
Brown, KE; Chagoya, G; Kwatra, SG; Yen, T; Keir, ST; Cooter, M; Hoadley, KA; Rasheed, A; Lipp, ES; Mclendon, R; Ali-Osman, F; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH; Kwatra, MM
MLA Citation
Brown, KE, Chagoya, G, Kwatra, SG, Yen, T, Keir, ST, Cooter, M, Hoadley, KA, Rasheed, A, Lipp, ES, Mclendon, R, Ali-Osman, F, Bigner, DD, Sampson, JH, and Kwatra, MM. "Proteomic profiling of patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts identifies a subset with activated EGFR: implications for drug development." Journal of Neurochemistry 133.5 (June 2015): 730-738.
PMID
25598002
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neurochemistry
Volume
133
Issue
5
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
730
End Page
738
DOI
10.1111/jnc.13032

Consultative issues in surgical neuropathology: a retrospective review of the rationale for submitting cases for expert review.

OBJECTIVES: Second opinions on neuropathology cases are sought for a variety of reasons. We investigated the rationales for seeking expert neuropathologic review. METHODS: A retrospective review was done of the correspondence accompanying neuropathology cases submitted over a 5-year period. The review used a taxonomy of referral reasons, the submitting diagnoses, and requests for ancillary tests. RESULTS: In total, 508 adult cases were submitted, including glioblastoma (n = 94), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 49), low-grade glioma (n = 49), oligodendroglioma (n = 48), and pituitary adenoma (n = 12). Thirty-nine cases submitted requested ancillary testing. A taxonomy of four categories revealed the following: preliminary diagnosis (n = 228 cases) was the most common reason for requesting review, followed by no diagnosis rendered (n = 183 cases), second opinion (n = 53), and confirmation/quality assurance (n = 43); the remaining case was "other." Overall, 456 cases were submitted by pathologists, 40 by clinicians and 12 by patients. CONCLUSIONS: Pathologists who predominately submit cases with a preliminary diagnosis rendered seek expert consultation while clinicians seek a second opinion.

Authors
Lipp, ES; Clark, AC; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Lipp, ES, Clark, AC, and McLendon, RE. "Consultative issues in surgical neuropathology: a retrospective review of the rationale for submitting cases for expert review." American journal of clinical pathology 143.6 (June 2015): 807-811.
PMID
25972322
Source
epmc
Published In
American Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume
143
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
807
End Page
811
DOI
10.1309/ajcpwep1hpx4edcs

Consultative Issues in Surgical Neuropathology: A Retrospective Review of the Rationale for Submitting Cases for Expert Review

Authors
Lipp, ES; Clark, AC; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Lipp, ES, Clark, AC, and McLendon, RE. "Consultative Issues in Surgical Neuropathology: A Retrospective Review of the Rationale for Submitting Cases for Expert Review." AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 143.6 (June 2015): 807-811.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
American Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume
143
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
807
End Page
811
DOI
10.1309/AJCPWEP1HPX4EDCS

Prognostic marker analysis in pediatric intracranial ependymomas.

Histologic grading methods dependent upon H&E staining review have not been shown to reliably predict survival in children with intracranial ependymomas due to the subjectivity of the analytical methods. We hypothesized that the immunohistochemical detection of MIB-1, Tenascin C, CD34, VEGF, and CA IX may represent objective markers of post-operative survival (Progression Free and Overall Survival; PFS, OS) in these patients. Intracranial ependymomas from patients aged 22 years or less were studied. The original histologic grade was recorded, H&E sections were reviewed for vascular proliferation status, and immunohistochemistry was used to determine MIB-1, Tenascin C, CD34, VEGF, and CA IX status. Based upon the World Health Organization (WHO) grading system, 3 Grade I, 18 Grade II and 9 Grade III ependymomas were studied. Median follow-up time was 9.0 years; median PFS was, 6.1 years. Original WHO grade did not correlate with PFS or OS. Peri-necrotic CA IX localization correlated with PFS (Log rank = 0.0181) and OS (Log rank p = 0.0015). All patients with a CA IX ≤ 5 % total area localization were alive at last follow-up. Perinecrotic CA IX staining was also associated with vascular proliferation (p = 0.006), though not with VEGF expression score. MIB-1 labeling index (LI) correlated with OS (HR 1.06, 95 % CI 1.01, 1.12) and PFS (HR 1.08, 95 % CI 1.02, 1.14). MIB-1 LI and perinecrotic CA IX individually correlated with PFS. The effect of perinecrotic CA IX remained when grade was added to a Cox model predicting PFS. Immunodetection of CA IX and MIB-1 expression are predictive biomarkers for survival in children with posterior fossa ependymomas. These markers represent objective indicators of survival that supplement H&E grading alone.

Authors
McLendon, RE; Lipp, E; Satterfield, D; Ehinger, M; Austin, A; Fleming, D; Perkinson, K; Lefaivre, M; Zagzag, D; Wiener, B; Gururangan, S; Fuchs, H; Friedman, HS; Herndon, JE; Healy, P
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Lipp, E, Satterfield, D, Ehinger, M, Austin, A, Fleming, D, Perkinson, K, Lefaivre, M, Zagzag, D, Wiener, B, Gururangan, S, Fuchs, H, Friedman, HS, Herndon, JE, and Healy, P. "Prognostic marker analysis in pediatric intracranial ependymomas." Journal of neuro-oncology 122.2 (April 2015): 255-261.
PMID
25563815
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
122
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
255
End Page
261
DOI
10.1007/s11060-014-1711-z

Increased proportion of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes is associated with tumor recurrence and reduced survival in patients with glioblastoma.

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive malignancy associated with profound host immunosuppression mediated in part by FoxP3 expressing regulatory CD4+ T lymphocytes (Tregs) that down-regulate anti-tumor immunity. In order to assess whether FoxP3 was an independent driver differentially expressed in primary versus recurrent GBMs, we stained resected primary and recurrent GBM tumors for CD3, CD4, CD8 and FoxP3 expression using standard immunohistochemistry. Slides were scanned with a high-resolution scanner (ScanScope CS; Aperio), and image analysis software (Aperio ScanScope) was used to enumerate lymphocyte subpopulations allowing for high-throughput analysis and bypassing manual selection bias. As shown in previous studies, enumeration of individual lymphocyte populations did not correlate with clinical outcomes in patients with GBM. However, the CD4+ to regulatory FoxP3+ T cell ratio was diminished in recurrent disease, and increased CD3 and CD8+ to regulatory T cell ratios showed a positive correlation with survival outcomes in primary GBM. These results suggest that while absolute numbers of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes may not be informative for predicting clinical outcomes in patients with GBM, the effective balance of CD3, CD4 and CD8+ T cells to immunosuppressive FoxP3+ regulatory cells may influence clinical outcomes in this patient population.

Authors
Sayour, EJ; McLendon, P; McLendon, R; De Leon, G; Reynolds, R; Kresak, J; Sampson, JH; Mitchell, DA
MLA Citation
Sayour, EJ, McLendon, P, McLendon, R, De Leon, G, Reynolds, R, Kresak, J, Sampson, JH, and Mitchell, DA. "Increased proportion of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes is associated with tumor recurrence and reduced survival in patients with glioblastoma." Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy : Cii 64.4 (April 2015): 419-427.
PMID
25555571
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy
Volume
64
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
419
End Page
427
DOI
10.1007/s00262-014-1651-7

Increased proportion of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes is associated with tumor recurrence and reduced survival in patients with glioblastoma

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive malignancy associated with profound host immunosuppression mediated in part by FoxP3 expressing regulatory CD4+ T lymphocytes (Tregs) that down-regulate anti-tumor immunity. In order to assess whether FoxP3 was an independent driver differentially expressed in primary versus recurrent GBMs, we stained resected primary and recurrent GBM tumors for CD3, CD4, CD8 and FoxP3 expression using standard immunohistochemistry. Slides were scanned with a high-resolution scanner (ScanScope CS; Aperio), and image analysis software (Aperio ScanScope) was used to enumerate lymphocyte subpopulations allowing for high-throughput analysis and bypassing manual selection bias. As shown in previous studies, enumeration of individual lymphocyte populations did not correlate with clinical outcomes in patients with GBM. However, the CD4+ to regulatory FoxP3+ T cell ratio was diminished in recurrent disease, and increased CD3 and CD8+ to regulatory T cell ratios showed a positive correlation with survival outcomes in primary GBM. These results suggest that while absolute numbers of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes may not be informative for predicting clinical outcomes in patients with GBM, the effective balance of CD3, CD4 and CD8+ T cells to immunosuppressive FoxP3+ regulatory cells may influence clinical outcomes in this patient population.

Authors
Sayour, EJ; McLendon, P; McLendon, R; De Leon, G; Reynolds, R; Kresak, J; Sampson, JH; Mitchell, DA
MLA Citation
Sayour, EJ, McLendon, P, McLendon, R, De Leon, G, Reynolds, R, Kresak, J, Sampson, JH, and Mitchell, DA. "Increased proportion of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes is associated with tumor recurrence and reduced survival in patients with glioblastoma." Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy 64.4 (March 22, 2015): 419-427.
Source
scopus
Published In
Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy
Volume
64
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
419
End Page
427
DOI
10.1007/s00262-014-1651-7

Tetanus toxoid and CCL3 improve dendritic cell vaccines in mice and glioblastoma patients.

After stimulation, dendritic cells (DCs) mature and migrate to draining lymph nodes to induce immune responses. As such, autologous DCs generated ex vivo have been pulsed with tumour antigens and injected back into patients as immunotherapy. While DC vaccines have shown limited promise in the treatment of patients with advanced cancers including glioblastoma, the factors dictating DC vaccine efficacy remain poorly understood. Here we show that pre-conditioning the vaccine site with a potent recall antigen such as tetanus/diphtheria (Td) toxoid can significantly improve the lymph node homing and efficacy of tumour-antigen-specific DCs. To assess the effect of vaccine site pre-conditioning in humans, we randomized patients with glioblastoma to pre-conditioning with either mature DCs or Td unilaterally before bilateral vaccination with DCs pulsed with Cytomegalovirus phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) RNA. We and other laboratories have shown that pp65 is expressed in more than 90% of glioblastoma specimens but not in surrounding normal brain, providing an unparalleled opportunity to subvert this viral protein as a tumour-specific target. Patients given Td had enhanced DC migration bilaterally and significantly improved survival. In mice, Td pre-conditioning also enhanced bilateral DC migration and suppressed tumour growth in a manner dependent on the chemokine CCL3. Our clinical studies and corroborating investigations in mice suggest that pre-conditioning with a potent recall antigen may represent a viable strategy to improve anti-tumour immunotherapy.

Authors
Mitchell, DA; Batich, KA; Gunn, MD; Huang, M-N; Sanchez-Perez, L; Nair, SK; Congdon, KL; Reap, EA; Archer, GE; Desjardins, A; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Herndon, JE; Coan, A; McLendon, RE; Reardon, DA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Mitchell, DA, Batich, KA, Gunn, MD, Huang, M-N, Sanchez-Perez, L, Nair, SK, Congdon, KL, Reap, EA, Archer, GE, Desjardins, A, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Herndon, JE, Coan, A, McLendon, RE, Reardon, DA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Bigner, DD, and Sampson, JH. "Tetanus toxoid and CCL3 improve dendritic cell vaccines in mice and glioblastoma patients." Nature 519.7543 (March 11, 2015): 366-369.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16099
PMID
25762141
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature
Volume
519
Issue
7543
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
366
End Page
369
DOI
10.1038/nature14320

Periostin secreted by glioblastoma stem cells recruits M2 tumour-associated macrophages and promotes malignant growth.

Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) are enriched in glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs) that contain glioma stem cells (GSCs) at the apex of their cellular hierarchy. The correlation between TAM density and glioma grade suggests a supportive role for TAMs in tumour progression. Here we interrogated the molecular link between GSCs and TAM recruitment in GBMs and demonstrated that GSCs secrete periostin (POSTN) to recruit TAMs. TAM density correlates with POSTN levels in human GBMs. Silencing POSTN in GSCs markedly reduced TAM density, inhibited tumour growth, and increased survival of mice bearing GSC-derived xenografts. We found that TAMs in GBMs are not brain-resident microglia, but mainly monocyte-derived macrophages from peripheral blood. Disrupting POSTN specifically attenuated the tumour-supportive M2 type of TAMs in xenografts. POSTN recruits TAMs through the integrin αvβ₃ as blocking this signalling by an RGD peptide inhibited TAM recruitment. Our findings highlight the possibility of improving GBM treatment by targeting POSTN-mediated TAM recruitment.

Authors
Zhou, W; Ke, SQ; Huang, Z; Flavahan, W; Fang, X; Paul, J; Wu, L; Sloan, AE; McLendon, RE; Li, X; Rich, JN; Bao, S
MLA Citation
Zhou, W, Ke, SQ, Huang, Z, Flavahan, W, Fang, X, Paul, J, Wu, L, Sloan, AE, McLendon, RE, Li, X, Rich, JN, and Bao, S. "Periostin secreted by glioblastoma stem cells recruits M2 tumour-associated macrophages and promotes malignant growth." Nature Cell Biology 17.2 (February 2015): 170-182.
PMID
25580734
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature Cell Biology
Volume
17
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
170
End Page
182
DOI
10.1038/ncb3090

Supratentorial tanycytic ependymoma in an adult male: case report and review of literature.

Ependymomas, tumors of the ependymal cells, are very rare and usually present in the pediatric population. Furthermore, there are even rarer variants of ependymomas that can include cellular, papillary, clear cell, and tanycytic subtypes. We present a case of a supratentorial tanycytic ependymoma in an adult male and review the literature in regard to this rare primary central nervous system neoplasm.

Authors
Lopez, G; McLendon, RE; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Lopez, G, McLendon, RE, and Peters, KB. "Supratentorial tanycytic ependymoma in an adult male: case report and review of literature." Case reports in oncology 8.1 (January 2015): 159-163.
PMID
25873884
Source
epmc
Published In
Case Reports in Oncology
Volume
8
Issue
1
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
159
End Page
163
DOI
10.1159/000380906

Proteomic profiling of patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts identifies a subset with activated EGFR: Implications for drug development

© 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.The development of drugs to inhibit glioblastoma (GBM) growth requires reliable pre-clinical models. To date, proteomic level validation of widely used patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts (PDGX) has not been performed. In the present study, we characterized 20 PDGX models according to subtype classification based on The Cancer Genome Atlas criteria, TP53, PTEN, IDH 1/2, and TERT promoter genetic analysis, EGFR amplification status, and examined their proteomic profiles against those of their parent tumors. The 20 PDGXs belonged to three of four The Cancer Genome Atlas subtypes: eight classical, eight mesenchymal, and four proneural; none neural. Amplification of EGFR gene was observed in 9 of 20 xenografts, and of these, 3 harbored the EGFRvIII mutation. We then performed proteomic profiling of PDGX, analyzing expression/activity of several proteins including EGFR. Levels of EGFR phosphorylated at Y1068 vary considerably between PDGX samples, and this pattern was also seen in primary GBM. Partitioning of 20 PDGX into high (n = 5) and low (n = 15) groups identified a panel of proteins associated with high EGFR activity. Thus, PDGX with high EGFR activity represent an excellent pre-clinical model to develop therapies for a subset of GBM patients whose tumors are characterized by high EGFR activity. Further, the proteins found to be associated with high EGFR activity can be monitored to assess the effectiveness of targeting EGFR.

Authors
Brown, KE; Chagoya, G; Kwatra, SG; Yen, T; Keir, ST; Cooter, M; Hoadley, KA; Rasheed, A; Lipp, ES; McLendon, R; Ali-Osman, F; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH; Kwatra, MM
MLA Citation
Brown, KE, Chagoya, G, Kwatra, SG, Yen, T, Keir, ST, Cooter, M, Hoadley, KA, Rasheed, A, Lipp, ES, McLendon, R, Ali-Osman, F, Bigner, DD, Sampson, JH, and Kwatra, MM. "Proteomic profiling of patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts identifies a subset with activated EGFR: Implications for drug development." Journal of Neurochemistry 133.5 (2015): 730-738.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Neurochemistry
Volume
133
Issue
5
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
730
End Page
738
DOI
10.1111/jnc.13032

Abstract LB-82: MLL2 maintains neoplastic cell growth and global histone H3 lysine 4 monomethylation

Authors
Guo, C; Chen, LH; Huang, Y; Chang, C-C; Wang, P; Pirozzi, CJ; Qin, X; Bao, X; Greer, PK; McLendon, RE; Yan, H; Keir, ST; Bigner, DD; He, Y
MLA Citation
Guo, C, Chen, LH, Huang, Y, Chang, C-C, Wang, P, Pirozzi, CJ, Qin, X, Bao, X, Greer, PK, McLendon, RE, Yan, H, Keir, ST, Bigner, DD, and He, Y. "Abstract LB-82: MLL2 maintains neoplastic cell growth and global histone H3 lysine 4 monomethylation." October 1, 2014.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
74
Issue
19 Supplement
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
LB-82
End Page
LB-82
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.AM2014-LB-82

Abstract 63: Driving brain tumorigenesis: Generation of a mutant IDH1 mouse model of progressive glioma

Authors
Pirozzi, CJ; Wang, CY; Carpenter, AB; Zhu, H; Greer, PK; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; He, Y; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Pirozzi, CJ, Wang, CY, Carpenter, AB, Zhu, H, Greer, PK, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, He, Y, and Yan, H. "Abstract 63: Driving brain tumorigenesis: Generation of a mutant IDH1 mouse model of progressive glioma." October 1, 2014.
Source
crossref
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
74
Issue
19 Supplement
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
63
End Page
63
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.AM2014-63

miR-33a promotes glioma-initiating cell self-renewal via PKA and NOTCH pathways.

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal brain tumor in adults. Glioma-initiating cells (GICs) are stem-like cells that have been implicated in glioblastoma progression and recurrence; however, the distinct properties of GICs and non-GICs within GBM tumors are largely uncharacterized. Here, we evaluated stem cell-associated microRNA (miR) expression in GICs from GBM patients and GICs derived from xenografted human glioma cell lines and determined that miR-33a promotes GIC growth and self-renewal. Moreover, evaluation of a GBM tissue array revealed that higher miR-33a expression was associated with poor prognosis of GBM patients. Antagonizing miR-33a function in GICs reduced self-renewal and tumor progression in immune-compromised mice, whereas overexpression of miR-33a in non-GICs promoted the display of features associated with GICs. We identified the mRNAs encoding phosphodiesterase 8A (PDE8A) and UV radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG) as direct miR-33a targets. PDE8A and UVRAG negatively regulated the cAMP/PKA and NOTCH pathways, respectively; therefore, miR-33a-dependent reduction of these proteins promoted growth and self-renewal of GICs by enhancing PKA and NOTCH activity. Furthermore, in GBM specimens, there was an inverse correlation between the expression levels of miR-33a and PDE8A and UVRAG expression. These findings reveal a miR-33a-centered signaling network that promotes GIC maintenance and has potential as a therapeutic target for GBM treatment.

Authors
Wang, H; Sun, T; Hu, J; Zhang, R; Rao, Y; Wang, S; Chen, R; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Keir, ST; Bigner, DD; Li, Q-J; Wang, H; Wang, X-F
MLA Citation
Wang, H, Sun, T, Hu, J, Zhang, R, Rao, Y, Wang, S, Chen, R, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, Keir, ST, Bigner, DD, Li, Q-J, Wang, H, and Wang, X-F. "miR-33a promotes glioma-initiating cell self-renewal via PKA and NOTCH pathways." The Journal of Clinical Investigation 124.10 (October 2014): 4489-4502.
PMID
25202981
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume
124
Issue
10
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
4489
End Page
4502
DOI
10.1172/JCI75284

EGFR phosphorylation of DCBLD2 recruits TRAF6 and stimulates AKT-promoted tumorigenesis.

Aberrant activation of EGFR in human cancers promotes tumorigenesis through stimulation of AKT signaling. Here, we determined that the discoidina neuropilin-like membrane protein DCBLD2 is upregulated in clinical specimens of glioblastomas and head and neck cancers (HNCs) and is required for EGFR-stimulated tumorigenesis. In multiple cancer cell lines, EGFR activated phosphorylation of tyrosine 750 (Y750) of DCBLD2, which is located within a recently identified binding motif for TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). Consequently, phosphorylation of DCBLD2 Y750 recruited TRAF6, leading to increased TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and subsequent activation of AKT, thereby enhancing EGFR-driven tumorigenesis. Moreover, evaluation of patient samples of gliomas and HNCs revealed an association among EGFR activation, DCBLD2 phosphorylation, and poor prognoses. Together, our findings uncover a pathway in which DCBLD2 functions as a signal relay for oncogenic EGFR signaling to promote tumorigenesis and suggest DCBLD2 and TRAF6 as potential therapeutic targets for human cancers that are associated with EGFR activation.

Authors
Feng, H; Lopez, GY; Kim, CK; Alvarez, A; Duncan, CG; Nishikawa, R; Nagane, M; Su, A-JA; Auron, PE; Hedberg, ML; Wang, L; Raizer, JJ; Kessler, JA; Parsa, AT; Gao, W-Q; Kim, S-H; Minata, M; Nakano, I; Grandis, JR; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Lin, H-K; Furnari, FB; Cavenee, WK; Hu, B; Yan, H; Cheng, S-Y
MLA Citation
Feng, H, Lopez, GY, Kim, CK, Alvarez, A, Duncan, CG, Nishikawa, R, Nagane, M, Su, A-JA, Auron, PE, Hedberg, ML, Wang, L, Raizer, JJ, Kessler, JA, Parsa, AT, Gao, W-Q, Kim, S-H, Minata, M, Nakano, I, Grandis, JR, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Lin, H-K, Furnari, FB, Cavenee, WK, Hu, B, Yan, H, and Cheng, S-Y. "EGFR phosphorylation of DCBLD2 recruits TRAF6 and stimulates AKT-promoted tumorigenesis." The Journal of Clinical Investigation 124.9 (September 2014): 3741-3756.
PMID
25061874
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume
124
Issue
9
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
3741
End Page
3756
DOI
10.1172/JCI73093

EGFR phosphorylation of DCBLD2 recruits TRAF6 and stimulates AKT-promoted tumorigenesis

Authors
Feng, H; Lopez, GY; Kim, CK; Alvarez, A; Duncan, CG; Nishikawa, R; Nagane, M; Su, A-JA; Auron, PE; Hedberg, ML; Wang, L; Raizer, JJ; Kessler, JA; Parsa, AT; Gao, W-Q; Kim, S-H; Minata, M; Nakano, I; Grandis, JR; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Lin, H-K; Furnari, FB; Cavenee, WK; Hu, B; Yan, H; Cheng, S-Y
MLA Citation
Feng, H, Lopez, GY, Kim, CK, Alvarez, A, Duncan, CG, Nishikawa, R, Nagane, M, Su, A-JA, Auron, PE, Hedberg, ML, Wang, L, Raizer, JJ, Kessler, JA, Parsa, AT, Gao, W-Q, Kim, S-H, Minata, M, Nakano, I, Grandis, JR, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Lin, H-K, Furnari, FB, Cavenee, WK, Hu, B, Yan, H, and Cheng, S-Y. "EGFR phosphorylation of DCBLD2 recruits TRAF6 and stimulates AKT-promoted tumorigenesis." JOURNAL OF CLINICAL INVESTIGATION 124.9 (September 2014): 3741-3756.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
The Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume
124
Issue
9
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
3741
End Page
3756
DOI
10.1172/JC173093

Malignant brainstem gliomas in adults: clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors.

Adult malignant brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are poorly characterized due to their relative rarity. We have examined histopathologically confirmed cases of adult malignant BSGs to better characterize the patient and tumor features and outcomes, including the natural history, presentation, imaging, molecular characteristics, prognostic factors, and appropriate treatments. A total of 34 patients were identified, consisting of 22 anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs) and 12 glioblastomas (GBMs). The overall median survival for all patients was 25.8 months, with patients having GBMs experiencing significantly worse survival (12.1 vs. 77.0 months, p = 0.0011). The majority of tumors revealed immunoreactivity for EGFR (93.3 %) and MGMT (64.7 %). Most tumors also exhibited chromosomal abnormalities affecting the loci of epidermal growth factor receptor (92.9 %), MET (100 %), PTEN (61.5 %), and 9p21 (80 %). AAs more commonly appeared diffusely enhancing (50.0 vs. 27.3 %) or diffusely nonenhancing (25.0 vs. 0.0 %), while GBMs were more likely to exhibit focal enhancement (54.6 vs. 10.0 %). Multivariate analysis revealed confirmed histopathology for GBM to significantly affect survival (HR 4.80; 95 % CI 1.86-12.4; p = 0.0012). In conclusion, adult malignant BSGs have an overall poor prognosis, with GBM tumors faring significantly worse than AAs. As AAs and GBMs have differing imaging characteristics, tissue diagnosis may be necessary to accurately determine patient prognosis and identify molecular characteristics which may aid in the treatment of these aggressive tumors.

Authors
Babu, R; Kranz, PG; Agarwal, V; McLendon, RE; Thomas, S; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Adamson, C
MLA Citation
Babu, R, Kranz, PG, Agarwal, V, McLendon, RE, Thomas, S, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, and Adamson, C. "Malignant brainstem gliomas in adults: clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors." Journal of neuro-oncology 119.1 (August 2014): 177-185.
PMID
24838419
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
119
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
177
End Page
185
DOI
10.1007/s11060-014-1471-9

The zinc finger transcription factor ZFX is required for maintaining the tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma stem cells.

Glioblastomas are highly lethal brain tumors containing tumor-propagating glioma stem cells (GSCs). The molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of the GSC phenotype are not fully defined. Here we demonstrate that the zinc finger and X-linked transcription factor (ZFX) maintains GSC self-renewal and tumorigenic potential by upregulating c-Myc expression. ZFX is differentially expressed in GSCs relative to non-stem glioma cells and neural progenitor cells. Disrupting ZFX by shRNA reduced c-Myc expression and potently inhibited GSC self-renewal and tumor growth. Ectopic expression of c-Myc to its endogenous level rescued the effects caused by ZFX disruption, supporting that ZFX controls GSC properties through c-Myc. Furthermore, ZFX binds to a specific sequence (GGGCCCCG) on the human c-Myc promoter to upregulate c-Myc expression. These data demonstrate that ZFX functions as a critical upstream regulator of c-Myc and plays essential roles in the maintenance of the GSC phenotype. This study also supports that c-Myc is a dominant driver linking self-renewal to malignancy.

Authors
Fang, X; Huang, Z; Zhou, W; Wu, Q; Sloan, AE; Ouyang, G; McLendon, RE; Yu, JS; Rich, JN; Bao, S
MLA Citation
Fang, X, Huang, Z, Zhou, W, Wu, Q, Sloan, AE, Ouyang, G, McLendon, RE, Yu, JS, Rich, JN, and Bao, S. "The zinc finger transcription factor ZFX is required for maintaining the tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma stem cells." Stem Cells (Dayton, Ohio) 32.8 (August 2014): 2033-2047.
PMID
24831540
Source
epmc
Published In
Stem Cells (Dayton, Ohio)
Volume
32
Issue
8
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
2033
End Page
2047
DOI
10.1002/stem.1730

Exome sequencing identifies somatic gain-of-function PPM1D mutations in brainstem gliomas.

Gliomas arising in the brainstem and thalamus are devastating tumors that are difficult to surgically resect. To determine the genetic and epigenetic landscape of these tumors, we performed exomic sequencing of 14 brainstem gliomas (BSGs) and 12 thalamic gliomas. We also performed targeted mutational analysis of an additional 24 such tumors and genome-wide methylation profiling of 45 gliomas. This study led to the discovery of tumor-specific mutations in PPM1D, encoding wild-type p53-induced protein phosphatase 1D (WIP1), in 37.5% of the BSGs that harbored hallmark H3F3A mutations encoding p.Lys27Met substitutions. PPM1D mutations were mutually exclusive with TP53 mutations in BSG and attenuated p53 activation in vitro. PPM1D mutations were truncating alterations in exon 6 that enhanced the ability of PPM1D to suppress the activation of the DNA damage response checkpoint protein CHK2. These results define PPM1D as a frequent target of somatic mutation and as a potential therapeutic target in brainstem gliomas.

Authors
Zhang, L; Chen, LH; Wan, H; Yang, R; Wang, Z; Feng, J; Yang, S; Jones, S; Wang, S; Zhou, W; Zhu, H; Killela, PJ; Zhang, J; Wu, Z; Li, G; Hao, S; Wang, Y; Webb, JB; Friedman, HS; Friedman, AH; McLendon, RE; He, Y; Reitman, ZJ; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Zhang, L, Chen, LH, Wan, H, Yang, R, Wang, Z, Feng, J, Yang, S, Jones, S, Wang, S, Zhou, W, Zhu, H, Killela, PJ, Zhang, J, Wu, Z, Li, G, Hao, S, Wang, Y, Webb, JB, Friedman, HS, Friedman, AH, McLendon, RE, He, Y, Reitman, ZJ, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "Exome sequencing identifies somatic gain-of-function PPM1D mutations in brainstem gliomas." Nature genetics 46.7 (July 2014): 726-730.
PMID
24880341
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature Genetics
Volume
46
Issue
7
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
726
End Page
730
DOI
10.1038/ng.2995

Exome sequencing identifies somatic gain-of-function PPM1D mutations in brainstem gliomas

Authors
Zhang, L; Chen, LH; Wan, H; Yang, R; Wang, Z; Feng, J; Yang, S; Jones, S; Wang, S; Zhou, W; Zhu, H; Killela, PJ; Zhang, J; Wu, Z; Li, G; Hao, S; Wang, Y; Webb, JB; Friedman, HS; Friedman, AH; McLendon, RE; He, Y; Reitman, ZJ; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Zhang, L, Chen, LH, Wan, H, Yang, R, Wang, Z, Feng, J, Yang, S, Jones, S, Wang, S, Zhou, W, Zhu, H, Killela, PJ, Zhang, J, Wu, Z, Li, G, Hao, S, Wang, Y, Webb, JB, Friedman, HS, Friedman, AH, McLendon, RE, He, Y, Reitman, ZJ, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "Exome sequencing identifies somatic gain-of-function PPM1D mutations in brainstem gliomas." Nature Genetics 46.7 (July 2014): 726-730.
Source
crossref
Published In
Nature Genetics
Volume
46
Issue
7
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
726
End Page
730
DOI
10.1038/ng.2995

TERT PROMOTER MUTATIONS OCCUR FREQUENTLY IN GLIOMAS AND A SUBSET OF TUMORS DERIVED FROM CELLS WITH LOW RATES OF SELF-RENEWAL.

BACKGROUND: Malignant cells must maintain their telomeres, but genetic mechanisms responsible for telomere maintenance in tumors have only recently been discovered. In particular, mutations of the telomere binding proteins alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) or death-domain associated protein (DAXX) have been shown to underlie a telomere maintenance mechanism not involving telomerase (alternative lengthening of telomeres), and point mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene increase telomerase expression and have been shown to occur in melanomas. METHODS: To further define the tumor types in which TERT plays a role, we surveyed 1,230 tumors of 60 different types. We also analyzed the relationship between median overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH1/2 and TERT promoter mutations in a panel of 473 adult gliomas with the hypothesis that genetic signatures capable of distinguishing among several types of gliomas could be established providing clinically relevant information that can serve as an adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. RESULTS: We found that tumors could be divided into types with low and high frequencies of TERT promoter mutations. The nine TERT-high tumor types almost always originated in tissues with relatively low rates of self renewal, including melanomas, liposarcomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, urothelial carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue, medulloblastomas, and subtypes of gliomas. TERT and ATRX mutations were mutually exclusive, suggesting that these two genetic mechanisms confer equivalent selective growth advantages. We found that mutations in the TERT promoter occurred in 74.2% of glioblastomas (GBM), but occurred in a minority of Grade II-III astrocytomas (18.2%). In contrast, IDH1/2 mutations were observed in 78.4% of Grade II-III astrocytomas, but were uncommon in primary GBM. In oligodendrogliomas, TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations co-occurred in 79% of cases. Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit TERT promoter mutations alone predominately have primary GBMs associated with poor median OS rates (11.5 months). Patients whose gliomas exhibit IDH1/2 mutations alone predominately have astrocytic morphologies and exhibit a median OS of 57 months while patients whose tumors exhibit both TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations predominately exhibit oligodendroglial morphologies and exhibit median OS of 125 months. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to their implications for understanding the relationship between telomeres and tumorigenesis, TERT mutations provide a biomarker that may aid in the classification and prognostication of brain tumors. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Tumor Biology.

Authors
Yan, H; Killela, PJ; Reitman, ZJ; Jiao, Y; Bettegowda, C; Agrawal, N; Diaz, LA; Friedman, AH; Friedman, H; Gallia, GL; Giovanella, BC; Grollman, AP; He, TC; He, Y; Hruban, RH; Jallo, GI; Mandahl, N; Meeker, AK; Mertens, F; Netto, GJ; Rasheed, BA; Riggins, GJ; Rosenquist, TA; Schiffman, M; Shih, I; Theodorescu, D; Torbenson, MS; Velculescu, VE; Wang, TL; Wentzensen, N; Wood, LD; Zhang, M; Healy, P; Yang, R; Diplas, B; Wang, ZH; Greer, P; Zhu, HS; Wang, C; Carpenter, A; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Kinzler, KW; Vogelstein, B; Papadopoulos, N; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Yan, H, Killela, PJ, Reitman, ZJ, Jiao, Y, Bettegowda, C, Agrawal, N, Diaz, LA, Friedman, AH, Friedman, H, Gallia, GL, Giovanella, BC, Grollman, AP, He, TC, He, Y, Hruban, RH, Jallo, GI, Mandahl, N, Meeker, AK, Mertens, F, Netto, GJ, Rasheed, BA, Riggins, GJ, Rosenquist, TA, Schiffman, M, Shih, I, Theodorescu, D, Torbenson, MS, Velculescu, VE, Wang, TL, Wentzensen, N, Wood, LD, Zhang, M, Healy, P, Yang, R, Diplas, B, Wang, ZH, Greer, P, Zhu, HS, Wang, C, Carpenter, A, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Kinzler, KW, Vogelstein, B, Papadopoulos, N, and Bigner, DD. "TERT PROMOTER MUTATIONS OCCUR FREQUENTLY IN GLIOMAS AND A SUBSET OF TUMORS DERIVED FROM CELLS WITH LOW RATES OF SELF-RENEWAL." Neuro Oncology 16.Suppl 3 (July 2014): iii5-iii6.
PMID
25165359
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
16
Issue
Suppl 3
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
iii5
End Page
iii6
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/nou206.18

Prognostic marker analysis in pediatric posterior fossa ependymomas.

NELL2 expression has been shown to identify patients with posterior fossa ependymomas (PFEp) that exhibit prolonged survivals. We analyzed expression NELL2; KI-67; Tenascin C; CD34; VEGF; and CA IX as well as vascular density against post-operative survival (Progression Free and Overall Survival; PFS, OS) in 31 patients under the age of 22 years.

Authors
McLendon, RE; Lipp, E; Gururangan, S; Fuchs, H; Zagzag, D; Herndon, J; Healy, P
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Lipp, E, Gururangan, S, Fuchs, H, Zagzag, D, Herndon, J, and Healy, P. "Prognostic marker analysis in pediatric posterior fossa ependymomas." Neuro Oncol 16 Suppl 3 (July 2014): iii27-.
PMID
25165266
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Volume
16 Suppl 3
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
iii27
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/nou208.17

Mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and in the TERT promoter define clinically distinct subgroups of adult malignant gliomas.

Frequent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) and the promoter of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) represent two significant discoveries in glioma genomics. Understanding the degree to which these two mutations co-occur or occur exclusively of one another in glioma subtypes presents a unique opportunity to guide glioma classification and prognosis. We analyzed the relationship between overall survival (OS) and the presence of IDH1/2 and TERT promoter mutations in a panel of 473 adult gliomas. We hypothesized and show that genetic signatures capable of distinguishing among several types of gliomas could be established providing clinically relevant information that can serve as an adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. We found that mutations in the TERT promoter occurred in 74.2% of glioblastomas (GBM), but occurred in a minority of Grade II-III astrocytomas (18.2%). In contrast, IDH1/2 mutations were observed in 78.4% of Grade II-III astrocytomas, but were uncommon in primary GBM. In oligodendrogliomas, TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations co-occurred in 79% of cases. Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit TERT promoter mutations alone predominately have primary GBMs associated with poor median OS (11.5 months). Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit IDH1/2 mutations alone predominately have astrocytic morphologies and exhibit a median OS of 57 months while patients whose tumors exhibit both TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations predominately exhibit oligodendroglial morphologies and exhibit median OS of 125 months. Analyzing gliomas based on their genetic signatures allows for the stratification of these patients into distinct cohorts, with unique prognosis and survival.

Authors
Killela, PJ; Pirozzi, CJ; Healy, P; Reitman, ZJ; Lipp, E; Rasheed, BA; Yang, R; Diplas, BH; Wang, Z; Greer, PK; Zhu, H; Wang, CY; Carpenter, AB; Friedman, H; Friedman, AH; Keir, ST; He, J; He, Y; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Yan, H; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Killela, PJ, Pirozzi, CJ, Healy, P, Reitman, ZJ, Lipp, E, Rasheed, BA, Yang, R, Diplas, BH, Wang, Z, Greer, PK, Zhu, H, Wang, CY, Carpenter, AB, Friedman, H, Friedman, AH, Keir, ST, He, J, He, Y, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Yan, H, and Bigner, DD. "Mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and in the TERT promoter define clinically distinct subgroups of adult malignant gliomas." Oncotarget 5.6 (March 2014): 1515-1525.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16105
PMID
24722048
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncotarget
Volume
5
Issue
6
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1515
End Page
1525
DOI
10.18632/oncotarget.1765

The genetic landscape of anaplastic astrocytoma.

Anaplastic astrocytoma WHO grade III (A3) is a lethal brain tumor that often occurs in middle aged patients. Clinically, it is challenging to distinguish A3 from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) WHO grade IV. To reveal the genetic landscape of this tumor type, we sequenced the exome of a cohort of A3s (n=16). For comparison and to illuminate the genomic landscape of other glioma subtypes, we also included in our study diffuse astrocytoma WHO grade II (A2, n=7), oligoastrocytoma WHO grade II (OA2, n=2), anaplastic oligoastrocytoma WHO grade III (OA3, n=4), and GBM (n=28). Exome sequencing of A3s identified frequent mutations in IDH1 (75%, 12/16), ATRX (63%, 10/16), and TP53 (82%, 13/16). In contrast, the majority of GBMs (75%, 21/28) did not contain IDH1 or ATRX mutations, and displayed a distinct spectrum of mutations. Finally, our study also identified novel genes that were not previously linked to this tumor type. In particular, we found mutations in Notch pathway genes (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, NOTCH4, NOTCH2NL), including a recurrent NOTCH1-A465Tmutation, in 31% (5/16) of A3s. This study suggests genetic signatures will be useful for the classification of gliomas.

Authors
Killela, PJ; Pirozzi, CJ; Reitman, ZJ; Jones, S; Rasheed, BA; Lipp, E; Friedman, H; Friedman, AH; He, Y; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Killela, PJ, Pirozzi, CJ, Reitman, ZJ, Jones, S, Rasheed, BA, Lipp, E, Friedman, H, Friedman, AH, He, Y, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "The genetic landscape of anaplastic astrocytoma." Oncotarget 5.6 (March 2014): 1452-1457.
PMID
24140581
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncotarget
Volume
5
Issue
6
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1452
End Page
1457
DOI
10.18632/oncotarget.1505

Clinico-pathological description of three paediatric medulloblastoma cases with MLL2/3 gene mutations

Authors
Lopez, GY; Grant, GA; Fuchs, HE; Leithe, LG; Gururangan, S; Bigner, DD; Yan, H; McLendon, RE; He, Y
MLA Citation
Lopez, GY, Grant, GA, Fuchs, HE, Leithe, LG, Gururangan, S, Bigner, DD, Yan, H, McLendon, RE, and He, Y. "Clinico-pathological description of three paediatric medulloblastoma cases with MLL2/3 gene mutations." NEUROPATHOLOGY AND APPLIED NEUROBIOLOGY 40.2 (February 2014): 217-220.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology
Volume
40
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
217
End Page
220
DOI
10.1111/nan.12060

Efficacy of bevacizumab plus irinotecan in children with recurrent Low-grade gliomas-a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study

Authors
Gururangan, S; Fangusaro, J; Poussaint, TY; McLendon, RE; Onar-Thomas, A; Wu, S; Packer, RJ; Banerjee, A; Gilbertson, RJ; Fahey, F; Vajapeyam, S; Jakacki, R; Gajjar, A; Goldman, S; Pollack, IF; Friedman, HS; Boyett, JM; Fouladi, M; Kun, LE
MLA Citation
Gururangan, S, Fangusaro, J, Poussaint, TY, McLendon, RE, Onar-Thomas, A, Wu, S, Packer, RJ, Banerjee, A, Gilbertson, RJ, Fahey, F, Vajapeyam, S, Jakacki, R, Gajjar, A, Goldman, S, Pollack, IF, Friedman, HS, Boyett, JM, Fouladi, M, and Kun, LE. "Efficacy of bevacizumab plus irinotecan in children with recurrent Low-grade gliomas-a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study." NEURO-ONCOLOGY 16.2 (February 2014): 310-317.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
16
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
310
End Page
317
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/not154

High-throughput flow cytometry screening reveals a role for junctional adhesion molecule a as a cancer stem cell maintenance factor.

Stem cells reside in niches that regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The identity of a stem cell is linked with the ability to interact with its niche through adhesion mechanisms. To identify targets that disrupt cancer stem cell (CSC) adhesion, we performed a flow cytometry screen on patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) cells and identified junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) as a CSC adhesion mechanism essential for self-renewal and tumor growth. JAM-A was dispensable for normal neural stem/progenitor cell (NPC) function, and JAM-A expression was reduced in normal brain versus GBM. Targeting JAM-A compromised the self-renewal of CSCs. JAM-A expression negatively correlated to GBM patient prognosis. Our results demonstrate that GBM-targeting strategies can be identified through screening adhesion receptors and JAM-A represents a mechanism for niche-driven CSC maintenance.

Authors
Lathia, JD; Li, M; Sinyuk, M; Alvarado, AG; Flavahan, WA; Stoltz, K; Rosager, AM; Hale, J; Hitomi, M; Gallagher, J; Wu, Q; Martin, J; Vidal, JG; Nakano, I; Dahlrot, RH; Hansen, S; McLendon, RE; Sloan, AE; Bao, S; Hjelmeland, AB; Carson, CT; Naik, UP; Kristensen, B; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Lathia, JD, Li, M, Sinyuk, M, Alvarado, AG, Flavahan, WA, Stoltz, K, Rosager, AM, Hale, J, Hitomi, M, Gallagher, J, Wu, Q, Martin, J, Vidal, JG, Nakano, I, Dahlrot, RH, Hansen, S, McLendon, RE, Sloan, AE, Bao, S, Hjelmeland, AB, Carson, CT, Naik, UP, Kristensen, B, and Rich, JN. "High-throughput flow cytometry screening reveals a role for junctional adhesion molecule a as a cancer stem cell maintenance factor." Cell Rep 6.1 (January 16, 2014): 117-129.
PMID
24373972
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
6
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
117
End Page
129
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2013.11.043

High-throughput flow cytometry screening reveals a role for junctional adhesion molecule a as a cancer stem cell maintenance factor

Stem cells reside in niches that regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The identity of a stem cell is linked with the ability tointeract with its niche through adhesion mechanisms. To identify targets that disrupt cancer stemcell (CSC) adhesion, we performed a flow cytometryscreen on patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) cells and identified junctional adhesion molecule A(JAM-A) as a CSC adhesion mechanism essentialfor self-renewal and tumor growth. JAM-A wasdispensable for normal neural stem/progenitorcell (NPC) function, and JAM-A expression was reduced in normal brain versus GBM. Targeting JAM-A compromised the self-renewal of CSCs. JAM-A expression negatively correlated to GBM patient prognosis. Our results demonstrate thatGBM-targeting strategies can be identified through screening adhesion receptors and JAM-A represents a mechanism for niche-driven CSC maintenance. © 2014 The Authors.

Authors
Lathia, JD; Li, M; Sinyuk, M; Alvarado, AG; Flavahan, WA; Stoltz, K; Rosager, AM; Hale, J; Hitomi, M; Gallagher, J; Wu, Q; Martin, J; Vidal, JG; Nakano, I; Dahlrot, RH; Hansen, S; McLendon, RE; Sloan, AE; Bao, S; Hjelmeland, AB; Carson, CT; Naik, UP; Kristensen, B; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Lathia, JD, Li, M, Sinyuk, M, Alvarado, AG, Flavahan, WA, Stoltz, K, Rosager, AM, Hale, J, Hitomi, M, Gallagher, J, Wu, Q, Martin, J, Vidal, JG, Nakano, I, Dahlrot, RH, Hansen, S, McLendon, RE, Sloan, AE, Bao, S, Hjelmeland, AB, Carson, CT, Naik, UP, Kristensen, B, and Rich, JN. "High-throughput flow cytometry screening reveals a role for junctional adhesion molecule a as a cancer stem cell maintenance factor." Cell Reports 6.1 (January 1, 2014): 117-129.
Source
scopus
Published In
Cell Reports
Volume
6
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
117
End Page
129
DOI
10.1016/j.celrep.2013.11.043

Malignant brainstem gliomas in adults: Clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors

Adult malignant brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are poorly characterized due to their relative rarity. We have examined histopathologically confirmed cases of adult malignant BSGs to better characterize the patient and tumor features and outcomes, including the natural history, presentation, imaging, molecular characteristics, prognostic factors, and appropriate treatments. A total of 34 patients were identified, consisting of 22 anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs) and 12 glioblastomas (GBMs). The overall median survival for all patients was 25.8 months, with patients having GBMs experiencing significantly worse survival (12.1 vs. 77.0 months, p = 0.0011). The majority of tumors revealed immunoreactivity for EGFR (93.3 %) and MGMT (64.7 %). Most tumors also exhibited chromosomal abnormalities affecting the loci of epidermal growth factor receptor (92.9 %), MET (100 %), PTEN (61.5 %), and 9p21 (80 %). AAs more commonly appeared diffusely enhancing (50.0 vs. 27.3 %) or diffusely nonenhancing (25.0 vs. 0.0 %), while GBMs were more likely to exhibit focal enhancement (54.6 vs. 10.0 %). Multivariate analysis revealed confirmed histopathology for GBM to significantly affect survival (HR 4.80; 95 % CI 1.86-12.4; p = 0.0012). In conclusion, adult malignant BSGs have an overall poor prognosis, with GBM tumors faring significantly worse than AAs. As AAs and GBMs have differing imaging characteristics, tissue diagnosis may be necessary to accurately determine patient prognosis and identify molecular characteristics which may aid in the treatment of these aggressive tumors. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

Authors
Babu, R; Kranz, PG; Agarwal, V; McLendon, RE; Thomas, S; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Adamson, C
MLA Citation
Babu, R, Kranz, PG, Agarwal, V, McLendon, RE, Thomas, S, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, and Adamson, C. "Malignant brainstem gliomas in adults: Clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors." Journal of Neuro-Oncology 119.1 (January 1, 2014): 177-185.
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
119
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
177
End Page
185
DOI
10.1007/s11060-014-1471-9

EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

Authors
Miao, H; Choi, BD; Suryadevara, CM; Sanchez-Perez, L; Yang, S; De Leon, G; Sayour, EJ; McLendon, R; Herndon, JE; Healy, P; Archer, GE; Bigner, DD; Johnson, LA; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Miao, H, Choi, BD, Suryadevara, CM, Sanchez-Perez, L, Yang, S, De Leon, G, Sayour, EJ, McLendon, R, Herndon, JE, Healy, P, Archer, GE, Bigner, DD, Johnson, LA, and Sampson, JH. "EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma." PloS one 9.4 (January 2014): e94281-.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16108
PMID
24722266
Source
epmc
Published In
Plos One
Volume
9
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
e94281
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0094281

Efficacy of bevacizumab plus irinotecan in children with recurrent low-grade gliomas--a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study.

A phase II study of bevacizumab (BVZ) plus irinotecan (CPT-11) was conducted in children with recurrent low-grade glioma to measure sustained response and/or stable disease lasting ≥6 months and progression-free survival.Thirty-five evaluable patients received 2 doses (10 mg/kg each) of single-agent BVZ intravenously 2 weeks apart and then BVZ + CPT-11 every 2 weeks until progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity, or a maximum of 2 years of therapy. Correlative studies included neuroimaging and expression of tumor angiogenic markers (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], VEGF receptor 2, hypoxia-inducible factor 2α, and carbonic anhydrase 9).Thirty-five evaluable patients (median age 8.4 y [range, 0.6-17.6]) received a median of 12 courses of BVZ + CPT-11 (range, 2-26). Twenty-nine of 35 patients (83%) received treatment for at least 6 months. Eight patients progressed on treatment at a median time of 5.4 months (range, 1-17.8). Six patients (17.7%) still in follow-up have had stable disease without receiving additional treatment for a median of 40.1 months (range, 30.6-49.3) from initiating therapy. The 6-month and 2-year progression-free survivals were 85.4% (SE ± 5.96%) and 47.8% (SE ± 9.27%), respectively. The commonest toxicities related to BVZ included grades 1-2 hypertension in 24, grades 1-2 fatigue in 23, grades 1-2 epistaxis in 18, and grades 1-4 proteinuria in 15. The median volume of enhancement decreased significantly between baseline and day 15 (P < .0001) and over the duration of treatment (P < .037).The combination of BVZ + CPT-11 appears to produce sustained disease control in some children with recurrent low-grade gliomas.

Authors
Gururangan, S; Fangusaro, J; Poussaint, TY; McLendon, RE; Onar-Thomas, A; Wu, S; Packer, RJ; Banerjee, A; Gilbertson, RJ; Fahey, F; Vajapeyam, S; Jakacki, R; Gajjar, A; Goldman, S; Pollack, IF; Friedman, HS; Boyett, JM; Fouladi, M; Kun, LE
MLA Citation
Gururangan, S, Fangusaro, J, Poussaint, TY, McLendon, RE, Onar-Thomas, A, Wu, S, Packer, RJ, Banerjee, A, Gilbertson, RJ, Fahey, F, Vajapeyam, S, Jakacki, R, Gajjar, A, Goldman, S, Pollack, IF, Friedman, HS, Boyett, JM, Fouladi, M, and Kun, LE. "Efficacy of bevacizumab plus irinotecan in children with recurrent low-grade gliomas--a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study." Neuro Oncology 16.2 (January 2014): 310-317.
PMID
24311632
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
16
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
310
End Page
317
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/not154

Bevacizumab (BVZ)-associated toxicities in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors treated with BVZ and irinotecan (CPT-11): A Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Study (PBTC-022)

BACKGROUND The incidence and spectrum of acute toxicities related to the use of bevacizumab (BVZ)-containing regimens in children are largely unknown. This report describes the adverse events in a recently completed large phase 2 trial of BVZ plus irinotecan (CPT-11) in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors. METHODS Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium trial-022 evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of BVZ (10 mg/kg administered intravenously) as a single agent for 2 doses given 2 weeks apart and then combined with CPT-11 every 2 weeks (1 course = 4 weeks) in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors. Children were treated until they experienced progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity or completed up to a maximum of 2 years of therapy. Toxicities were graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Patients who received at least 1 dose of BVZ were included for toxicity assessment. RESULTS Between October 2006 and June 2010, 92 patients evaluable for toxicity were enrolled and received 687 treatment courses. The most common toxicities attributable to BVZ included grade I-III hypertension (38% of patients), grade I-III fatigue (30%), grade I-II epistaxis (24%), and grade I-IV proteinuria (22%). Twenty-two patients (24%) stopped therapy due to toxicity. CONCLUSIONS The combination of BVZ and CPT-11 was fairly well-tolerated, and most severe BVZ-related toxicities were rare, self-limiting, and manageable. ©2013 American Cancer Society.

Authors
Fangusaro, J; Gururangan, S; Poussaint, TY; McLendon, RE; Onar-Thomas, A; Warren, KE; Wu, S; Packer, RJ; Banerjee, A; Gilbertson, RJ; Jakacki, R; Gajjar, A; Goldman, S; Pollack, IF; Friedman, HS; Boyett, JM; Kun, LE; Fouladi, M
MLA Citation
Fangusaro, J, Gururangan, S, Poussaint, TY, McLendon, RE, Onar-Thomas, A, Warren, KE, Wu, S, Packer, RJ, Banerjee, A, Gilbertson, RJ, Jakacki, R, Gajjar, A, Goldman, S, Pollack, IF, Friedman, HS, Boyett, JM, Kun, LE, and Fouladi, M. "Bevacizumab (BVZ)-associated toxicities in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors treated with BVZ and irinotecan (CPT-11): A Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Study (PBTC-022)." Cancer 119.23 (December 1, 2013): 4180-4187.
Source
scopus
Published In
Cancer
Volume
119
Issue
23
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
4180
End Page
4187
DOI
10.1002/cncr.28343

Bevacizumab (BVZ)-associated toxicities in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors treated with BVZ and irinotecan (CPT-11): a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Study (PBTC-022).

The incidence and spectrum of acute toxicities related to the use of bevacizumab (BVZ)-containing regimens in children are largely unknown. This report describes the adverse events in a recently completed large phase 2 trial of BVZ plus irinotecan (CPT-11) in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors.Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium trial-022 evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of BVZ (10 mg/kg administered intravenously) as a single agent for 2 doses given 2 weeks apart and then combined with CPT-11 every 2 weeks (1 course = 4 weeks) in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors. Children were treated until they experienced progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity or completed up to a maximum of 2 years of therapy. Toxicities were graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Patients who received at least 1 dose of BVZ were included for toxicity assessment.Between October 2006 and June 2010, 92 patients evaluable for toxicity were enrolled and received 687 treatment courses. The most common toxicities attributable to BVZ included grade I-III hypertension (38% of patients), grade I-III fatigue (30%), grade I-II epistaxis (24%), and grade I-IV proteinuria (22%). Twenty-two patients (24%) stopped therapy due to toxicity.The combination of BVZ and CPT-11 was fairly well-tolerated, and most severe BVZ-related toxicities were rare, self-limiting, and manageable.

Authors
Fangusaro, J; Gururangan, S; Poussaint, TY; McLendon, RE; Onar-Thomas, A; Warren, KE; Wu, S; Packer, RJ; Banerjee, A; Gilbertson, RJ; Jakacki, R; Gajjar, A; Goldman, S; Pollack, IF; Friedman, HS; Boyett, JM; Kun, LE; Fouladi, M
MLA Citation
Fangusaro, J, Gururangan, S, Poussaint, TY, McLendon, RE, Onar-Thomas, A, Warren, KE, Wu, S, Packer, RJ, Banerjee, A, Gilbertson, RJ, Jakacki, R, Gajjar, A, Goldman, S, Pollack, IF, Friedman, HS, Boyett, JM, Kun, LE, and Fouladi, M. "Bevacizumab (BVZ)-associated toxicities in children with recurrent central nervous system tumors treated with BVZ and irinotecan (CPT-11): a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Study (PBTC-022)." December 2013.
PMID
24104527
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
119
Issue
23
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
4180
End Page
4187
DOI
10.1002/cncr.28343

TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma.

Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought to describe these mutations and their impact in a subgroup-specific manner. We analyzed the TERT promoter by direct sequencing and genotyping in 466 medulloblastomas. The mutational distributions were determined according to subgroup affiliation, demographics, and clinical, prognostic, and molecular features. Integrated genomics approaches were used to identify specific somatic copy number alterations in TERT promoter-mutated and wild-type tumors. Overall, TERT promoter mutations were identified in 21 % of medulloblastomas. Strikingly, the highest frequencies of TERT mutations were observed in SHH (83 %; 55/66) and WNT (31 %; 4/13) medulloblastomas derived from adult patients. Group 3 and Group 4 harbored this alteration in <5 % of cases and showed no association with increased patient age. The prognostic implications of these mutations were highly subgroup-specific. TERT mutations identified a subset with good and poor prognosis in SHH and Group 4 tumors, respectively. Monosomy 6 was mostly restricted to WNT tumors without TERT mutations. Hallmark SHH focal copy number aberrations and chromosome 10q deletion were mutually exclusive with TERT mutations within SHH tumors. TERT promoter mutations are the most common recurrent somatic point mutation in medulloblastoma, and are very highly enriched in adult SHH and WNT tumors. TERT mutations define a subset of SHH medulloblastoma with distinct demographics, cytogenetics, and outcomes.

Authors
Remke, M; Ramaswamy, V; Peacock, J; Shih, DJH; Koelsche, C; Northcott, PA; Hill, N; Cavalli, FMG; Kool, M; Wang, X; Mack, SC; Barszczyk, M; Morrissy, AS; Wu, X; Agnihotri, S; Luu, B; Jones, DTW; Garzia, L; Dubuc, AM; Zhukova, N; Vanner, R; Kros, JM; French, PJ; Van Meir, EG; Vibhakar, R; Zitterbart, K; Chan, JA; Bognár, L; Klekner, A; Lach, B; Jung, S; Saad, AG; Liau, LM; Albrecht, S; Zollo, M; Cooper, MK; Thompson, RC; Delattre, OO; Bourdeaut, F; Doz, FF; Garami, M; Hauser, P; Carlotti, CG et al.
MLA Citation
Remke, M, Ramaswamy, V, Peacock, J, Shih, DJH, Koelsche, C, Northcott, PA, Hill, N, Cavalli, FMG, Kool, M, Wang, X, Mack, SC, Barszczyk, M, Morrissy, AS, Wu, X, Agnihotri, S, Luu, B, Jones, DTW, Garzia, L, Dubuc, AM, Zhukova, N, Vanner, R, Kros, JM, French, PJ, Van Meir, EG, Vibhakar, R, Zitterbart, K, Chan, JA, Bognár, L, Klekner, A, Lach, B, Jung, S, Saad, AG, Liau, LM, Albrecht, S, Zollo, M, Cooper, MK, Thompson, RC, Delattre, OO, Bourdeaut, F, Doz, FF, Garami, M, Hauser, P, and Carlotti, CG et al. "TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma." Acta Neuropathol 126.6 (December 2013): 917-929.
PMID
24174164
Source
pubmed
Published In
Acta Neuropathologica
Volume
126
Issue
6
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
917
End Page
929
DOI
10.1007/s00401-013-1198-2

Recurrence patterns across medulloblastoma subgroups: An integrated clinical and molecular analysis

Background: Recurrent medulloblastoma is a therapeutic challenge because it is almost always fatal. Studies have confirmed that medulloblastoma consists of at least four distinct subgroups. We sought to delineate subgroup-specific differences in medulloblastoma recurrence patterns. Methods: We retrospectively identified a discovery cohort of all recurrent medulloblastomas at the Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, ON, Canada) from 1994 to 2012 (cohort 1), and established molecular subgroups using a nanoString-based assay on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues or frozen tissue. The anatomical site of recurrence (local tumour bed or leptomeningeal metastasis), time to recurrence, and survival after recurrence were assessed in a subgroup-specific manner. Two independent, non-overlapping cohorts (cohort 2: samples from patients with recurrent medulloblastomas from 13 centres worldwide, obtained between 1991 and 2012; cohort 3: samples from patients with recurrent medulloblastoma obtained at the NN Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute [Moscow, Russia] between 1994 and 2011) were analysed to confirm and validate observations. When possible, molecular subgrouping was done on tissue obtained from both the initial surgery and at recurrence. Results: Cohort 1 consisted of 30 patients with recurrent medulloblastomas; nine with local recurrences, and 21 with metastatic recurrences. Cohort 2 consisted of 77 patients and cohort 3 of 96 patients with recurrent medulloblastoma. Subgroup affiliation remained stable at recurrence in all 34 cases with available matched primary and recurrent pairs (five pairs from cohort 1 and 29 pairs from cohort 2 [15 SHH, five group 3, 14 group 4]). This finding was validated in 17 pairs from cohort 3. When analysed in a subgroup-specific manner, local recurrences in cohort 1 were more frequent in SHH tumours (eight of nine [89%]) and metastatic recurrences were more common in group 3 and group 4 tumours (17 of 20 [85%] with one WNT, p=0·0014, local vs metastatic recurrence, SHH vs group 3 vs group 4). The subgroup-specific location of recurrence was confirmed in cohort 2 (p=0·0013 for local vs metastatic recurrence, SHH vs group 3 vs group 4,), and cohort 3 (p<0·0001). Treatment with craniospinal irradiation at diagnosis was not significantly associated with the anatomical pattern of recurrence. Survival after recurrence was significantly longer in patients with group 4 tumours in cohort 1 (p=0·013) than with other subgroups, which was confirmed in cohort 2 (p=0·0075), but not cohort 3 (p=0·70). Interpretation: Medulloblastoma does not change subgroup at the time of recurrence, reinforcing the stability of the four main medulloblastoma subgroups. Significant differences in the location and timing of recurrence across medulloblastoma subgroups have potential treatment ramifications. Specifically, intensified local (posterior fossa) therapy should be tested in the initial treatment of patients with SHH tumours. Refinement of therapy for patients with group 3 or group 4 tumours should focus on metastases. Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health, Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, Garron Family Chair in Childhood Cancer Research at The Hospital for Sick Children and The University of Toronto. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Authors
Ramaswamy, V; Remke, M; Bouffet, E; Faria, CC; Perreault, S; Cho, YJ; Shih, DJ; Luu, B; Dubuc, AM; Northcott, PA; Schüller, U; Gururangan, S; McLendon, R; Bigner, D; Fouladi, M; Ligon, KL; Pomeroy, SL; Dunn, S; Triscott, J; Jabado, N; Fontebasso, A; Jones, DTW; Kool, M; Karajannis, MA; Gardner, SL; Zagzag, D; Nunes, S; Pimentel, J; Mora, J; Lipp, E; Walter, AW; Ryzhova, M; Zheludkova, O; Kumirova, E; Alshami, J; Croul, SE; Rutka, JT; Hawkins, C; Tabori, U; Codispoti, KET; Packer, RJ; Pfister, SM; Korshunov, A; Taylor, MD
MLA Citation
Ramaswamy, V, Remke, M, Bouffet, E, Faria, CC, Perreault, S, Cho, YJ, Shih, DJ, Luu, B, Dubuc, AM, Northcott, PA, Schüller, U, Gururangan, S, McLendon, R, Bigner, D, Fouladi, M, Ligon, KL, Pomeroy, SL, Dunn, S, Triscott, J, Jabado, N, Fontebasso, A, Jones, DTW, Kool, M, Karajannis, MA, Gardner, SL, Zagzag, D, Nunes, S, Pimentel, J, Mora, J, Lipp, E, Walter, AW, Ryzhova, M, Zheludkova, O, Kumirova, E, Alshami, J, Croul, SE, Rutka, JT, Hawkins, C, Tabori, U, Codispoti, KET, Packer, RJ, Pfister, SM, Korshunov, A, and Taylor, MD. "Recurrence patterns across medulloblastoma subgroups: An integrated clinical and molecular analysis." The Lancet Oncology 14.12 (November 1, 2013): 1200-1207.
Source
scopus
Published In
The Lancet. Oncology
Volume
14
Issue
12
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1200
End Page
1207
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(13)70449-2

KMT2D maintains neoplastic cell proliferation and global histone H3 lysine 4 monomethylation.

KMT2D (lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D), formerly named MLL2 (myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage leukemia 2, also known as ALR/MLL4), is a histone methyltransferase that plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In particular, it targets histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4), whose methylations serve as a gene activation mark. Recently, KMT2D has emerged as one of the most frequently mutated genes in a variety of cancers and in other human diseases, including lymphoma, medulloblastoma, gastric cancer, and Kabuki syndrome. Mutations in KMT2D identified thus far point to its loss-of-function in pathogenesis and suggest its role as a tumor suppressor in various tissues. To determine the effect of a KMT2D deficiency on neoplastic cells, we used homologous recombination- and nuclease-mediated gene editing approaches to generate a panel of isogenic colorectal and medulloblastoma cancer cell lines that differ with respect to their endogenous KMT2D status. We found that a KMT2D deficiency resulted in attenuated cancer cell proliferation and defective cell migration. Analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed that KMT2D was essential for maintaining the level of global H3K4 monomethylation and that its enzymatic SET domain was directly responsible for this function. Furthermore, we found that a majority of KMT2D binding sites are located in regions of potential enhancer elements. Together, these findings revealed the role of KMT2D in regulating enhancer elements in human cells and shed light on the tumorigenic role of its deficiency. Our study supports that KMT2D has distinct roles in neoplastic cells, as opposed to normal cells, and that inhibiting KMT2D may be a viable strategy for cancer therapeutics.

Authors
Guo, C; Chen, LH; Huang, Y; Chang, C-C; Wang, P; Pirozzi, CJ; Qin, X; Bao, X; Greer, PK; McLendon, RE; Yan, H; Keir, ST; Bigner, DD; He, Y
MLA Citation
Guo, C, Chen, LH, Huang, Y, Chang, C-C, Wang, P, Pirozzi, CJ, Qin, X, Bao, X, Greer, PK, McLendon, RE, Yan, H, Keir, ST, Bigner, DD, and He, Y. "KMT2D maintains neoplastic cell proliferation and global histone H3 lysine 4 monomethylation." Oncotarget 4.11 (November 2013): 2144-2153.
PMID
24240169
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncotarget
Volume
4
Issue
11
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
2144
End Page
2153
DOI
10.18632/oncotarget.1555

Development and Validation of a Clinical Molecular Diagnostic Test for TERT Gene Promoter Mutations C250T and C228T

Authors
Gagnon, R; Yan, H; Rasheed, AB; McLendon, RE; Killella, PJ; Reitman, ZJ; Datto, MB; Sebastian, S
MLA Citation
Gagnon, R, Yan, H, Rasheed, AB, McLendon, RE, Killella, PJ, Reitman, ZJ, Datto, MB, and Sebastian, S. "Development and Validation of a Clinical Molecular Diagnostic Test for TERT Gene Promoter Mutations C250T and C228T." November 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
Volume
15
Issue
6
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
920
End Page
920

Recurrence patterns across medulloblastoma subgroups: an integrated clinical and molecular analysis.

Recurrent medulloblastoma is a therapeutic challenge because it is almost always fatal. Studies have confirmed that medulloblastoma consists of at least four distinct subgroups. We sought to delineate subgroup-specific differences in medulloblastoma recurrence patterns.We retrospectively identified a discovery cohort of all recurrent medulloblastomas at the Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, ON, Canada) from 1994 to 2012 (cohort 1), and established molecular subgroups using a nanoString-based assay on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues or frozen tissue. The anatomical site of recurrence (local tumour bed or leptomeningeal metastasis), time to recurrence, and survival after recurrence were assessed in a subgroup-specific manner. Two independent, non-overlapping cohorts (cohort 2: samples from patients with recurrent medulloblastomas from 13 centres worldwide, obtained between 1991 and 2012; cohort 3: samples from patients with recurrent medulloblastoma obtained at the NN Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute [Moscow, Russia] between 1994 and 2011) were analysed to confirm and validate observations. When possible, molecular subgrouping was done on tissue obtained from both the initial surgery and at recurrence.Cohort 1 consisted of 30 patients with recurrent medulloblastomas; nine with local recurrences, and 21 with metastatic recurrences. Cohort 2 consisted of 77 patients and cohort 3 of 96 patients with recurrent medulloblastoma. Subgroup affiliation remained stable at recurrence in all 34 cases with available matched primary and recurrent pairs (five pairs from cohort 1 and 29 pairs from cohort 2 [15 SHH, five group 3, 14 group 4]). This finding was validated in 17 pairs from cohort 3. When analysed in a subgroup-specific manner, local recurrences in cohort 1 were more frequent in SHH tumours (eight of nine [89%]) and metastatic recurrences were more common in group 3 and group 4 tumours (17 of 20 [85%] with one WNT, p=0·0014, local vs metastatic recurrence, SHH vs group 3 vs group 4). The subgroup-specific location of recurrence was confirmed in cohort 2 (p=0·0013 for local vs metastatic recurrence, SHH vs group 3 vs group 4,), and cohort 3 (p<0·0001). Treatment with craniospinal irradiation at diagnosis was not significantly associated with the anatomical pattern of recurrence. Survival after recurrence was significantly longer in patients with group 4 tumours in cohort 1 (p=0·013) than with other subgroups, which was confirmed in cohort 2 (p=0·0075), but not cohort 3 (p=0·70).Medulloblastoma does not change subgroup at the time of recurrence, reinforcing the stability of the four main medulloblastoma subgroups. Significant differences in the location and timing of recurrence across medulloblastoma subgroups have potential treatment ramifications. Specifically, intensified local (posterior fossa) therapy should be tested in the initial treatment of patients with SHH tumours. Refinement of therapy for patients with group 3 or group 4 tumours should focus on metastases.

Authors
Ramaswamy, V; Remke, M; Bouffet, E; Faria, CC; Perreault, S; Cho, Y-J; Shih, DJ; Luu, B; Dubuc, AM; Northcott, PA; Schüller, U; Gururangan, S; McLendon, R; Bigner, D; Fouladi, M; Ligon, KL; Pomeroy, SL; Dunn, S; Triscott, J; Jabado, N; Fontebasso, A; Jones, DTW; Kool, M; Karajannis, MA; Gardner, SL; Zagzag, D; Nunes, S; Pimentel, J; Mora, J; Lipp, E; Walter, AW; Ryzhova, M; Zheludkova, O; Kumirova, E; Alshami, J; Croul, SE; Rutka, JT; Hawkins, C; Tabori, U; Codispoti, K-ET; Packer, RJ; Pfister, SM; Korshunov, A; Taylor, MD
MLA Citation
Ramaswamy, V, Remke, M, Bouffet, E, Faria, CC, Perreault, S, Cho, Y-J, Shih, DJ, Luu, B, Dubuc, AM, Northcott, PA, Schüller, U, Gururangan, S, McLendon, R, Bigner, D, Fouladi, M, Ligon, KL, Pomeroy, SL, Dunn, S, Triscott, J, Jabado, N, Fontebasso, A, Jones, DTW, Kool, M, Karajannis, MA, Gardner, SL, Zagzag, D, Nunes, S, Pimentel, J, Mora, J, Lipp, E, Walter, AW, Ryzhova, M, Zheludkova, O, Kumirova, E, Alshami, J, Croul, SE, Rutka, JT, Hawkins, C, Tabori, U, Codispoti, K-ET, Packer, RJ, Pfister, SM, Korshunov, A, and Taylor, MD. "Recurrence patterns across medulloblastoma subgroups: an integrated clinical and molecular analysis." The Lancet. Oncology 14.12 (November 2013): 1200-1207.
PMID
24140199
Source
epmc
Published In
The Lancet. Oncology
Volume
14
Issue
12
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1200
End Page
1207
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(13)70449-2

TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought to describe these mutations and their impact in a subgroup-specific manner. We analyzed the TERT promoter by direct sequencing and genotyping in 466 medulloblastomas. The mutational distributions were determined according to subgroup affiliation, demographics, and clinical, prognostic, and molecular features. Integrated genomics approaches were used to identify specific somatic copy number alterations in TERT promoter-mutated and wild-type tumors. Overall, TERT promoter mutations were identified in 21 % of medulloblastomas. Strikingly, the highest frequencies of TERT mutations were observed in SHH (83 %; 55/66) and WNT (31 %; 4/13) medulloblastomas derived from adult patients. Group 3 and Group 4 harbored this alteration in <5 % of cases and showed no association with increased patient age. The prognostic implications of these mutations were highly subgroup-specific. TERT mutations identified a subset with good and poor prognosis in SHH and Group 4 tumors, respectively. Monosomy 6 was mostly restricted to WNT tumors without TERT mutations. Hallmark SHH focal copy number aberrations and chromosome 10q deletion were mutually exclusive with TERT mutations within SHH tumors. TERT promoter mutations are the most common recurrent somatic point mutation in medulloblastoma, and are very highly enriched in adult SHH and WNT tumors. TERT mutations define a subset of SHH medulloblastoma with distinct demographics, cytogenetics, and outcomes. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

Authors
Remke, M; Ramaswamy, V; Peacock, J; Shih, DJH; Koelsche, C; Northcott, PA; Hill, N; Cavalli, FMG; Kool, M; Wang, X; Mack, SC; Barszczyk, M; Morrissy, AS; Wu, X; Agnihotri, S; Luu, B; Jones, DTW; Garzia, L; Dubuc, AM; Zhukova, N; Vanner, R; Kros, JM; French, PJ; Van Meir, EG; Vibhakar, R; Zitterbart, K; Chan, JA; Bognár, L; Klekner, A; Lach, B; Jung, S; Saad, AG; Liau, LM; Albrecht, S; Zollo, M; Cooper, MK; Thompson, RC; Delattre, OO; Bourdeaut, F; Doz, FF; Garami, M; Hauser, P; Carlotti, CG; Van Meter, TE; Massimi, L; Fults, D; Pomeroy, SL; Kumabe, T; Ra, YS; Leonard, JR; Elbabaa, SK; Mora, J; Rubin, JB; Cho, YJ; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Eberhart, CG; Fouladi, M; Wechsler-Reya, RJ; Faria, CC; Croul, SE; Huang, A; Bouffet, E; Hawkins, CE; Dirks, PB; Weiss, WA; Schüller, U; Pollack, IF; Rutkowski, S; Meyronet, D; Jouvet, A; Fèvre-Montange, M; Jabado, N; Perek-Polnik, M
MLA Citation
Remke, M, Ramaswamy, V, Peacock, J, Shih, DJH, Koelsche, C, Northcott, PA, Hill, N, Cavalli, FMG, Kool, M, Wang, X, Mack, SC, Barszczyk, M, Morrissy, AS, Wu, X, Agnihotri, S, Luu, B, Jones, DTW, Garzia, L, Dubuc, AM, Zhukova, N, Vanner, R, Kros, JM, French, PJ, Van Meir, EG, Vibhakar, R, Zitterbart, K, Chan, JA, Bognár, L, Klekner, A, Lach, B, Jung, S, Saad, AG, Liau, LM, Albrecht, S, Zollo, M, Cooper, MK, Thompson, RC, Delattre, OO, Bourdeaut, F, Doz, FF, Garami, M, Hauser, P, Carlotti, CG, Van Meter, TE, Massimi, L, Fults, D, Pomeroy, SL, Kumabe, T, Ra, YS, Leonard, JR, Elbabaa, SK, Mora, J, Rubin, JB, Cho, YJ, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Eberhart, CG, Fouladi, M, Wechsler-Reya, RJ, Faria, CC, Croul, SE, Huang, A, Bouffet, E, Hawkins, CE, Dirks, PB, Weiss, WA, Schüller, U, Pollack, IF, Rutkowski, S, Meyronet, D, Jouvet, A, Fèvre-Montange, M, Jabado, N, and Perek-Polnik, M. "TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma." Acta Neuropathologica 126.6 (October 31, 2013): 917-929.
Source
scopus
Published In
Acta Neuropathologica
Volume
126
Issue
6
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
917
End Page
929
DOI
10.1007/s00401-013-1198-2

Complete response to steroids in dural inflammatory pseudotumor associated with Still's disease.

We report a unique case of a dural-based inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) arising in the left cavernous sinus of a patient with a history of juvenile Still's disease. The patient presented with hemi-facial paresthesias, dull, constant headaches, and transient episodes of sharp pain along the temporalis region. Treatment with oral steroid therapy resulted in complete regression of the lesion and accompanied neuralgia symptoms. Because intracranial IPT can mimic meningiomas both clinically and radiographically and can be associated with systemic arthritic diseases, neurosurgeons should be familiar with this entity in order to avoid unnecessary radical surgery and alternatively consider a tapering course of steroid therapy.

Authors
Batich, KA; William St Clair, E; McLendon, RE; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Batich, KA, William St Clair, E, McLendon, RE, and Sampson, JH. "Complete response to steroids in dural inflammatory pseudotumor associated with Still's disease." J Clin Neurosci 20.10 (October 2013): 1445-1448.
PMID
23768965
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume
20
Issue
10
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1445
End Page
1448
DOI
10.1016/j.jocn.2013.01.009

The integrated landscape of driver genomic alterations in glioblastoma.

Glioblastoma is one of the most challenging forms of cancer to treat. Here we describe a computational platform that integrates the analysis of copy number variations and somatic mutations and unravels the landscape of in-frame gene fusions in glioblastoma. We found mutations with loss of heterozygosity in LZTR1, encoding an adaptor of CUL3-containing E3 ligase complexes. Mutations and deletions disrupt LZTR1 function, which restrains the self renewal and growth of glioma spheres that retain stem cell features. Loss-of-function mutations in CTNND2 target a neural-specific gene and are associated with the transformation of glioma cells along the very aggressive mesenchymal phenotype. We also report recurrent translocations that fuse the coding sequence of EGFR to several partners, with EGFR-SEPT14 being the most frequent functional gene fusion in human glioblastoma. EGFR-SEPT14 fusions activate STAT3 signaling and confer mitogen independence and sensitivity to EGFR inhibition. These results provide insights into the pathogenesis of glioblastoma and highlight new targets for therapeutic intervention.

Authors
Frattini, V; Trifonov, V; Chan, JM; Castano, A; Lia, M; Abate, F; Keir, ST; Ji, AX; Zoppoli, P; Niola, F; Danussi, C; Dolgalev, I; Porrati, P; Pellegatta, S; Heguy, A; Gupta, G; Pisapia, DJ; Canoll, P; Bruce, JN; McLendon, RE; Yan, H; Aldape, K; Finocchiaro, G; Mikkelsen, T; Privé, GG; Bigner, DD; Lasorella, A; Rabadan, R; Iavarone, A
MLA Citation
Frattini, V, Trifonov, V, Chan, JM, Castano, A, Lia, M, Abate, F, Keir, ST, Ji, AX, Zoppoli, P, Niola, F, Danussi, C, Dolgalev, I, Porrati, P, Pellegatta, S, Heguy, A, Gupta, G, Pisapia, DJ, Canoll, P, Bruce, JN, McLendon, RE, Yan, H, Aldape, K, Finocchiaro, G, Mikkelsen, T, Privé, GG, Bigner, DD, Lasorella, A, Rabadan, R, and Iavarone, A. "The integrated landscape of driver genomic alterations in glioblastoma." Nature Genetics 45.10 (October 2013): 1141-1149.
PMID
23917401
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature Genetics
Volume
45
Issue
10
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1141
End Page
1149
DOI
10.1038/ng.2734

The somatic genomic landscape of glioblastoma.

We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization of more than 500 glioblastoma tumors (GBMs). We identify several novel mutated genes as well as complex rearrangements of signature receptors, including EGFR and PDGFRA. TERT promoter mutations are shown to correlate with elevated mRNA expression, supporting a role in telomerase reactivation. Correlative analyses confirm that the survival advantage of the proneural subtype is conferred by the G-CIMP phenotype, and MGMT DNA methylation may be a predictive biomarker for treatment response only in classical subtype GBM. Integrative analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles challenges the notion of therapeutic inhibition of a pathway as an alternative to inhibition of the target itself. These data will facilitate the discovery of therapeutic and diagnostic target candidates, the validation of research and clinical observations and the generation of unanticipated hypotheses that can advance our molecular understanding of this lethal cancer.

Authors
Brennan, CW; Verhaak, RGW; McKenna, A; Campos, B; Noushmehr, H; Salama, SR; Zheng, S; Chakravarty, D; Sanborn, JZ; Berman, SH; Beroukhim, R; Bernard, B; Wu, C-J; Genovese, G; Shmulevich, I; Barnholtz-Sloan, J; Zou, L; Vegesna, R; Shukla, SA; Ciriello, G; Yung, WK; Zhang, W; Sougnez, C; Mikkelsen, T; Aldape, K; Bigner, DD; Van Meir, EG; Prados, M; Sloan, A; Black, KL; Eschbacher, J; Finocchiaro, G; Friedman, W; Andrews, DW; Guha, A; Iacocca, M; O'Neill, BP; Foltz, G; Myers, J; Weisenberger, DJ; Penny, R; Kucherlapati, R; Perou, CM; Hayes, DN; Gibbs, R; Marra, M; Mills, GB; Lander, E; Spellman, P; Wilson, R; Sander, C; Weinstein, J; Meyerson, M; Gabriel, S; Laird, PW; Haussler, D; Getz, G; Chin, L; TCGA Research Network,
MLA Citation
Brennan, CW, Verhaak, RGW, McKenna, A, Campos, B, Noushmehr, H, Salama, SR, Zheng, S, Chakravarty, D, Sanborn, JZ, Berman, SH, Beroukhim, R, Bernard, B, Wu, C-J, Genovese, G, Shmulevich, I, Barnholtz-Sloan, J, Zou, L, Vegesna, R, Shukla, SA, Ciriello, G, Yung, WK, Zhang, W, Sougnez, C, Mikkelsen, T, Aldape, K, Bigner, DD, Van Meir, EG, Prados, M, Sloan, A, Black, KL, Eschbacher, J, Finocchiaro, G, Friedman, W, Andrews, DW, Guha, A, Iacocca, M, O'Neill, BP, Foltz, G, Myers, J, Weisenberger, DJ, Penny, R, Kucherlapati, R, Perou, CM, Hayes, DN, Gibbs, R, Marra, M, Mills, GB, Lander, E, Spellman, P, Wilson, R, Sander, C, Weinstein, J, Meyerson, M, Gabriel, S, Laird, PW, Haussler, D, Getz, G, Chin, L, and TCGA Research Network, . "The somatic genomic landscape of glioblastoma." Cell 155.2 (October 2013): 462-477.
PMID
24120142
Source
epmc
Published In
Cell
Volume
155
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
462
End Page
477
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2013.09.034

Construction of an immunotoxin, D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL, targeting EGFRwt and EGFRvIII for brain tumor therapy.

The EGF receptor gene (EGFR) is most frequently amplified and overexpressed, along with its deletion mutant, EGFRvIII, in glioblastoma. We tested the preclinical efficacy of the recombinant immunotoxin, D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL, which is reactive with a 55-amino acid (AA) region present in the extracellular domain of both EGFRwt (583-637 AAs) and EGFRvIII (292-346 AAs) proteins.The binding affinity and specificity of D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL for EGFRwt and EGFRvIII were measured by surface-plasmon resonance and flow cytometry. In vitro cytotoxicity of D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL was measured by inhibition of protein synthesis in human EGFRwt-transfected NR6 (NR6W), human EGFRvIII-transfected NR6 (NR6M), EGFRwt-overexpressing A431-epidermoid-carcinoma, and glioblastoma xenograft cells (43, D08-0493MG, D2159MG, and D270MG). In vivo antitumor efficacy of D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL was evaluated using 43, NR6M, and D270MG orthotopic tumor models.The KD of D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL for EGFRwt and EGFRvIII was 1.6×10(-9) mol/L and 1.3×10(-9) mol/L, respectively. Flow cytometry with NR6W and NR6M cells confirmed the specificity of D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL for EGFRwt and EGFRvIII. The D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL IC50 was 0.18 to 2.5 ng/mL on cells expressing EGFRwt (NR6W, A431, 43, and D08-0493MG). The D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL IC50 was approximately 0.25 ng/mL on EGFRvIII-expressing cells (NR6M) and on EGFRwt- and EGFRvIII-expressing glioblastoma xenograft cells (D2159MG and D270MG). Significantly, in intracranial tumor models of 43, NR6M, and D270MG, treatment with D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL by convection-enhanced delivery prolonged survival by 310% (P=0.006), 28% (P=0.002), and 166% (P=0.001), respectively.In preclinical studies, the D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL immunotoxin exhibited significant potential for treating brain tumors expressing EGFRwt, EGFRvIII, or both.

Authors
Chandramohan, V; Bao, X; Keir, ST; Pegram, CN; Szafranski, SE; Piao, H; Wikstrand, CJ; McLendon, RE; Kuan, C-T; Pastan, IH; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Chandramohan, V, Bao, X, Keir, ST, Pegram, CN, Szafranski, SE, Piao, H, Wikstrand, CJ, McLendon, RE, Kuan, C-T, Pastan, IH, and Bigner, DD. "Construction of an immunotoxin, D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL, targeting EGFRwt and EGFRvIII for brain tumor therapy." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 19.17 (September 2013): 4717-4727.
PMID
23857604
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
19
Issue
17
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
4717
End Page
4727
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-3891

Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in glioblastoma are associated with specific genomic alterations and related to transcriptional class.

Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have prognostic significance in many cancers, yet their roles in glioblastoma have not been fully defined. We hypothesized that TILs in glioblastoma are associated with molecular alterations, histologies, and survival.We used data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to investigate molecular, histologic, and clinical correlates of TILs in glioblastomas. Lymphocytes were categorized as absent, present, or abundant in histopathologic images from 171 TCGA glioblastomas. Associations were examined between lymphocytes and histologic features, mutations, copy number alterations, CpG island methylator phenotype, transcriptional class, and survival. We validated histologic findings using CD3G gene expression.We found a positive correlation between TILs and glioblastomas with gemistocytes, sarcomatous cells, epithelioid cells, and giant cells. Lymphocytes were enriched in the mesenchymal transcriptional class and strongly associated with mutations in NF1 and RB1. These mutations are frequent in the mesenchymal class and characteristic of gemistocytic, sarcomatous, epithelioid, and giant cell histologies. Conversely, TILs were rare in glioblastomas with small cells and oligodendroglioma components. Lymphocytes were depleted in the classical transcriptional class and in EGF receptor (EGFR)-amplified and homozygous PTEN-deleted glioblastomas. These alterations are characteristic of glioblastomas with small cells and glioblastomas of the classical transcriptional class. No association with survival was shown.TILs were enriched in glioblastomas of the mesenchymal class, strongly associated with mutations in NF1 and RB1 and typical of histologies characterized by these mutations. Conversely, TILs were depleted in the classical class, EGFR-amplified, and homozygous PTEN-deleted tumors and rare in histologies characterized by these alterations.

Authors
Rutledge, WC; Kong, J; Gao, J; Gutman, DA; Cooper, LAD; Appin, C; Park, Y; Scarpace, L; Mikkelsen, T; Cohen, ML; Aldape, KD; McLendon, RE; Lehman, NL; Miller, CR; Schniederjan, MJ; Brennan, CW; Saltz, JH; Moreno, CS; Brat, DJ
MLA Citation
Rutledge, WC, Kong, J, Gao, J, Gutman, DA, Cooper, LAD, Appin, C, Park, Y, Scarpace, L, Mikkelsen, T, Cohen, ML, Aldape, KD, McLendon, RE, Lehman, NL, Miller, CR, Schniederjan, MJ, Brennan, CW, Saltz, JH, Moreno, CS, and Brat, DJ. "Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in glioblastoma are associated with specific genomic alterations and related to transcriptional class." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 19.18 (September 2013): 4951-4960.
PMID
23864165
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
19
Issue
18
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
4951
End Page
4960
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-0551

O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunohistochemistry as a predictor of resistance to temozolomide in primary CNS lymphoma.

Temozolomide, an alkylating agent, has shown promise in treating primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). The enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repairs alkylating damage, such as that induced by temozolomide. We hypothesized that MGMT immunohistochemistry would predict resistance to temozolomide in PCNSL. A retrospective study of newly-diagnosed and recurrent PCNSL patients treated at our institution was conducted to study the predictive value of MGMT immunohistochemistry for response to temozolomide. 20 patients who were treated with temozolomide as a single agent were identified during the study time period. 6/20 patients demonstrated a response, corresponding to an objective response rate of 30 % (95 % CI 8-52). Five patients with low MGMT level (<30 %) showed a response to temozolomide. Only one of 10 patients (10 %) with high MGMT level (≥30 %) exhibited a response to temozolomide. Small sample numbers precluded formal statistical comparisons. Two patients with complete response remain alive without progressive disease 6.7 and 7.2 years after temozolomide initiation. Immunohistochemistry can be performed on small biopsies to selectively assess MGMT status in tumor versus surrounding inflammation. MGMT analysis by immunohistochemistry may predict response to temozolomide in PCNSL and should be prospectively investigated.

Authors
Jiang, X; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Quinn, JA; Austin, AD; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Jiang, X, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Quinn, JA, Austin, AD, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, and Friedman, HS. "O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunohistochemistry as a predictor of resistance to temozolomide in primary CNS lymphoma." United States. August 2013.
PMID
23686298
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurooncol
Volume
114
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
135
End Page
140
DOI
10.1007/s11060-013-1162-y

Clinicopathological characteristics and treatment of rhabdoid glioblastoma Clinical article

Authors
Babu, R; Hatef, J; McLendon, RE; Cummings, TJ; Sampson, JH; Friedman, AH; Adamson, C
MLA Citation
Babu, R, Hatef, J, McLendon, RE, Cummings, TJ, Sampson, JH, Friedman, AH, and Adamson, C. "Clinicopathological characteristics and treatment of rhabdoid glioblastoma Clinical article." JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY 119.2 (August 2013): 412-419.
PMID
23641829
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Neurosurgery
Volume
119
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
412
End Page
419
DOI
10.3171/2013.3.JNS121773

Intraaxial dermoid cyst of the medulla

Authors
Park, JG; Babij, R; Kranz, PG; McLendon, RE; Adamson, C
MLA Citation
Park, JG, Babij, R, Kranz, PG, McLendon, RE, and Adamson, C. "Intraaxial dermoid cyst of the medulla." JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY 119.2 (August 2013): 442-445.
PMID
23621596
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Neurosurgery
Volume
119
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
442
End Page
445
DOI
10.3171/2013.3.JNS122430

TERT promoter mutations occur frequently in gliomas and a subset of tumors derived from cells with low rates of self-renewal.

Malignant cells, like all actively growing cells, must maintain their telomeres, but genetic mechanisms responsible for telomere maintenance in tumors have only recently been discovered. In particular, mutations of the telomere binding proteins alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) or death-domain associated protein (DAXX) have been shown to underlie a telomere maintenance mechanism not involving telomerase (alternative lengthening of telomeres), and point mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene increase telomerase expression and have been shown to occur in melanomas and a small number of other tumors. To further define the tumor types in which this latter mechanism plays a role, we surveyed 1,230 tumors of 60 different types. We found that tumors could be divided into types with low (<15%) and high (≥15%) frequencies of TERT promoter mutations. The nine TERT-high tumor types almost always originated in tissues with relatively low rates of self renewal, including melanomas, liposarcomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, urothelial carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue, medulloblastomas, and subtypes of gliomas (including 83% of primary glioblastoma, the most common brain tumor type). TERT and ATRX mutations were mutually exclusive, suggesting that these two genetic mechanisms confer equivalent selective growth advantages. In addition to their implications for understanding the relationship between telomeres and tumorigenesis, TERT mutations provide a biomarker that may be useful for the early detection of urinary tract and liver tumors and aid in the classification and prognostication of brain tumors.

Authors
Killela, PJ; Reitman, ZJ; Jiao, Y; Bettegowda, C; Agrawal, N; Diaz, LA; Friedman, AH; Friedman, H; Gallia, GL; Giovanella, BC; Grollman, AP; He, T-C; He, Y; Hruban, RH; Jallo, GI; Mandahl, N; Meeker, AK; Mertens, F; Netto, GJ; Rasheed, BA; Riggins, GJ; Rosenquist, TA; Schiffman, M; Shih, I-M; Theodorescu, D; Torbenson, MS; Velculescu, VE; Wang, T-L; Wentzensen, N; Wood, LD; Zhang, M; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Kinzler, KW; Vogelstein, B; Papadopoulos, N; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Killela, PJ, Reitman, ZJ, Jiao, Y, Bettegowda, C, Agrawal, N, Diaz, LA, Friedman, AH, Friedman, H, Gallia, GL, Giovanella, BC, Grollman, AP, He, T-C, He, Y, Hruban, RH, Jallo, GI, Mandahl, N, Meeker, AK, Mertens, F, Netto, GJ, Rasheed, BA, Riggins, GJ, Rosenquist, TA, Schiffman, M, Shih, I-M, Theodorescu, D, Torbenson, MS, Velculescu, VE, Wang, T-L, Wentzensen, N, Wood, LD, Zhang, M, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Kinzler, KW, Vogelstein, B, Papadopoulos, N, and Yan, H. "TERT promoter mutations occur frequently in gliomas and a subset of tumors derived from cells with low rates of self-renewal." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110.15 (April 2013): 6021-6026.
PMID
23530248
Source
epmc
Published In
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume
110
Issue
15
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
6021
End Page
6026
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1303607110

Exomic Sequencing of Four Rare Central Nervous System Tumor Types

Authors
Bettegowda, C; Agrawal, N; Jiao, Y; Wang, Y; Wood, LD; Rodriguez, FJ; Hruban, RH; Gallia, GL; Binder, ZA; Riggins, CJ; Salmasi, V; Riggins, GJ; Reitman, ZJ; Rasheed, A; Keir, S; Shinjo, S; Marie, S; McLendon, R; Jallo, G; Vogelstein, B; Bigner, D; Yan, H; Kinzler, KW; Papadopoulos, N
MLA Citation
Bettegowda, C, Agrawal, N, Jiao, Y, Wang, Y, Wood, LD, Rodriguez, FJ, Hruban, RH, Gallia, GL, Binder, ZA, Riggins, CJ, Salmasi, V, Riggins, GJ, Reitman, ZJ, Rasheed, A, Keir, S, Shinjo, S, Marie, S, McLendon, R, Jallo, G, Vogelstein, B, Bigner, D, Yan, H, Kinzler, KW, and Papadopoulos, N. "Exomic Sequencing of Four Rare Central Nervous System Tumor Types." ONCOTARGET 4.4 (April 2013): 572-583.
PMID
23592488
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Oncotarget
Volume
4
Issue
4
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
572
End Page
583
DOI
10.18632/oncotarget.964

A comprehensive analysis of 41 patients with rosette-forming glioneuronal tumors of the fourth ventricle.

The rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor (RGNT) of the fourth ventricle is a recently described, rare, and distinct tumor of the glioneuronal family. The presentation, natural history, and treatment response of these tumors has been unclear as there are no significant series of a sizeable population with long-term follow-up. We report a comprehensive analysis of 41 patients with RGNT to provide the most current understanding of this rare tumor. Treatment of these patients has consisted of resection via the transvermian and telovelar approaches, with one patient requiring radiotherapy due to tumor recurrence. Various unique imaging characteristics may allow for the preoperative identification of these tumors. Resection via the telovelar approach should be considered for symptomatic tumors and those that pose a risk of obstructive hydrocephalus. Due to their benign nature and low propensity for recurrence, subtotal resection may be appropriate for those that are adherent to the brainstem. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients with tumor recurrence.

Authors
Zhang, J; Babu, R; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Adamson, C
MLA Citation
Zhang, J, Babu, R, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, and Adamson, C. "A comprehensive analysis of 41 patients with rosette-forming glioneuronal tumors of the fourth ventricle." J Clin Neurosci 20.3 (March 2013): 335-341. (Review)
PMID
23375398
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Neuroscience
Volume
20
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
335
End Page
341
DOI
10.1016/j.jocn.2012.09.003

Glioblastoma stem cells generate vascular pericytes to support vessel function and tumor growth.

Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly vascular and lethal brain tumors that display cellular hierarchies containing self-renewing tumorigenic glioma stem cells (GSCs). Because GSCs often reside in perivascular niches and may undergo mesenchymal differentiation, we interrogated GSC potential to generate vascular pericytes. Here, we show that GSCs give rise to pericytes to support vessel function and tumor growth. In vivo cell lineage tracing with constitutive and lineage-specific fluorescent reporters demonstrated that GSCs generate the majority of vascular pericytes. Selective elimination of GSC-derived pericytes disrupts the neovasculature and potently inhibits tumor growth. Analysis of human GBM specimens showed that most pericytes are derived from neoplastic cells. GSCs are recruited toward endothelial cells via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis and are induced to become pericytes predominantly by transforming growth factor β. Thus, GSCs contribute to vascular pericytes that may actively remodel perivascular niches. Therapeutic targeting of GSC-derived pericytes may effectively block tumor progression and improve antiangiogenic therapy.

Authors
Cheng, L; Huang, Z; Zhou, W; Wu, Q; Donnola, S; Liu, JK; Fang, X; Sloan, AE; Mao, Y; Lathia, JD; Min, W; McLendon, RE; Rich, JN; Bao, S
MLA Citation
Cheng, L, Huang, Z, Zhou, W, Wu, Q, Donnola, S, Liu, JK, Fang, X, Sloan, AE, Mao, Y, Lathia, JD, Min, W, McLendon, RE, Rich, JN, and Bao, S. "Glioblastoma stem cells generate vascular pericytes to support vessel function and tumor growth." Cell 153.1 (March 2013): 139-152.
PMID
23540695
Source
epmc
Published In
Cell
Volume
153
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
139
End Page
152
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2013.02.021

A phase I/II trial of pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in adult patients with relapsed malignant glioma.

PURPOSE: Increased mitogenic signaling and angiogenesis, frequently facilitated by somatic activation of EGF receptor (EGFR; ErbB1) and/or loss of PTEN, and VEGF overexpression, respectively, drive malignant glioma growth. We hypothesized that patients with recurrent glioblastoma would exhibit differential antitumor benefit based on tumor PTEN/EGFRvIII status when treated with the antiangiogenic agent pazopanib and the ErbB inhibitor lapatinib. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A phase II study evaluated the antitumor activity of pazopanib 400 mg/d plus lapatinib 1,000 mg/d in patients with grade 4 malignant glioma and known PTEN/EGFRvIII status not receiving enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (EIAC). The phase II study used a two-stage Green-Dahlberg design for futility. An independent, parallel phase I component determined the maximum-tolerated regimen (MTR) of pazopanib and lapatinib in patients with grade 3/4 glioma receiving EIACs. RESULTS: The six-month progression-free survival (PFS) rates in phase II (n = 41) were 0% and 15% in the PTEN/EGFRvIII-positive and PTEN/EGFRvIII-negative cohorts, respectively, leading to early termination. Two patients (5%) had a partial response and 14 patients (34%) had stable disease lasting 8 or more weeks. In phase I (n = 34), the MTR was not reached. On the basis of pharmacokinetic and safety review, a regimen of pazopanib 600 mg plus lapatinib 1,000 mg, each twice daily, was considered safe. Concomitant EIACs reduced exposure to pazopanib and lapatinib. CONCLUSIONS: The antitumor activity of this combination at the phase II dose tested was limited. Pharmacokinetic data indicated that exposure to lapatinib was subtherapeutic in the phase II evaluation. Evaluation of intratumoral drug delivery and activity may be essential for hypothesis-testing trials with targeted agents in malignant glioma.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Groves, MD; Wen, PY; Nabors, L; Mikkelsen, T; Rosenfeld, S; Raizer, J; Barriuso, J; McLendon, RE; Suttle, AB; Ma, B; Curtis, CM; Dar, MM; de Bono, J
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Groves, MD, Wen, PY, Nabors, L, Mikkelsen, T, Rosenfeld, S, Raizer, J, Barriuso, J, McLendon, RE, Suttle, AB, Ma, B, Curtis, CM, Dar, MM, and de Bono, J. "A phase I/II trial of pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in adult patients with relapsed malignant glioma." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 19.4 (February 2013): 900-908.
PMID
23363814
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
19
Issue
4
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
900
End Page
908
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-12-1707

A PK2/Bv8/PROK2 antagonist suppresses tumorigenic processes by inhibiting angiogenesis in glioma and blocking myeloid cell infiltration in pancreatic cancer.

Infiltration of myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment is often associated with enhanced angiogenesis and tumor progression, resulting in poor prognosis in many types of cancer. The polypeptide chemokine PK2 (Bv8, PROK2) has been shown to regulate myeloid cell mobilization from the bone marrow, leading to activation of the angiogenic process, as well as accumulation of macrophages and neutrophils in the tumor site. Neutralizing antibodies against PK2 were shown to display potent anti-tumor efficacy, illustrating the potential of PK2-antagonists as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. In this study we demonstrate the anti-tumor activity of a small molecule PK2 antagonist, PKRA7, in the context of glioblastoma and pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor models. For the highly vascularized glioblastoma, PKRA7 was associated with decreased blood vessel density and increased necrotic areas in the tumor mass. Consistent with the anti-angiogenic activity of PKRA7 in vivo, this compound effectively reduced PK2-induced microvascular endothelial cell branching in vitro. For the poorly vascularized pancreatic cancer, the primary anti-tumor effect of PKRA7 appears to be mediated by the blockage of myeloid cell migration/infiltration. At the molecular level, PKRA7 inhibits PK2-induced expression of certain pro-migratory chemokines and chemokine receptors in macrophages. Combining PKRA7 treatment with standard chemotherapeutic agents resulted in enhanced effects in xenograft models for both types of tumor. Taken together, our results indicate that the anti-tumor activity of PKRA7 can be mediated by two distinct mechanisms that are relevant to the pathological features of the specific type of cancer. This small molecule PK2 antagonist holds the promise to be further developed as an effective agent for combinational cancer therapy.

Authors
Curtis, VF; Wang, H; Yang, P; McLendon, RE; Li, X; Zhou, Q-Y; Wang, X-F
MLA Citation
Curtis, VF, Wang, H, Yang, P, McLendon, RE, Li, X, Zhou, Q-Y, and Wang, X-F. "A PK2/Bv8/PROK2 antagonist suppresses tumorigenic processes by inhibiting angiogenesis in glioma and blocking myeloid cell infiltration in pancreatic cancer." Plos One 8.1 (January 23, 2013): e54916-null.
PMID
23372791
Source
epmc
Published In
Plos One
Volume
8
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
e54916
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0054916

Disruption of wild-type IDH1 suppresses D-2-hydroxyglutarate production in IDH1-mutated gliomas.

Point mutations at Arg132 of the cytoplasmic NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) occur frequently in gliomas and result in a gain of function to produce the "oncometabolite" D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). The mutated IDH1 allele is usually associated with a wild-type IDH1 allele (heterozygous) in cancer. Here, we identify 2 gliomas that underwent loss of the wild-type IDH1 allele but retained the mutant IDH1 allele following tumor progression from World Health Organization (WHO) grade III anaplastic astrocytomas to WHO grade IV glioblastomas. Intratumoral D-2HG was 14-fold lower in the glioblastomas lacking wild-type IDH1 than in glioblastomas with heterozygous IDH1 mutations. To characterize the contribution of wild-type IDH1 to cancer cell D-2HG production, we established an IDH1-mutated astrocytoma (IMA) cell line from a WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytoma. Disruption of the wild-type IDH1 allele in IMA cells by gene targeting resulted in an 87-fold decrease in cellular D-2HG levels, showing that both wild-type and mutant IDH1 alleles are required for D-2HG production in glioma cells. Expression of wild-type IDH1 was also critical for mutant IDH1-associated D-2HG production in the colorectal cancer cell line HCT116. These insights may aid in the development of therapeutic strategies to target IDH1-mutated cancers.

Authors
Jin, G; Reitman, ZJ; Duncan, CG; Spasojevic, I; Gooden, DM; Rasheed, BA; Yang, R; Lopez, GY; He, Y; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Jin, G, Reitman, ZJ, Duncan, CG, Spasojevic, I, Gooden, DM, Rasheed, BA, Yang, R, Lopez, GY, He, Y, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "Disruption of wild-type IDH1 suppresses D-2-hydroxyglutarate production in IDH1-mutated gliomas." Cancer Research 73.2 (January 2013): 496-501.
PMID
23204232
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
73
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
496
End Page
501
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-2852

The integrated landscape of driver genomic alterations in glioblastoma

Glioblastoma is one of the most challenging forms of cancer to treat. Here we describe a computational platform that integrates the analysis of copy number variations and somatic mutations and unravels the landscape of in-frame gene fusions in glioblastoma. We found mutations with loss of heterozygosity in LZTR1, encoding an adaptor of CUL3-containing E3 ligase complexes. Mutations and deletions disrupt LZTR1 function, which restrains the self renewal and growth of glioma spheres that retain stem cell features. Loss-of-function mutations in CTNND2 target a neural-specific gene and are associated with the transformation of glioma cells along the very aggressive mesenchymal phenotype. We also report recurrent translocations that fuse the coding sequence of EGFR to several partners, with EGFR-SEPT14 being the most frequent functional gene fusion in human glioblastoma. EGFR-SEPT14 fusions activate STAT3 signaling and confer mitogen independence and sensitivity to EGFR inhibition. These results provide insights into the pathogenesis of glioblastoma and highlight new targets for therapeutic intervention. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

Authors
Frattini, V; Trifonov, V; Chan, JM; Castano, A; Lia, M; Abate, F; Keir, ST; Ji, AX; Zoppoli, P; Niola, F; al, E
MLA Citation
Frattini, V, Trifonov, V, Chan, JM, Castano, A, Lia, M, Abate, F, Keir, ST, Ji, AX, Zoppoli, P, Niola, F, and al, E. "The integrated landscape of driver genomic alterations in glioblastoma." Nature Genetics 45.10 (2013): 1141-1149.
Source
scival
Published In
Nature Genetics
Volume
45
Issue
10
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1141
End Page
1149
DOI
10.1038/ng.2734

O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunohistochemistry as a predictor of resistance to temozolomide in primary CNS lymphoma

Temozolomide, an alkylating agent, has shown promise in treating primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). The enzyme O6-methylguanine- DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repairs alkylating damage, such as that induced by temozolomide. We hypothesized that MGMT immunohistochemistry would predict resistance to temozolomide in PCNSL. A retrospective study of newly-diagnosed and recurrent PCNSL patients treated at our institution was conducted to study the predictive value of MGMT immunohistochemistry for response to temozolomide. 20 patients who were treated with temozolomide as a single agent were identified during the study time period. 6/20 patients demonstrated a response, corresponding to an objective response rate of 30 % (95 % CI 8-52). Five patients with low MGMT level (<30 %) showed a response to temozolomide. Only one of 10 patients (10 %) with high MGMT level (≥30 %) exhibited a response to temozolomide. Small sample numbers precluded formal statistical comparisons. Two patients with complete response remain alive without progressive disease 6.7 and 7.2 years after temozolomide initiation. Immunohistochemistry can be performed on small biopsies to selectively assess MGMT status in tumor versus surrounding inflammation. MGMT analysis by immunohistochemistry may predict response to temozolomide in PCNSL and should be prospectively investigated. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

Authors
Jiang, X; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Quinn, JA; Austin, AD; II, JEH; McLendon, RE; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Jiang, X, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Quinn, JA, Austin, AD, II, JEH, McLendon, RE, and Friedman, HS. "O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunohistochemistry as a predictor of resistance to temozolomide in primary CNS lymphoma." Journal of Neuro-Oncology 114.1 (2013): 135-140.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
114
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
135
End Page
140
DOI
10.1007/s11060-013-1162-y

Laminin alpha 2 enables glioblastoma stem cell growth.

Glioblastomas (GBMs) are lethal cancers that display cellular hierarchies parallel to normal brain. At the apex are GBM stem cells (GSCs), which are relatively resistant to conventional therapy. Interactions with the adjacent perivascular niche are an important driver of malignancy and self-renewal in GSCs. Extracellular matrix (ECM) cues instruct neural stem/progenitor cell-niche interactions, and the objective of our study was to elucidate its composition and contribution to GSC maintenance in the perivascular niche.We interrogated human tumor tissue for immunofluorescence analysis and derived GSCs from tumor tissues for functional studies. Bioinformatics analyses were conducted by mining publicly available databases.We find that laminin ECM proteins are localized to the perivascular GBM niche and inform negative patient prognosis. To identify the source of laminins, we characterized cellular elements within the niche and found that laminin α chains were expressed by nonstem tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells (ECs). RNA interference targeting laminin α2 inhibited GSC growth and self-renewal. In co-culture studies of GSCs and ECs, laminin α2 knockdown in ECs resulted in decreased tumor growth.Our studies highlight the contribution of nonstem tumor cell-derived laminin juxtracrine signaling. As laminin α2 has recently been identified as a molecular marker of aggressive ependymoma, we propose that the brain vascular ECM promotes tumor malignancy through maintenance of the GSC compartment, providing not only a molecular fingerprint but also a possible therapeutic target.

Authors
Lathia, JD; Li, M; Hall, PE; Gallagher, J; Hale, JS; Wu, Q; Venere, M; Levy, E; Rani, MRS; Huang, P; Bae, E; Selfridge, J; Cheng, L; Guvenc, H; McLendon, RE; Nakano, I; Sloan, AE; Phillips, HS; Lai, A; Gladson, CL; Bredel, M; Bao, S; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Lathia, JD, Li, M, Hall, PE, Gallagher, J, Hale, JS, Wu, Q, Venere, M, Levy, E, Rani, MRS, Huang, P, Bae, E, Selfridge, J, Cheng, L, Guvenc, H, McLendon, RE, Nakano, I, Sloan, AE, Phillips, HS, Lai, A, Gladson, CL, Bredel, M, Bao, S, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Laminin alpha 2 enables glioblastoma stem cell growth." Annals of Neurology 72.5 (November 2012): 766-778.
PMID
23280793
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Neurology
Volume
72
Issue
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
766
End Page
778
DOI
10.1002/ana.23674

Global identification of MLL2-targeted loci reveals MLL2's role in diverse signaling pathways.

Myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)-family genes encode histone lysine methyltransferases that play important roles in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. MLL genes are frequently mutated in human cancers. Unlike MLL1, MLL2 (also known as ALR/MLL4) and its homolog MLL3 are not well-understood. Specifically, little is known regarding the extent of global MLL2 involvement in the regulation of gene expression and the mechanism underlying its alterations in driving tumorigenesis. Here we profile the global loci targeted by MLL2. A combinatorial analysis of the MLL2 binding profile and gene expression in MLL2 wild-type versus MLL2-null isogenic cell lines identified direct transcriptional target genes and revealed the connection of MLL2 to multiple cellular signaling pathways, including the p53 pathway, cAMP-mediated signaling, and cholestasis signaling. In particular, we demonstrate that MLL2 participates in retinoic acid receptor signaling by promoting retinoic acid-responsive gene transcription. Our results present a genome-wide integrative analysis of the MLL2 target loci and suggest potential mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis driven by MLL2 alterations.

Authors
Guo, C; Chang, C-C; Wortham, M; Chen, LH; Kernagis, DN; Qin, X; Cho, Y-W; Chi, J-T; Grant, GA; McLendon, RE; Yan, H; Ge, K; Papadopoulos, N; Bigner, DD; He, Y
MLA Citation
Guo, C, Chang, C-C, Wortham, M, Chen, LH, Kernagis, DN, Qin, X, Cho, Y-W, Chi, J-T, Grant, GA, McLendon, RE, Yan, H, Ge, K, Papadopoulos, N, Bigner, DD, and He, Y. "Global identification of MLL2-targeted loci reveals MLL2's role in diverse signaling pathways." Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109.43 (October 23, 2012): 17603-17608.
PMID
23045699
Source
pubmed
Published In
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume
109
Issue
43
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
17603
End Page
17608
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1208807109

Phase II study of Gleevec plus hydroxyurea in adults with progressive or recurrent low-grade glioma.

We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive/recurrent low-grade glioma.A total of 64 patients with recurrent/progressive low-grade glioma were enrolled in this single-center study that stratified patients into astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma cohorts. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 400 mg per day for patients not on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and at 500 mg twice a day if on EIAEDs. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 12 months (PFS-12) and secondary endpoints were safety, median progression-free survival, and radiographic response rate.Thirty-two patients were enrolled into each cohort. Eleven patients (17%) had before radiotherapy and 24 (38%) had received before chemotherapy. The median PFS and PFS-12 were 11 months and 39%, respectively. Outcome did not differ between the histologic cohorts. No patient achieved a radiographic response. The most common grade 3 or greater adverse events were neutropenia (11%), thrombocytopenia (3%), and diarrhea (3%).Imatinib plus hydroxyurea was well tolerated among recurrent/progressive LGG patients but this regimen demonstrated negligible antitumor activity.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Herndon, JE; Coan, A; Gururangan, S; Peters, KB; McLendon, R; Sathornsumetee, S; Rich, JN; Lipp, ES; Janney, D; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Herndon, JE, Coan, A, Gururangan, S, Peters, KB, McLendon, R, Sathornsumetee, S, Rich, JN, Lipp, ES, Janney, D, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II study of Gleevec plus hydroxyurea in adults with progressive or recurrent low-grade glioma." Cancer 118.19 (October 2012): 4759-4767.
PMID
22371319
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
118
Issue
19
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
4759
End Page
4767
DOI
10.1002/cncr.26541

NICHE DERIVED EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX CUES ARE PIVOTAL FOR GLIOBLASTOMA STEM CELL GROWTH AND MAINTENANCE

Authors
Hall, PE; Li, M; Gallagher, J; Hale, JS; Wu, Q; Venere, M; Levy, E; Rani, MRS; Huang, P; Bae, E; Selfridge, J; Cheng, L; Guvenc, H; McLendon, RE; Nakano, I; Sloan, AE; Phillips, H; Lai, A; Gladson, C; Bredel, M; Bao, S; Hjelmeland, A; Lathia, JD; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Hall, PE, Li, M, Gallagher, J, Hale, JS, Wu, Q, Venere, M, Levy, E, Rani, MRS, Huang, P, Bae, E, Selfridge, J, Cheng, L, Guvenc, H, McLendon, RE, Nakano, I, Sloan, AE, Phillips, H, Lai, A, Gladson, C, Bredel, M, Bao, S, Hjelmeland, A, Lathia, JD, and Rich, JN. "NICHE DERIVED EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX CUES ARE PIVOTAL FOR GLIOBLASTOMA STEM CELL GROWTH AND MAINTENANCE." October 2012.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
14
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
143
End Page
143

Pilot study of systemic and intrathecal mafosfamide followed by conformal radiation for infants with intracranial central nervous system tumors: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study (PBTC-001).

A pilot study to investigate the feasibility of the addition of intrathecal (IT) mafosfamide to a regimen of concomitant multi-agent systemic chemotherapy followed by conformal radiation therapy (RT) for children <3 years with newly diagnosed embryonal CNS tumors was performed. Ninety-three newly diagnosed infants and children (<3 years) with embryonal CNS tumors were enrolled. Twenty weeks of systemic multi-agent chemotherapy commenced within 35 days of surgery. Patients without CSF flow obstruction (n = 71) received IT mafosfamide (14 mg) with chemotherapy. Localized (M(0)) patients with SD or better subsequently received RT followed by 20 additional weeks of chemotherapy. Second look surgery was encouraged prior to RT if there was an incomplete surgical resection at diagnosis. 71 evaluable patients with normal CSF flow received IT Mafosfamide with systemic chemotherapy; patients with M + disease were removed from protocol therapy at 20 weeks and those with PD at the time of progression. One and 5-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for the cohort of 71 evaluable patients were 52 ± 6.5 % and 33 ± 13 %, and 67 ± 6.2 % and 51 ± 11 %, respectively. The 1-year Progression Free Survival (PFS) for M0 patients with medulloblastoma (MB, n = 20), supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET, n = 9), and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT, n = 12) was 80 ± 7 %, 67 ± 15 % and 27 ± 13 % and 5-year PFS was 65 ± 19 %, 37 ± 29 %, and 0 ± 0 %, respectively. The addition of IT mafosfamide to systemic chemotherapy in infants with embryonal CNS tumors was feasible. The PFS for M0 patients appears comparable to or better than most prior historical comparisons and was excellent for those receiving conformal radiotherapy.

Authors
Blaney, SM; Kocak, M; Gajjar, A; Chintagumpala, M; Merchant, T; Kieran, M; Pollack, IF; Gururangan, S; Geyer, R; Phillips, P; McLendon, RE; Packer, R; Goldman, S; Banerjee, A; Heideman, R; Boyett, JM; Kun, L
MLA Citation
Blaney, SM, Kocak, M, Gajjar, A, Chintagumpala, M, Merchant, T, Kieran, M, Pollack, IF, Gururangan, S, Geyer, R, Phillips, P, McLendon, RE, Packer, R, Goldman, S, Banerjee, A, Heideman, R, Boyett, JM, and Kun, L. "Pilot study of systemic and intrathecal mafosfamide followed by conformal radiation for infants with intracranial central nervous system tumors: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study (PBTC-001)." Journal of Neuro Oncology 109.3 (September 2012): 565-571.
PMID
22790443
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
109
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
565
End Page
571
DOI
10.1007/s11060-012-0929-x

Descriptive epidemiology of malignant and nonmalignant primary spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina tumors, United States, 2004-2007.

Primary tumors of the spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina are relatively rare, and a paucity of population-based data exist on tumors in these sites. This study intends to augment the current literature by examining incidence of these tumors on a national level.Data from central cancer registries in the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) programs for 2004-2007 (covering 99.2% of US population) and 1999-2007 (covering 89.4% of US population) were analyzed. Analyses for diagnosis years 2004-2007 included cases of malignant and nonmalignant primary spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina tumors. Descriptive statistics including estimated age-adjusted incidence rates standardized to the 2000 US standard population were conducted for both malignant and nonmalignant primary spinal tumors from cases diagnosed during 2004-2007 as well as trend analyses on malignant cases of primary spinal tumors (n = 5103) for cases diagnosed during 1999-2007 using SEER Stat 6.6.2 software.There were 2576 cases of malignant primary spinal tumors and 9136 cases of nonmalignant primary spinal tumors in 2004-2007. The incidence of malignant and nonmalignant primary spinal tumors combined differed by age, sex, race, and ethnicity. Results of trend analyses indicated that malignant primary spinal tumors have been stable throughout the 1999-2007 period.This large population-based study adds new insights into the descriptive epidemiology of primary spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina tumors by providing in-depth analyses of the incidence of these tumors on a national level.

Authors
Duong, LM; McCarthy, BJ; McLendon, RE; Dolecek, TA; Kruchko, C; Douglas, LL; Ajani, UA
MLA Citation
Duong, LM, McCarthy, BJ, McLendon, RE, Dolecek, TA, Kruchko, C, Douglas, LL, and Ajani, UA. "Descriptive epidemiology of malignant and nonmalignant primary spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina tumors, United States, 2004-2007." Cancer 118.17 (September 2012): 4220-4227.
PMID
22907705
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
118
Issue
17
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
4220
End Page
4227
DOI
10.1002/cncr.27390

Bevacizumab therapy for adults with recurrent/progressive meningioma: a retrospective series.

Intracranial meningiomas are often indolent tumors which typically grow over years to decades. Nonetheless, meningiomas that progress after maximum safe resection and radiation therapy pose a significant therapeutic challenge and effective therapies have yet to be identified. Preclinical studies implicate angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of more aggressive meningiomas, suggesting that anti-angiogenic therapies may be of utility in this setting. We performed a retrospective review of fourteen patients with recurrent meningioma treated at Duke University Medical Center with bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, administered either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Most patients were heavily pre-treated. Progression-free survival at 6 months was 86 % and was comparable regardless of meningioma grade and whether bevacizumab was administered as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. Most toxicities were mild however single patients developed CNS hemorrhage (grade 1) and intestinal perforation (grade 4), respectively. Bevacizumab can be administered safely to patients with meningioma and appears to be associated with encouraging anti-tumor effect when administered as either a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy. Phase II trials investigating bevacizumab in patients with progressive/recurrent meningioma are warranted.

Authors
Lou, E; Sumrall, AL; Turner, S; Peters, KB; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; McSherry, F; Norfleet, J; Friedman, HS; Reardon, DA
MLA Citation
Lou, E, Sumrall, AL, Turner, S, Peters, KB, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, McSherry, F, Norfleet, J, Friedman, HS, and Reardon, DA. "Bevacizumab therapy for adults with recurrent/progressive meningioma: a retrospective series." J Neurooncol 109.1 (August 2012): 63-70.
PMID
22535433
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurooncol
Volume
109
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
63
End Page
70
DOI
10.1007/s11060-012-0861-0

Subgroup-specific structural variation across 1,000 medulloblastoma genomes.

Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour, is currently treated with nonspecific cytotoxic therapies including surgery, whole-brain radiation, and aggressive chemotherapy. As medulloblastoma exhibits marked intertumoural heterogeneity, with at least four distinct molecular variants, previous attempts to identify targets for therapy have been underpowered because of small samples sizes. Here we report somatic copy number aberrations (SCNAs) in 1,087 unique medulloblastomas. SCNAs are common in medulloblastoma, and are predominantly subgroup-enriched. The most common region of focal copy number gain is a tandem duplication of SNCAIP, a gene associated with Parkinson's disease, which is exquisitely restricted to Group 4α. Recurrent translocations of PVT1, including PVT1-MYC and PVT1-NDRG1, that arise through chromothripsis are restricted to Group 3. Numerous targetable SCNAs, including recurrent events targeting TGF-β signalling in Group 3, and NF-κB signalling in Group 4, suggest future avenues for rational, targeted therapy.

Authors
Northcott, PA; Shih, DJH; Peacock, J; Garzia, L; Morrissy, AS; Zichner, T; Stütz, AM; Korshunov, A; Reimand, J; Schumacher, SE; Beroukhim, R; Ellison, DW; Marshall, CR; Lionel, AC; Mack, S; Dubuc, A; Yao, Y; Ramaswamy, V; Luu, B; Rolider, A; Cavalli, FMG; Wang, X; Remke, M; Wu, X; Chiu, RYB; Chu, A; Chuah, E; Corbett, RD; Hoad, GR; Jackman, SD; Li, Y; Lo, A; Mungall, KL; Nip, KM; Qian, JQ; Raymond, AGJ; Thiessen, NT; Varhol, RJ; Birol, I; Moore, RA; Mungall, AJ; Holt, R; Kawauchi, D; Roussel, MF; Kool, M; Jones, DTW; Witt, H; Fernandez-L, A; Kenney, AM; Wechsler-Reya, RJ; Dirks, P; Aviv, T; Grajkowska, WA; Perek-Polnik, M; Haberler, CC; Delattre, O; Reynaud, SS; Doz, FF; Pernet-Fattet, SS; Cho, B-K; Kim, S-K; Wang, K-C; Scheurlen, W; Eberhart, CG; Fèvre-Montange, M; Jouvet, A; Pollack, IF; Fan, X; Muraszko, KM; Gillespie, GY; Di Rocco, C; Massimi, L; Michiels, EMC; Kloosterhof, NK; French, PJ; Kros, JM; Olson, JM; Ellenbogen, RG; Zitterbart, K; Kren, L; Thompson, RC; Cooper, MK; Lach, B; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Fontebasso, A; Albrecht, S; Jabado, N; Lindsey, JC; Bailey, S; Gupta, N; Weiss, WA; Bognár, L; Klekner, A; Van Meter, TE; Kumabe, T; Tominaga, T; Elbabaa, SK; Leonard, JR; Rubin, JB; Liau, LM; Van Meir, EG; Fouladi, M; Nakamura, H; Cinalli, G; Garami, M; Hauser, P; Saad, AG; Iolascon, A; Jung, S; Carlotti, CG; Vibhakar, R; Ra, YS; Robinson, S; Zollo, M; Faria, CC; Chan, JA; Levy, ML; Sorensen, PHB; Meyerson, M; Pomeroy, SL; Cho, Y-J; Bader, GD; Tabori, U; Hawkins, CE; Bouffet, E; Scherer, SW; Rutka, JT; Malkin, D; Clifford, SC; Jones, SJM; Korbel, JO; Pfister, SM; Marra, MA; Taylor, MD
MLA Citation
Northcott, PA, Shih, DJH, Peacock, J, Garzia, L, Morrissy, AS, Zichner, T, Stütz, AM, Korshunov, A, Reimand, J, Schumacher, SE, Beroukhim, R, Ellison, DW, Marshall, CR, Lionel, AC, Mack, S, Dubuc, A, Yao, Y, Ramaswamy, V, Luu, B, Rolider, A, Cavalli, FMG, Wang, X, Remke, M, Wu, X, Chiu, RYB, Chu, A, Chuah, E, Corbett, RD, Hoad, GR, Jackman, SD, Li, Y, Lo, A, Mungall, KL, Nip, KM, Qian, JQ, Raymond, AGJ, Thiessen, NT, Varhol, RJ, Birol, I, Moore, RA, Mungall, AJ, Holt, R, Kawauchi, D, Roussel, MF, Kool, M, Jones, DTW, Witt, H, Fernandez-L, A, Kenney, AM, Wechsler-Reya, RJ, Dirks, P, Aviv, T, Grajkowska, WA, Perek-Polnik, M, Haberler, CC, Delattre, O, Reynaud, SS, Doz, FF, Pernet-Fattet, SS, Cho, B-K, Kim, S-K, Wang, K-C, Scheurlen, W, Eberhart, CG, Fèvre-Montange, M, Jouvet, A, Pollack, IF, Fan, X, Muraszko, KM, Gillespie, GY, Di Rocco, C, Massimi, L, Michiels, EMC, Kloosterhof, NK, French, PJ, Kros, JM, Olson, JM, Ellenbogen, RG, Zitterbart, K, Kren, L, Thompson, RC, Cooper, MK, Lach, B, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Fontebasso, A, Albrecht, S, Jabado, N, Lindsey, JC, Bailey, S, Gupta, N, Weiss, WA, Bognár, L, Klekner, A, Van Meter, TE, Kumabe, T, Tominaga, T, Elbabaa, SK, Leonard, JR, Rubin, JB, Liau, LM, Van Meir, EG, Fouladi, M, Nakamura, H, Cinalli, G, Garami, M, Hauser, P, Saad, AG, Iolascon, A, Jung, S, Carlotti, CG, Vibhakar, R, Ra, YS, Robinson, S, Zollo, M, Faria, CC, Chan, JA, Levy, ML, Sorensen, PHB, Meyerson, M, Pomeroy, SL, Cho, Y-J, Bader, GD, Tabori, U, Hawkins, CE, Bouffet, E, Scherer, SW, Rutka, JT, Malkin, D, Clifford, SC, Jones, SJM, Korbel, JO, Pfister, SM, Marra, MA, and Taylor, MD. "Subgroup-specific structural variation across 1,000 medulloblastoma genomes." Nature 488.7409 (August 2012): 49-56.
PMID
22832581
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature
Volume
488
Issue
7409
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
49
End Page
56
DOI
10.1038/nature11327

Phase 1 trial of dasatinib plus erlotinib in adults with recurrent malignant glioma.

To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of dasatinib, an inhibitor of the Src family kinase proteins, with erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, among recurrent malignant glioma patients. Once daily dasatinib was escalated in successive cohorts while erlotinib was administered daily at established doses based on concurrent CYP3A-inducing anticonvulsant (EIAEDS) use. Dasatinib pharmacokinetic analyzes were performed. Forty-seven patients enrolled including 37 (79 %) with grade IV and 10 (21 %) with grade III malignant glioma. Thirty patients (64 %) were at ≥second recurrence, while 27 (57 %) had received prior bevacizumab. The dasatinib MTD was 180 mg when combined with either 150 mg of erlotinib for patients not on EIAEDs, or 450 mg of erlotinib for patients on EIAEDs. The most common DLTs were diarrhea and fatigue, while most adverse events were grade 2. Pharmacokinetic data suggests that dasatinib exposure increased with increased dasatinib dose and concurrent erlotinib administration, while concurrent EIAED use diminished dasatinib exposure. No radiographic responses were observed, and only one patient (2 %) remained progression-free at 6 months. We demonstrate that dasatinib plus erlotinib can be safely co-administered on a continuous, daily dosing schedule with erlotinib, and established the recommended dose level of this combination.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; Peters, KB; Sathornsumetee, S; Threatt, S; Sampson, JH; Herndon, JE; Coan, A; McSherry, F; Rich, JN; McLendon, RE; Zhang, S; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, Peters, KB, Sathornsumetee, S, Threatt, S, Sampson, JH, Herndon, JE, Coan, A, McSherry, F, Rich, JN, McLendon, RE, Zhang, S, and Friedman, HS. "Phase 1 trial of dasatinib plus erlotinib in adults with recurrent malignant glioma." Journal of Neuro Oncology 108.3 (July 2012): 499-506.
PMID
22407177
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
108
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
499
End Page
506
DOI
10.1007/s11060-012-0848-x

Frequent ATRX, CIC, FUBP1 and IDH1 mutations refine the classification of malignant gliomas.

Mutations in the critical chromatin modifier ATRX and mutations in CIC and FUBP1, which are potent regulators of cell growth, have been discovered in specific subtypes of gliomas, the most common type of primary malignant brain tumors. However, the frequency of these mutations in many subtypes of gliomas, and their association with clinical features of the patients, is poorly understood. Here we analyzed these loci in 363 brain tumors. ATRX is frequently mutated in grade II-III astrocytomas (71%), oligoastrocytomas (68%), and secondary glioblastomas (57%), and ATRX mutations are associated with IDH1 mutations and with an alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype. CIC and FUBP1 mutations occurred frequently in oligodendrogliomas (46% and 24%, respectively) but rarely in astrocytomas or oligoastrocytomas ( more than 10%). This analysis allowed us to define two highly recurrent genetic signatures in gliomas: IDH1/ATRX (I-A) and IDH1/CIC/FUBP1 (I-CF). Patients with I-CF gliomas had a significantly longer median overall survival (96 months) than patients with I-A gliomas (51 months) and patients with gliomas that did not harbor either signature (13 months). The genetic signatures distinguished clinically distinct groups of oligoastrocytoma patients, which usually present a diagnostic challenge, and were associated with differences in clinical outcome even among individual tumor types. In addition to providing new clues about the genetic alterations underlying gliomas, the results have immediate clinical implications, providing a tripartite genetic signature that can serve as a useful adjunct to conventional glioma classification that may aid in prognosis, treatment selection, and therapeutic trial design.

Authors
Jiao, Y; Killela, PJ; Reitman, ZJ; Rasheed, AB; Heaphy, CM; de Wilde, RF; Rodriguez, FJ; Rosemberg, S; Oba-Shinjo, SM; Nagahashi Marie, SK; Bettegowda, C; Agrawal, N; Lipp, E; Pirozzi, C; Lopez, G; He, Y; Friedman, H; Friedman, AH; Riggins, GJ; Holdhoff, M; Burger, P; McLendon, R; Bigner, DD; Vogelstein, B; Meeker, AK; Kinzler, KW; Papadopoulos, N; Diaz, LA; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Jiao, Y, Killela, PJ, Reitman, ZJ, Rasheed, AB, Heaphy, CM, de Wilde, RF, Rodriguez, FJ, Rosemberg, S, Oba-Shinjo, SM, Nagahashi Marie, SK, Bettegowda, C, Agrawal, N, Lipp, E, Pirozzi, C, Lopez, G, He, Y, Friedman, H, Friedman, AH, Riggins, GJ, Holdhoff, M, Burger, P, McLendon, R, Bigner, DD, Vogelstein, B, Meeker, AK, Kinzler, KW, Papadopoulos, N, Diaz, LA, and Yan, H. "Frequent ATRX, CIC, FUBP1 and IDH1 mutations refine the classification of malignant gliomas." Oncotarget 3.7 (July 2012): 709-722.
PMID
22869205
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncotarget
Volume
3
Issue
7
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
709
End Page
722
DOI
10.18632/oncotarget.588

MET and ALK in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM): Comparison of IHC and FISH

Authors
Kulig, K; McLendon, RE; Locke, SC; Young, DR; Zhong, X; Hudson, LL; Abernethy, AP
MLA Citation
Kulig, K, McLendon, RE, Locke, SC, Young, DR, Zhong, X, Hudson, LL, and Abernethy, AP. "MET and ALK in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM): Comparison of IHC and FISH." May 20, 2012.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
30
Issue
15
Publish Date
2012

Phase II study of carboplatin, irinotecan, and bevacizumab for bevacizumab naïve, recurrent glioblastoma.

We evaluated the efficacy of carboplatin, irinotecan, and bevacizumab among bevacizumab-naïve, recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients in a phase 2, open-label, single arm trial. Forty eligible patients received carboplatin (area under the plasma curve [AUC] 4 mg/ml-min) on day one, while bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan (340 mg/m(2) for patients on CYP3A-enzyme-inducing anti-epileptics [EIAEDs] and 125 mg/m(2) for patients not on EIAEDs) were administered on days 1 and 14 of every 28-day cycle. Patients were evaluated after each of the first two cycles and then after every other cycle. Treatment continued until progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity, non-compliance, or voluntary withdrawal. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and secondary endpoints included safety and median overall survival (OS). All patients had progression after standard therapy. The median age was 51 years. Sixteen patients (40%) had a KPS of 90-100, while 27 (68%) were at first progression. The median time from original diagnosis was 11.4 months. The PFS-6 rate was 46.5% (95% CI: 30.4, 61.0%) and the median OS was 8.3 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9, and 10.7 months]. Grade 4 events were primarily hematologic and included neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in 20 and 10%, respectively. The most common grade 3 events were neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, fatigue, and infection in 25, 20, 13, and 10%, respectively. Eleven patients (28%) discontinued study therapy due to toxicity and 17 patients (43%) required dose modification. One patient died due to treatment-related intestinal perforation. The addition of carboplatin and irinotecan to bevacizumab significantly increases toxicity but does not improve anti-tumor activity to that achieved historically with single-agent bevacizumab among bevacizumab-naïve, recurrent GBM patients. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00953121).

Authors
Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Peters, KB; Gururangan, S; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Bulusu, A; Threatt, S; Friedman, AH; Vredenburgh, JJ; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Peters, KB, Gururangan, S, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Bulusu, A, Threatt, S, Friedman, AH, Vredenburgh, JJ, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II study of carboplatin, irinotecan, and bevacizumab for bevacizumab naïve, recurrent glioblastoma." Journal of Neuro Oncology 107.1 (March 2012): 155-164.
PMID
21986722
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
107
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
155
End Page
164
DOI
10.1007/s11060-011-0722-2

Clinical data simplified.

Authors
Sampson, JH; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Hasselblad, V; Asher, AL; McGirt, MJ; Peterson, ED
MLA Citation
Sampson, JH, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Hasselblad, V, Asher, AL, McGirt, MJ, and Peterson, ED. "Clinical data simplified." J Neurosurg 116.2 (February 2012): 346-348.
PMID
22054209
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of neurosurgery
Volume
116
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
346
End Page
348
DOI
10.3171/2011.5.JNS11279

An animal model of MYC-driven medulloblastoma.

Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Patients whose tumors exhibit overexpression or amplification of the MYC oncogene (c-MYC) usually have an extremely poor prognosis, but there are no animal models of this subtype of the disease. Here, we show that cerebellar stem cells expressing Myc and mutant Trp53 (p53) generate aggressive tumors following orthotopic transplantation. These tumors consist of large, pleiomorphic cells and resemble human MYC-driven MB at a molecular level. Notably, antagonists of PI3K/mTOR signaling, but not Hedgehog signaling, inhibit growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest that cerebellar stem cells can give rise to MYC-driven MB and identify a novel model that can be used to test therapies for this devastating disease.

Authors
Pei, Y; Moore, CE; Wang, J; Tewari, AK; Eroshkin, A; Cho, Y-J; Witt, H; Korshunov, A; Read, T-A; Sun, JL; Schmitt, EM; Miller, CR; Buckley, AF; McLendon, RE; Westbrook, TF; Northcott, PA; Taylor, MD; Pfister, SM; Febbo, PG; Wechsler-Reya, RJ
MLA Citation
Pei, Y, Moore, CE, Wang, J, Tewari, AK, Eroshkin, A, Cho, Y-J, Witt, H, Korshunov, A, Read, T-A, Sun, JL, Schmitt, EM, Miller, CR, Buckley, AF, McLendon, RE, Westbrook, TF, Northcott, PA, Taylor, MD, Pfister, SM, Febbo, PG, and Wechsler-Reya, RJ. "An animal model of MYC-driven medulloblastoma." Cancer Cell 21.2 (February 2012): 155-167.
PMID
22340590
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
21
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
155
End Page
167
DOI
10.1016/j.ccr.2011.12.021

A phase II study of O6-benzylguanine and temozolomide in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade gliomas and brainstem gliomas: a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study.

To estimate the sustained (≥8 weeks) objective response rate in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade gliomas (HGG, Stratum A) or brainstem gliomas (BSG, Stratum B) treated with the combination of O6-benzylguanine (O6BG) and temozolomide(®) (TMZ). Patients received O6BG 120 mg/m(2)/d IV followed by TMZ 75 mg/m(2)/d orally daily for 5 consecutive days of each 28-day course. The target objective response rate to consider the combination active was 17%. A two-stage design was employed. Forty-three patients were enrolled; 41 were evaluable for response, including 25 patients with HGG and 16 patients with BSG. The combination of O6BG and TMZ was tolerable, and the primary toxicities were myelosuppression and gastrointestinal symptoms. One sustained (≥8 weeks) partial response was observed in the HGG cohort; no sustained objective responses were observed in the BSG cohort. Long-term (≥6 courses) stable disease (SD) was observed in 4 patients in Stratum A and 1 patient in Stratum B. Of the 5 patients with objective response or long-term SD, 3 underwent central review with 2 reclassified as low-grade gliomas. The combination of O6BG and TMZ did not achieve the target response rate for activity in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive HGG and BSG.

Authors
Warren, KE; Gururangan, S; Geyer, JR; McLendon, RE; Poussaint, TY; Wallace, D; Balis, FM; Berg, SL; Packer, RJ; Goldman, S; Minturn, JE; Pollack, IF; Boyett, JM; Kun, LE
MLA Citation
Warren, KE, Gururangan, S, Geyer, JR, McLendon, RE, Poussaint, TY, Wallace, D, Balis, FM, Berg, SL, Packer, RJ, Goldman, S, Minturn, JE, Pollack, IF, Boyett, JM, and Kun, LE. "A phase II study of O6-benzylguanine and temozolomide in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade gliomas and brainstem gliomas: a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study." Journal of Neuro Oncology 106.3 (February 2012): 643-649.
PMID
21968943
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
106
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
643
End Page
649
DOI
10.1007/s11060-011-0709-z

Deletion or epigenetic silencing of AJAP1 on 1p36 in glioblastoma.

Glioblastoma is universally fatal because of its propensity for rapid recurrence due to highly migratory tumor cells. Unraveling the genomic complexity that underlies this migratory characteristic could provide therapeutic targets that would greatly complement current surgical therapy. Using multiple high-resolution genomic screening methods, we identified a single locus, adherens junctional associated protein 1 (AJAP1) on chromosome 1p36 that is lost or epigenetically silenced in many glioblastomas. We found AJAP1 expression absent or reduced in 86% and 100% of primary glioblastoma tumors and cell lines, respectively, and the loss of expression correlates with AJAP1 methylation. Restoration of AJAP1 gene expression by transfection or demethylation agents results in decreased tumor cell migration in glioblastoma cell lines. This work shows the significant loss of expression of AJAP1 in glioblastoma and provides evidence of its role in the highly migratory characteristic of these tumors.

Authors
Lin, N; Di, C; Bortoff, K; Fu, J; Truszkowski, P; Killela, P; Duncan, C; McLendon, R; Bigner, D; Gregory, S; Adamson, DC
MLA Citation
Lin, N, Di, C, Bortoff, K, Fu, J, Truszkowski, P, Killela, P, Duncan, C, McLendon, R, Bigner, D, Gregory, S, and Adamson, DC. "Deletion or epigenetic silencing of AJAP1 on 1p36 in glioblastoma." Molecular Cancer Research : Mcr 10.2 (February 2012): 208-217.
PMID
22241217
Source
epmc
Published In
Molecular Cancer Research : Mcr
Volume
10
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
208
End Page
217
DOI
10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-10-0109

Biomarker discovery in central nervous system neoplasms: Past, present and future

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012. Brain tumor biomarkers have long been used as diagnostic tools; they are now finally being brought to bear as therapeutic elements in the fight against brain cancer. Because of the heterogeneity of glial brain tumors, it is clear that no one marker will ever define or defeat them: this has been understood since early days of the search for brain tumor biomarkers. In this chapter, therefore, we provide a context for the trajectory of current research by first discussing the history of brain tumor biomarker research. This is followed by a discussion of the immunologic, cytogenetic, biochemical, and molecular approaches that are currently being used to discover, characterize, and exploit the aberrant features of brain tumor cells. Major biomarkers that have been discovered during decades of research are covered in the earlier sections: gangliosides, tenascin, EGFR and its mutant form EGFRvIII, and GLI. Later sections describe newer, high-thoughput analyses such as gene expression analysis and integrated genome analysis, and outline their role in the discovery of more recent promising biomarkers including doublecortin, osteonectin, semaphoring3B, OTX2, and IDH1 and IDH2. A combination of old and new approaches that harnesses the power of multi-institutional and international cooperation has greatly accelerated the rate of discovery in this field, and is bringing us closer to our goal of finding cures for brain cancers.

Authors
Buckley, AF; McLendon, RE; Wikstrand, CJ; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Buckley, AF, McLendon, RE, Wikstrand, CJ, and Bigner, DD. "Biomarker discovery in central nervous system neoplasms: Past, present and future." Tumors of the Central Nervous System: Astrocytomas, Hemangioblastomas, and Gangliogliomas. January 1, 2012. 107-119.
Source
scopus
Volume
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
107
End Page
119
DOI
10.1007/978-94-007-2019-0_13

Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of n.c.a. iodoquine: a novel radiotracer with high uptake in cells with high ALDH1 expression.

PURPOSE: Chloroquine has demonstrated high affinity for aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1), an enzyme expressed in the highly tumorigenic CD133+ brain tumor initiating subpopulation. The purpose of this study is to report the novel synthesis of a chloroquine analogue, n.c.a. iodoquine, and the in vitro and in vivo uptake in cells with high ALDH1 content. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Iodoquine was synthesized in novel no-carrier-added forms (n.c.a.) for both 125I and 123I. I25I IQ and 18F FDG cell uptake assays were performed in the L1210 and L1210cpa (cyclophosphamide resistant), A549, and MG456 glioblastoma cell lines. Uptake was expressed as a percent of the administered activity. 125I IQ biodistribution studies assessed organ uptake at 1, 4, and 24 hours after IV administration (n= 15 total; 5 mice/timepoint). Radiation dosimetry estimates were calculated using standard OLINDA/EXM software. In vivo imaging of 123I IQ uptake in MG456 glioblastoma mouse model (n=10) was performed with small animal high resolution micro-SPECT. Autoradiography and histology co-localized radiotracer and tumor biodistribution. Uptake in MG456 glioblastoma tumors was quantified with gamma counting. RESULTS: L1210 cpa (high ALDH1) showed significantly higher 125I IQ uptake compared to the parental L1210 (low ALDH1) for all time points through 4 hours (20.7% ± 1.4% versus 11.0% ± 0.5%; 21.3% ± 0.9% versus 11.0% ± 0.4%; 20.6% ± 0.7% versus 9.4% ± 0.3%; and 15.7% ± 0.7% versus 7.5% + 0.4% at 30 minutes, and 1, 2 and 4 hours, respectively; p < 0.001 for all time points). In the CD133+ fraction of MG456 glioblastoma cell line, IQ uptake was significantly higher compared to FDG at all time points through 4 hours (81.5% ± 0.9% versus 1.3% ± 0.1%; 88.8% ± 0.4% versus 1.3% ± 0.1%; 87.8% ± 2.1% versus 1.7% ± 0.2%; and 87.0% ± 2.4% versus 1.8% ± 0.1 at 30 minutes, and 1, 2 and 4 hours, respectively; p > 0.001 for all time points). The A549 lung cancer cell line also showed high IQ uptake through 4 hours. IQ normal biodistribution studies showed rapid renal excretion and very low normal background brain activity after IV administration. In vivo micro-SPECT images showed mild uptake in larger MG456 glioblastomas (n=6) as verified with autoradiography and histology. Gamma well counter uptake in large tumors was 2.3% ± 0.48% ID/g (n=5). CONCLUSION: Iodoquine localizes to cells with high ALDH1 content. Cell assays show high 125I IQ uptake in the MG456 cell line, and in vivo micro-SPECT imaging showed mild 123I IQ uptake in MG456 glioblastomas. Further studies are necessary to investigate 131I IQ as a potential therapeutic agent targeting the highly tumorigenic CD133+ brain tumor stem cell subpopulation.

Authors
Chin, BB; Hjelemand, A; Rich, J; Song, H; Lascola, C; Storms, R; McLendon, R; Reiman, R; Greer, KL; Metzler, SD; McDougald, D; Dai, D; Vaidyanathan, G
MLA Citation
Chin, BB, Hjelemand, A, Rich, J, Song, H, Lascola, C, Storms, R, McLendon, R, Reiman, R, Greer, KL, Metzler, SD, McDougald, D, Dai, D, and Vaidyanathan, G. "Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of n.c.a. iodoquine: a novel radiotracer with high uptake in cells with high ALDH1 expression." Curr Radiopharm 5.1 (January 2012): 47-58.
PMID
21864242
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume
5
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
47
End Page
58

Radioimmunotargeting of malignant glioma by monoclonal antibody D2C7 reactive against both wild-type and variant III mutant epidermal growth factor receptors.

Malignant glioma remains a significant therapeutic challenge, and immunotherapeutics might be a beneficial approach for these patients. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for multiple molecular targets could expand the treatable patient population and the fraction of tumor cells targeted, with potentially increased efficacy. This motivated the generation of MAb D2C7, which recognizes both wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRwt) and a tumor-specific mutant, EGFRvIII.D2C7 binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance and its specificity characterized through comparison to EGFRwt-specific EGFR.1 and EGFRvIII-specific L8A4 MAbs by flow cytometry and immunohistochemical analysis. The three MAbs were labeled with (125)I or (131)I using Iodogen, and paired-label internalization assays and biodistribution experiments in athymic mice with human tumor xenografts were performed.The affinity of D2C7 for EGFRwt and EGFRvIII was 5.2×10(9) M(-1) and 3.6×10(9) M(-1), and cell-surface reactivity with both receptors was documented by flow cytometry. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed D2C7 reactivity with malignant glioma tissue from 90 of 101 patients. Internalization assays performed on EGFRwt-expressing WTT cells and EGFRvIII-expressing NR6M cells indicated a threefold lower degradation of (125)I-labeled D2C7 compared with (131)I-labeled EGFR.1. Uptake of (125)I-labeled D2C7 in NR6M xenografts (52.45±13.97 %ID g(-1) on Day 3) was more than twice that of (131)I-labeled L8A4; a threefold to fivefold tumor delivery advantage was seen when compared to (131)I-labeled EGFR.1 in mice with WTT xenografts.These results suggest that D2C7 warrants further evaluation for the development of MAb-based therapeutics against cancers expressing EGFRwt and EGFRvIII.

Authors
Zalutsky, MR; Boskovitz, A; Kuan, C-T; Pegram, CN; Ayriss, J; Wikstrand, CJ; Buckley, AF; Lipp, ES; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Zalutsky, MR, Boskovitz, A, Kuan, C-T, Pegram, CN, Ayriss, J, Wikstrand, CJ, Buckley, AF, Lipp, ES, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, and Bigner, DD. "Radioimmunotargeting of malignant glioma by monoclonal antibody D2C7 reactive against both wild-type and variant III mutant epidermal growth factor receptors." Nuclear Medicine and Biology 39.1 (January 2012): 23-34.
PMID
21958852
Source
epmc
Published In
Nuclear Medicine and Biology
Volume
39
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
23
End Page
34
DOI
10.1016/j.nucmedbio.2011.06.005

Phase II study of Gleevec® plus hydroxyurea (HU) in adults with progressive or recurrent meningioma.

We prospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive/recurrent meningioma. A total of 21 patients with progressive/recurrent meningioma were enrolled in this dual center, single-arm, phase II trial. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 400 mg/day for patients not on CYP3A enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and at 500 mg twice a day for patients on EIAEDs. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and secondary endpoints were safety, radiographic response rate, and overall survival (OS). Best radiographic response was stable disease and was observed in 14 patients (67%). PFS-6 for all patients, those with grade I tumors (n = 8) and those with grade II or III tumors (n = 13) was 61.9, 87.5 and 46.2%, respectively. Patients with grade II or III tumors had poorer PFS and OS than those with grade I tumors, (P = 0.025 and P = 0.018) respectively. The only grade 3 or greater adverse event occurring in ≥ 10% of patients was anemia (10%). Imatinib plus hydroxyurea is well tolerated among patients with meningioma but has modest anti-tumor activity for this indication.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Norden, AD; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Herndon, JE; Coan, A; Sampson, JH; Gururangan, S; Peters, KB; McLendon, RE; Norfleet, JA; Lipp, ES; Drappatz, J; Wen, PY; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Norden, AD, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Herndon, JE, Coan, A, Sampson, JH, Gururangan, S, Peters, KB, McLendon, RE, Norfleet, JA, Lipp, ES, Drappatz, J, Wen, PY, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II study of Gleevec® plus hydroxyurea (HU) in adults with progressive or recurrent meningioma." Journal of Neuro Oncology 106.2 (January 2012): 409-415.
PMID
21938530
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
106
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
409
End Page
415
DOI
10.1007/s11060-011-0687-1

A pilot study of IL-2Rα blockade during lymphopenia depletes regulatory T-cells and correlates with enhanced immunity in patients with glioblastoma.

BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies in mice have demonstrated that the prophylactic depletion of immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells (T(Regs)) through targeting the high affinity interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor (IL-2Rα/CD25) can enhance anti-tumor immunotherapy. However, therapeutic approaches are complicated by the inadvertent inhibition of IL-2Rα expressing anti-tumor effector T-cells. OBJECTIVE: To determine if changes in the cytokine milieu during lymphopenia may engender differential signaling requirements that would enable unarmed anti-IL-2Rα monoclonal antibody (MAbs) to selectively deplete T(Regs) while permitting vaccine-stimulated immune responses. METHODOLOGY: A randomized placebo-controlled pilot study was undertaken to examine the ability of the anti-IL-2Rα MAb daclizumab, given at the time of epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) targeted peptide vaccination, to safely and selectively deplete T(Regs) in patients with glioblastoma (GBM) treated with lymphodepleting temozolomide (TMZ). RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Daclizumab treatment (n = 3) was well-tolerated with no symptoms of autoimmune toxicity and resulted in a significant reduction in the frequency of circulating CD4+Foxp3+ TRegs in comparison to saline controls (n = 3)( p = 0.0464). A significant (p<0.0001) inverse correlation between the frequency of TRegs and the level of EGFRvIII specific humoral responses suggests the depletion of TRegs may be linked to increased vaccine-stimulated humoral immunity. These data suggest this approach deserves further study. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00626015.

Authors
Sampson, JH; Schmittling, RJ; Archer, GE; Congdon, KL; Nair, SK; Reap, EA; Desjardins, A; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Herndon, JE; Coan, A; McLendon, RE; Reardon, DA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Bigner, DD; Mitchell, DA
MLA Citation
Sampson, JH, Schmittling, RJ, Archer, GE, Congdon, KL, Nair, SK, Reap, EA, Desjardins, A, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Herndon, JE, Coan, A, McLendon, RE, Reardon, DA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Bigner, DD, and Mitchell, DA. "A pilot study of IL-2Rα blockade during lymphopenia depletes regulatory T-cells and correlates with enhanced immunity in patients with glioblastoma." PLoS One 7.2 (2012): e31046-.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16110
PMID
22383993
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos One
Volume
7
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
e31046
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0031046

Central nervous system

Several different types of tumors, benign and malignant, have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS). The prognoses for these tumors are related to several factors, such as the age of the patient and the location and histology of the tumor. In adults, about half of all CNS tumors are malignant, whereas in pediatric patients, more than 75% are malignant. For most benign CNS tumors that require treatment, neurosurgeons can offer curative resections or at least provide significant relief from mass effect. Unfortunately, we still lack effective treatments for most primary and secondary malignant CNS tumors. However, the past decade has witnessed an explosion in the understanding of the early molecular events in malignant primary CNS tumors, and for the first time in history, oncologists are seeing that a plethora of new therapies targeting these molecular events are being tested in clinical trials. There is hope on the horizon for the fight against these deadly tumors. The distribution of CNS tumors by location has remained constant for numerous years. The majority of primary CNS tumors arise in the major cortical lobes. Twenty nine percent of primary CNS tumors arise from the dural meninges that encase the CNS structures. The vast majority of these are meningiomas, of which over 90% are benign. About 10% of primary CNS tumors are found in the sella turcica region, where the pituitary gland resides. Other much less common sites of primary CNS tumors include the pineal region, ventricular system, cerebellum, brain stem, cranial nerves, and spinal cord. The distribution of CNS tumors by histology has seen a slight increase in more malignant tumors over the past decade, possibly due to increased neuroimaging practices or environmental exposures. Arising from glial cells, gliomas represent over 36% of all primary CNS tumors and consist of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, mixed gliomas, and neuroepithelial tumors. The benign meningiomas make up 32% of primary CNS tumors, followed by nerve sheath tumors and pituitary tumors. Primary CNS lymphomas, embryonal tumors, and craniopharyngiomas are uncommon. The most common gliomas are astrocytomas, and these tumors are typically classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as Grades I through IV. Grade IV, the most malignant grade of astrocytoma, includes glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common malignant primary CNS glioma in adults, which represents 51% of all primary CNS gliomas. GBM is unfortunately the most challenging to effectively treat and has the worst patient survival. This chapter is therefore primarily devoted to the current understanding of this topic. Here we describe the molecular and cellular events associated with malignant glioma initiation and progression. We also review the importance of glioma stem cell biology and tumor immunology in early gliomagenesis. In addition, we present a brief description of the most common malignant primary CNS glioma in pediatric patients - medulloblastoma, as well as familial cancer syndromes that include gliomas as part of the syndrome. © 2012 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

Authors
Adamsona, DC; Rasheed, BAK; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Adamsona, DC, Rasheed, BAK, McLendon, RE, and Bigner, DD. "Central nervous system." Translational Pathology of Early Cancer (2012): 193-210.
Source
scival
Published In
Translational Pathology of Early Cancer
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
193
End Page
210
DOI
10.3233/978-1-61499-024-6-193

Central nervous system

Several different types of tumors, benign and malignant, have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS). The prognoses for these tumors are related to several factors, such as the age of the patient and the location and histology of the tumor. In adults, about half of all CNS tumors are malignant, whereas in pediatric patients, more than 75% are malignant. For most benign CNS tumors that require treatment, neurosurgeons can offer curative resections or at least provide significant relief from mass effect. Unfortunately, we still lack effective treatments for most primary and secondary malignant CNS tumors. However, the past decade has witnessed an explosion in the understanding of the early molecular events in malignant primary CNS tumors, and for the first time in history, oncologists are seeing that a plethora of new therapies targeting these molecular events are being tested in clinical trials. There is hope on the horizon for the fight against these deadly tumors. The distribution of CNS tumors by location has remained constant for numerous years. The majority of primary CNS tumors arise in the major cortical lobes. Twenty nine percent of primary CNS tumors arise from the dural meninges that encase the CNS structures. The vast majority of these are meningiomas, of which over 90% are benign. About 10% of primary CNS tumors are found in the sella turcica region, where the pituitary gland resides. Other much less common sites of primary CNS tumors include the pineal region, ventricular system, cerebellum, brain stem, cranial nerves, and spinal cord. The distribution of CNS tumors by histology has seen a slight increase in more malignant tumors over the past decade, possibly due to increased neuroimaging practices or environmental exposures. Arising from glial cells, gliomas represent over 36% of all primary CNS tumors and consist of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, mixed gliomas, and neuroepithelial tumors. The benign meningiomas make up 32% of primary CNS tumors, followed by nerve sheath tumors and pituitary tumors. Primary CNS lymphomas, embryonal tumors, and craniopharyngiomas are uncommon. The most common gliomas are astrocytomas, and these tumors are typically classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as Grades I through IV. Grade IV, the most malignant grade of astrocytoma, includes glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common malignant primary CNS glioma in adults, which represents 51% of all primary CNS gliomas. GBM is unfortunately the most challenging to effectively treat and has the worst patient survival. This chapter is therefore primarily devoted to the current understanding of this topic. Here we describe the molecular and cellular events associated with malignant glioma initiation and progression. We also review the importance of glioma stem cell biology and tumor immunology in early gliomagenesis. In addition, we present a brief description of the most common malignant primary CNS glioma in pediatric patients - medulloblastoma, as well as familial cancer syndromes that include gliomas as part of the syndrome. © 2012 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

Authors
Adamsona, DC; Rasheed, BAK; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Adamsona, DC, Rasheed, BAK, McLendon, RE, and Bigner, DD. "Central nervous system." Translational Pathology of Early Cancer (2012): 193-210.
Source
scival
Published In
Translational Pathology of Early Cancer
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
193
End Page
210
DOI
10.3233/978-1-61499-024-6-193

Phase 2 study of carboplatin, irinotecan, and bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma after progression on bevacizumab therapy.

The efficacy of carboplatin, irinotecan, and bevacizumab among recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients after prior progression on bevacizumab therapy in a phase 2, open-label, single-arm trial was evaluated.Eligible patients received carboplatin (area under the plasma curve [AUC] 4 mg/ml-min) on day 1, whereas bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan (340 mg/m(2) for patients on CYP3A enzyme-inducing anti-epileptics [EIAEDs] and 125 mg/m(2) for patients not on EIAEDs) were administered on days 1 and 14 of every 28-day cycle. Patients were evaluated after each of the first 2 cycles and then after every other cycle. Treatment continued until progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity, noncompliance, or voluntary withdrawal. The primary end point was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6), and secondary end points included safety and median overall survival (OS).All patients had progression on at least 1 prior bevacizumab regimen and 56% enrolled after either second or third overall progression. The median OS was 5.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.0-7.0 months) and PFS-6 rate was 16% (95% CI, 5.0%-32.5%). The most common grade 3 or 4 events were hematologic and occurred in 29% of cycles. Nine patients (38%) required dose modification. There were no treatment-related deaths.Carboplatin, irinotecan, and bevacizumab was associated with modest activity and adequate safety among recurrent GBM patients who progressed on bevacizumab previously.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Peters, KB; Vredenburgh, JJ; Gururangan, S; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Coan, A; Threatt, S; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Peters, KB, Vredenburgh, JJ, Gururangan, S, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Coan, A, Threatt, S, Friedman, AH, and Friedman, HS. "Phase 2 study of carboplatin, irinotecan, and bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma after progression on bevacizumab therapy." Cancer 117.23 (December 2011): 5351-5358.
PMID
21590689
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
117
Issue
23
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
5351
End Page
5358
DOI
10.1002/cncr.26188

Monoclonal antibody blockade of IL-2 receptor α during lymphopenia selectively depletes regulatory T cells in mice and humans.

Lymphodepletion augments adoptive cell transfer during antitumor immunotherapy, producing dramatic clinical responses in patients with malignant melanoma. We report that the lymphopenia induced by the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide (TMZ) enhances vaccine-driven immune responses and significantly reduces malignant growth in an established model of murine tumorigenesis. Unexpectedly, despite the improved antitumor efficacy engendered by TMZ-induced lymphopenia, there was a treatment related increase in the frequency of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (T(Regs); P = .0006). Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-mediated inhibition of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor α (IL-2Rα/CD25) during immunotherapy in normal mice depleted T(Regs) (73% reduction; P = .0154) but also abolished vaccine-induced immune responses. However, during lymphodepletion, IL-2Rα blockade decreased T(Regs) (93% reduction; P = .0001) without impairing effector T-cell responses, to augment therapeutic antitumor efficacy (66% reduction in tumor growth; P = .0024). Of clinical relevance, we also demonstrate that anti-IL-2Rα mAb administration during recovery from lymphodepletive TMZ in patients with glioblastoma reduced T(Reg) frequency (48% reduction; P = .0061) while permitting vaccine-stimulated antitumor effector cell expansion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of systemic antibody-mediated T(Reg) depletion during lymphopenia and the consequent synergistic enhancement of vaccine-driven cellular responses, as well as the first demonstration that anti-IL-2Rα mAbs function differentially in nonlymphopenic versus lymphopenic contexts.

Authors
Mitchell, DA; Cui, X; Schmittling, RJ; Sanchez-Perez, L; Snyder, DJ; Congdon, KL; Archer, GE; Desjardins, A; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Reardon, DA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Mitchell, DA, Cui, X, Schmittling, RJ, Sanchez-Perez, L, Snyder, DJ, Congdon, KL, Archer, GE, Desjardins, A, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Reardon, DA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Bigner, DD, and Sampson, JH. "Monoclonal antibody blockade of IL-2 receptor α during lymphopenia selectively depletes regulatory T cells in mice and humans." Blood 118.11 (September 15, 2011): 3003-3012.
PMID
21768296
Source
pubmed
Published In
Blood
Volume
118
Issue
11
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
3003
End Page
3012
DOI
10.1182/blood-2011-02-334565

Mutations in CIC and FUBP1 contribute to human oligodendroglioma.

Oligodendrogliomas are the second most common malignant brain tumor in adults and exhibit characteristic losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q. To identify the molecular genetic basis for this alteration, we performed exomic sequencing of seven tumors. Among other changes, we found that the CIC gene (homolog of the Drosophila gene capicua) on chromosome 19q was somatically mutated in six cases and that the FUBP1 gene [encoding far-upstream element (FUSE) binding protein] on chromosome 1p was somatically mutated in two tumors. Examination of 27 additional oligodendrogliomas revealed 12 and 3 more tumors with mutations of CIC and FUBP1, respectively, 58% of which were predicted to result in truncations of the encoded proteins. These results suggest a critical role for these genes in the biology and pathology of oligodendrocytes.

Authors
Bettegowda, C; Agrawal, N; Jiao, Y; Sausen, M; Wood, LD; Hruban, RH; Rodriguez, FJ; Cahill, DP; McLendon, R; Riggins, G; Velculescu, VE; Oba-Shinjo, SM; Marie, SKN; Vogelstein, B; Bigner, D; Yan, H; Papadopoulos, N; Kinzler, KW
MLA Citation
Bettegowda, C, Agrawal, N, Jiao, Y, Sausen, M, Wood, LD, Hruban, RH, Rodriguez, FJ, Cahill, DP, McLendon, R, Riggins, G, Velculescu, VE, Oba-Shinjo, SM, Marie, SKN, Vogelstein, B, Bigner, D, Yan, H, Papadopoulos, N, and Kinzler, KW. "Mutations in CIC and FUBP1 contribute to human oligodendroglioma." Science (New York, N.Y.) 333.6048 (September 2011): 1453-1455.
PMID
21817013
Source
epmc
Published In
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Volume
333
Issue
6048
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
1453
End Page
1455
DOI
10.1126/science.1210557

Distribution of CD133 reveals glioma stem cells self-renew through symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions.

Malignant gliomas contain a population of self-renewing tumorigenic stem-like cells; however, it remains unclear how these glioma stem cells (GSCs) self-renew or generate cellular diversity at the single-cell level. Asymmetric cell division is a proposed mechanism to maintain cancer stem cells, yet the modes of cell division that GSCs utilize remain undetermined. Here, we used single-cell analyses to evaluate the cell division behavior of GSCs. Lineage-tracing analysis revealed that the majority of GSCs were generated through expansive symmetric cell division and not through asymmetric cell division. The majority of differentiated progeny was generated through symmetric pro-commitment divisions under expansion conditions and in the absence of growth factors, occurred mainly through asymmetric cell divisions. Mitotic pair analysis detected asymmetric CD133 segregation and not any other GSC marker in a fraction of mitoses, some of which were associated with Numb asymmetry. Under growth factor withdrawal conditions, the proportion of asymmetric CD133 divisions increased, congruent with the increase in asymmetric cell divisions observed in the lineage-tracing studies. Using single-cell-based observation, we provide definitive evidence that GSCs are capable of different modes of cell division and that the generation of cellular diversity occurs mainly through symmetric cell division, not through asymmetric cell division.

Authors
Lathia, JD; Hitomi, M; Gallagher, J; Gadani, SP; Adkins, J; Vasanji, A; Liu, L; Eyler, CE; Heddleston, JM; Wu, Q; Minhas, S; Soeda, A; Hoeppner, DJ; Ravin, R; McKay, RDG; McLendon, RE; Corbeil, D; Chenn, A; Hjelmeland, AB; Park, DM; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Lathia, JD, Hitomi, M, Gallagher, J, Gadani, SP, Adkins, J, Vasanji, A, Liu, L, Eyler, CE, Heddleston, JM, Wu, Q, Minhas, S, Soeda, A, Hoeppner, DJ, Ravin, R, McKay, RDG, McLendon, RE, Corbeil, D, Chenn, A, Hjelmeland, AB, Park, DM, and Rich, JN. "Distribution of CD133 reveals glioma stem cells self-renew through symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions." Cell Death & Disease 2 (September 2011): e200-null.
PMID
21881602
Source
epmc
Published In
Cell Death & Disease
Volume
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
e200
DOI
10.1038/cddis.2011.80

Embryonal central nervous system neoplasms arising in infants and young children: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study.

Medulloblastomas (MBs) and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RTs) arising in infants and children can be difficult to distinguish; however, histologic characterization is prognostically important.To determine histologic and phenotypic markers associated with utility with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in children younger than 3 years with MBs and AT/RTs.We undertook a histologic and immunophenotypic study of MBs and AT/RTs arising in infants and children younger than 3 years treated in a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study. The 41 girls and 55 boys ranged in age from 2 to 36 months at enrollment. These infants and children exhibited 51 MBs, 26 AT/RTs, and 24 other tumors (not further studied). Median follow-up of the patients was 17.2 months from diagnosis (range: 1.4-93 months).Infants and children with AT/RT exhibited a statistically significant shorter PFS and OS when compared to infants and children with MBs (both P < .001). A lack of nuclear BAF47 immunohistochemical reactivity proved reliable in identifying AT/RTs. Among MBs, our data suggest an association of nodularity and prolonged PFS and OS, which must be independently confirmed. Anaplasia correlated with OTX2 reactivity and both OTX2 and moderate to severe anaplasia correlated with PFS but not with OS.Distinguishing AT/RT from MBs is clinically important. For expert neuropathologists, the diagnoses of AT/RT and MB can be reliably made from hematoxylin-eosin stains in the vast majority of cases. However certain rare small cell variants of AT/RT can be confused with MB. We also found that immunohistochemical reactivity for BAF47 is clinically useful in distinguishing MBs from AT/RTs and for identifying certain small cell AT/RTs. Among MBs, nodularity may be an important prognostic factor for improved PFS and OS in infants and children.

Authors
McLendon, RE; Adekunle, A; Rajaram, V; Koçak, M; Blaney, SM
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Adekunle, A, Rajaram, V, Koçak, M, and Blaney, SM. "Embryonal central nervous system neoplasms arising in infants and young children: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study." Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine 135.8 (August 2011): 984-993.
PMID
21809989
Source
epmc
Published In
Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Volume
135
Issue
8
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
984
End Page
993
DOI
10.5858/2010-0515-OAR1

Altered telomeres in tumors with ATRX and DAXX mutations.

The proteins encoded by ATRX and DAXX participate in chromatin remodeling at telomeres and other genomic sites. Because inactivating mutations of these genes are common in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), we examined the telomere status of these tumors. We found that 61% of PanNETs displayed abnormal telomeres that are characteristic of a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance mechanism termed ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). All of the PanNETs exhibiting these abnormal telomeres had ATRX or DAXX mutations or loss of nuclear ATRX or DAXX protein. ATRX mutations also correlate with abnormal telomeres in tumors of the central nervous system. These data suggest that an alternative telomere maintenance function may operate in human tumors with alterations in the ATRX or DAXX genes.

Authors
Heaphy, CM; de Wilde, RF; Jiao, Y; Klein, AP; Edil, BH; Shi, C; Bettegowda, C; Rodriguez, FJ; Eberhart, CG; Hebbar, S; Offerhaus, GJ; McLendon, R; Rasheed, BA; He, Y; Yan, H; Bigner, DD; Oba-Shinjo, SM; Marie, SKN; Riggins, GJ; Kinzler, KW; Vogelstein, B; Hruban, RH; Maitra, A; Papadopoulos, N; Meeker, AK
MLA Citation
Heaphy, CM, de Wilde, RF, Jiao, Y, Klein, AP, Edil, BH, Shi, C, Bettegowda, C, Rodriguez, FJ, Eberhart, CG, Hebbar, S, Offerhaus, GJ, McLendon, R, Rasheed, BA, He, Y, Yan, H, Bigner, DD, Oba-Shinjo, SM, Marie, SKN, Riggins, GJ, Kinzler, KW, Vogelstein, B, Hruban, RH, Maitra, A, Papadopoulos, N, and Meeker, AK. "Altered telomeres in tumors with ATRX and DAXX mutations." Science (New York, N.Y.) 333.6041 (July 2011): 425-null.
PMID
21719641
Source
epmc
Published In
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Volume
333
Issue
6041
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
425
DOI
10.1126/science.1207313

Glioma stem cell proliferation and tumor growth are promoted by nitric oxide synthase-2.

Malignant gliomas are aggressive brain tumors with limited therapeutic options, and improvements in treatment require a deeper molecular understanding of this disease. As in other cancers, recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic subpopulations within malignant gliomas, known generally as cancer stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that glioma stem cells (GSCs) produce nitric oxide via elevated nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2) expression. GSCs depend on NOS2 activity for growth and tumorigenicity, distinguishing them from non-GSCs and normal neural progenitors. Gene expression profiling identified many NOS2-regulated genes, including the cell-cycle inhibitor cell division autoantigen-1 (CDA1). Further, high NOS2 expression correlates with decreased survival in human glioma patients, and NOS2 inhibition slows glioma growth in a murine intracranial model. These data provide insight into how GSCs are mechanistically distinct from their less tumorigenic counterparts and suggest that NOS2 inhibition may be an efficacious approach to treating this devastating disease.

Authors
Eyler, CE; Wu, Q; Yan, K; MacSwords, JM; Chandler-Militello, D; Misuraca, KL; Lathia, JD; Forrester, MT; Lee, J; Stamler, JS; Goldman, SA; Bredel, M; McLendon, RE; Sloan, AE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Eyler, CE, Wu, Q, Yan, K, MacSwords, JM, Chandler-Militello, D, Misuraca, KL, Lathia, JD, Forrester, MT, Lee, J, Stamler, JS, Goldman, SA, Bredel, M, McLendon, RE, Sloan, AE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Glioma stem cell proliferation and tumor growth are promoted by nitric oxide synthase-2." Cell 146.1 (July 2011): 53-66.
PMID
21729780
Source
epmc
Published In
Cell
Volume
146
Issue
1
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
53
End Page
66
DOI
10.1016/j.cell.2011.06.006

Phase II study of metronomic chemotherapy with bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma after progression on bevacizumab therapy.

We evaluated the efficacy of metronomic etoposide or temozolomide administered with bevacizumab among recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients who progressed on prior bevacizumab therapy in a phase 2, open-label, two-arm trial. Twenty-three patients received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) every 2 weeks with either oral etoposide (50 mg/m2) daily for 21 consecutive days each month or daily temozolomide (50 mg/m2). The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS-6) and secondary endpoints included safety and overall survival. Both the etoposide and temozolomide arms of the study closed at the interim analysis due to lack of adequate anti-tumor activity. No radiographic responses were observed. Although 12 patients (52%) achieved stable disease, PFS-6 was 4.4% and the median PFS was 7.3 weeks. The only grade 4 adverse event was reversible neutropenia. Grade 3 toxicities included fatigue (n = 2) and infection (n = 1). Metronomic etoposide or temozolomide is ineffective when administered with bevacizumab among recurrent GBM patients who have progressed on prior bevacizumab therapy. Alternative treatment strategies remain critically needed for this indication.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Peters, K; Gururangan, S; Sampson, J; Rich, JN; McLendon, R; Herndon, JE; Marcello, J; Threatt, S; Friedman, AH; Vredenburgh, JJ; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Peters, K, Gururangan, S, Sampson, J, Rich, JN, McLendon, R, Herndon, JE, Marcello, J, Threatt, S, Friedman, AH, Vredenburgh, JJ, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II study of metronomic chemotherapy with bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma after progression on bevacizumab therapy." Journal of Neuro Oncology 103.2 (June 2011): 371-379.
PMID
20853132
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
103
Issue
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
371
End Page
379
DOI
10.1007/s11060-010-0403-6

Acidic stress promotes a glioma stem cell phenotype.

Malignant gliomas are lethal cancers that display cellular hierarchies with cancer stem cells at the apex. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are not uniformly distributed, but rather located in specialized niches, suggesting that the cancer stem cell phenotype is regulated by the tumor microenvironment. Indeed, recent studies show that hypoxia and its molecular responses regulate cancer stem cell maintenance. We now demonstrate that acidic conditions, independent of restricted oxygen, promote the expression of GSC markers, self-renewal and tumor growth. GSCs exert paracrine effects on tumor growth through elaboration of angiogenic factors, and low pH conditions augment this expression associated with induction of hypoxia inducible factor 2α (HIF2α), a GSC-specific regulator. Induction of HIF2α and other GSC markers by acidic stress can be reverted by elevating pH in vitro, suggesting that raising intratumoral pH may be beneficial for targeting the GSC phenotype. Together, our results suggest that exposure to low pH promotes malignancy through the induction of a cancer stem cell phenotype, and that culturing cancer cells at lower pH reflective of endogenous tumor conditions may better retain the cellular heterogeneity found in tumors.

Authors
Hjelmeland, AB; Wu, Q; Heddleston, JM; Choudhary, GS; MacSwords, J; Lathia, JD; McLendon, R; Lindner, D; Sloan, A; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Hjelmeland, AB, Wu, Q, Heddleston, JM, Choudhary, GS, MacSwords, J, Lathia, JD, McLendon, R, Lindner, D, Sloan, A, and Rich, JN. "Acidic stress promotes a glioma stem cell phenotype." Cell Death and Differentiation 18.5 (May 2011): 829-840.
PMID
21127501
Source
epmc
Published In
Cell Death and Differentiation
Volume
18
Issue
5
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
829
End Page
840
DOI
10.1038/cdd.2010.150

CLINICAL PATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION OF THREE PEDIATRIC MEDULLOBLASTOMA CASES WITH MLL2/3 GENE MUTATIONS

Authors
He, Y; Lopez, G; Grant, G; Fuchs, H; Leithe, L; Gururangan, S; Bigner, D; Yan, H; Mclendon, R
MLA Citation
He, Y, Lopez, G, Grant, G, Fuchs, H, Leithe, L, Gururangan, S, Bigner, D, Yan, H, and Mclendon, R. "CLINICAL PATHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION OF THREE PEDIATRIC MEDULLOBLASTOMA CASES WITH MLL2/3 GENE MUTATIONS." May 2011.
PMID
23659599
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
13
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
I30
End Page
I30

A review of VEGF/VEGFR-targeted therapeutics for recurrent glioblastoma.

Glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, is a highly angiogenic and deadly tumor. Angiogenesis in glioblastoma, driven by hypoxia-dependent and independent mechanisms, is primarily mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and generates blood vessels with distinctive features. The outcome for patients with recurrent glioblastoma is poor because of ineffective therapies. However, recent encouraging rates of radiographic response and progression-free survival, and adequate safety, led the FDA to grant accelerated approval of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma in May 2009. These results have triggered significant interest in additional antiangiogenic agents and therapeutic strategies for patients with both recurrent and newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Given the potent antipermeability effect of VEGF inhibitors, the Radiologic Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria were recently implemented to better assess response among patients with glioblastoma. Although bevacizumab improves survival and quality of life, eventual tumor progression is the norm. Better understanding of resistance mechanisms to VEGF inhibitors and identification of effective therapy after bevacizumab progression are currently a critical need for patients with glioblastoma.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Turner, S; Peters, KB; Desjardins, A; Gururangan, S; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Jones, LW; Kirkpatrick, JP; Friedman, AH; Vredenburgh, JJ; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Turner, S, Peters, KB, Desjardins, A, Gururangan, S, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Jones, LW, Kirkpatrick, JP, Friedman, AH, Vredenburgh, JJ, Bigner, DD, and Friedman, HS. "A review of VEGF/VEGFR-targeted therapeutics for recurrent glioblastoma." J Natl Compr Canc Netw 9.4 (April 2011): 414-427. (Review)
PMID
21464146
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
9
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
414
End Page
427

Nonreceptor tyrosine kinase BMX maintains self-renewal and tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma stem cells by activating STAT3.

Glioblastomas display cellular hierarchies containing tumor-propagating glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). STAT3 is a critical signaling node in GSC maintenance but molecular mechanisms underlying STAT3 activation in GSCs are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the bone marrow X-linked (BMX) nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activates STAT3 signaling to maintain self-renewal and tumorigenic potential of GSCs. BMX is differentially expressed in GSCs relative to nonstem cancer cells and neural progenitors. BMX knockdown potently inhibited STAT3 activation, expression of GSC transcription factors, and growth of GSC-derived intracranial tumors. Constitutively active STAT3 rescued the effects of BMX downregulation, supporting that BMX signals through STAT3 in GSCs. These data demonstrate that BMX represents a GSC therapeutic target and reinforces the importance of STAT3 signaling in stem-like cancer phenotypes.

Authors
Guryanova, OA; Wu, Q; Cheng, L; Lathia, JD; Huang, Z; Yang, J; MacSwords, J; Eyler, CE; McLendon, RE; Heddleston, JM; Shou, W; Hambardzumyan, D; Lee, J; Hjelmeland, AB; Sloan, AE; Bredel, M; Stark, GR; Rich, JN; Bao, S
MLA Citation
Guryanova, OA, Wu, Q, Cheng, L, Lathia, JD, Huang, Z, Yang, J, MacSwords, J, Eyler, CE, McLendon, RE, Heddleston, JM, Shou, W, Hambardzumyan, D, Lee, J, Hjelmeland, AB, Sloan, AE, Bredel, M, Stark, GR, Rich, JN, and Bao, S. "Nonreceptor tyrosine kinase BMX maintains self-renewal and tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma stem cells by activating STAT3." Cancer Cell 19.4 (April 2011): 498-511.
PMID
21481791
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
19
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
498
End Page
511
DOI
10.1016/j.ccr.2011.03.004

Greater chemotherapy-induced lymphopenia enhances tumor-specific immune responses that eliminate EGFRvIII-expressing tumor cells in patients with glioblastoma.

Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a tumor-specific mutation widely expressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other neoplasms, but absent from normal tissues. Immunotherapeutic targeting of EGFRvIII could eliminate neoplastic cells more precisely but may be inhibited by concurrent myelosuppressive chemotherapy like temozolomide (TMZ), which produces a survival benefit in GBM. A phase II, multicenter trial was undertaken to assess the immunogenicity of an experimental EGFRvIII-targeted peptide vaccine in patients with GBM undergoing treatment with serial cycles of standard-dose (STD) (200 mg/m(2) per 5 days) or dose-intensified (DI) TMZ (100 mg/m(2) per 21 days). All patients receiving STD TMZ exhibited at least a transient grade 2 lymphopenia, whereas those receiving DI TMZ exhibited a sustained grade 3 lymphopenia (<500 cells/μL). CD3(+) T-cell (P = .005) and B-cell (P = .004) counts were reduced significantly only in the DI cohort. Patients in the DI cohort had an increase in the proportion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (T(Reg); P = .008). EGFRvIII-specific immune responses developed in all patients treated with either regimen, but the DI TMZ regimen produced humoral (P = .037) and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses (P = .036) of greater magnitude. EGFRvIII-expressing tumor cells were also eradicated in nearly all patients (91.6%; CI(95): 64.0%-99.8%; P < .0001). The median progression-free survival (15.2 months; CI(95): 11.0-18.5 months; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.35; P = .024) and overall survival (23.6 months; CI(95): 18.5-33.1 months; HR = 0.23; P = .019) exceeded those of historical controls matched for entry criteria and adjusted for known prognostic factors. EGFRvIII-targeted vaccination induces patient immune responses despite therapeutic TMZ-induced lymphopenia and eliminates EGFRvIII-expressing tumor cells without autoimmunity.

Authors
Sampson, JH; Aldape, KD; Archer, GE; Coan, A; Desjardins, A; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Gilbert, MR; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Mitchell, DA; Reardon, DA; Sawaya, R; Schmittling, R; Shi, W; Vredenburgh, JJ; Bigner, DD; Heimberger, AB
MLA Citation
Sampson, JH, Aldape, KD, Archer, GE, Coan, A, Desjardins, A, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Gilbert, MR, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Mitchell, DA, Reardon, DA, Sawaya, R, Schmittling, R, Shi, W, Vredenburgh, JJ, Bigner, DD, and Heimberger, AB. "Greater chemotherapy-induced lymphopenia enhances tumor-specific immune responses that eliminate EGFRvIII-expressing tumor cells in patients with glioblastoma." Neuro Oncology 13.3 (March 2011): 324-333.
PMID
21149254
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
13
Issue
3
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
324
End Page
333
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noq157

O6-Methylguanine-DNA Methytransferase (MGMT) Immunohistochemistry as a Predictor of Resistance to Temozolomide in Primary CNS Lymphoma

Authors
Jiang, X; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Quinn, JA; Austin, AD; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Jiang, X, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Quinn, JA, Austin, AD, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, and Friedman, HS. "O6-Methylguanine-DNA Methytransferase (MGMT) Immunohistochemistry as a Predictor of Resistance to Temozolomide in Primary CNS Lymphoma." February 2011.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Laboratory Investigation
Volume
91
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
382A
End Page
382A

Treatment recommendations for primary extradural meningiomas.

Primary extradural meningiomas (PEMs) represent about 2% of all meningiomas and are often encountered by non-neurosurgeons. These lesions typically present as enlarging, painless, benign masses that can be surgically cured. Imaging is critical for defining involvement of adjacent structures; however, diagnosis depends on classic histologic patterns. Treatment for benign PEMs (WHO I) consists of resection with wide margins, whereas adjuvant therapy after resection of atypical (WHO II) or malignant (WHO III) PEMs should be considered. By using the collective experience from our comprehensive cancer center, including neuro-oncologists, neuroradiologists, and neurosurgeons, in addition to a complete literature review, the authors have established treatment guidelines not previously reported. This manuscript describes key features of these challenging tumors to aid in diagnosis, presents the largest published review of all reported PEMs (n = 163), and provides salient treatment guidelines to surgeons unfamiliar with these challenging tumors.

Authors
Mattox, A; Hughes, B; Oleson, J; Reardon, D; McLendon, R; Adamson, C
MLA Citation
Mattox, A, Hughes, B, Oleson, J, Reardon, D, McLendon, R, and Adamson, C. "Treatment recommendations for primary extradural meningiomas." Cancer 117.1 (January 1, 2011): 24-38. (Review)
PMID
20824719
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
117
Issue
1
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
24
End Page
38
DOI
10.1002/cncr.25384

Effect of CYP3A-inducing anti-epileptics on sorafenib exposure: results of a phase II study of sorafenib plus daily temozolomide in adults with recurrent glioblastoma.

Sorafenib, an oral VEGFR-2, Raf, PDGFR, c-KIT and Flt-3 inhibitor, is active against renal cell and hepatocellular carcinomas, and has recently demonstrated promising activity for lung and breast cancers. In addition, various protracted temozolomide dosing schedules have been evaluated as a strategy to further enhance its anti-tumor activity. We reasoned that sorafenib and protracted, daily temozolomide may provide complementary therapeutic benefit, and therefore performed a phase 2 trial among recurrent glioblastoma patients. Adult glioblastoma patients at any recurrence after standard temozolomide chemoradiotherapy received sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) and continuous daily temozolomide (50 mg/m²/day). Assessments were performed every eight weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and secondary end points were radiographic response, overall survival (OS), safety and sorafenib pharmacokinetics. Of 32 enrolled patients, 12 (38%) were on CYP3-A inducing anti-epileptics (EIAEDs), 17 (53%) had 2 or more prior progressions, 15 had progressed while receiving 5-day temozolomide, and 12 (38%) had failed either prior bevacizumab or VEGFR inhibitor therapy. The most common grade ≥ 3 toxicities were palmer-planter erythrodysesthesia (19%) and elevated amylase/lipase (13%). Sorafenib pharmacokinetic exposures were comparable on day 1 regardless of EIAED status, but significantly lower on day 28 for patients on EIAEDs (P = 0.0431). With a median follow-up of 93 weeks, PFS-6 was 9.4%. Only one patient (3%) achieved a partial response. In conclusion, sorafenib can be safely administered with daily temozolomide, but this regimen has limited activity for recurrent GBM. Co-administration of EIAEDs can lower sorafenib exposures in this population.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; Peters, K; Gururangan, S; Sampson, JH; Marcello, J; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Janney, D; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, Peters, K, Gururangan, S, Sampson, JH, Marcello, J, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Janney, D, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, and Friedman, HS. "Effect of CYP3A-inducing anti-epileptics on sorafenib exposure: results of a phase II study of sorafenib plus daily temozolomide in adults with recurrent glioblastoma." J Neurooncol 101.1 (January 2011): 57-66.
PMID
20443129
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurooncol
Volume
101
Issue
1
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
57
End Page
66
DOI
10.1007/s11060-010-0217-6

The genetic landscape of the childhood cancer medulloblastoma.

Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor of children. To identify the genetic alterations in this tumor type, we searched for copy number alterations using high-density microarrays and sequenced all known protein-coding genes and microRNA genes using Sanger sequencing in a set of 22 MBs. We found that, on average, each tumor had 11 gene alterations, fewer by a factor of 5 to 10 than in the adult solid tumors that have been sequenced to date. In addition to alterations in the Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, our analysis led to the discovery of genes not previously known to be altered in MBs. Most notably, inactivating mutations of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase genes MLL2 or MLL3 were identified in 16% of MB patients. These results demonstrate key differences between the genetic landscapes of adult and childhood cancers, highlight dysregulation of developmental pathways as an important mechanism underlying MBs, and identify a role for a specific type of histone methylation in human tumorigenesis.

Authors
Parsons, DW; Li, M; Zhang, X; Jones, S; Leary, RJ; Lin, JC-H; Boca, SM; Carter, H; Samayoa, J; Bettegowda, C; Gallia, GL; Jallo, GI; Binder, ZA; Nikolsky, Y; Hartigan, J; Smith, DR; Gerhard, DS; Fults, DW; VandenBerg, S; Berger, MS; Marie, SKN; Shinjo, SMO; Clara, C; Phillips, PC; Minturn, JE; Biegel, JA; Judkins, AR; Resnick, AC; Storm, PB; Curran, T; He, Y; Rasheed, BA; Friedman, HS; Keir, ST; McLendon, R; Northcott, PA; Taylor, MD; Burger, PC; Riggins, GJ; Karchin, R; Parmigiani, G; Bigner, DD; Yan, H; Papadopoulos, N; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, KW; Velculescu, VE
MLA Citation
Parsons, DW, Li, M, Zhang, X, Jones, S, Leary, RJ, Lin, JC-H, Boca, SM, Carter, H, Samayoa, J, Bettegowda, C, Gallia, GL, Jallo, GI, Binder, ZA, Nikolsky, Y, Hartigan, J, Smith, DR, Gerhard, DS, Fults, DW, VandenBerg, S, Berger, MS, Marie, SKN, Shinjo, SMO, Clara, C, Phillips, PC, Minturn, JE, Biegel, JA, Judkins, AR, Resnick, AC, Storm, PB, Curran, T, He, Y, Rasheed, BA, Friedman, HS, Keir, ST, McLendon, R, Northcott, PA, Taylor, MD, Burger, PC, Riggins, GJ, Karchin, R, Parmigiani, G, Bigner, DD, Yan, H, Papadopoulos, N, Vogelstein, B, Kinzler, KW, and Velculescu, VE. "The genetic landscape of the childhood cancer medulloblastoma." Science (New York, N.Y.) 331.6016 (January 2011): 435-439.
PMID
21163964
Source
epmc
Published In
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Volume
331
Issue
6016
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
435
End Page
439
DOI
10.1126/science.1198056

Glioblastoma Stem Cells: A Neuropathologist's View.

Glioblastoma (WHO Grade IV) is both the most common primary brain tumor and the most malignant. Advances in the understanding of the biology of the tumor are needed in order to obtain a clearer picture of the mechanisms driving these tumors. To neuropathologists, glioblastoma is a tumor that represents a complex system of migrating pleomorphic tumor cells, proliferating blood vessels, infiltrating inflammatory cells, and necrosis. This review will highlight how the glioma stem cell concept brings these elements together into a collective whole, interacting with microenvironmental influences in complex ways. Borrowing from chaos theory a vocabulary of "self organizing systems" and "complex adaptive systems" that seem useful in describing these pathologic features, a new paradigm of glioblastoma biology will be proposed that genetic changes should be understood in a three dimensional framework as they relate not only to the tumor cells themselves but also to the multicellular hierarchical unit, not isolated from, but responsive to, its local milieu. In this way we will come to better appreciate the impact our therapeutic interventions have on the regional phenotypic heterogeneity that exists within the tumor and the intercellular communications directing adaptation and progression.

Authors
McLendon, RE; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, and Rich, JN. "Glioblastoma Stem Cells: A Neuropathologist's View." J Oncol 2011 (2011): 397195-.
PMID
21052560
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Oncology
Volume
2011
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
397195
DOI
10.1155/2011/397195

Direct in vivo evidence for tumor propagation by glioblastoma cancer stem cells.

High-grade gliomas (World Health Organization grade III anaplastic astrocytoma and grade IV glioblastoma multiforme), the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumors, display a cellular hierarchy with self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) at the apex. While the CSC hypothesis has been an attractive model to describe many aspects of tumor behavior, it remains controversial due to unresolved issues including the use of ex vivo analyses with differential growth conditions. A CSC population has been confirmed in malignant gliomas by preferential tumor formation from cells directly isolated from patient biopsy specimens. However, direct comparison of multiple tumor cell populations with analysis of the resulting phenotypes of each population within a representative tumor environment has not been clearly described. To directly test the relative tumorigenic potential of CSCs and non-stem tumor cells in the same microenvironment, we interrogated matched tumor populations purified from a primary human tumor transplanted into a xenograft mouse model and monitored competitive in vivo tumor growth studies using serial in vivo intravital microscopy. While CSCs were a small minority of the initial transplanted cancer cell population, the CSCs, not the non-stem tumor cells, drove tumor formation and yielded tumors displaying a cellular hierarchy. In the resulting tumors, a fraction of the initial transplanted CSCs maintained expression of stem cell and proliferation markers, which were significantly higher compared to the non-stem tumor cell population and demonstrated that CSCs generated cellular heterogeneity within the tumor. These head-to-head comparisons between matched CSCs and non-stem tumor cells provide the first functional evidence using live imaging that in the same microenvironment, CSCs more than non-stem tumor cells are responsible for tumor propagation, confirming the functional definition of a CSC.

Authors
Lathia, JD; Gallagher, J; Myers, JT; Li, M; Vasanji, A; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Huang, AY; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Lathia, JD, Gallagher, J, Myers, JT, Li, M, Vasanji, A, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, Huang, AY, and Rich, JN. "Direct in vivo evidence for tumor propagation by glioblastoma cancer stem cells." PLoS One 6.9 (2011): e24807-.
PMID
21961046
Source
pubmed
Published In
Plos One
Volume
6
Issue
9
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
e24807
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0024807

Reply to M.S. Lesniak

Authors
Mehta, AI; Persson, O; II, JEH; Archer, GE; McLendon, R; Heimberger, AB; Mitchell, DA; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Mehta, AI, Persson, O, II, JEH, Archer, GE, McLendon, R, Heimberger, AB, Mitchell, DA, Bigner, DD, and Sampson, JH. "Reply to M.S. Lesniak." Journal of Clinical Oncology 29.22 (2011): 3105-3106.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
29
Issue
22
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
3105
End Page
3106
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2011.35.0256

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with occult Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

Authors
Chiarchiaro, J; McLendon, RE; Buckley, PJ; Laskowitz, DT
MLA Citation
Chiarchiaro, J, McLendon, RE, Buckley, PJ, and Laskowitz, DT. "Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with occult Waldenström macroglobulinemia." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 28.36 (December 2010): e759-e761.
PMID
20855833
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
28
Issue
36
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
e759
End Page
e761
DOI
10.1200/jco.2010.30.7447

Phase II trial of bevacizumab and erlotinib in patients with recurrent malignant glioma.

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling are established contributors to malignant glioma (MG) biology. We, therefore, evaluated bevacizumab, a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, in combination with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib, in this phase 2 study for recurrent MG patients (www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00671970). Fifty-seven patients (n = 25, glioblastoma [GBM]; n = 32, anaplastic glioma [AG]) were enrolled. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS-6). Overall survival (OS), radiographic response, pharmacokinetics, and correlative biomarkers were the secondary endpoints. Patients were stratified based on the concurrent use of enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs). Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) was given intravenously every 2 weeks. Erlotinib was orally administered daily at 200 mg/day for patients not on EIAEDs and 500 mg/day for patients on EIAEDs. PFS-6 and median OS were 28% and 42 weeks for GBM patients and 44% and 71 weeks for AG patients, respectively. Twelve (48%) GBM patients and 10 (31%) AG patients achieved a radiographic response. Erlotinib pharmacokinetic exposures were comparable between EIAED and non-EIAED groups. Rash, mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue were common but mostly grades 1 and 2. Among GBM patients, grade 3 rash, observed in 32%, was associated with survival benefit, whereas elevated hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha and VEGF receptor-2 levels were associated with poor survival. Bevacizumab plus erlotinib was adequately tolerated in recurrent MG patients. However, this regimen was associated with similar PFS benefit and radiographic response when compared with other historical bevacizumab-containing regimens.

Authors
Sathornsumetee, S; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; McLendon, RE; Marcello, J; Herndon, JE; Mathe, A; Hamilton, M; Rich, JN; Norfleet, JA; Gururangan, S; Friedman, HS; Reardon, DA
MLA Citation
Sathornsumetee, S, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, McLendon, RE, Marcello, J, Herndon, JE, Mathe, A, Hamilton, M, Rich, JN, Norfleet, JA, Gururangan, S, Friedman, HS, and Reardon, DA. "Phase II trial of bevacizumab and erlotinib in patients with recurrent malignant glioma." Neuro Oncol 12.12 (December 2010): 1300-1310.
PMID
20716591
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Volume
12
Issue
12
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
1300
End Page
1310
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noq099

Multiple phenotypic changes in mice after knockout of the B3gnt5 gene, encoding Lc3 synthase--a key enzyme in lacto-neolacto ganglioside synthesis.

Ganglioside biosynthesis occurs through a multi-enzymatic pathway which at the lactosylceramide step is branched into several biosynthetic series. Lc3 synthase utilizes a variety of galactose-terminated glycolipids as acceptors by establishing a glycosidic bond in the beta-1,3-linkage to GlcNaAc to extend the lacto- and neolacto-series gangliosides. In order to examine the lacto-series ganglioside functions in mice, we used gene knockout technology to generate Lc3 synthase gene B3gnt5-deficient mice by two different strategies and compared the phenotypes of the two null mouse groups with each other and with their wild-type counterparts.B3gnt5 gene knockout mutant mice appeared normal in the embryonic stage and, if they survived delivery, remained normal during early life. However, about 9% developed early-stage growth retardation, 11% died postnatally in less than 2 months, and adults tended to die in 5-15 months, demonstrating splenomegaly and notably enlarged lymph nodes. Without lacto-neolacto series gangliosides, both homozygous and heterozygous mice gradually displayed fur loss or obesity, and breeding mice demonstrated reproductive defects. Furthermore, B3gnt5 gene knockout disrupted the functional integrity of B cells, as manifested by a decrease in B-cell numbers in the spleen, germinal center disappearance, and less efficiency to proliferate in hybridoma fusion.These novel results demonstrate unequivocally that lacto-neolacto series gangliosides are essential to multiple physiological functions, especially the control of reproductive output, and spleen B-cell abnormality. We also report the generation of anti-IgG response against the lacto-series gangliosides 3'-isoLM1 and 3',6'-isoLD1.

Authors
Kuan, C-T; Chang, J; Mansson, J-E; Li, J; Pegram, C; Fredman, P; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Kuan, C-T, Chang, J, Mansson, J-E, Li, J, Pegram, C, Fredman, P, McLendon, RE, and Bigner, DD. "Multiple phenotypic changes in mice after knockout of the B3gnt5 gene, encoding Lc3 synthase--a key enzyme in lacto-neolacto ganglioside synthesis." Bmc Developmental Biology 10 (November 18, 2010): 114-null.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4341
PMID
21087515
Source
epmc
Published In
Bmc Developmental Biology
Volume
10
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
114
DOI
10.1186/1471-213X-10-114

Immunologic escape after prolonged progression-free survival with epidermal growth factor receptor variant III peptide vaccination in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

Immunologic targeting of tumor-specific gene mutations may allow precise eradication of neoplastic cells without toxicity. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is a constitutively activated and immunogenic mutation not expressed in normal tissues but widely expressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other neoplasms.A phase II, multicenter trial was undertaken to assess the immunogenicity of an EGFRvIII-targeted peptide vaccine and to estimate the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of vaccinated patients with newly diagnosed EGFRvIII-expressing GBM with minimal residual disease. Intradermal vaccinations were given until toxicity or tumor progression was observed. Sample size was calculated to differentiate between PFS rates of 20% and 40% 6 months after vaccination.There were no symptomatic autoimmune reactions. The 6-month PFS rate after vaccination was 67% (95% CI, 40% to 83%) and after diagnosis was 94% (95% CI, 67% to 99%; n = 18). The median OS was 26.0 months (95% CI, 21.0 to 47.7 months). After adjustment for age and Karnofsky performance status, the OS of vaccinated patients was greater than that observed in a control group matched for eligibility criteria, prognostic factors, and temozolomide treatment (hazard ratio, 5.3; P = .0013; n = 17). The development of specific antibody (P = .025) or delayed-type hypersensitivity (P = .03) responses to EGFRvIII had a significant effect on OS. At recurrence, 82% (95% CI, 48% to 97%) of patients had lost EGFRvIII expression (P < .001).EGFRvIII-targeted vaccination in patients with GBM warrants investigation in a phase III, randomized trial.

Authors
Sampson, JH; Heimberger, AB; Archer, GE; Aldape, KD; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Gilbert, MR; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Mitchell, DA; Reardon, DA; Sawaya, R; Schmittling, RJ; Shi, W; Vredenburgh, JJ; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Sampson, JH, Heimberger, AB, Archer, GE, Aldape, KD, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Gilbert, MR, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Mitchell, DA, Reardon, DA, Sawaya, R, Schmittling, RJ, Shi, W, Vredenburgh, JJ, and Bigner, DD. "Immunologic escape after prolonged progression-free survival with epidermal growth factor receptor variant III peptide vaccination in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 28.31 (November 2010): 4722-4729.
PMID
20921459
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
28
Issue
31
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
4722
End Page
4729
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2010.28.6963

ADDITION OF GBM HISTOLOGICAL FEATURES AND EGFRVIII EXPRESSION TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS: PHENOTYPIC CORRELATES OF MOLECULAR SUBCLASSES

Authors
Brennan, CW; Brat, DJ; Aldape, KD; Cohen, M; Lehman, NL; McLendon, RE; Miller, R; Schniederjan, M; Vandenberg, SR; Working, CGACNSD
MLA Citation
Brennan, CW, Brat, DJ, Aldape, KD, Cohen, M, Lehman, NL, McLendon, RE, Miller, R, Schniederjan, M, Vandenberg, SR, and Working, CGACNSD. "ADDITION OF GBM HISTOLOGICAL FEATURES AND EGFRVIII EXPRESSION TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS: PHENOTYPIC CORRELATES OF MOLECULAR SUBCLASSES." November 2010.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
12
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
67
End Page
68

MRP3: a molecular target for human glioblastoma multiforme immunotherapy.

BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is refractory to conventional therapies. To overcome the problem of heterogeneity, more brain tumor markers are required for prognosis and targeted therapy. We have identified and validated a promising molecular therapeutic target that is expressed by GBM: human multidrug-resistance protein 3 (MRP3). METHODS: We investigated MRP3 by genetic and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of human gliomas to determine the incidence, distribution, and localization of MRP3 antigens in GBM and their potential correlation with survival. To determine MRP3 mRNA transcript and protein expression levels, we performed quantitative RT-PCR, raising MRP3-specific antibodies, and IHC analysis with biopsies of newly diagnosed GBM patients. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the correlation of RNA expression and IHC of MRP3 with patient survival, with and without adjustment for age, extent of resection, and KPS. RESULTS: Real-time PCR results from 67 GBM biopsies indicated that 59/67 (88%) samples highly expressed MRP3 mRNA transcripts, in contrast with minimal expression in normal brain samples. Rabbit polyvalent and murine monoclonal antibodies generated against an extracellular span of MRP3 protein demonstrated reactivity with defined MRP3-expressing cell lines and GBM patient biopsies by Western blotting and FACS analyses, the latter establishing cell surface MRP3 protein expression. IHC evaluation of 46 GBM biopsy samples with anti-MRP3 IgG revealed MRP3 in a primarily membranous and cytoplasmic pattern in 42 (91%) of the 46 samples. Relative RNA expression was a strong predictor of survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients. Hazard of death for GBM patients with high levels of MRP3 RNA expression was 2.71 (95% CI: 1.54-4.80) times that of patients with low/moderate levels (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Human GBMs overexpress MRP3 at both mRNA and protein levels, and elevated MRP3 mRNA levels in GBM biopsy samples correlated with a higher risk of death. These data suggest that the tumor-associated antigen MRP3 has potential use for prognosis and as a target for malignant glioma immunotherapy.

Authors
Kuan, C-T; Wakiya, K; Herndon, JE; Lipp, ES; Pegram, CN; Riggins, GJ; Rasheed, A; Szafranski, SE; McLendon, RE; Wikstrand, CJ; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Kuan, C-T, Wakiya, K, Herndon, JE, Lipp, ES, Pegram, CN, Riggins, GJ, Rasheed, A, Szafranski, SE, McLendon, RE, Wikstrand, CJ, and Bigner, DD. "MRP3: a molecular target for human glioblastoma multiforme immunotherapy. (Published online)" BMC Cancer 10 (September 1, 2010): 468-.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16100
PMID
20809959
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bmc Cancer
Volume
10
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
468
DOI
10.1186/1471-2407-10-468

MGMT immunoexpression in silent subtype 3 pituitary adenomas: possible therapeutic implications.

The objective of the study was to assess O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunoreactivity in pituitary adenomas of silent subtype 3 as a potential indicator of temozolomide susceptibility. The Mayo Clinic Anatomic Pathology Database was searched for all cases of silent subtype 3 pituitary adenoma. Each of the 23 cases identified had been confirmed on the basis of histology, immunohistochemical staining for pituitary hormones, as well as on diagnostic ultrastructural criteria. Unstained microscopic sections were immunostained for MGMT and were semiquantitatively assessed. Of the 23 tumors examined, 18 (78%) showed no MGMT immunoreactivity. The remaining five (22%) showed immunoreactivity in < or =50% of tumor cells. Among eight of the most clinically aggressive tumors in this study, six (75%) lacked MGMT immunoreactivity. The observed lack of or low-level expression of MGMT by this distinctive, clinically aggressive form of pituitary adenoma suggests potential efficacy of treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide.

Authors
Fealey, ME; Scheithauer, BW; Horvath, E; Erickson, D; Kovacs, K; McLendon, R; Lloyd, RV
MLA Citation
Fealey, ME, Scheithauer, BW, Horvath, E, Erickson, D, Kovacs, K, McLendon, R, and Lloyd, RV. "MGMT immunoexpression in silent subtype 3 pituitary adenomas: possible therapeutic implications." Endocr Pathol 21.3 (September 2010): 161-165.
PMID
20480258
Source
pubmed
Published In
Endocrine Pathology
Volume
21
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
161
End Page
165
DOI
10.1007/s12022-010-9120-0

HDMX regulates p53 activity and confers chemoresistance to 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the deadliest tumors afflicting humans, and the mechanisms of its onset and progression remain largely undefined. Our attempts to elucidate its molecular pathogenesis through DNA copy-number analysis by genome-wide digital karyotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism arrays identified a dramatic focal amplification on chromosome 1q32 in 4 of 57 GBM tumors. Quantitative real-time PCR measurements revealed that HDMX is the most commonly amplified and overexpressed gene in the 1q32 locus. Further genetic screening of 284 low- and high-grade gliomas revealed that HDMX amplifications occur solely in pediatric and adult GBMs and that they are mutually exclusive of TP53 mutations and MDM2 amplifications. Here, we demonstrate that HDMX regulates p53 to promote GBM growth and attenuates tumor response to chemotherapy. In GBM cells, HDMX overexpression inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation of p21, releases cells from G0 to G1 phase, and enhances cellular proliferation. HDMX overexpression does not affect the expression of PUMA and BAX proapoptotic genes. While in GBM cells treated with the chemotherapeutic agent 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), HDMX appears to stabilize p53 and promote phosphorylation of the DNA double-stranded break repair protein H2AX, up-regulate the DNA repair gene VPX, stimulate DNA repair, and confer resistance to BCNU. In summary, HDMX exhibits bona fide oncogenic properties and offers a promising molecular target for GBM therapeutic intervention.

Authors
Jin, G; Cook, S; Cui, B; Chen, WC; Keir, ST; Killela, P; Di, C; Payne, CA; Gregory, SG; McLendon, R; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Jin, G, Cook, S, Cui, B, Chen, WC, Keir, ST, Killela, P, Di, C, Payne, CA, Gregory, SG, McLendon, R, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "HDMX regulates p53 activity and confers chemoresistance to 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea." Neuro Oncol 12.9 (September 2010): 956-966.
PMID
20472715
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Volume
12
Issue
9
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
956
End Page
966
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noq045

Recombinant single-chain variable fragment antibodies against extracellular epitopes of human multidrug resistance protein MRP3 for targeting malignant gliomas.

Multidrug resistance protein 3 (MRP3), a multidrug resistance protein identified by serial analysis of gene expression as a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-associated molecule, is highly expressed in GBM, but not in normal brain cells. Thus, MRP3 is a candidate for GBM immunotargeting, but to date, no monoclonal antibody has been isolated that can target an extracellular MRP3 epitope. By phage display, we have isolated 3 recombinant, fully human, single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies, M25, M58 and M89, which specifically react with the extracellular N-terminus of human MRP3. In ELISA, these scFvs reacted only with the peptide used for screening and not with other MRP3-derived peptides. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that these scFv fragments bind specifically to viable human GBM cells displaying different MRP3 expression levels, but not to MRP3-null cells. Furthermore, these scFv antibodies failed to react with tumor cells overexpressing other MRP proteins, including MRP1, MRP2, MRP4 and MRP5. M25 and M58 also bound to viable neurospheres. Iodogen-labeled scFvs demonstrated a yield of 56-76%. The immunoreactive fractions of the radiolabeled M25, M58 and M89 scFvs were 32, 52 and 69%, respectively. M25 exhibited 20% internalization into D2159MG neurospheres, M58, 33% into D54MG cells and M89, 26% into D247MG. Immunohistochemical evaluation of human gliomas to determine the localization of MRP3 antigen using scFvs M25 and M58 showed a dense cytoplasmic and membranous staining pattern. These Fv-based recombinant antibodies, which possess superior tumor penetration capabilities and selectively target tumor cells that express MRP3, may potentially be used in immunotherapy and diagnosis for brain tumors and other cancers.

Authors
Kuan, C-T; Srivastava, N; McLendon, RE; Marasco, WA; Zalutsky, MR; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Kuan, C-T, Srivastava, N, McLendon, RE, Marasco, WA, Zalutsky, MR, and Bigner, DD. "Recombinant single-chain variable fragment antibodies against extracellular epitopes of human multidrug resistance protein MRP3 for targeting malignant gliomas." Int J Cancer 127.3 (August 1, 2010): 598-611.
PMID
19937796
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Cancer
Volume
127
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
598
End Page
611
DOI
10.1002/ijc.25062

Integrated genomic analyses identify ERRFI1 and TACC3 as glioblastoma-targeted genes.

The glioblastoma genome displays remarkable chromosomal aberrations, which harbor critical glioblastoma-specific genes contributing to several oncogenetic pathways. To identify glioblastoma-targeted genes, we completed a multifaceted genome-wide analysis to characterize the most significant aberrations of DNA content occurring in glioblastomas. We performed copy number analysis of 111 glioblastomas by Digital Karyotyping and Illumina BeadChip assays and validated our findings using data from the TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) glioblastoma project. From this study, we identified recurrent focal copy number alterations in 1p36.23 and 4p16.3. Expression analyses of genes located in the two regions revealed genes which are dysregulated in glioblastomas. Specifically, we identify EGFR negative regulator, ERRFI1, within the minimal region of deletion in 1p36.23. In glioblastoma cells with a focal deletion of the ERRFI1 locus, restoration of ERRFI1 expression slowed cell migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that TACC3, an Aurora-A kinase substrate, on 4p16.3, displays gain of copy number, is overexpressed in a glioma-grade-specific pattern, and correlates with Aurora kinase overexpression in glioblastomas. Our multifaceted genomic evaluation of glioblastoma establishes ERRFI1 as a potential candidate tumor suppressor gene and TACC3 as a potential oncogene, and provides insight on targets for oncogenic pathway-based therapy.

Authors
Duncan, CG; Killela, PJ; Payne, CA; Lampson, B; Chen, WC; Liu, J; Solomon, D; Waldman, T; Towers, AJ; Gregory, SG; McDonald, KL; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Duncan, CG, Killela, PJ, Payne, CA, Lampson, B, Chen, WC, Liu, J, Solomon, D, Waldman, T, Towers, AJ, Gregory, SG, McDonald, KL, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "Integrated genomic analyses identify ERRFI1 and TACC3 as glioblastoma-targeted genes." Oncotarget 1.4 (August 2010): 265-277.
PMID
21113414
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncotarget
Volume
1
Issue
4
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
265
End Page
277
DOI
10.18632/oncotarget.137

IDH1(R132) mutation identified in one human melanoma metastasis, but not correlated with metastases to the brain.

Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) are enzymes which convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+to NADPH). IDH1/2 were recently identified as mutated in a large percentage of progressive gliomas. These mutations occur at IDH1(R132) or the homologous IDH2(R172). Melanomas share some genetic features with IDH1/2-mutated gliomas, such as frequent TP53 mutation. We sought to test whether melanoma is associated with IDH1/2 mutations. Seventy-eight human melanoma samples were analyzed for IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R172) mutation status. A somatic, heterozygous IDH1 c.C394T (p.R132C) mutation was identified in one human melanoma metastasis to the lung. Having identified this mutation in one metastasis, we sought to test the hypothesis that certain selective pressures in the brain environment may specifically favor the cell growth or survival of tumor cells with mutations in IDH1/2, regardless of primary tumor site. To address this, we analyzed IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R172) mutation status 53 metastatic brain tumors, including nine melanoma metastases. Results revealed no mutations in any samples. This lack of mutations would suggest that mutations in IDH1(R132) or IDH2(R172) may be necessary for the formation of tumors in a cell-lineage dependent manner, with a particularly strong selective pressure for mutations in progressive gliomas; this also suggests the lack of a particular selective pressure for growth in brain tissue in general. Studies on the cell-lineages of tumors with IDH1/2 mutations may help clarify the role of these mutations in the development of brain tumors.

Authors
Lopez, GY; Reitman, ZJ; Solomon, D; Waldman, T; Bigner, DD; McLendon, RE; Rosenberg, SA; Samuels, Y; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Lopez, GY, Reitman, ZJ, Solomon, D, Waldman, T, Bigner, DD, McLendon, RE, Rosenberg, SA, Samuels, Y, and Yan, H. "IDH1(R132) mutation identified in one human melanoma metastasis, but not correlated with metastases to the brain." Biochem Biophys Res Commun 398.3 (July 30, 2010): 585-587.
PMID
20603105
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume
398
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
585
End Page
587
DOI
10.1016/j.bbrc.2010.06.125

IDH1 and IDH2 hotspot mutations are not found in canine glioma.

Authors
Reitman, ZJ; Olby, NJ; Mariani, CL; Thomas, R; Breen, M; Bigner, DD; McLendon, RE; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Reitman, ZJ, Olby, NJ, Mariani, CL, Thomas, R, Breen, M, Bigner, DD, McLendon, RE, and Yan, H. "IDH1 and IDH2 hotspot mutations are not found in canine glioma." Int J Cancer 127.1 (July 1, 2010): 245-246. (Letter)
PMID
19877121
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Cancer
Volume
127
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
245
End Page
246
DOI
10.1002/ijc.25017

Bevacizumab fails to treat temporal paraganglioma: discussion and case illustration.

Temporal paragangliomas are highly vascular tumors treated primarily by surgical resection. However, surgery to remove these tumors is associated with significant morbidity, including cranial nerve dysfunction. Interestingly, these tumors have been shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). A variety of tumors expressing VEGF and the VEGF receptor have been shown to reduce in size and vascularity when treated with the VEGF-specific antibody, bevacizumab (Avastin). We hypothesized that paragangliomas may be treated noninvasively with bevacizumab, either as a primary treatment or as a useful adjuvant to surgical resection or radiation. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the effects of bevacizumab on this patient's paraganglioma. A 36-year-old female presented to us with a 3 month history of positional dizziness, light-headedness, and left ear pulsatile tinnitus and hearing loss. She was found to have a temporal paraganglioma (glomus jugulare tumor) on imaging. Histopathology confirmed significant staining for VEGF. This patient was treated with bevacizumab prior to surgical treatment; radiographic imaging at 3 months, however, showed no significant response. We discuss possible reasons for treatment failure.

Authors
Aliabadi, H; Vredenburgh, JJ; Everson, RG; Desjardins, A; Friedman, HS; McLendon, RE; Tucci, DL; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Aliabadi, H, Vredenburgh, JJ, Everson, RG, Desjardins, A, Friedman, HS, McLendon, RE, Tucci, DL, and Sampson, JH. "Bevacizumab fails to treat temporal paraganglioma: discussion and case illustration." J Neurooncol 98.3 (July 2010): 427-430.
PMID
20020179
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurooncol
Volume
98
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
427
End Page
430
DOI
10.1007/s11060-009-0091-2

CYP3A-inducing antiepileptics decrease sorafenib exposures: Results of a phase II study in adults with recurrent glioblastoma.

Authors
Gururangan, S; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; Peters, K; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Janney, D; Friedman, HS; Reardon, DA
MLA Citation
Gururangan, S, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, Peters, K, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Janney, D, Friedman, HS, and Reardon, DA. "CYP3A-inducing antiepileptics decrease sorafenib exposures: Results of a phase II study in adults with recurrent glioblastoma." Journal of Clinical Oncology 28.15_suppl (May 20, 2010): 2089-2089.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
28
Issue
15_suppl
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
2089
End Page
2089
DOI
10.1200/jco.2010.28.15_suppl.2089

Phase II trial of bevacizumab plus erlotinib for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: Final results.

Authors
Sathornsumetee, S; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; McLendon, RE; Marcello, J; Herndon, JE; Norfleet, J; Gururangan, S; Friedman, HS; Reardon, DA
MLA Citation
Sathornsumetee, S, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, McLendon, RE, Marcello, J, Herndon, JE, Norfleet, J, Gururangan, S, Friedman, HS, and Reardon, DA. "Phase II trial of bevacizumab plus erlotinib for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: Final results." Journal of Clinical Oncology 28.15_suppl (May 20, 2010): 2055-2055.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
28
Issue
15_suppl
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
2055
End Page
2055
DOI
10.1200/jco.2010.28.15_suppl.2055

Integrin alpha 6 regulates glioblastoma stem cells.

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells suggested to be critical for tumor maintenance, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. Prospective identification and targeting of CSCs are therefore priorities for the development of novel therapeutic paradigms. Although CSC enrichment has been achieved with cell surface proteins including CD133 (Prominin-1), the roles of current CSC markers in tumor maintenance remain unclear. We examined the glioblastoma stem cell (GSC) perivascular microenvironment in patient specimens to identify enrichment markers with a functional significance and identified integrin alpha6 as a candidate. Integrin alpha6 is coexpressed with conventional GSC markers and enriches for GSCs. Targeting integrin alpha6 in GSCs inhibits self-renewal, proliferation, and tumor formation capacity. Our results provide evidence that GSCs express high levels of integrin alpha6, which can serve not only as an enrichment marker but also as a promising antiglioblastoma therapy.

Authors
Lathia, JD; Gallagher, J; Heddleston, JM; Wang, J; Eyler, CE; Macswords, J; Wu, Q; Vasanji, A; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Lathia, JD, Gallagher, J, Heddleston, JM, Wang, J, Eyler, CE, Macswords, J, Wu, Q, Vasanji, A, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Integrin alpha 6 regulates glioblastoma stem cells." Cell Stem Cell 6.5 (May 2010): 421-432.
PMID
20452317
Source
epmc
Published In
Cell Stem Cell
Volume
6
Issue
5
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
421
End Page
432
DOI
10.1016/j.stem.2010.02.018

Treatment of Recurrent Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma with SRC-Related Tyrosine Kinase Targeted Therapy: A Case Report.

Hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare sarcomatous tumor arising from pericytes, a support cell found in blood vessels. These tumors can occur throughout the body, particularly in the lower extremities and retroperitoneum. In rare circumstances, HPCs can arise from the meninges. In these cases, they behave similar to meningiomas, in particular angiomatous meningiomas, but tend to be more aggressive and are likely to recur. Treatment usually focuses on surgical resection and radiotherapy with possible inclusion of chemotherapy for control of recurrent disease. We describe a case of recurrent right temporal HPC that first manifested as a paraneoplastic syndrome of oncogenic osteomalacia. Despite maximum therapy, this patient experienced multiple recurrences of the tumor, and immunohistochemical analysis revealed overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor, a member of the SRC-related tyrosine kinases. After multiple recurrences, the patient's tumor has been stable with treatment with monotherapy utilizing molecularly targeted therapy to SRC-related tyrosine kinases. This is the first case report of the treatment of recurrent meningeal HPC with molecularly targeted therapy to SRC-related tyrosine kinases.

Authors
Peters, KB; McLendon, R; Morse, MA; Vredenburgh, JJ
MLA Citation
Peters, KB, McLendon, R, Morse, MA, and Vredenburgh, JJ. "Treatment of Recurrent Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma with SRC-Related Tyrosine Kinase Targeted Therapy: A Case Report. (Published online)" Case Rep Oncol 3.1 (April 8, 2010): 93-97.
PMID
20740166
Source
pubmed
Published In
Case Reports in Oncology
Volume
3
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
93
End Page
97
DOI
10.1159/000307468

Single-stage bilateral choroid plexectomy for choroid plexus papilloma in a patient presenting with high cerebrospinal fluid output.

Cerebrospinal fluid overproduction resulting in communicating hydrocephalus is observed in patients who have choroid plexus papilloma or choroid plexus carcinoma. Less often, patients with these conditions have diffuse villous hyperplasia. Prior studies report CSF production greater than 3 L per day in these patients. These patients are treated with CSF shunting or by either unilateral choroid plexectomy or staged bilateral choroid plexectomy. The authors present a patient who had a number of congenital anomalies and a karyotype that revealed balanced translocations, 5 to 7 and 9 to 11. She presented with hydrocephalus and had CSF production of 5 L per day, greater output than ever previously reported. She was treated with a single-stage bilateral choroid plexectomy. Histopathological analysis revealed a bilateral choroid plexus papilloma. Postoperatively, the patient responded well clinically and showed radiographic improvement of her hydrocephalus. Bilateral choroid plexus papilloma has been reported in the literature as a cause for neonatal and congenital hydrocephalus. It can result in high CSF output and can be successfully treated with a single-stage bilateral choroid plexectomy. Further studies are ongoing to identify genes involved in embryogenesis of the choroid plexus.

Authors
Nimjee, SM; Powers, CJ; McLendon, RE; Grant, GA; Fuchs, HE
MLA Citation
Nimjee, SM, Powers, CJ, McLendon, RE, Grant, GA, and Fuchs, HE. "Single-stage bilateral choroid plexectomy for choroid plexus papilloma in a patient presenting with high cerebrospinal fluid output." J Neurosurg Pediatr 5.4 (April 2010): 342-345.
PMID
20367337
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Volume
5
Issue
4
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
342
End Page
345
DOI
10.3171/2009.10.PEDS08454

Targeting A20 decreases glioma stem cell survival and tumor growth.

Glioblastomas are deadly cancers that display a functional cellular hierarchy maintained by self-renewing glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). GSCs are regulated by molecular pathways distinct from the bulk tumor that may be useful therapeutic targets. We determined that A20 (TNFAIP3), a regulator of cell survival and the NF-kappaB pathway, is overexpressed in GSCs relative to non-stem glioblastoma cells at both the mRNA and protein levels. To determine the functional significance of A20 in GSCs, we targeted A20 expression with lentiviral-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Inhibiting A20 expression decreased GSC growth and survival through mechanisms associated with decreased cell-cycle progression and decreased phosphorylation of p65/RelA. Elevated levels of A20 in GSCs contributed to apoptotic resistance: GSCs were less susceptible to TNFalpha-induced cell death than matched non-stem glioma cells, but A20 knockdown sensitized GSCs to TNFalpha-mediated apoptosis. The decreased survival of GSCs upon A20 knockdown contributed to the reduced ability of these cells to self-renew in primary and secondary neurosphere formation assays. The tumorigenic potential of GSCs was decreased with A20 targeting, resulting in increased survival of mice bearing human glioma xenografts. In silico analysis of a glioma patient genomic database indicates that A20 overexpression and amplification is inversely correlated with survival. Together these data indicate that A20 contributes to glioma maintenance through effects on the glioma stem cell subpopulation. Although inactivating mutations in A20 in lymphoma suggest A20 can act as a tumor suppressor, similar point mutations have not been identified through glioma genomic sequencing: in fact, our data suggest A20 may function as a tumor enhancer in glioma through promotion of GSC survival. A20 anticancer therapies should therefore be viewed with caution as effects will likely differ depending on the tumor type.

Authors
Hjelmeland, AB; Wu, Q; Wickman, S; Eyler, C; Heddleston, J; Shi, Q; Lathia, JD; Macswords, J; Lee, J; McLendon, RE; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Hjelmeland, AB, Wu, Q, Wickman, S, Eyler, C, Heddleston, J, Shi, Q, Lathia, JD, Macswords, J, Lee, J, McLendon, RE, and Rich, JN. "Targeting A20 decreases glioma stem cell survival and tumor growth." Plos Biology 8.2 (February 23, 2010): e1000319-null.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4444
PMID
20186265
Source
epmc
Published In
Plos Biology
Volume
8
Issue
2
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
e1000319
DOI
10.1371/journal.pbio.1000319

GMab-1, a high-affinity anti-3'-isoLM1/3',6'-isoLD1 IgG monoclonal antibody, raised in lacto-series ganglioside-defective knockout mice.

The lacto-series gangliosides 3'-isoLM1 and 3',6'-isoLD1 have been identified as tumor-associated antigens whose formation is initiated by the Lc3-synthase. Until now, high-affinity IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against 3'-isoLM1 and 3',6'-isoLD1, which are highly expressed in gliomas, have not been developed, although mAbs against lacto-series gangliosides are powerful tools for functional studies. We previously produced the Lc3-synthase gene beta3Gn-T5 knockout mice. In this study, we immunized beta3Gn-T5 knockout mice with 3'-isoLM1/3',6'-isoLD1 and produced the anti-3'-isoLM1/3',6'-isoLD1 mAb GMab-1, of the IgG(3) subclass, which should be useful for functional analysis of lacto-series gangliosides and for antibody-based therapy of gliomas.

Authors
Kato, Y; Kuan, C-T; Chang, J; Kaneko, MK; Ayriss, J; Piao, H; Chandramohan, V; Pegram, C; McLendon, RE; Fredman, P; Månsson, J-E; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Kato, Y, Kuan, C-T, Chang, J, Kaneko, MK, Ayriss, J, Piao, H, Chandramohan, V, Pegram, C, McLendon, RE, Fredman, P, Månsson, J-E, and Bigner, DD. "GMab-1, a high-affinity anti-3'-isoLM1/3',6'-isoLD1 IgG monoclonal antibody, raised in lacto-series ganglioside-defective knockout mice." Biochem Biophys Res Commun 391.1 (January 1, 2010): 750-755.
PMID
19944071
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume
391
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
750
End Page
755
DOI
10.1016/j.bbrc.2009.11.132

Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling Through STAT3 Is Required For Glioma Stem Cell Maintenance.

Recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is a growth factor used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia, but recent studies suggest that EPO may accelerate cancer growth. Although several cancers express EPO receptors (EPORs), the mechanism by which EPOR promotes tumor growth remains poorly understood. Glioblastomas display a cellular hierarchy of self-renewal and tumor propagation restricted to glioma stem cells (GSCs). We find that GSCs express higher levels of EPOR than matched non-stem glioma cells. Prospective enrichment for EPOR on GSCs increased neurosphere formation, suggesting that EPOR can select for a subset of GSCs with increased self-renewal capacity. Targeting EPOR expression with lentiviral mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) reduced GSC growth, survival, and neurosphere formation capacity, defining a crucial role for EPOR in GSC maintenance. We further find that STAT3 is an important mediator of EPOR signals in GSCs. EPOR knockdown attenuated the basal activation of STAT3 present in GSCs, and a small molecule inhibitor of STAT3 reduced GSC growth and survival. EPOR signaling was critical for survival in vivo, as targeting EPOR expression decreased GSC tumorigenic potential. Elevated EPOR expression also associated with poor patient outcome. Thus, EPOR on GSCs promotes tumor growth and may explain the poor survival of cancer patients treated with EPO.

Authors
Cao, Y; Lathia, JD; Eyler, CE; Wu, Q; Li, Z; Wang, H; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Cao, Y, Lathia, JD, Eyler, CE, Wu, Q, Li, Z, Wang, H, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling Through STAT3 Is Required For Glioma Stem Cell Maintenance." Genes Cancer 1.1 (January 1, 2010): 50-61.
PMID
20657792
Source
pubmed
Published In
Genes and Cancer
Volume
1
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
50
End Page
61
DOI
10.1177/1947601909356352

OTX2 is critical for the maintenance and progression of Shh-independent medulloblastomas.

OTX2 is a developmentally regulated transcription factor involved in early morphogenesis of the central nervous system. This gene is amplified and overexpressed in medulloblastoma cell lines, but the nature and extent of its genetic alterations in primary tumors have not been evaluated. Analysis of a large cohort of primary medulloblastomas revealed frequent focal copy number gain of a region minimally containing OTX2 as a single gene. OTX2 copy number gain was restricted to tumor subtypes that did not express a molecular signature of Wnt or Shh pathway activation. FISH analysis revealed copy number gain in a subset of cells within medulloblastoma samples, suggesting a late event in tumor progression. Gain of OTX2 copy number was associated with the presence of anaplastic histologic features and shorter survival in medulloblastoma patients. In support of a functional role, ectopic OTX2 expression enhanced proliferation and tumorigenicity of immortalized primary cells, whereas OTX2 knockdown in medulloblastoma cells prolonged the survival of animals bearing xenograft tumors. Mechanistic investigations revealed upregulation of MYC as a potential mechanism whereby OTX2 promotes tumor progression. Our findings define OTX2 as an important oncogenic driver in medulloblastoma.

Authors
Adamson, DC; Shi, Q; Wortham, M; Northcott, PA; Di, C; Duncan, CG; Li, J; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Taylor, MD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Adamson, DC, Shi, Q, Wortham, M, Northcott, PA, Di, C, Duncan, CG, Li, J, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Taylor, MD, and Yan, H. "OTX2 is critical for the maintenance and progression of Shh-independent medulloblastomas." Cancer Research 70.1 (January 2010): 181-191.
PMID
20028867
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
70
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
181
End Page
191
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-2331

Phase 2 trial of erlotinib plus sirolimus in adults with recurrent glioblastoma.

We evaluated the anti-tumor activity and safety of erlotinib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, plus sirolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, among patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a phase 2, open-label, single-arm trial. Thirty-two patients received daily erlotinib and sirolimus. The doses of erlotinib and sirolimus were 150 mg and 5 mg for patients not on concurrent CYP3A-inducing anti-epileptics (EIAEDS), and 450 mg and 10 mg for patients on EIAEDS. Evaluations were performed every two months. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival and secondary endpoints included safety and overall survival. Archival tumor samples were assessed for EGFR, EGFRvIII, PTEN, pAKT and pS6. Enrolled patients were heavily pre-treated including 53% who had received three or more prior chemotherapy agents and 28% who had received prior bevacizumab therapy. The most common grade > or = 2 adverse events were rash (59%), mucositis (34%) and diarrhea (31%). Grade 3 or higher events were rare. Best radiographic response included stable disease in 15 patients (47%); no patients achieved either a CR or PR. The estimated 6-month progression-free survival was 3.1% for all patients. Progression-free survival was better for patients not on EIAEDs (P = 0.03). Tumor markers failed to show an association with PFS except for increased pAKT expression which achieved borderline significance (P = 0.045). Although neither rash nor diarrhea had an association with outcome, hyperlipidemia was associated with longer PFS (P = 0.029). Erlotinib plus sirolimus was well tolerated but had negligible activity among unselected recurrent GBM patients. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT0062243).

Authors
Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Gururangan, S; Friedman, AH; Herndon, JE; Marcello, J; Norfleet, JA; McLendon, RE; Sampson, JH; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Gururangan, S, Friedman, AH, Herndon, JE, Marcello, J, Norfleet, JA, McLendon, RE, Sampson, JH, and Friedman, HS. "Phase 2 trial of erlotinib plus sirolimus in adults with recurrent glioblastoma." Journal of Neuro Oncology 96.2 (January 2010): 219-230.
PMID
19562254
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
96
Issue
2
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
219
End Page
230
DOI
10.1007/s11060-009-9950-0

Central nervous system.

Several different types of tumors, benign and malignant, have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS). The prognoses for these tumors are related to several factors, such as the age of the patient and the location and histology of the tumor. In adults, about half of all CNS tumors are malignant, whereas in pediatric patients, more than 75% are malignant. For most benign CNS tumors that require treatment, neurosurgeons can offer curative resections or at least provide significant relief from mass effect. Unfortunately, we still lack effective treatments for most primary and secondary malignant CNS tumors. However, the past decade has witnessed an explosion in the understanding of the early molecular events in malignant primary CNS tumors, and for the first time in history, oncologists are seeing that a plethora of new therapies targeting these molecular events are being tested in clinical trials. There is hope on the horizon for the fight against these deadly tumors. The distribution of CNS tumors by location has remained constant for numerous years. The majority of primary CNS tumors arise in the major cortical lobes. Twenty nine percent of primary CNS tumors arise from the dural meninges that encase the CNS structures. The vast majority of these are meningiomas, of which over 90% are benign. About 10% of primary CNS tumors are found in the sella turcica region, where the pituitary gland resides. Other much less common sites of primary CNS tumors include the pineal region, ventricular system, cerebellum, brain stem, cranial nerves, and spinal cord. The distribution of CNS tumors by histology has seen a slight increase in more malignant tumors over the past decade, possibly due to increased neuroimaging practices or environmental exposures. Arising from glial cells, gliomas represent over 36% of all primary CNS tumors and consist of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, mixed gliomas, and neuroepithelial tumors. The benign meningiomas make up 32% of primary CNS tumors, followed by nerve sheath tumors and pituitary tumors. Primary CNS lymphomas, embryonal tumors, and craniopharyngiomas are uncommon. The most common gliomas are astrocytomas, and these tumors are typically classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as Grades I through IV. Grade IV, the most malignant grade of astrocytoma, includes glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common malignant primary CNS glioma in adults, which represents 51% of all CNS gliomas. GBM is unfortunately the most challenging to effectively treat and has the worst patient survival. This chapter is therefore primarily devoted to the current understanding of this topic. Here we describe the molecular and cellular events associated with malignant glioma initiation and progression. We also review the importance of glioma stem cell biology and tumor immunology in early gliomagenesis. In addition, we present a brief description of the most common malignant primary CNS glioma in pediatric patients - medulloblastoma, as well as familial cancer syndromes that include gliomas as part of the syndrome.

Authors
Adamson, DC; Rasheed, BAK; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Adamson, DC, Rasheed, BAK, McLendon, RE, and Bigner, DD. "Central nervous system." Cancer Biomarkers : Section a of Disease Markers 9.1-6 (January 2010): 193-210. (Review)
PMID
22112477
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Biomarkers : Section a of Disease Markers
Volume
9
Issue
1-6
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
193
End Page
210
DOI
10.3233/cbm-2011-0177

Detection of amino-terminal extracellular domain of somatostatin receptor 2 by specific monoclonal antibodies and quantification of receptor density in medulloblastoma.

Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) is expressed by most medulloblastomas (MEDs). We isolated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the 12-mer (33)QTEPYYDLTSNA(44), which resides in the extracellular domain of the SSTR2 amino terminus, screened the peptide-bound MAbs by fluorescence microassay on D341 and D283 MED cells, and demonstrated homogeneous cell-surface binding, indicating that all cells expressed cell surface-detectable epitopes. Five radiolabeled MAbs were tested for immunoreactive fraction (IRF), affinity (KA) (Scatchard analysis vs. D341 MED cells), and internalization by MED cells. One IgG(3) MAb exhibited a 50-100% IRF, but low KA. Four IgG(2a) MAbs had 46-94% IRFs and modest KAs versus intact cells (0.21-1.2 x 10(8) M(-1)). Following binding of radiolabeled MAbs to D341 MED at 4 degrees C, no significant internalization was observed, which is consistent with results obtained in the absence of ligand. However, all MAbs exhibited long-term association with the cells; binding at 37 degrees C after 2 h was 65-66%, and after 24 h, 52-64%. In tests with MAbs C10 and H5, the number of cell surface receptors per cell, estimated by Scatchard and quantitative FACS analyses, was 3.9 x 10(4) for the "glial" phenotype DAOY MED cell line and 0.6-8.8 x 10(5) for four neuronal phenotype MED cell lines. Our results indicate a potential immunotherapeutic application for these MAbs.

Authors
Kuan, C-T; Wikstrand, CJ; McLendon, RE; Zalutsky, MR; Kumar, U; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Kuan, C-T, Wikstrand, CJ, McLendon, RE, Zalutsky, MR, Kumar, U, and Bigner, DD. "Detection of amino-terminal extracellular domain of somatostatin receptor 2 by specific monoclonal antibodies and quantification of receptor density in medulloblastoma." Hybridoma (2005) 28.6 (December 2009): 389-403.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3241
PMID
20025498
Source
epmc
Published In
Hybridoma (2005)
Volume
28
Issue
6
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
389
End Page
403
DOI
10.1089/hyb.2009.0049

Phase II trial of temozolomide (TMZ) plus irinotecan (CPT-11) in adults with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme before radiotherapy.

This phase II trial evaluated efficacy and safety of temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11) before radiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Prior to radiotherapy, patients were treated with a maximum of three 6-week cycles of TMZ and CPT-11. Patients received TMZ at a dose of 200 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-5 and CPT-11 on days 1, 8, 22, and 29, with a dose adjustment for enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug use. The primary end point was objective response rate (ORR). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), safety, and tumor O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression. Of the 42 patients treated, 8 (19%) patients achieved a partial response. Median PFS and median OS were 3.1 and 13.8 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 AEs were documented in 36% of patients, most of which were hematologic (29%). Twenty-four percent of patients had grade 3 or 4 non-hematologic AEs, with gastrointestinal AEs being the most common (12%) Two patients died, one of intracranial hemorrhage and one of treatment-related renal failure. Low MGMT expression, compared with high MGMT expression, showed no significant difference in ORR (25 vs. 8%), median PFS (14 vs. 5 months) or OS (21 vs. 15 months). Although TMZ plus CPT-11 is at least comparable in efficacy to TMZ alone, this combination appears more toxic and poorly tolerated. The lack of correlation of activity with MGMT expression is intriguing, but needs further evaluation in subsequent trials.

Authors
Quinn, JA; Jiang, SX; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Friedman, AH; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Quinn, JA, Jiang, SX, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Friedman, AH, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II trial of temozolomide (TMZ) plus irinotecan (CPT-11) in adults with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme before radiotherapy." J Neurooncol 95.3 (December 2009): 393-400.
PMID
19533023
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurooncol
Volume
95
Issue
3
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
393
End Page
400
DOI
10.1007/s11060-009-9937-x

A monoclonal antibody IMab-1 specifically recognizes IDH1R132H, the most common glioma-derived mutation.

IDH1 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1) mutations have been identified as early and frequent genetic alterations in astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and oligoastrocytomas as well as secondary glioblastomas. In contrast, primary glioblastomas very rarely contain IDH1 mutations, although primary and secondary glioblastomas are histologically indistinguishable. The IDH1 mutations are remarkably specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important Arg132 in IDH1. In gliomas, the most frequent IDH1 mutations (>90%) were G395A (R132H). In this study, we immunized mice with R132H-containing IDH1 (IDH1(R132H)) peptide. After cell fusion using Sendai virus envelope, the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which specifically reacted with IDH1(R132H), were screened in ELISA. One of the mAbs, IMab-1 reacted with the IDH1(R132H) peptide, but not with wild type IDH1 (IDH1(wt)) peptide in ELISA. In Western-blot analysis, IMab-1 reacted with only the IDH1(R132H) protein, not IDH1(wt) protein or the other IDH1 mutants, indicating that IMab-1 is IDH1(R132H)-specific. Furthermore, IMab-1 specifically stained the IDH1(R132H)-expressing cells in astrocytomas in immunohistochemistry, whereas it did not react with IDH1(R132H)-negative primary glioblastoma sections. In conclusion, we established an anti-IDH1(R132H)-specific monoclonal antibody IMab-1, which should be significantly useful for diagnosis and biological evaluation of mutation-bearing gliomas.

Authors
Kato, Y; Jin, G; Kuan, C-T; McLendon, RE; Yan, H; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Kato, Y, Jin, G, Kuan, C-T, McLendon, RE, Yan, H, and Bigner, DD. "A monoclonal antibody IMab-1 specifically recognizes IDH1R132H, the most common glioma-derived mutation." Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 390.3 (December 2009): 547-551.
PMID
19818334
Source
epmc
Published In
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume
390
Issue
3
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
547
End Page
551
DOI
10.1016/j.bbrc.2009.10.001

Glioblastoma proto-oncogene SEC61gamma is required for tumor cell survival and response to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

Glioblastoma multiforme is the most prevalent type of adult brain tumor and one of the deadliest tumors known to mankind. The genetic understanding of glioblastoma multiforme is, however, limited, and the molecular mechanisms that facilitate glioblastoma multiforme cell survival and growth within the tumor microenvironment are largely unknown. We applied digital karyotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism arrays to screen for copy-number changes in glioblastoma multiforme samples and found that the most frequently amplified region is at chromosome 7p11.2. The high resolution of digital karyotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism arrays permits the precise delineation of amplicon boundaries and has enabled identification of the minimal region of amplification at chromosome 7p11.2, which contains two genes, EGFR and SEC61gamma. SEC61gamma encodes a subunit of a heterotrimeric protein channel located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In addition to its high frequency of gene amplification in glioblastoma multiforme, SEC61gamma is also remarkably overexpressed in 77% of glioblastoma multiforme but not in lower-grade gliomas. The small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of SEC61gamma expression in tumor cells led to growth suppression and apoptosis. Furthermore, we showed that pharmacologic ER stress agents induce SEC61gamma expression in glioblastoma multiforme cells. Together, these results indicate that aberrant expression of SEC61gamma serves significant roles in glioblastoma multiforme cell survival likely via a mechanism that is involved in the cytoprotective ER stress-adaptive response to the tumor microenvironment.

Authors
Lu, Z; Zhou, L; Killela, P; Rasheed, AB; Di, C; Poe, WE; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Nicchitta, C; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Lu, Z, Zhou, L, Killela, P, Rasheed, AB, Di, C, Poe, WE, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, Nicchitta, C, and Yan, H. "Glioblastoma proto-oncogene SEC61gamma is required for tumor cell survival and response to endoplasmic reticulum stress." Cancer Research 69.23 (December 2009): 9105-9111.
PMID
19920201
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
69
Issue
23
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
9105
End Page
9111
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-2775

Metronomic chemotherapy with daily, oral etoposide plus bevacizumab for recurrent malignant glioma: a phase II study.

We evaluated bevacizumab with metronomic etoposide among recurrent malignant glioma patients in a phase 2, open-label trial.A total of 59 patients, including 27 with glioblastoma (GBM) and 32 with grade 3 malignant glioma, received 10 mg kg(-1) bevacizumab biweekly and 50 mg m(-2) etoposide daily for 21 consecutive days each month. The primary end point was a 6-month progression-free survival, and secondary end points included safety and overall survival. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGFR-2, carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) and hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha) were assessed semiquantitatively in archival tumours using immunohistochemistry and were correlated with outcome.Among grade 3 and GBM patients, the 6-month progression-free survivals were 40.6% and 44.4%, the radiographic response rates were 22% and 37% and the median survivals were 63.1 and 44.4 weeks, respectively. Hypertension predicted better outcome among both grade 3 and GBM patients, whereas high CA9 and low VEGF were associated with poorer progression-free survival (PFS) among those with GBM. The most common grade > or = 3 adverse events included neutropaenia (24%), thrombosis (12%), infection (8%) and hypertension (3%). Two patients had asymptomatic, grade 1 intracranial haemorrhage and one on-study death occurred because of pulmonary embolism.Bevacizumab with metronomic etoposide has increased toxicity compared with previous reports of bevacizumab monotherapy. Its anti-tumour activity is similar to that of bevacizumab monotherapy or bevacizumab plus irinotecan. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00612430).

Authors
Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Gururangan, S; Sampson, JH; Sathornsumetee, S; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Marcello, JE; Norfleet, J; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Gururangan, S, Sampson, JH, Sathornsumetee, S, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Marcello, JE, Norfleet, J, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, and Friedman, HS. "Metronomic chemotherapy with daily, oral etoposide plus bevacizumab for recurrent malignant glioma: a phase II study." British Journal of Cancer 101.12 (December 2009): 1986-1994.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16102
PMID
19920819
Source
epmc
Published In
British Journal of Cancer
Volume
101
Issue
12
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1986
End Page
1994
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6605412

The hypoxic microenvironment maintains glioblastoma stem cells and promotes reprogramming towards a cancer stem cell phenotype.

Glioblastomas are highly lethal cancers that contain cellular hierarchies with self-renewing cancer stem cells that can propagate tumors in secondary transplant assays. The potential significance of cancer stem cells in cancer biology has been demonstrated by studies showing contributions to therapeutic resistance, angiogenesis and tumor dispersal. We recently reported that physiologic oxygen levels differentially induce hypoxia inducible factor-2alpha (HIF2alpha) levels in cancer stem cells. HIF1alpha functioned in proliferation and survival of all cancer cells but also was activated in normal neural progenitors suggesting a potentially restricted therapeutic index while HIF2alpha was essential in only in cancer stem cells and was not expressed by normal neural progenitors demonstrating HIF2alpha is a cancer stem cell specific target. We now extend these studies to examine the role of hypoxia in regulating tumor cell plasticity. We find that hypoxia promotes the self-renewal capability of the stem and non-stem population as well as promoting a more stem-like phenotype in the non-stem population with increased neurosphere formation as well as upregulation of important stem cell factors, such as OCT4, NANOG and c-MYC. The importance of HIF2alpha was further supported as forced expression of non-degradable HIF2alpha induced a cancer stem cell marker and augmented the tumorigenic potential of the non-stem population. This novel finding may indicate a specific role of HIF2alpha in promoting glioma tumorigenesis. The unexpected plasticity of the non-stem glioma population and the stem-like phenotype emphasizes the importance of developing therapeutic strategies targeting the microenvironmental influence on the tumor in addition to cancer stem cells.

Authors
Heddleston, JM; Li, Z; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Heddleston, JM, Li, Z, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "The hypoxic microenvironment maintains glioblastoma stem cells and promotes reprogramming towards a cancer stem cell phenotype." Cell Cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 8.20 (October 3, 2009): 3274-3284.
PMID
19770585
Source
epmc
Published In
Cell Cycle
Volume
8
Issue
20
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
3274
End Page
3284
DOI
10.4161/cc.8.20.9701

Targeting interleukin 6 signaling suppresses glioma stem cell survival and tumor growth.

Glioblastomas are the most common and most lethal primary brain tumor. Recent studies implicate an important role for a restricted population of neoplastic cells (glioma stem cells (GSCs)) in glioma maintenance and recurrence. We now demonstrate that GSCs preferentially express two interleukin 6 (IL6) receptors: IL6 receptor alpha (IL6R alpha) and glycoprotein 130 (gp130). Targeting IL6R alpha or IL6 ligand expression in GSCs with the use of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) significantly reduces growth and neurosphere formation capacity while increasing apoptosis. Perturbation of IL6 signaling in GSCs attenuates signal transducers and activators of transcription three (STAT3) activation, and small molecule inhibitors of STAT3 potently induce GSC apoptosis. These data indicate that STAT3 is a downstream mediator of prosurvival IL6 signals in GSCs. Targeting of IL6R alpha or IL6 expression in GSCs increases the survival of mice bearing intracranial human glioma xenografts. IL6 is clinically significant because elevated IL6 ligand and receptor expression are associated with poor glioma patient survival. The potential utility of anti-IL6 therapies is demonstrated by decreased growth of subcutaneous human GSC-derived xenografts treated with IL6 antibody. Together, our data indicate that IL6 signaling contributes to glioma malignancy through the promotion of GSC growth and survival, and that targeting IL6 may offer benefit for glioma patients.

Authors
Wang, H; Lathia, JD; Wu, Q; Wang, J; Li, Z; Heddleston, JM; Eyler, CE; Elderbroom, J; Gallagher, J; Schuschu, J; MacSwords, J; Cao, Y; McLendon, RE; Wang, X-F; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Wang, H, Lathia, JD, Wu, Q, Wang, J, Li, Z, Heddleston, JM, Eyler, CE, Elderbroom, J, Gallagher, J, Schuschu, J, MacSwords, J, Cao, Y, McLendon, RE, Wang, X-F, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Targeting interleukin 6 signaling suppresses glioma stem cell survival and tumor growth." Stem Cells (Dayton, Ohio) 27.10 (October 2009): 2393-2404.
PMID
19658188
Source
epmc
Published In
Stem Cells (Dayton, Ohio)
Volume
27
Issue
10
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
2393
End Page
2404
DOI
10.1002/stem.188

EGFRvIII-targeted vaccination therapy of malignant glioma.

Given the highly infiltrative growth pattern of malignant glioma and the lack of specificity associated with currently available treatment regimens, alternative strategies designed to eradicate cancer cells while limiting collateral toxicity in normal tissues remain a high priority. To this end, the development of specific immunotherapies against targeted neoplastic cells represents a promising approach. The epidermal growth factor receptor class III variant (EGFRvIII), a constitutively activated mutant of the wild-type tyrosine kinase, is present in a substantial proportion of malignant gliomas and other human cancers, yet completely absent from normal tissues. This receptor variant consists of an in-frame deletion, the translation of which produces an extracellular junction with a novel glycine residue, flanked by amino acid sequences that are not typically adjacent in the normal protein. In this review, both preclinical and early clinical development of a peptide vaccine directed against this portion of the EGFRvIII antigenic domain are recapitulated. Following vaccination, our group has demonstrated potent, redirected cellular and humoral immunity against cancer cells expressing the mutant receptor without significant toxicity. Additionally, the corresponding therapeutic outcomes observed in these studies lend credence to the potential role of peptide-based vaccination strategies among emerging antitumor immunotherapies in patients with malignant glioma.

Authors
Choi, BD; Archer, GE; Mitchell, DA; Heimberger, AB; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Choi, BD, Archer, GE, Mitchell, DA, Heimberger, AB, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, and Sampson, JH. "EGFRvIII-targeted vaccination therapy of malignant glioma." Brain Pathology (Zurich, Switzerland) 19.4 (October 2009): 713-723. (Review)
PMID
19744042
Source
epmc
Published In
Brain Pathology
Volume
19
Issue
4
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
713
End Page
723
DOI
10.1111/j.1750-3639.2009.00318.x

Robust detection of EGFR copy number changes and EGFR variant III: technical aspects and relevance for glioma diagnostics.

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly affected in cancer, generally in the form of an increase in DNA copy number and/or as mutation variants [e.g., EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII), an in-frame deletion of exons 2-7]. While detection of EGFR aberrations can be expected to be relevant for glioma patients, such analysis has not yet been implemented in a routine setting, also because feasible and robust assays were lacking. We evaluated multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for detection of EGFR amplification and EGFRvIII in DNA of a spectrum of 216 diffuse gliomas. EGFRvIII detection was verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry and at the RNA level using the conventionally used endpoint RT-PCR as well as a newly developed quantitative RT-PCR. Compared to these techniques, the DNA-based MLPA assay for EGFR/EGFRvIII analysis tested showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We conclude that MLPA is a robust assay for detection of EGFR/EGFRvIII aberrations. While the exact diagnostic, prognostic and predictive value of such EGFR testing remains to be seen, MLPA has great potential as it can reliably and relatively easily be performed on routinely processed (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded) tumor tissue in combination with testing for other relevant glioma markers.

Authors
Jeuken, J; Sijben, A; Alenda, C; Rijntjes, J; Dekkers, M; Boots-Sprenger, S; McLendon, R; Wesseling, P
MLA Citation
Jeuken, J, Sijben, A, Alenda, C, Rijntjes, J, Dekkers, M, Boots-Sprenger, S, McLendon, R, and Wesseling, P. "Robust detection of EGFR copy number changes and EGFR variant III: technical aspects and relevance for glioma diagnostics." Brain Pathol 19.4 (October 2009): 661-671.
PMID
19744038
Source
pubmed
Published In
Brain Pathology
Volume
19
Issue
4
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
661
End Page
671
DOI
10.1111/j.1750-3639.2009.00320.x

Phase I trial of temozolomide plus O6-benzylguanine 5-day regimen with recurrent malignant glioma.

This phase I clinical trial conducted with patients who had recurrent or progressive malignant glioma (MG) was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity of three different 5-day dosing regimens of temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG). Both TMZ and O(6)-BG were administered on days 1-5 of a 28-day treatment cycle. A bolus infusion of O(6)-BG was administered at 120 mg/m(2) over 1 h on days 1, 3, and 5, along with a continuous infusion of O(6)-BG at 30 mg/m(2)/day. TMZ was administered at the end of the first bolus infusion of O(6)-BG and then every 24 h for 5 days during the continuous infusion of O(6)-BG. Patients were accrued to one of three 5-day dosing regimens of TMZ. Twenty-nine patients were enrolled into this study. The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were grade 4 neutropenia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The MTD for TMZ for the three different 5-day dosing schedules was determined as follows: schedule 1, 200 mg/m(2) on day 1 and 50 mg/m(2)/day on days 2-5; schedule 2, 50 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-5; and schedule 3, 50 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-5 while receiving pegfilgrastim. Thus, the 5-day TMZ dosing schedule that maximized the total dose of TMZ when combined with O(6)-BG was schedule 1. This study provides the foundation for a phase II trial of O(6)-BG in combination with a 5-day dosing schedule of TMZ in TMZ-resistant MG.

Authors
Quinn, JA; Jiang, SX; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Rich, JN; Gururangan, S; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Walker, A; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Quinn, JA, Jiang, SX, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Rich, JN, Gururangan, S, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Walker, A, and Friedman, HS. "Phase I trial of temozolomide plus O6-benzylguanine 5-day regimen with recurrent malignant glioma." Neuro Oncology 11.5 (October 2009): 556-561.
PMID
19289491
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
11
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
556
End Page
561
DOI
10.1215/15228517-2009-007

Treatment of HER2-positive breast carcinomatous meningitis with intrathecal administration of alpha-particle-emitting (211)At-labeled trastuzumab.

INTRODUCTION: Carcinomatous meningitis (CM) is a devastating disease characterized by the dissemination of malignant tumor cells into the subarachnoid space along the brain and spine. Systemic treatment with monoclonal antibody (mAb) trastuzumab can be effective against HER2-positive systemic breast carcinoma but, like other therapies, is ineffective against CM. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of alpha-particle emitting (211)At-labeled trastuzumab following intrathecal administration in a rat model of breast carcinoma CM. METHODS: Athymic rats were injected intrathecally with MCF-7/HER2-18 breast carcinoma cells through a surgically implanted indwelling intrathecal catheter. In Experiment 1, animals received 33 or 66 muCi (211)At-labeled trastuzumab, cold trastuzumab or saline. In Experiment 2, animals were inoculated with a lower tumor burden and received 46 or 92 muCi (211)At-labeled trastuzumab or saline. In Experiment 3, animals received 28 muCi (211)At-labeled trastuzumab, 30 muCi (211)At-labeled TPS3.2 control mAb or saline. Histopathological analysis of the neuroaxis was performed at the end of the study. RESULTS: In Experiment 1, median survival increased from 21 days for the saline and cold trastuzumab groups to 45 and 48 days for 33 and 66 muCi (211)At-labeled trastuzumab, respectively. In Experiment 2, median survival increased from 23 days for saline controls to 68 and 92 days for 46 and 92 muCi (211)At-labeled trastuzumab, respectively. In Experiment 3, median survival increased from 20 days to 29 and 36 days for animals treated with (211)At-labeled TPS3.2 and (211)At-labeled trastuzumab, respectively. Long-term survivors were observed exclusively in the (211)At-trastuzumab-treated groups. CONCLUSION: Intrathecal (211)At-labeled trastuzumab shows promise as a treatment for patients with HER2-positive breast CM.

Authors
Boskovitz, A; McLendon, RE; Okamura, T; Sampson, JH; Bigner, DD; Zalutsky, MR
MLA Citation
Boskovitz, A, McLendon, RE, Okamura, T, Sampson, JH, Bigner, DD, and Zalutsky, MR. "Treatment of HER2-positive breast carcinomatous meningitis with intrathecal administration of alpha-particle-emitting (211)At-labeled trastuzumab." Nucl Med Biol 36.6 (August 2009): 659-669.
PMID
19647172
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nuclear Medicine and Biology
Volume
36
Issue
6
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
659
End Page
669
DOI
10.1016/j.nucmedbio.2009.04.003

Phase 1 trial of temozolomide plus irinotecan plus O6-benzylguanine in adults with recurrent malignant glioma.

BACKGROUND: The current study was a phase 1 clinical trial conducted with patients who had recurrent or progressive malignant glioma (MG). The trial was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity of irinotecan (CPT-11) when administered with temozolomide (TMZ) and O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG). METHODS: All 3 drugs, CPT-11, TMZ, and O(6)-BG, were administered on Day 1 of a 21-day treatment. First, patients were treated with a 1-hour bolus infusion of O(6)-BG at a dose of 120 mg/m(2) followed immediately by a 48-hour continuous infusion of O(6)-BG at a dose of 30 mg/m(2)/d. Second, within 60 minutes of the end of the 1-hour bolus infusion of O(6)-BG, TMZ was administered orally at a dose of 355 mg/m(2). Third, 1 hour after administration of TMZ, CPT-11 was infused over 90 minutes. Patients were accrued to 1 of 2 strata based on CYP3A1- and CYP3A4-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) use; dose escalation was conducted independently within these strata. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients were enrolled. In both strata, the dose-limiting toxicities were hematologic and included grade 4 neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, leukopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. For Stratum 1 (EIAEDs), when TMZ was administered at a dose of 355 mg/m(2), the MTD of CPT-11 was determined to be 120 mg/m(2). In contrast, for Stratum 2 (no EIAEDs), when TMZ was administered at a dose of 200 mg/m(2), the MTD of CPT-11 was determined to be 80 mg/m(2). CONCLUSIONS: The authors believe that the results of the current study provide the foundation for a phase 2 trial of O(6)-BG in combination with CPT-11 and TMZ in patients with MG.

Authors
Quinn, JA; Jiang, SX; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Gururangan, S; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Quinn, JA, Jiang, SX, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Gururangan, S, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, and Friedman, HS. "Phase 1 trial of temozolomide plus irinotecan plus O6-benzylguanine in adults with recurrent malignant glioma." Cancer 115.13 (July 1, 2009): 2964-2970.
PMID
19402172
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
115
Issue
13
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
2964
End Page
2970
DOI
10.1002/cncr.24336

Chordoid glioma: a case report and molecular characterization of five cases.

Chordoid gliomas are rare, slow-growing neoplasms of the anterior third ventricle. We reported a case of chordoid glioma in a 41-year-old man with obstructive hydrocephalus. Histologically, the tumor consisted of polygonal epithelioid cells admixed with elongated cells in a myxoid stroma. A prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate was present. The tumor cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), vimentin, CD31, CD34, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and S100 but were negative for pankeratin and E-cadherin. The percentage of Ki67 positive cells was approximately 3%. Weak p53 immunoreactivity was seen in less than 10% of the cells. Array comparative genomic hybridization performed on this case, as well as on four other archived cases, showed losses at several loci. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed consistent genetic alterations at 9p21 and 11q13. These are the fifth through ninth reported cases of chordoid gliomas with molecular characterization suggesting a distinct genetic origin from other gliomas.

Authors
Horbinski, C; Dacic, S; McLendon, RE; Cieply, K; Datto, M; Brat, DJ; Chu, CT
MLA Citation
Horbinski, C, Dacic, S, McLendon, RE, Cieply, K, Datto, M, Brat, DJ, and Chu, CT. "Chordoid glioma: a case report and molecular characterization of five cases." Brain Pathol 19.3 (July 2009): 439-448.
PMID
18652591
Source
pubmed
Published In
Brain Pathology
Volume
19
Issue
3
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
439
End Page
448
DOI
10.1111/j.1750-3639.2008.00196.x

Hypoxia-inducible factors regulate tumorigenic capacity of glioma stem cells.

Glioblastomas are lethal cancers characterized by florid angiogenesis promoted in part by glioma stem cells (GSCs). Because hypoxia regulates angiogenesis, we examined hypoxic responses in GSCs. We now demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor HIF2alpha and multiple HIF-regulated genes are preferentially expressed in GSCs in comparison to non-stem tumor cells and normal neural progenitors. In tumor specimens, HIF2alpha colocalizes with cancer stem cell markers. Targeting HIFs in GSCs inhibits self-renewal, proliferation, and survival in vitro, and attenuates tumor initiation potential of GSCs in vivo. Analysis of a molecular database reveals that HIF2A expression correlates with poor glioma patient survival. Our results demonstrate that GSCs differentially respond to hypoxia with distinct HIF induction patterns, and HIF2alpha might represent a promising target for antiglioblastoma therapies.

Authors
Li, Z; Bao, S; Wu, Q; Wang, H; Eyler, C; Sathornsumetee, S; Shi, Q; Cao, Y; Lathia, J; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Li, Z, Bao, S, Wu, Q, Wang, H, Eyler, C, Sathornsumetee, S, Shi, Q, Cao, Y, Lathia, J, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Hypoxia-inducible factors regulate tumorigenic capacity of glioma stem cells." Cancer Cell 15.6 (June 2009): 501-513.
PMID
19477429
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
15
Issue
6
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
501
End Page
513
DOI
10.1016/j.ccr.2009.03.018

RNA Transfected Dendritic Cell Vaccines Targeting Human Cytomegalovirus Antigens in Patients with Glioblastoma

Authors
Mitchell, DA; Archer, GE; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS; Lally-Goss, D; Perry, B; II, HJE; McGehee, S; McLendon, RE; Reardon, D; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Mitchell, DA, Archer, GE, Bigner, DD, Friedman, HS, Lally-Goss, D, Perry, B, II, HJE, McGehee, S, McLendon, RE, Reardon, D, and Sampson, JH. "RNA Transfected Dendritic Cell Vaccines Targeting Human Cytomegalovirus Antigens in Patients with Glioblastoma." May 2009.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Molecular Therapy
Volume
17
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
S93
End Page
S93

INDUCTION OF IMMUNOLOGIC AND CLINICAL RESPONSES WITH EGFRVIII-TARGETED VACCINE (CDX-110) WITH CYCLES OF TEMOZOLOMIDE IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED EGFRVIII-POSITIVE GBM

Authors
Archer, GE; Heimberger, AB; Bigner, DD; Davis, T; Friedman, HS; Keler, T; McLendon, RE; Mitchell, DA; Reardon, D; Sawaya, R; Vredenberg, J; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Archer, GE, Heimberger, AB, Bigner, DD, Davis, T, Friedman, HS, Keler, T, McLendon, RE, Mitchell, DA, Reardon, D, Sawaya, R, Vredenberg, J, and Sampson, JH. "INDUCTION OF IMMUNOLOGIC AND CLINICAL RESPONSES WITH EGFRVIII-TARGETED VACCINE (CDX-110) WITH CYCLES OF TEMOZOLOMIDE IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED EGFRVIII-POSITIVE GBM." NEURO-ONCOLOGY 11.2 (April 2009): 224-224.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
11
Issue
2
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
224
End Page
224

RECOMBINANT ANTIBODY-BASED MOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS FOR BRAIN TUMOR IMMUNOTHERAPY

Authors
Kuan, C-T; Wakiya, K; II, HJE; Wikstrand, CJ; McLendon, RE; Zalutsky, MR; Pastan, IH; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Kuan, C-T, Wakiya, K, II, HJE, Wikstrand, CJ, McLendon, RE, Zalutsky, MR, Pastan, IH, and Bigner, DD. "RECOMBINANT ANTIBODY-BASED MOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS FOR BRAIN TUMOR IMMUNOTHERAPY." NEURO-ONCOLOGY 11.2 (April 2009): 224-224.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
11
Issue
2
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
224
End Page
224

Phase II trial of temozolomide plus o6-benzylguanine in adults with recurrent, temozolomide-resistant malignant glioma.

This phase II trial was designed to define the role of O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG) in restoring temozolomide sensitivity in patients with recurrent or progressive, temozolomide-resistant malignant glioma and to evaluate the safety of administering O(6)-BG in combination with temozolomide.Patients were accrued into two independent strata on the basis of histology: glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and anaplastic glioma. Both temozolomide and O(6)-BG were administered on day 1 of a 28-day treatment cycle. Patients were administered a 1-hour O(6)-BG infusion at a dose of 120 mg/m(2) followed immediately by a 48-hour infusion at a dose of 30 mg/m(2)/d. Temozolomide was administered orally within 60 minutes of the end of the 1-hour O(6)-BG infusion at a dose of 472 mg/m(2). The primary end point was objective response rate. Secondary end points included progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety.Sixty-six of 67 patients who enrolled were treated with temozolomide and O(6)-BG. One of 34 patients (3%) with GBM (95% CI, 0.1% to 15%) and five of 32 assessable patients (16%) with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5% to 33%) were responders. The most commonly reported adverse events were grade 4 hematologic events experienced in 48% of the patients.O(6)-BG when added to a 1-day dosing regimen of temozolomide was able to restore temozolomide sensitivity in patients with temozolomide-resistant anaplastic glioma, but there seemed to be no significant restoration of temozolomide sensitivity in patients with temozolomide-resistant GBM.

Authors
Quinn, JA; Jiang, SX; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Rich, JN; Gururangan, S; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Walker, A; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Quinn, JA, Jiang, SX, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Rich, JN, Gururangan, S, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Walker, A, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II trial of temozolomide plus o6-benzylguanine in adults with recurrent, temozolomide-resistant malignant glioma." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 27.8 (March 2009): 1262-1267.
PMID
19204199
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
27
Issue
8
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1262
End Page
1267
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2008.18.8417

Identification of CD15 as a marker for tumor-propagating cells in a mouse model of medulloblastoma.

The growth of many cancers depends on self-renewing cells called cancer stem cells or tumor-propagating cells (TPCs). In human brain tumors, cells expressing the stem cell marker CD133 have been implicated as TPCs. Here we show that tumors from a model of medulloblastoma, the Patched mutant mouse, are propagated not by CD133(+) cells but by cells expressing the progenitor markers Math1 and CD15/SSEA-1. These cells have a distinct expression profile that suggests increased proliferative capacity and decreased tendency to undergo apoptosis and differentiation. CD15 is also found in a subset of human medulloblastomas, and tumors expressing genes similar to those found in murine CD15(+) cells have a poorer prognosis. Thus, CD15 may represent an important marker for TPCs in medulloblastoma.

Authors
Read, T-A; Fogarty, MP; Markant, SL; McLendon, RE; Wei, Z; Ellison, DW; Febbo, PG; Wechsler-Reya, RJ
MLA Citation
Read, T-A, Fogarty, MP, Markant, SL, McLendon, RE, Wei, Z, Ellison, DW, Febbo, PG, and Wechsler-Reya, RJ. "Identification of CD15 as a marker for tumor-propagating cells in a mouse model of medulloblastoma." Cancer Cell 15.2 (February 3, 2009): 135-147.
PMID
19185848
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
15
Issue
2
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
135
End Page
147
DOI
10.1016/j.ccr.2008.12.016

IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in gliomas.

A recent genomewide mutational analysis of glioblastomas (World Health Organization [WHO] grade IV glioma) revealed somatic mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1) in a fraction of such tumors, most frequently in tumors that were known to have evolved from lower-grade gliomas (secondary glioblastomas).We determined the sequence of the IDH1 gene and the related IDH2 gene in 445 central nervous system (CNS) tumors and 494 non-CNS tumors. The enzymatic activity of the proteins that were produced from normal and mutant IDH1 and IDH2 genes was determined in cultured glioma cells that were transfected with these genes.We identified mutations that affected amino acid 132 of IDH1 in more than 70% of WHO grade II and III astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and in glioblastomas that developed from these lower-grade lesions. Tumors without mutations in IDH1 often had mutations affecting the analogous amino acid (R172) of the IDH2 gene. Tumors with IDH1 or IDH2 mutations had distinctive genetic and clinical characteristics, and patients with such tumors had a better outcome than those with wild-type IDH genes. Each of four tested IDH1 and IDH2 mutations reduced the enzymatic activity of the encoded protein.Mutations of NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases encoded by IDH1 and IDH2 occur in a majority of several types of malignant gliomas.

Authors
Yan, H; Parsons, DW; Jin, G; McLendon, R; Rasheed, BA; Yuan, W; Kos, I; Batinic-Haberle, I; Jones, S; Riggins, GJ; Friedman, H; Friedman, A; Reardon, D; Herndon, J; Kinzler, KW; Velculescu, VE; Vogelstein, B; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Yan, H, Parsons, DW, Jin, G, McLendon, R, Rasheed, BA, Yuan, W, Kos, I, Batinic-Haberle, I, Jones, S, Riggins, GJ, Friedman, H, Friedman, A, Reardon, D, Herndon, J, Kinzler, KW, Velculescu, VE, Vogelstein, B, and Bigner, DD. "IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in gliomas." The New England Journal of Medicine 360.8 (February 2009): 765-773.
PMID
19228619
Source
epmc
Published In
The New England Journal of Medicine
Volume
360
Issue
8
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
765
End Page
773
DOI
10.1056/NEJMoa0808710

Phase II trial of Gliadel plus O6-benzylguanine in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

This phase II trial was designed to define the efficacy of Gliadel wafers in combination with an infusion of O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG) that suppresses tumor O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) levels in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme for 5 days and to evaluate the safety of this combination therapy.This was a phase II, open-label, single center trial. On gross total resection of the tumor, up to eight Gliadel wafers were implanted. Bolus infusion of O6-BG was administered at 120 mg/m2 over 1 hour on days 1, 3, and 5, along with a continuous infusion at 30 mg/m2/d. The primary end points were 6-month overall survival (OS) and safety, and the secondary end points were 1-year, 2-year, and median OS.Fifty-two patients were accrued. The 6-month OS was 82% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 72-93%]. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 47% (95% CI, 35-63%) and 10% (95% CI, 3-32%), respectively. The median OS was 50.3 weeks (95% CI, 36.1-69.4 weeks). Treatment-related toxicity with this drug combination included grade 3 hydrocephalus (9.6%), grade 3 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak (19.2%), and grade 3 CSF/brain infection (13.4%).The efficacy of implanted Gliadel wafers may be improved with the addition of O6-BG. Although systemically administered O6-BG can be coadministered with Gliadel wafers safely, it may increase the risk of hydrocephalus, CSF leak, and CSF/brain infection. Future trials are required to verify that inhibition of tumor AGT levels by O6-BG results in increased efficacy of Gliadel wafers without added toxicity.

Authors
Quinn, JA; Jiang, SX; Carter, J; Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Rich, JN; Gururangan, S; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH; McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; Threatt, S; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Quinn, JA, Jiang, SX, Carter, J, Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Rich, JN, Gururangan, S, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, Sampson, JH, McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, Threatt, S, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II trial of Gliadel plus O6-benzylguanine in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 15.3 (February 2009): 1064-1068.
PMID
19188181
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
15
Issue
3
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1064
End Page
1068
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-2130

Few isolated neurons in hypothalamic hamartomas may cause gelastic seizures.

Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are congenital, benign masses in the hypothalamus and tuber cinereum that may cause central precocious puberty and gelastic seizures. Nodules of small neurons are thought to be a universal feature of the microarchitecture of HH lesions associated with epilepsy. Here we describe the case of a 5-year-old boy with gelastic seizures who underwent resection of a HH that contained nodules of glial cells, but only few, randomly distributed neurons. HHs that contain few or no neurons have only been reported thus far in cases associated with precocious puberty. This case demonstrates that few solitary neurons in HHs can drive the development of gelastic seizures, and nodules of small neurons may not be a universal feature of HHs associated with epilepsy. This finding is clinically important since hypothalamic hamartomas with rare neurons can easily be misdiagnosed as pilocytic astrocytomas or subependymomas if their presence is overlooked. A neuronal stain is helpful in making the correct diagnosis in these cases.

Authors
Waldau, B; McLendon, RE; Fuchs, HE; George, TM; Grant, GA
MLA Citation
Waldau, B, McLendon, RE, Fuchs, HE, George, TM, and Grant, GA. "Few isolated neurons in hypothalamic hamartomas may cause gelastic seizures." Pediatr Neurosurg 45.3 (2009): 225-229.
PMID
19521137
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pediatric neurosurgery
Volume
45
Issue
3
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
225
End Page
229
DOI
10.1159/000224620

Identification of CD15 as a Marker for Tumor-Propagating Cells in a Mouse Model of Medulloblastoma (DOI:10.1016/j.ccr.2008.12.016)

Authors
Read, T-A; Fogarty, MP; Markant, SL; McLendon, RE; Wei, Z; Ellison, DW; Febbo, PG; Wechsler-Reya, RJ
MLA Citation
Read, T-A, Fogarty, MP, Markant, SL, McLendon, RE, Wei, Z, Ellison, DW, Febbo, PG, and Wechsler-Reya, RJ. "Identification of CD15 as a Marker for Tumor-Propagating Cells in a Mouse Model of Medulloblastoma (DOI:10.1016/j.ccr.2008.12.016)." Cancer Cell 16.3 (2009): 267--.
Source
scival
Published In
Cancer Cell
Volume
16
Issue
3
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
267-
DOI
10.1016/j.ccr.2009.08.009

Brain cancer stem cells display preferential sensitivity to Akt inhibition.

Malignant brain tumors are among the most lethal cancers, and conventional therapies are largely limited to palliation. Novel therapies targeted against specific molecular pathways may offer superior efficacy and less toxicity than conventional therapies, but initial clinical trials of molecular targeted agents in brain cancer therapy have been frequently disappointing. In brain tumors and other cancers, subpopulations of tumor cells have recently been characterized by their ability to self-renew and initiate tumors. Although these cancer stem cells, or tumor initiating cells, are often only present in small numbers in human tumors, mounting evidence suggests that cancer stem cells contribute to tumor maintenance and therapeutic resistance. Thus, the development of therapies that target cancer stem cell signal transduction and biology may improve brain tumor patient survival. We now demonstrate that populations enriched for cancer stem cells are preferentially sensitive to an inhibitor of Akt, a prominent cell survival and invasion signaling node. Treatment with an Akt inhibitor more potently reduced the numbers of viable brain cancer stem cells relative to matched nonstem cancer cells associated with a preferential induction of apoptosis and a suppression of neurosphere formation. Akt inhibition also reduced the motility and invasiveness of all tumor cells but had a greater impact on cancer stem cell behaviors. Furthermore, inhibition of Akt activity in cancer stem cells increased the survival of immunocompromised mice bearing human glioma xenografts in vivo. Together, these results suggest that Akt inhibitors may function as effective anticancer stem cell therapies.

Authors
Eyler, CE; Foo, W-C; LaFiura, KM; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Eyler, CE, Foo, W-C, LaFiura, KM, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Brain cancer stem cells display preferential sensitivity to Akt inhibition." Stem Cells 26.12 (December 2008): 3027-3036.
PMID
18802038
Source
pubmed
Published In
Stem Cells
Volume
26
Issue
12
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
3027
End Page
3036
DOI
10.1634/stemcells.2007-1073

A recurrent cerebellar lesion in a young boy.

Authors
Ray, GT; Agarwal, SS; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Ray, GT, Agarwal, SS, and McLendon, RE. "A recurrent cerebellar lesion in a young boy." Brain Pathol 18.4 (October 2008): 623-627. (Letter)
PMID
18782180
Source
pubmed
Published In
Brain Pathology
Volume
18
Issue
4
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
623
End Page
627
DOI
10.1111/j.1750-3639.2008.00216.x

Efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy or standard salvage therapy in patients with recurrent medulloblastoma.

The efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) or standard salvage therapy was evaluated in patients with recurrent medulloblastoma (MBL) using retrospective chart review of all patients with recurrent MBL treated at Duke University Medical Center between 1995 and 2005 and who had undergone HDC with or without radiotherapy (RT) or standard salvage therapy after relapse. A total of 30 patients were diagnosed with recurrent MBL after standard RT alone or chemotherapy with RT. Nineteen patients (7 who received no RT before recurrence [group A] and 12 who received definitive RT before recurrence [group B]) underwent surgery and/or induction chemotherapy followed by HDC plus autologous stem-cell rescue. Eleven patients (group C) underwent standard salvage therapy. Six of seven group A patients also received standard RT just before or after recovery from HDC, and 5 of 12 group B patients received adjuvant palliative focal RT post-HDC. At a median follow-up of 28 months, three of seven patients in group A are alive and disease-free at >or=34, >or=110, and >or=116 months, respectively, post-HDC. All patients in groups B and C have died of tumor, at a median of 35 months and 26 months from HDC and standard salvage therapy, respectively. HDC or standard salvage therapy was ineffective in our patients with recurrent MBL who had received standard RT before recurrence. The favorable impact of HDC on disease control in the two long-term survivors cannot be clearly established due to the cofounding effect of definitive RT postrecurrence.

Authors
Gururangan, S; Krauser, J; Watral, MA; Driscoll, T; Larrier, N; Reardon, DA; Rich, JN; Quinn, JA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; McLendon, RE; Fuchs, H; Kurtzberg, J; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Gururangan, S, Krauser, J, Watral, MA, Driscoll, T, Larrier, N, Reardon, DA, Rich, JN, Quinn, JA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, McLendon, RE, Fuchs, H, Kurtzberg, J, and Friedman, HS. "Efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy or standard salvage therapy in patients with recurrent medulloblastoma." Neuro Oncol 10.5 (October 2008): 745-751.
PMID
18755919
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
10
Issue
5
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
745
End Page
751
DOI
10.1215/15228517-2008-044

Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways.

Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large-scale multi-dimensional analysis of these molecular characteristics in human cancer and to provide the data rapidly to the research community. Here we report the interim integrative analysis of DNA copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation aberrations in 206 glioblastomas--the most common type of adult brain cancer--and nucleotide sequence aberrations in 91 of the 206 glioblastomas. This analysis provides new insights into the roles of ERBB2, NF1 and TP53, uncovers frequent mutations of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase regulatory subunit gene PIK3R1, and provides a network view of the pathways altered in the development of glioblastoma. Furthermore, integration of mutation, DNA methylation and clinical treatment data reveals a link between MGMT promoter methylation and a hypermutator phenotype consequent to mismatch repair deficiency in treated glioblastomas, an observation with potential clinical implications. Together, these findings establish the feasibility and power of TCGA, demonstrating that it can rapidly expand knowledge of the molecular basis of cancer.

Authors
Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network,
MLA Citation
Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, . "Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways." Nature 455.7216 (October 2008): 1061-1068.
PMID
18772890
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature
Volume
455
Issue
7216
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
1061
End Page
1068
DOI
10.1038/nature07385

An integrated genomic analysis of human glioblastoma multiforme.

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal type of brain cancer. To identify the genetic alterations in GBMs, we sequenced 20,661 protein coding genes, determined the presence of amplifications and deletions using high-density oligonucleotide arrays, and performed gene expression analyses using next-generation sequencing technologies in 22 human tumor samples. This comprehensive analysis led to the discovery of a variety of genes that were not known to be altered in GBMs. Most notably, we found recurrent mutations in the active site of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) in 12% of GBM patients. Mutations in IDH1 occurred in a large fraction of young patients and in most patients with secondary GBMs and were associated with an increase in overall survival. These studies demonstrate the value of unbiased genomic analyses in the characterization of human brain cancer and identify a potentially useful genetic alteration for the classification and targeted therapy of GBMs.

Authors
Parsons, DW; Jones, S; Zhang, X; Lin, JC-H; Leary, RJ; Angenendt, P; Mankoo, P; Carter, H; Siu, I-M; Gallia, GL; Olivi, A; McLendon, R; Rasheed, BA; Keir, S; Nikolskaya, T; Nikolsky, Y; Busam, DA; Tekleab, H; Diaz, LA; Hartigan, J; Smith, DR; Strausberg, RL; Marie, SKN; Shinjo, SMO; Yan, H; Riggins, GJ; Bigner, DD; Karchin, R; Papadopoulos, N; Parmigiani, G; Vogelstein, B; Velculescu, VE; Kinzler, KW
MLA Citation
Parsons, DW, Jones, S, Zhang, X, Lin, JC-H, Leary, RJ, Angenendt, P, Mankoo, P, Carter, H, Siu, I-M, Gallia, GL, Olivi, A, McLendon, R, Rasheed, BA, Keir, S, Nikolskaya, T, Nikolsky, Y, Busam, DA, Tekleab, H, Diaz, LA, Hartigan, J, Smith, DR, Strausberg, RL, Marie, SKN, Shinjo, SMO, Yan, H, Riggins, GJ, Bigner, DD, Karchin, R, Papadopoulos, N, Parmigiani, G, Vogelstein, B, Velculescu, VE, and Kinzler, KW. "An integrated genomic analysis of human glioblastoma multiforme." Science (New York, N.Y.) 321.5897 (September 4, 2008): 1807-1812.
PMID
18772396
Source
epmc
Published In
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Volume
321
Issue
5897
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
1807
End Page
1812
DOI
10.1126/science.1164382

Targeting cancer stem cells through L1CAM suppresses glioma growth.

Malignant gliomas are lethal cancers that display striking cellular heterogeneity. A highly tumorigenic glioma tumor subpopulation, termed cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells, promotes therapeutic resistance and tumor angiogenesis. Therefore, targeting cancer stem cells may improve patient survival. We interrogated the role of a neuronal cell adhesion molecule, L1CAM, in glioma stem cells as L1CAM regulates brain development and is expressed in gliomas. L1CAM(+) and CD133(+) cells cosegregated in gliomas, and levels of L1CAM were higher in CD133(+) glioma cells than normal neural progenitors. Targeting L1CAM using lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference in CD133(+) glioma cells potently disrupted neurosphere formation, induced apoptosis, and inhibited growth specifically in glioma stem cells. We identified a novel mechanism for L1CAM regulation of cell survival as L1CAM knockdown decreased expression of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2 and up-regulated the p21(WAF1/CIP1) tumor suppressor in CD133(+) glioma cells. To determine if targeting L1CAM was sufficient to reduce glioma stem cell tumor growth in vivo, we targeted L1CAM in glioma cells before injection into immunocompromised mice or directly in established tumors. In each glioma xenograft model, shRNA targeting of L1CAM expression in vivo suppressed tumor growth and increased the survival of tumor-bearing animals. Together, these data show that L1CAM is required for maintaining the growth and survival of CD133(+) glioma cells both in vitro and in vivo, and L1CAM may represent a cancer stem cell-specific therapeutic target for improving the treatment of malignant gliomas and other brain tumors.

Authors
Bao, S; Wu, Q; Li, Z; Sathornsumetee, S; Wang, H; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Bao, S, Wu, Q, Li, Z, Sathornsumetee, S, Wang, H, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "Targeting cancer stem cells through L1CAM suppresses glioma growth." Cancer Research 68.15 (August 2008): 6043-6048.
PMID
18676824
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
68
Issue
15
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
6043
End Page
6048
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-1079

Mismatch repair deficiency does not mediate clinical resistance to temozolomide in malignant glioma.

A major mechanism of resistance to methylating agents, including temozolomide, is the DNA repair protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT). Preclinical data indicates that defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) results in tolerance to temozolomide regardless of AGT activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of MMR deficiency in mediating resistance in samples from patients with both newly diagnosed malignant gliomas and those who have failed temozolomide therapy.The roles of AGT and MMR deficiency in mediating resistance in glioblastoma multiforme were assessed by immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability (MSI), respectively. The mutation status of the MSH6 gene, a proposed correlate of temozolomide resistance, was determined by direct sequencing and compared with data from immunofluorescent detection of MSH6 protein and reverse transcription-PCR amplification of MSH6 RNA.Seventy percent of newly diagnosed and 78% of failed-therapy glioblastoma multiforme samples expressed nuclear AGT protein in > or = 20% of cells analyzed, suggesting alternate means of resistance in 20% to 30% of cases. Single loci MSI was observed in 3% of patient samples; no sample showed the presence of high MSI. MSI was not shown to correlate with MSH6 mutation or loss of MSH6 protein expression.Although high AGT levels may mediate resistance in a portion of these samples, MMR deficiency does not seem to be responsible for mediating temozolomide resistance in adult malignant glioma. Accordingly, the presence of a fraction of samples exhibiting both low AGT expression and MMR proficiency suggests that additional mechanisms of temozolomide resistance are operational in the clinic.

Authors
Maxwell, JA; Johnson, SP; McLendon, RE; Lister, DW; Horne, KS; Rasheed, A; Quinn, JA; Ali-Osman, F; Friedman, AH; Modrich, PL; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Maxwell, JA, Johnson, SP, McLendon, RE, Lister, DW, Horne, KS, Rasheed, A, Quinn, JA, Ali-Osman, F, Friedman, AH, Modrich, PL, Bigner, DD, and Friedman, HS. "Mismatch repair deficiency does not mediate clinical resistance to temozolomide in malignant glioma." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 14.15 (August 2008): 4859-4868.
PMID
18676759
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
14
Issue
15
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
4859
End Page
4868
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-07-4807

Re: Axonal injury in head injuries with very short survival.

Authors
McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE. "Re: Axonal injury in head injuries with very short survival." Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 34.3 (June 2008): 371-. (Letter)
PMID
18363642
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuropathology & Applied Neurobiology
Volume
34
Issue
3
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
371
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2990.2008.00942.x

Surgical neuropathology update: a review of changes introduced by the WHO classification of tumours of the central nervous system, 4th edition.

CONTEXT: The World Health Organization (WHO) recently published its 4th edition of the classification of tumors of the central nervous system, incorporating a substantial number of important changes to the previous version (WHO 2000). The new WHO classification introduces 7 changes in the grading of central nervous system neoplasms, ranging in significance from minor to major, in categories of anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, meningiomas, choroid plexus tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, ganglioglioma, cerebellar liponeurocytoma, and hemangiopericytomas. The 4th edition also introduces 10 newly codified entities, variants, and patterns, as well as 1 new genetic syndrome. A number of established brain tumors are reorganized, including medulloblastomas and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, in an attempt to more closely align classification with current understanding of central nervous system neoplasia. OBJECTIVE: To summarize and discuss the most significant updates in the 4th edition for the practicing surgical pathologist, including (1) changes in grading among established entities; (2) newly codified tumor entities, variants, patterns, and syndromes; and (3) changes in the classification of existing brain tumors. DATA SOURCES: The primary source for this review is the WHO Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System, 4th edition. Other important sources include the 3rd edition of this book and the primary literature that supported changes in the 4th edition. CONCLUSIONS: The new edition of the WHO blue book reflects advancements in the understanding of brain tumors in terms of classification, grading, and new entities. The changes introduced are substantial and will have an impact on the practice of general surgical pathologists and neuropathologists.

Authors
Brat, DJ; Parisi, JE; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, BK; Yachnis, AT; Montine, TJ; Boyer, PJ; Powell, SZ; Prayson, RA; McLendon, RE; Neuropathology Committee, College of American Pathologists,
MLA Citation
Brat, DJ, Parisi, JE, Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, BK, Yachnis, AT, Montine, TJ, Boyer, PJ, Powell, SZ, Prayson, RA, McLendon, RE, Neuropathology Committee, and College of American Pathologists, . "Surgical neuropathology update: a review of changes introduced by the WHO classification of tumours of the central nervous system, 4th edition." Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine 132.6 (June 2008): 993-1007. (Review)
PMID
18517285
Source
epmc
Published In
Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Volume
132
Issue
6
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
993
End Page
1007
DOI
10.1043/1543-2165(2008)132[993:snuaro]2.0.co;2

Intracerebral infusion of an EGFR-targeted toxin in recurrent malignant brain tumors.

The purpose of this study is to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and intracerebral distribution of a recombinant toxin (TP-38) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors using the intracerebral infusion technique of convection-enhanced delivery (CED). Twenty patients were enrolled and stratified for dose escalation by the presence of residual tumor from 25 to 100 ng/ml in a 40-ml infusion volume. In the last eight patients, coinfusion of (123)I-albumin was performed to monitor distribution within the brain. The MTD was not reached in this study. Dose escalation was stopped at 100 ng/ml due to inconsistent drug delivery as evidenced by imaging the coinfused (123)I-albumin. Two DLTs were seen, and both were neurologic. Median survival after TP-38 was 28 weeks (95% confidence interval, 26.5-102.8). Of 15 patients treated with residual disease, two (13.3%) demonstrated radiographic responses, including one patient with glioblastoma multiforme who had a nearly complete response and remains alive >260 weeks after therapy. Coinfusion of (123)I-albumin demonstrated that high concentrations of the infusate could be delivered >4 cm from the catheter tip. However, only 3 of 16 (19%) catheters produced intraparenchymal infusate distribution, while the majority leaked infusate into the cerebrospinal fluid spaces. Intracerebral CED of TP-38 was well tolerated and produced some durable radiographic responses at doses

Authors
Sampson, JH; Akabani, G; Archer, GE; Berger, MS; Coleman, RE; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Greer, K; Herndon, JE; Kunwar, S; McLendon, RE; Paolino, A; Petry, NA; Provenzale, JM; Reardon, DA; Wong, TZ; Zalutsky, MR; Pastan, I; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Sampson, JH, Akabani, G, Archer, GE, Berger, MS, Coleman, RE, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Greer, K, Herndon, JE, Kunwar, S, McLendon, RE, Paolino, A, Petry, NA, Provenzale, JM, Reardon, DA, Wong, TZ, Zalutsky, MR, Pastan, I, and Bigner, DD. "Intracerebral infusion of an EGFR-targeted toxin in recurrent malignant brain tumors." Neuro Oncology 10.3 (June 2008): 320-329.
PMID
18403491
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
10
Issue
3
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
320
End Page
329
DOI
10.1215/15228517-2008-012

Protocol for the examination of specimens from patients with tumors of the brain/spinal cord.

Authors
Parisi, JE; Miller, DV; Boyer, PJ; Brat, DJ; Cochran, EJ; Cohen, ML; Demasters, BK; Dolinak, D; McComb, RD; McLendon, RE; Powell, SZ; Prayson, RA; Vinters, HV; Yachnis, AT; Members of Cancer Committee, College of American Pathologists,
MLA Citation
Parisi, JE, Miller, DV, Boyer, PJ, Brat, DJ, Cochran, EJ, Cohen, ML, Demasters, BK, Dolinak, D, McComb, RD, McLendon, RE, Powell, SZ, Prayson, RA, Vinters, HV, Yachnis, AT, Members of Cancer Committee, and College of American Pathologists, . "Protocol for the examination of specimens from patients with tumors of the brain/spinal cord." Arch Pathol Lab Med 132.6 (June 2008): 907-912.
PMID
18517271
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume
132
Issue
6
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
907
End Page
912
DOI
10.1043/1543-2165(2008)132[907:PFTEOS]2.0.CO;2

Safety and pharmacokinetics of dose-intensive imatinib mesylate plus temozolomide: phase 1 trial in adults with malignant glioma.

We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of imatinib mesylate, an inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), the proto-oncogene product c-kit, and the fusion protein Bcr-Abl, when administered for 8 days in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) to malignant glioma (MG) patients. MG patients who had not failed prior TMZ were eligible to receive TMZ at a dose of 150-200 mg/m(2) per day on days 4-8 plus imatinib mesylate administered orally on days 1-8 of each 4-week cycle. Patients were stratified based on concurrent administration of CYP3A4-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs). The imatinib dose was escalated in successive cohorts of patients independently for each stratum. Imatinib, at doses ranging from 400 mg to 1,200 mg, was administered with TMZ to 65 patients: 52 (80%) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 13 (20%) with grade III MG. At enrollment, 34 patients (52%) had stable disease, and 33 (48%) had progressive disease; 30 patients (46%) were on EIAEDs. The MTD of imatinib for patients concurrently receiving or not receiving EIAEDs was 1,000 mg. DLTs were hematologic, gastrointestinal, renal, and hepatic. Pharmacokinetic analyses revealed lowered exposures and enhanced clearance among patients on EIAEDs. Among GBM patients with stable disease at enrollment (n=28), the median progression-free and overall survival times were 41.7 and 56.1 weeks, respectively. Imatinib doses up to 1,000 mg/day for 8 consecutive days are well tolerated when combined with standard TMZ dosing for MG patients. A subsequent phase 2 study is required to further evaluate the efficacy of this regimen for this patient population.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, JJ; Sathornsumetee, S; Rich, JN; Quinn, JA; Lagattuta, TF; Egorin, MJ; Gururangan, S; McLendon, R; Herndon, JE; Friedman, AH; Salvado, AJ; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, JJ, Sathornsumetee, S, Rich, JN, Quinn, JA, Lagattuta, TF, Egorin, MJ, Gururangan, S, McLendon, R, Herndon, JE, Friedman, AH, Salvado, AJ, and Friedman, HS. "Safety and pharmacokinetics of dose-intensive imatinib mesylate plus temozolomide: phase 1 trial in adults with malignant glioma." Neuro Oncology 10.3 (June 2008): 330-340.
PMID
18359865
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
10
Issue
3
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
330
End Page
340
DOI
10.1215/15228517-2008-003

A pilot study: 131I-antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81c6 to deliver a 44-Gy resection cavity boost.

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and assess the efficacy and toxicity, among newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients, of administering (131)I-labeled murine antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 ((131)I-81C6) into a surgically created resection cavity (SCRC) to achieve a patient-specific, 44-Gy boost to the 2-cm SCRC margin. A radioactivity dose of (131)I-81C6 calculated to achieve a 44-Gy boost to the SCRC was administered, followed by conventional external beam radiotherapy (XRT) and chemotherapy. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the study: 16 with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 5 with anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty patients received the targeted 44-Gy boost (+/-10%) to the SCRC. Attributable toxicity was mild and limited to reversible grade 3 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia (n = 3; 14%), CNS wound infections (n = 3; 14%), and headache (n = 2; 10%). With a median follow-up of 151 weeks, median overall survival times for all patients and those with GBM are 96.6 and 90.6 weeks, respectively; 87% of GBM patients are alive at 1 year. It is feasible to consistently achieve a 44-Gy boost dose to the SCRC margin with patient-specific dosing of (131)I-81C6. Our study regimen ((131)I-81C6 + XRT + temozolomide) was well tolerated and had encouraging survival. To determine if selection of good-prognosis patients affects outcome associated with this approach, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a trial randomizing newly diagnosed GBM patients to either our study regimen or standard XRT plus temozolomide.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Zalutsky, MR; Akabani, G; Coleman, RE; Friedman, AH; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Pegram, CN; Quinn, JA; Rich, JN; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; Guruangan, S; Boulton, S; Raynor, RH; Dowell, JM; Wong, TZ; Zhao, X-G; Friedman, HS; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Zalutsky, MR, Akabani, G, Coleman, RE, Friedman, AH, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Pegram, CN, Quinn, JA, Rich, JN, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, Guruangan, S, Boulton, S, Raynor, RH, Dowell, JM, Wong, TZ, Zhao, X-G, Friedman, HS, and Bigner, DD. "A pilot study: 131I-antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81c6 to deliver a 44-Gy resection cavity boost." Neuro Oncology 10.2 (April 2008): 182-189.
PMID
18287339
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
10
Issue
2
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
182
End Page
189
DOI
10.1215/15228517-2007-053

Issues of diagnostic review in brain tumor studies: from the Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium.

Epidemiologists routinely conduct centralized single pathology reviews to minimize interobserver diagnostic variability, but this practice does not facilitate the combination of studies across geographic regions and institutions where diagnostic practices differ. A meeting of neuropathologists and epidemiologists focused on brain tumor classification issues in the context of protocol needs for consortial studies (http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/btec/). It resulted in recommendations relevant to brain tumors and possibly other rare disease studies. Two categories of brain tumors have enough general agreement over time, across regions, and between individual pathologists that one can consider using existing diagnostic data without further review: glioblastomas and meningiomas (as long as uniform guidelines such as those provided by the WHO are used). Prospective studies of these tumors benefit from collection of pathology reports, at a minimum recording the pathology department and classification system used in the diagnosis. Other brain tumors, such as oligodendroglioma, are less distinct and require careful histopathologic review for consistent classification across study centers. Epidemiologic study protocols must consider the study specific aims, diagnostic changes that have taken place over time, and other issues unique to the type(s) of tumor being studied. As diagnostic changes are being made rapidly, there are no readily available answers on disease classification issues. It is essential that epidemiologists and neuropathologists collaborate to develop appropriate study designs and protocols for specific hypothesis and populations.

Authors
Davis, FG; Malmer, BS; Aldape, K; Barnholtz-Sloan, JS; Bondy, ML; Brännström, T; Bruner, JM; Burger, PC; Collins, VP; Inskip, PD; Kruchko, C; McCarthy, BJ; McLendon, RE; Sadetzki, S; Tihan, T; Wrensch, MR; Buffler, PA
MLA Citation
Davis, FG, Malmer, BS, Aldape, K, Barnholtz-Sloan, JS, Bondy, ML, Brännström, T, Bruner, JM, Burger, PC, Collins, VP, Inskip, PD, Kruchko, C, McCarthy, BJ, McLendon, RE, Sadetzki, S, Tihan, T, Wrensch, MR, and Buffler, PA. "Issues of diagnostic review in brain tumor studies: from the Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium." Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 17.3 (March 2008): 484-489.
PMID
18349266
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
17
Issue
3
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
484
End Page
489
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0725

MGMT immunoexpression predicts responsiveness of pituitary tumors to temozolomide therapy.

Authors
Kovacs, K; Scheithauer, BW; Lombardero, M; McLendon, RE; Syro, LV; Uribe, H; Ortiz, LD; Penagos, LC
MLA Citation
Kovacs, K, Scheithauer, BW, Lombardero, M, McLendon, RE, Syro, LV, Uribe, H, Ortiz, LD, and Penagos, LC. "MGMT immunoexpression predicts responsiveness of pituitary tumors to temozolomide therapy." Acta Neuropathologica 115.2 (February 2008): 261-262. (Letter)
PMID
17926052
Source
epmc
Published In
Acta Neuropathologica
Volume
115
Issue
2
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
261
End Page
262
DOI
10.1007/s00401-007-0279-5

Sensitive detection of human cytomegalovirus in tumors and peripheral blood of patients diagnosed with glioblastoma.

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been described to be associated with several human malignancies, though the frequency of detection remains controversial. It is unclear whether HCMV plays an active role in malignant tumor progression or becomes reactivated under pathologic conditions that result in chronic inflammation or immunosuppression. In this study, we report on the investigation of detecting HCMV in the tumors and peripheral blood of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction amplification of viral DNA, the detection of HCMV was investigated in tumor and blood specimens from patients with GBM as well as in the peripheral blood of normal volunteers and patients undergoing craniotomy for diagnoses other than GBM. We found that a high percentage (>90%) of GBM tumors, not surrounding normal brain, are associated with HCMV nucleic acids and proteins. Furthermore, a significant proportion of patients (80%) with newly diagnosed GBM have detectable HCMV DNA in their peripheral blood, while sero-positive normal donors and other surgical patients did not exhibit detectable virus, suggesting either a systemic reactivation of HCMV within patients with GBM or shedding of viral DNA from infected tumor cells into the periphery. These results confirm the association of HCMV with malignant gliomas and demonstrate that subclinical HCMV viremia (presence of viral DNA in blood without clinical symptoms of infection) is a previously unrecognized disease spectrum in patients with GBM.

Authors
Mitchell, DA; Xie, W; Schmittling, R; Learn, C; Friedman, A; McLendon, RE; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Mitchell, DA, Xie, W, Schmittling, R, Learn, C, Friedman, A, McLendon, RE, and Sampson, JH. "Sensitive detection of human cytomegalovirus in tumors and peripheral blood of patients diagnosed with glioblastoma." Neuro Oncology 10.1 (February 2008): 10-18.
PMID
17951512
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
10
Issue
1
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
10
End Page
18
DOI
10.1215/15228517-2007-035

Utility of EGFR and PTEN numerical aberrations in the evaluation of diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas. Laboratory investigation.

OBJECT: Diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas are the most common primary brain tumors. As a group, they demonstrate an inherent tendency toward malignant progression. Histological grading using the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO) remains the gold standard for predicting the biological behavior of these tumors. Although useful, this grading system is often limited due to small sample sizes and the subjectivity in interpretation. Given the important roles for EGFR and PTEN in the malignant progression of astrocytomas, the authors hypothesized that the fraction of tumor cells with aberrations in these genetic loci would correlate with the histological grade. METHODS: The authors evaluated 217 consecutive diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas that were graded using the WHO guidelines, including 16 diffuse astrocytomas (WHO Grade II), 72 anaplastic astrocytomas ([AAs] WHO Grade III), and 129 glioblastomas multiforme ([GBMs] WHO Grade IV). Cases were evaluated quantitatively using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for the EGFR and PTEN loci and the centromeres of chromosomes 7 and 10. RESULTS: The population of tumor cells with polysomy of chromosome 7 and the EGFR locus and monosomy of chromosome 10 and the PTEN locus correlated significantly with histological grade. In particular, high-grade astrocytomas (that is, AAs and GBMs) had elevated fractions of tumor cells with polysomy of chromosome 7 and the EGFR locus and monosomy of chromosome 10 and the PTEN locus. Using these findings, the authors generated a mathematical model capable of subcategorizing high-grade astrocytomas. The successful model incorporated only the percentage of tumor cells with polysomy of EGFR and monosomy of PTEN, as well as patient age. The predictions of this model correlated with survival in a manner similar to histopathological grading. CONCLUSIONS: The findings presented in this study emphasize the utility of combining histological interpretation and molecular testing in the evaluation of infiltrating astrocytomas. These results underscore the utility of building a grading framework that combines histopathological and molecular analysis.

Authors
Mott, RT; Turner, KC; Bigner, DD; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Mott, RT, Turner, KC, Bigner, DD, and McLendon, RE. "Utility of EGFR and PTEN numerical aberrations in the evaluation of diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas. Laboratory investigation." J Neurosurg 108.2 (February 2008): 330-335.
PMID
18240930
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Neurosurgery
Volume
108
Issue
2
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
330
End Page
335
DOI
10.3171/JNS/2008/108/2/0330

Splenda alters gut microflora and increases intestinal p-glycoprotein and cytochrome p-450 in male rats.

Splenda is comprised of the high-potency artificial sweetener sucralose (1.1%) and the fillers maltodextrin and glucose. Splenda was administered by oral gavage at 100, 300, 500, or 1000 mg/kg to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 12-wk, during which fecal samples were collected weekly for bacterial analysis and measurement of fecal pH. After 12-wk, half of the animals from each treatment group were sacrificed to determine the intestinal expression of the membrane efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) metabolism system by Western blot. The remaining animals were allowed to recover for an additional 12-wk, and further assessments of fecal microflora, fecal pH, and expression of P-gp and CYP were determined. At the end of the 12-wk treatment period, the numbers of total anaerobes, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, Bacteroides, clostridia, and total aerobic bacteria were significantly decreased; however, there was no significant treatment effect on enterobacteria. Splenda also increased fecal pH and enhanced the expression of P-gp by 2.43-fold, CYP3A4 by 2.51-fold, and CYP2D1 by 3.49-fold. Following the 12-wk recovery period, only the total anaerobes and bifidobacteria remained significantly depressed, whereas pH values, P-gp, and CYP3A4 and CYP2D1 remained elevated. These changes occurred at Splenda dosages that contained sucralose at 1.1-11 mg/kg (the US FDA Acceptable Daily Intake for sucralose is 5 mg/kg). Evidence indicates that a 12-wk administration of Splenda exerted numerous adverse effects, including (1) reduction in beneficial fecal microflora, (2) increased fecal pH, and (3) enhanced expression levels of P-gp, CYP3A4, and CYP2D1, which are known to limit the bioavailability of orally administered drugs.

Authors
Abou-Donia, MB; El-Masry, EM; Abdel-Rahman, AA; McLendon, RE; Schiffman, SS
MLA Citation
Abou-Donia, MB, El-Masry, EM, Abdel-Rahman, AA, McLendon, RE, and Schiffman, SS. "Splenda alters gut microflora and increases intestinal p-glycoprotein and cytochrome p-450 in male rats." Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A 71.21 (January 2008): 1415-1429.
PMID
18800291
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A
Volume
71
Issue
21
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
1415
End Page
1429
DOI
10.1080/15287390802328630

Clinical experience with alpha-particle emitting 211At: treatment of recurrent brain tumor patients with 211At-labeled chimeric antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6.

alpha-Particle-emitting radionuclides, such as (211)At, with a 7.2-h half-life, may be optimally suited for the molecularly targeted radiotherapy of strategically sensitive tumor sites, such as those in the central nervous system. Because of the much shorter range and more potent cytotoxicity of alpha-particles than of beta-particles, (211)At-labeled agents may be ideal for the eradication of tumor cells remaining after surgical debulking of malignant brain tumors. The main goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of this approach in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors.Chimeric antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 (ch81C6) (10 mg) was labeled with 71-347 MBq of (211)At by use of N-succinimidyl 3-[(211)At]astatobenzoate. Eighteen patients were treated with (211)At-labeled ch81C6 ((211)At-ch81C6) administered into a surgically created resection cavity (SCRC) and then with salvage chemotherapy. Serial gamma-camera imaging and blood sampling over 24 h were performed.A total of 96.7% +/- 3.6% (mean +/- SD) of (211)At decays occurred in the SCRC, and the mean blood-pool percentage injected dose was < or = 0.3. No patient experienced dose-limiting toxicity, and the maximum tolerated dose was not identified. Six patients experienced grade 2 neurotoxicity within 6 wk of (211)At-ch81C6 administration; this neurotoxicity resolved fully in all but 1 patient. No toxicities of grade 3 or higher were attributable to the treatment. No patient required repeat surgery for radionecrosis. The median survival times for all patients, those with glioblastoma multiforme, and those with anaplastic astrocytoma or oligodendroglioma were 54, 52, and 116 wk, respectively.This study provides proof of concept for regional targeted radiotherapy with (211)At-labeled molecules in oncology. Specifically, the regional administration of (211)At-ch81C6 is feasible, safe, and associated with a promising antitumor benefit in patients with malignant central nervous system tumors.

Authors
Zalutsky, MR; Reardon, DA; Akabani, G; Coleman, RE; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; McLendon, RE; Wong, TZ; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Zalutsky, MR, Reardon, DA, Akabani, G, Coleman, RE, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, McLendon, RE, Wong, TZ, and Bigner, DD. "Clinical experience with alpha-particle emitting 211At: treatment of recurrent brain tumor patients with 211At-labeled chimeric antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6." Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine 49.1 (January 2008): 30-38.
PMID
18077533
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
49
Issue
1
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
30
End Page
38
DOI
10.2967/jnumed.107.046938

Tumor angiogenic and hypoxic profiles predict radiographic response and survival in malignant astrocytoma patients treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan.

The combination of a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -neutralizing antibody, bevacizumab, and irinotecan is associated with high radiographic response rates and improved survival outcomes in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. The aim of these retrospective studies was to evaluate tumor vascularity and expression of components of the VEGF pathway and hypoxic responses as predictive markers for radiographic response and survival benefit from the bevacizumab and irinotecan therapy.In a phase II trial, 60 patients with recurrent malignant astrocytomas were treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan. Tumor specimens collected at the time of diagnosis were available for further pathologic studies in 45 patients (75%). VEGF, VEGF receptor-2, CD31, hypoxia-inducible carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), and hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha were semiquantitatively assessed by immunohistochemistry. Radiographic response and survival outcomes were correlated with these angiogenic and hypoxic markers.Of 45 patients, 27 patients had glioblastoma multiforme, and 18 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty-six patients (58%) had at least partial radiographic response. High VEGF expression was associated with increased likelihood of radiographic response (P = .024) but not survival benefit. Survival analysis revealed that high CA9 expression was associated with poor survival outcome (P = .016).In this patient cohort, tumor expression levels of VEGF, the molecular target of bevacizumab, were associated with radiographic response, and the upstream promoter of angiogenesis, hypoxia, determined survival outcome, as measured from treatment initiation. Validation in a larger clinical trial is warranted.

Authors
Sathornsumetee, S; Cao, Y; Marcello, JE; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Desjardins, A; Friedman, HS; Dewhirst, MW; Vredenburgh, JJ; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Sathornsumetee, S, Cao, Y, Marcello, JE, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Desjardins, A, Friedman, HS, Dewhirst, MW, Vredenburgh, JJ, and Rich, JN. "Tumor angiogenic and hypoxic profiles predict radiographic response and survival in malignant astrocytoma patients treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 26.2 (January 2008): 271-278.
PMID
18182667
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
26
Issue
2
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
271
End Page
278
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2007.13.3652

c-Myc is required for maintenance of glioma cancer stem cells.

Malignant gliomas rank among the most lethal cancers. Gliomas display a striking cellular heterogeneity with a hierarchy of differentiation states. Recent studies support the existence of cancer stem cells in gliomas that are functionally defined by their capacity for extensive self-renewal and formation of secondary tumors that phenocopy the original tumors. As the c-Myc oncoprotein has recognized roles in normal stem cell biology, we hypothesized that c-Myc may contribute to cancer stem cell biology as these cells share characteristics with normal stem cells.Based on previous methods that we and others have employed, tumor cell populations were enriched or depleted for cancer stem cells using the stem cell marker CD133 (Prominin-1). We characterized c-Myc expression in matched tumor cell populations using real time PCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Here we report that c-Myc is highly expressed in glioma cancer stem cells relative to non-stem glioma cells. To interrogate the significance of c-Myc expression in glioma cancer stem cells, we targeted its expression using lentivirally transduced short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Knockdown of c-Myc in glioma cancer stem cells reduced proliferation with concomitant cell cycle arrest in the G(0)/G(1) phase and increased apoptosis. Non-stem glioma cells displayed limited dependence on c-Myc expression for survival and proliferation. Further, glioma cancer stem cells with decreased c-Myc levels failed to form neurospheres in vitro or tumors when xenotransplanted into the brains of immunocompromised mice.These findings support a central role of c-Myc in regulating proliferation and survival of glioma cancer stem cells. Targeting core stem cell pathways may offer improved therapeutic approaches for advanced cancers.

Authors
Wang, J; Wang, H; Li, Z; Wu, Q; Lathia, JD; McLendon, RE; Hjelmeland, AB; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Wang, J, Wang, H, Li, Z, Wu, Q, Lathia, JD, McLendon, RE, Hjelmeland, AB, and Rich, JN. "c-Myc is required for maintenance of glioma cancer stem cells." Plos One 3.11 (January 2008): e3769-null.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4507
PMID
19020659
Source
epmc
Published In
Plos One
Volume
3
Issue
11
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
e3769
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0003769

Choroid plexus papilloma with neuropil-like islands.

Choroid plexus papilloma may display unusual histologic features, but the presence of neuronal differentiation at the light microscopic level has not yet been described. We thus report a choroid plexus papilloma with neuropil-like islands located within the lateral ventricle of an 11-year-old girl. The absence of atypical histologic features associated with recurrence (particularly increased mitotic activity) and recurrence-free follow-up upon gross total resection are compatible with a diagnosis of choroid plexus papilloma (WHO grade I). This case further emphasizes the capacity of choroid plexus tumor cells toward neuronal differentiation, and expands the spectrum of tumors, which may contain neuropil-like islands.

Authors
Hasselblatt, M; Jeibmann, A; Guerry, M; Senner, V; Paulus, W; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Hasselblatt, M, Jeibmann, A, Guerry, M, Senner, V, Paulus, W, and McLendon, RE. "Choroid plexus papilloma with neuropil-like islands." Am J Surg Pathol 32.1 (January 2008): 162-166.
PMID
18162784
Source
pubmed
Published In
The American Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume
32
Issue
1
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
162
End Page
166
DOI
10.1097/PAS.0b013e3180cc2015

Second messenger systems in human gliomas.

CONTEXT: Patients with glioblastoma (astrocytoma, World Health Organization grade IV) exhibit 2-year survival rates of less than 20% despite significant advances in therapeutic options available to patients. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) hyperexpression is one of the most commonly encountered abnormalities in this tumor. However, EGFR expression, amplification, and mutations are poorly predictive of patient survival. Investigators have taken to exploiting the sensitivities of activated downstream targets in the EGFR second messenger pathways to certain inhibitory drugs to downregulate their neoplastic messages promoting cell growth and inhibiting cell death. OBJECTIVE: It is important to both gain some understanding of the functional significance of these pathways and to understand the role the pathologist might play in characterizing the activation status of certain downstream messenger proteins that are targeted in these brain tumor therapies. We have reviewed the literature regarding histologic assays that have been incorporated into trials of these new drugs and report on the methods used to study these proteins and the conclusions of these studies. DATA SOURCES: Literature review and primary material from Duke University (Durham, NC) Department of Pathology archives. CONCLUSIONS: To date, drug trial reports indicate that identification of the presence of the EGFR variant, EGFRvIII, and measurement of the activated downstream targets, phospho-Akt, phospho-S6, and phospho-MAPK, may be useful in predicting sensitivity to some of the EGFR kinase inhibitors. No studies to date have identified prognostic significance related to immunoreactivity status among any of these markers that is independent of histologic grade.

Authors
McLendon, RE; Turner, K; Perkinson, K; Rich, J
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Turner, K, Perkinson, K, and Rich, J. "Second messenger systems in human gliomas." Arch Pathol Lab Med 131.10 (October 2007): 1585-1590. (Review)
PMID
17922598
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume
131
Issue
10
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
1585
End Page
1590
DOI
10.1043/1543-2165(2007)131[1585:SMSIHG]2.0.CO;2

Targeting methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in the treatment of neuroblastoma.

The combination of temozolomide and irinotecan has preclinical schedule-dependent synergy against neuroblastoma but is not curative for relapsed high-risk patients. We hypothesized that the DNA repair protein methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is an important resistance factor, and that inactivation of MGMT would sensitize neuroblastoma cells to these agents.MGMT protein expression was assessed in 74 primary neuroblastoma tumors. Growth inhibition assays were done to determine the IC(50) and the extent of synergy observed with various concentrations of temozolomide, irinotecan, and the MGMT-inactivating agent O(6)-benzylguanine, using cultured syngeneic neuroblastoma cells with either low or high levels of MGMT expression. We then assessed efficacy in a mouse xenograft model of metastatic neuroblastoma.MGMT was expressed by all 74 tumors evaluated. Pretreatment of neuroblastoma cells with O(6)-benzylguanine reduced the IC(50) of temozolomide by 10-fold regardless of level of MGMT expression, and pretreatment with BG followed by temozolomide + irinotecan further reduced the IC(50) in cells with high MGMT expression another 10-fold, to well below clinically achievable concentrations. The combination index was 0.27 to 0.30 for all three drugs in both cell lines, indicating strong synergy. Survival at 100 days for mice with metastatic neuroblastoma was 56% with three-drug treatment, compared with untreated controls (0%, P < 0.001) or temozolomide + irinotecan (10%, P = 0.081).MGMT is widely expressed in primary neuroblastoma tumors, and is a relevant therapeutic target. Both in vitro and in vivo studies suggest inactivation of MGMT with O(6)-benzylguanine may increase the activity of temozolomide and irinotecan against neuroblastoma.

Authors
Wagner, LM; McLendon, RE; Yoon, KJ; Weiss, BD; Billups, CA; Danks, MK
MLA Citation
Wagner, LM, McLendon, RE, Yoon, KJ, Weiss, BD, Billups, CA, and Danks, MK. "Targeting methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in the treatment of neuroblastoma." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 13.18 Pt 1 (September 2007): 5418-5425.
PMID
17875772
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
13
Issue
18 Pt 1
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
5418
End Page
5425
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-07-0418

Tumor resection cavity administered iodine-131-labeled antitenascin 81C6 radioimmunotherapy in patients with malignant glioma: neuropathology aspects.

The neurohistological findings in patients treated with targeted beta emitters such as (131)I are poorly described. We report a histopathologic analysis from patients treated with combined external beam therapy and a brachytherapy consisting of a (131)I-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) injected into surgically created resection cavities during brain tumor resections.Directed tissue samples of the cavity walls were obtained because of suspected tumor recurrence from 28 patients. Samples and clinical follow-up were evaluated on all patients (Group A) based on total radiation dose received and a subset of these (n=18; Group B, proximal therapy subset) who had received external beam therapy within

Authors
McLendon, RE; Akabani, G; Friedman, HS; Reardon, DA; Cleveland, L; Cokgor, I; Herndon, JE; Wikstrand, C; Boulton, ST; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD; Zalutsky, MR
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Akabani, G, Friedman, HS, Reardon, DA, Cleveland, L, Cokgor, I, Herndon, JE, Wikstrand, C, Boulton, ST, Friedman, AH, Bigner, DD, and Zalutsky, MR. "Tumor resection cavity administered iodine-131-labeled antitenascin 81C6 radioimmunotherapy in patients with malignant glioma: neuropathology aspects." Nuclear Medicine and Biology 34.4 (May 2007): 405-413.
PMID
17499730
Source
epmc
Published In
Nuclear Medicine and Biology
Volume
34
Issue
4
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
405
End Page
413
DOI
10.1016/j.nucmedbio.2007.01.009

Phase II study of imatinib mesylate and hydroxyurea for recurrent grade III malignant gliomas.

Recent reports demonstrate the activity of imatinib mesylate, an ATP-mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. We performed the current phase 2 study to evaluate this regimen among patients with recurrent WHO grade III malignant glioma (MG).Patients with grade III MG at any recurrence, received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Clinical assessments were performed monthly and radiographic assessments were obtained at least every 2 months. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate.Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. All patients had progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. The median number of episodes of prior progression was 2 (range, 1-7) and the median number of prior treatment regimens was 3 (range, 1-8). With a median follow-up of 82.9 weeks, 24% of patients were progression-free at 6 months. The radiographic response rate was 10%, while 33% achieved stable disease. Among patients who achieved at least stable disease at first evaluation, the 6-month and 12-month PFS rates were 53% and 29%, respectively. The most common grade 3 or greater toxicities were hematologic and complicated less than 4% of administered courses.Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea, is well tolerated and associated with anti-tumor activity in some patients with recurrent grade 3 MG.

Authors
Desjardins, A; Quinn, JA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Sathornsumetee, S; Friedman, AH; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Provenzale, JM; Rich, JN; Sampson, JH; Gururangan, S; Dowell, JM; Salvado, A; Friedman, HS; Reardon, DA
MLA Citation
Desjardins, A, Quinn, JA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Sathornsumetee, S, Friedman, AH, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Provenzale, JM, Rich, JN, Sampson, JH, Gururangan, S, Dowell, JM, Salvado, A, Friedman, HS, and Reardon, DA. "Phase II study of imatinib mesylate and hydroxyurea for recurrent grade III malignant gliomas." Journal of Neuro Oncology 83.1 (May 2007): 53-60.
PMID
17245623
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
83
Issue
1
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
53
End Page
60
DOI
10.1007/s11060-006-9302-2

Recurrent glioblastoma diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization for EGFR.

Authors
Grunkemeier, MN; Turner, K; McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
Grunkemeier, MN, Turner, K, and McLendon, RE. "Recurrent glioblastoma diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization for EGFR." Acta Neuropathol 113.2 (February 2007): 217-219. (Letter)
PMID
17151838
Source
pubmed
Published In
Acta Neuropathologica
Volume
113
Issue
2
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
217
End Page
219
DOI
10.1007/s00401-006-0175-4

Cerebellopontine angle craniopharyngioma: case report and literature review.

The authors report an unusual case of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma occurring in isolation in the cerebellopontine angle of a 12-year-old female. The patient presented with a 1-year history of nausea, vomiting, and headache. MRI revealed a left cerebellopontine angle tumor without connection to the suprasellar space. Following near-total resection, histological review confirmed the lesion as an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma. This is only the third published report of craniopharyngioma occurring in isolation in the cerebellopontine angle. The case report and a brief review of the literature are presented.

Authors
Powers, CJ; New, KC; McLendon, RE; Friedman, AH; Fuchs, HE
MLA Citation
Powers, CJ, New, KC, McLendon, RE, Friedman, AH, and Fuchs, HE. "Cerebellopontine angle craniopharyngioma: case report and literature review." Pediatric Neurosurgery 43.2 (January 2007): 158-163. (Review)
PMID
17337933
Source
epmc
Published In
Pediatric Neurosurgery
Volume
43
Issue
2
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
158
End Page
163
DOI
10.1159/000098394

Glioma stem cells promote radioresistance by preferential activation of the DNA damage response.

Ionizing radiation represents the most effective therapy for glioblastoma (World Health Organization grade IV glioma), one of the most lethal human malignancies, but radiotherapy remains only palliative because of radioresistance. The mechanisms underlying tumour radioresistance have remained elusive. Here we show that cancer stem cells contribute to glioma radioresistance through preferential activation of the DNA damage checkpoint response and an increase in DNA repair capacity. The fraction of tumour cells expressing CD133 (Prominin-1), a marker for both neural stem cells and brain cancer stem cells, is enriched after radiation in gliomas. In both cell culture and the brains of immunocompromised mice, CD133-expressing glioma cells survive ionizing radiation in increased proportions relative to most tumour cells, which lack CD133. CD133-expressing tumour cells isolated from both human glioma xenografts and primary patient glioblastoma specimens preferentially activate the DNA damage checkpoint in response to radiation, and repair radiation-induced DNA damage more effectively than CD133-negative tumour cells. In addition, the radioresistance of CD133-positive glioma stem cells can be reversed with a specific inhibitor of the Chk1 and Chk2 checkpoint kinases. Our results suggest that CD133-positive tumour cells represent the cellular population that confers glioma radioresistance and could be the source of tumour recurrence after radiation. Targeting DNA damage checkpoint response in cancer stem cells may overcome this radioresistance and provide a therapeutic model for malignant brain cancers.

Authors
Bao, S; Wu, Q; McLendon, RE; Hao, Y; Shi, Q; Hjelmeland, AB; Dewhirst, MW; Bigner, DD; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Bao, S, Wu, Q, McLendon, RE, Hao, Y, Shi, Q, Hjelmeland, AB, Dewhirst, MW, Bigner, DD, and Rich, JN. "Glioma stem cells promote radioresistance by preferential activation of the DNA damage response." Nature 444.7120 (December 2006): 756-760.
PMID
17051156
Source
epmc
Published In
Nature
Volume
444
Issue
7120
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
756
End Page
760
DOI
10.1038/nature05236

Phase II study of oxaliplatin in children with recurrent or refractory medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study.

BACKGROUND: An open-label Phase II study of oxaliplatin was conducted to evaluate its safety and efficacy in children with recurrent or refractory medulloblastoma (MB), supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (SPNET), and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT). METHODS: Patients were stratified as follows: stratum IA, first recurrence MB with measurable disease; IB, recurrent MB with only cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) positivity or linear leptomeningeal disease (LLD); IC, MB > or =second recurrence; stratum II, recurrent SPNET; stratum III, recurrent ATRT. Patients received oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m(2) intravenously over 2 hours every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to estimate the sustained response rate in stratum 1A. Plasma ultrafiltrate platinum pharmacokinetics were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 43 patients with a median age of 8.5 years (range, 0.6-18.9 years) were enrolled. In stratum 1A, 2 of 15 had partial responses (PRs, 1 sustained PR). No responses were observed in other strata. The most frequent Grade 3 and 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (25.6%), neutropenia (16.3%), leukopenia (12%), increase in serum alanine transaminase (ALT) (7%), vomiting (4.7%), and sensory neuropathy (4.7%). No severe ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity was reported. Plasma ultrafiltrate platinum pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to adults, with a median clearance of 12.2 L/hr (range, 4.4-30 L/hr) and median area under the curve (AUC(0-infinity)) of 9.4 microg/mL/hr (range, 6.2-13.9 microg/mL/hr). CONCLUSIONS: Oxaliplatin was well tolerated in children but has limited activity in children with recurrent CNS embryonal tumors previously treated with platinum compounds.

Authors
Fouladi, M; Blaney, SM; Poussaint, TY; Freeman, BB; McLendon, R; Fuller, C; Adesina, AM; Hancock, ML; Danks, MK; Stewart, C; Boyett, JM; Gajjar, A
MLA Citation
Fouladi, M, Blaney, SM, Poussaint, TY, Freeman, BB, McLendon, R, Fuller, C, Adesina, AM, Hancock, ML, Danks, MK, Stewart, C, Boyett, JM, and Gajjar, A. "Phase II study of oxaliplatin in children with recurrent or refractory medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a pediatric brain tumor consortium study." Cancer 107.9 (November 1, 2006): 2291-2297.
PMID
17019740
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
107
Issue
9
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
2291
End Page
2297
DOI
10.1002/cncr.22241

A phase II trial of O6-benzylguanine and carmustine in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma.

Tumor resistance to alkylating agents such as carmustine (BCNU) has been found to be associated with intracellular expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Administration of O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG), a substrate that inactivates MGMT, may help overcome chemotherapy resistance. We performed a phase II study to explore the activity of O6-BG in combination with BCNU in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma.Informed consent was obtained from patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma naïve to systemic chemotherapy (adjuvant chemotherapy allowed). Patients received O6-BG 120 mg/m2 I.V. followed by BCNU 40 mg/m2 I.V. Treatment was repeated every 6 weeks until disease progression or development of unacceptable toxicity.No objective responses were observed in 12 enrolled patients. Four patients exhibited stable disease lasting 11-25+ weeks. The median overall survival was 16.9 months (95% CI, 2.9-NR). The most common grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. Depletion of MGMT activity was demonstrated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemical estimation of MGMT expression from archival tissue ranged from 20 to 99% positive staining cells.Observed toxicities were consistent with previous studies of O6-BG plus BCNU. The degree of MGMT expression was variable in this small sample of heterogeneous sarcomas. Further development of this regimen and dose for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma is not warranted due to the lack of objective responses.

Authors
Ryan, CW; Dolan, ME; Brockstein, BB; McLendon, R; Delaney, SM; Samuels, BL; Agamah, ES; Vokes, EE
MLA Citation
Ryan, CW, Dolan, ME, Brockstein, BB, McLendon, R, Delaney, SM, Samuels, BL, Agamah, ES, and Vokes, EE. "A phase II trial of O6-benzylguanine and carmustine in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma." Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 58.5 (November 2006): 634-639.
PMID
16520986
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
Volume
58
Issue
5
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
634
End Page
639
DOI
10.1007/s00280-006-0210-0

Treatment of neoplastic meningitis with intrathecal 9-nitro-camptothecin.

The topoisomerase I inhibitor, 9-nitro-camptothecin (9NC), is highly tumoricidal against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in vitro. However, systemic administration of 9NC has not shown the expected efficacy in clinical trials. This failure may be due to the rapid hydrolysis of 9NC in plasma from the active form to the inactive and myelosuppressive form in the presence of human albumin at physiologic pH. Concurrent treatment with anticonvulsants and dexamethasone, drugs indispensable for the supportive therapy of patients with GBM, has also been shown to decrease plasma concentrations of these drugs. Intrathecal drug delivery circumvents the blood-brain barrier and minimizes systemic toxicity. Intrathecal delivery of 9NC may also have the more specific advantage of significantly reducing the hydrolysis of 9NC that occurs after systemic delivery due to the more favorable pH and reduced albumin content in cerebrospinal fluid. The present study evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of intrathecal delivery of 9NC in an athymic rat model of neoplastic meningitis. Toxicity tests showed that 0.3 micromol (5000 microM), 0.03 micromol (500 microM), 0.003 micromol (50 microM), or 0.0003 micromol (5 microM) of 9NC administered intrathecally to the athymic rats caused no evidence of clinical or histological toxicity. Intrathecal administration of 0.3 micromol (5000 microM) of 9NC twice a week for three doses to athymic rats with neoplastic meningitis induced by the GBM cell line, U87MGDeltaEGFR, resulted in a 26% increase of median survival compared to the control group (p < 0.005). These results suggest that intrathecal treatment with 9NC may be useful for patients with GBM neoplastic meningitis.

Authors
Ochiai, H; Pernell, CT; Archer, GE; Chewning, TA; McLendon, RE; Friedman, HS; Sampson, JH
MLA Citation
Ochiai, H, Pernell, CT, Archer, GE, Chewning, TA, McLendon, RE, Friedman, HS, and Sampson, JH. "Treatment of neoplastic meningitis with intrathecal 9-nitro-camptothecin." Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) 46.10 (October 2006): 485-489.
PMID
17062987
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neurologia Medico Chirurgica
Volume
46
Issue
10
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
485
End Page
489

Quantitative analysis of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in malignant glioma.

Promoter hypermethylation of the DNA repair protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) has been associated with an enhanced response to chloroethylating and methylating agents in patients with malignant glioma. The purpose of this study was to compare three distinct yet related indices for measuring AGT to determine if these assays could be used interchangeably when AGT status is to be used to guide chemotherapeutic decisions. Real-time methylation-specific PCR (MSP), assessed as the ratio of methylated AGT copies to internal beta-actin control, was used to quantitate AGT hypermethylation in 32 glioma samples. Data were compared with AGT enzyme activity as well as immunohistochemical detection of AGT protein from the same samples. Hypermethylation of the AGT promoter was detected in 19 of 31 (61%) samples evaluable by MSP. Low-level AGT, defined as <20% nuclear AGT staining by immunohistochemistry, was found in 10 of 32 samples (31%), whereas 12 of 32 (38%) had low levels of AGT activity. Correlation of immunohistochemistry to AGT activity was statistically significant (P = 0.014) as was the correlation of immunohistochemistry to MSP (P = 0.043), whereas MSP compared with AGT activity (P = 0.246) was not significant. Cross-tabulation of immunohistochemistry and MSP data based on prognostic groups, where good prognosis was represented by an immunohistochemistry of <20% and an MSP ratio >12, showed no significant relationship (P = 0.214), suggesting that one assay cannot be used interchangeably for another. The observed discordance between respective measures of AGT based on prognosis supports further standardization of AGT assays designed to guide therapeutic practice. The data also suggest that consideration be given to the large population of AGT-expressing cells within samples when therapeutic strategies based on tumor methylation are used.

Authors
Maxwell, JA; Johnson, SP; Quinn, JA; McLendon, RE; Ali-Osman, F; Friedman, AH; Herndon, JE; Bierau, K; Bigley, J; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Maxwell, JA, Johnson, SP, Quinn, JA, McLendon, RE, Ali-Osman, F, Friedman, AH, Herndon, JE, Bierau, K, Bigley, J, Bigner, DD, and Friedman, HS. "Quantitative analysis of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase in malignant glioma." Mol Cancer Ther 5.10 (October 2006): 2531-2539.
PMID
17041097
Source
pubmed
Published In
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Volume
5
Issue
10
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
2531
End Page
2539
DOI
10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-06-0106

AAL881, a novel small molecule inhibitor of RAF and VEGFR activities, blocks growth of malignant glioma

Authors
Sathornsumetee, S; Hjelmeland, AB; Keir, ST; McLendon, RE; Batt, D; Ramsey, T; Yusuff, N; Ahmed Rasheed, BK; Kieran, MW; Laforme, A; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Sathornsumetee, S, Hjelmeland, AB, Keir, ST, McLendon, RE, Batt, D, Ramsey, T, Yusuff, N, Ahmed Rasheed, BK, Kieran, MW, Laforme, A, Bigner, DD, Friedman, HS, and Rich, JN. "AAL881, a novel small molecule inhibitor of RAF and VEGFR activities, blocks growth of malignant glioma." October 2006.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
417
End Page
417

Glioma cancer stem cells promote tumor angiogenesis through vascular endothelial growth factor

Authors
Bao, S; Wu, Q; Sathornsumetee, S; Hao, Y; Li, Z; Hjelmeland, AB; Shi, Q; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Bao, S, Wu, Q, Sathornsumetee, S, Hao, Y, Li, Z, Hjelmeland, AB, Shi, Q, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, and Rich, JN. "Glioma cancer stem cells promote tumor angiogenesis through vascular endothelial growth factor." October 2006.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
392
End Page
392

Characterizing genomic rearrangements in oligodendroglioma using whole genome tilepath hrCGH arrays

Authors
Gregory, SG; Johnson, NV; Connelly, JJ; Virgadamo, J; McLendon, RE; Vance, JM; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Gregory, SG, Johnson, NV, Connelly, JJ, Virgadamo, J, McLendon, RE, Vance, JM, and Bigner, DD. "Characterizing genomic rearrangements in oligodendroglioma using whole genome tilepath hrCGH arrays." October 2006.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
421
End Page
421

AAL881, a novel small molecule inhibitor of RAF and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor activities, blocks the growth of malignant glioma.

Malignant gliomas are highly proliferative and angiogenic cancers resistant to conventional therapies. Although RAS and RAF mutations are uncommon in gliomas, RAS activity is increased in gliomas. Additionally, vascular endothelial growth factor and its cognate receptors are highly expressed in gliomas. We now report that AAL881, a novel low-molecular weight inhibitor of the kinase activities associated with B-RAF, C-RAF (RAF-1), and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2), showed activity against glioma cell lines and xenografts. In culture, AAL881 inhibited the downstream effectors of RAF in a concentration-dependent manner, with inhibition of proliferation associated with a G(1) cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, and decreased colony formation. AAL881 decreased the proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells as well as the tumor cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and inhibited the invasion of glioma cells through an artificial extracellular matrix. Orally administered AAL881 was well tolerated with minimal weight loss in non-tumor-bearing mice. Established s.c. human malignant glioma xenografts grown in immunocompromised mice treated with a 10-day course of oral AAL881 exhibited growth delays relative to control tumors, frequently resulting in long-term complete regressions. AAL881 treatment extended the survival of immunocompromised mice bearing orthotopic glioma xenografts compared with placebo controls. The intraparenchymal portions of orthotopic AAL881-treated tumors underwent widespread necrosis consistent with vascular disruption compared with the subarachnoid elements. These effects are distinct from our prior experience with VEGFR2 inhibitors, suggesting that targeting RAF itself or in combination with VEGFR2 induces profound tumor responses in gliomas and may serve as a novel therapeutic approach in patients with malignant gliomas.

Authors
Sathornsumetee, S; Hjelmeland, AB; Keir, ST; McLendon, RE; Batt, D; Ramsey, T; Yusuff, N; Rasheed, BKA; Kieran, MW; Laforme, A; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Sathornsumetee, S, Hjelmeland, AB, Keir, ST, McLendon, RE, Batt, D, Ramsey, T, Yusuff, N, Rasheed, BKA, Kieran, MW, Laforme, A, Bigner, DD, Friedman, HS, and Rich, JN. "AAL881, a novel small molecule inhibitor of RAF and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor activities, blocks the growth of malignant glioma." Cancer Research 66.17 (September 2006): 8722-8730.
PMID
16951188
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
66
Issue
17
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
8722
End Page
8730
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.can-06-0284

Chimeric murine/human IgG(2) anti-tenascin 81C6 monoclonal antibody: phase I trial in patients with malignant glioma of a construct with improved stability

Authors
Zalutsky, MR; Reardon, DA; Quinn, JA; Coleman, RE; Akabani, G; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; II, HJE; McLendon, RE; Wong, TZ; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Zalutsky, MR, Reardon, DA, Quinn, JA, Coleman, RE, Akabani, G, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, II, HJE, McLendon, RE, Wong, TZ, and Bigner, DD. "Chimeric murine/human IgG(2) anti-tenascin 81C6 monoclonal antibody: phase I trial in patients with malignant glioma of a construct with improved stability." EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING 33 (September 2006): S194-S194.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume
33
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
S194
End Page
S194

Radioimmunotherapy of patients with malignant brain tumors: patient-specific dosing of I-131-labeled anti-tenacin antibody to achieve 44 Gy boost dose to resection cavity margins

Authors
Reardon, DA; Zalutsky, MR; Akabani, G; Coleman, RE; Friedman, AH; McLendon, RE; Friedman, HS; II, HJE; Kirkpatrick, J; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Zalutsky, MR, Akabani, G, Coleman, RE, Friedman, AH, McLendon, RE, Friedman, HS, II, HJE, Kirkpatrick, J, and Bigner, DD. "Radioimmunotherapy of patients with malignant brain tumors: patient-specific dosing of I-131-labeled anti-tenacin antibody to achieve 44 Gy boost dose to resection cavity margins." EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING 33 (September 2006): S194-S194.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume
33
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
S194
End Page
S194

Stem cell-like glioma cells promote tumor angiogenesis through vascular endothelial growth factor.

Malignant gliomas are highly lethal cancers dependent on angiogenesis. Critical tumor subpopulations within gliomas share characteristics with neural stem cells. We examined the potential of stem cell-like glioma cells (SCLGC) to support tumor angiogenesis. SCLGC isolated from human glioblastoma biopsy specimens and xenografts potently generated tumors when implanted into the brains of immunocompromised mice, whereas non-SCLGC tumor cells isolated from only a few tumors formed secondary tumors when xenotransplanted. Tumors derived from SCLGC were morphologically distinguishable from non-SCLGC tumor populations by widespread tumor angiogenesis, necrosis, and hemorrhage. To determine a potential molecular mechanism for SCLGC in angiogenesis, we measured the expression of a panel of angiogenic factors secreted by SCLGC. In comparison with matched non-SCLGC populations, SCLGC consistently secreted markedly elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which were further induced by hypoxia. In an in vitro model of angiogenesis, SCLGC-conditioned medium significantly increased endothelial cell migration and tube formation compared with non-SCLGC tumor cell-conditioned medium. The proangiogenic effects of glioma SCLGC on endothelial cells were specifically abolished by the anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab, which is in clinical use for cancer therapy. Furthermore, bevacizumab displayed potent antiangiogenic efficacy in vivo and suppressed growth of xenografts derived from SCLGC but limited efficacy against xenografts derived from a matched non-SCLGC population. Together these data indicate that stem cell-like tumor cells can be a crucial source of key angiogenic factors in cancers and that targeting proangiogenic factors from stem cell-like tumor populations may be critical for patient therapy.

Authors
Bao, S; Wu, Q; Sathornsumetee, S; Hao, Y; Li, Z; Hjelmeland, AB; Shi, Q; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Bao, S, Wu, Q, Sathornsumetee, S, Hao, Y, Li, Z, Hjelmeland, AB, Shi, Q, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, and Rich, JN. "Stem cell-like glioma cells promote tumor angiogenesis through vascular endothelial growth factor." Cancer Research 66.16 (August 2006): 7843-7848.
PMID
16912155
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
66
Issue
16
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
7843
End Page
7848
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.can-06-1010

Russell & Rubinstein's Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System 7Ed

This is the leading international professional reference text that also serves as a bench book, describing all aspects of the pathology of brain tumours - genetics, molecular biology, epidemiology, morphology, immunohistochemistry, ...

Authors
McLendon, RE; Rosenblum, MK; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Rosenblum, MK, and Bigner, DD. Russell & Rubinstein's Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System 7Ed. CRC Press, July 28, 2006. (Edited Book)
Source
manual
Publish Date
2006

Russell & Rubinstein's Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System 7Ed

This is the leading international professional reference text that also serves as a bench book, describing all aspects of the pathology of brain tumours - genetics, molecular biology, epidemiology, morphology, immunohistochemistry, ...

Authors
McLendon, RE; Rosenblum, MK; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Rosenblum, MK, and Bigner, DD. Russell & Rubinstein's Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System 7Ed. CRC Press, July 28, 2006. (Edited Book)
Source
manual
Publish Date
2006

Russell & Rubinstein's Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System 7Ed

This is the leading international professional reference text that also serves as a bench book, describing all aspects of the pathology of brain tumours - genetics, molecular biology, epidemiology, morphology, immunohistochemistry, ...

Authors
McLendon, RE; Rosenblum, MK; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Rosenblum, MK, and Bigner, DD. Russell & Rubinstein's Pathology of Tumors of the Nervous System 7Ed. CRC Press, July 28, 2006. (Edited Book)
Source
manual
Publish Date
2006

Novel human IgG2b/murine chimeric antitenascin monoclonal antibody construct radiolabeled with 131I and administered into the surgically created resection cavity of patients with malignant glioma: phase I trial results.

UNLABELLED: Results from animal experiments have shown that human IgG2/mouse chimeric antitenascin 81C6 (ch81C6) monoclonal antibody exhibited higher tumor accumulation and enhanced stability compared with its murine parent. Our objective was to determine the effect of these differences on the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, dosimetry, and antitumor activity of (131)I-ch81C6 administered into the surgically created resection cavity (SCRC) of malignant glioma patients. METHODS: In this phase I trial, eligible patients received a single injection of (131)I-ch81C6 administered through a Rickham catheter into the SCRC. Patients were stratified as newly diagnosed and untreated (stratum A), newly diagnosed after external beam radiotherapy (XRT) (stratum B), and recurrent (stratum C). (131)I-ch81C6 was administered either before (stratum A) or after (stratum B) conventional XRT for newly diagnosed patients. In addition, chemotherapy was prescribed for all patients after (131)I-ch81C6 administration. Dose escalation was performed independently for each stratum. Patients were observed for toxicity and response until death or progressive disease. RESULTS: We treated 47 patients with (131)I-ch81C6 doses up to 4.44 GBq (120 mCi), including 35 with newly diagnosed tumors (strata A and B) and 12 with recurrent disease (stratum C). Dose-limiting hematologic toxicity defined the MTD to be 2.96 GBq (80 mCi) for all patients, regardless of treatment strata. Neurologic dose-limiting toxicity developed in 3 patients; however, none required further surgery to debulk radiation necrosis. Median survival was 88.6 wk and 65.0 wk for newly diagnosed and recurrent patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: The MTD of (131)I-ch81C6 is 2.96 GBq (80 mCi) because of dose-limiting hematologic toxicity. Although encouraging survival was observed, (131)I-ch81C6 was associated with greater hematologic toxicity, probably due to the enhanced stability of the IgG2 construct, than previously observed with (131)I-murine 81C6.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Quinn, JA; Akabani, G; Coleman, RE; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Pegram, CN; Provenzale, JM; Dowell, JM; Rich, JN; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; Sampson, JH; Gururangan, S; Wong, TZ; Badruddoja, MA; Zhao, X-G; Bigner, DD; Zalutsky, MR
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Quinn, JA, Akabani, G, Coleman, RE, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Pegram, CN, Provenzale, JM, Dowell, JM, Rich, JN, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, Sampson, JH, Gururangan, S, Wong, TZ, Badruddoja, MA, Zhao, X-G, Bigner, DD, and Zalutsky, MR. "Novel human IgG2b/murine chimeric antitenascin monoclonal antibody construct radiolabeled with 131I and administered into the surgically created resection cavity of patients with malignant glioma: phase I trial results." Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine 47.6 (June 2006): 912-918.
PMID
16741299
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
47
Issue
6
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
912
End Page
918

Errors in surgical neuropathology and the influence of cognitive biases: the psychology of intelligence analysis.

CONTEXT: A significant difficulty that pathologists encounter in arriving at a correct diagnosis is related to the way information from various sources is processed and assimilated in context. OBJECTIVE: These issues are addressed by the science of cognitive psychology. Although cognitive biases are the focus of a number of studies on medical decision making, few if any focus on the visual sciences. DATA SOURCES: A recent publication authored by Richards Heuer, Jr, The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis, directly addresses many of the cognitive biases faced by neuropathologists and anatomic pathologists in general. These biases include visual anticipation, first impression, and established mindsets and subconsciously influence our critical decision-making processes. CONCLUSIONS: The book points out that while biases are an inherent property of cognition, the influence of such biases can be recognized and the effects blunted.

Authors
McLendon, RE
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE. "Errors in surgical neuropathology and the influence of cognitive biases: the psychology of intelligence analysis." Arch Pathol Lab Med 130.5 (May 2006): 613-616.
PMID
16683873
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume
130
Issue
5
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
613
End Page
616
DOI
10.1043/1543-2165(2006)130[613:EISNAT]2.0.CO;2

A phase II window trial of procarbazine and topotecan in children with high-grade glioma: a report from the children's oncology group.

The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of high-grade gliomas in children is unclear. Early reports were suggestive of improved outcome in children with high-grade glioma with the addition of chemotherapy after surgery and radiation therapy. Subsequent studies did not show similar favorable contribution of chemotherapy to the outcome of these children. Further efforts to identify active chemotherapy agents in children include use of agents that have shown efficacy in adult patients with high-grade glioma and agents that have shown promise in mice bearing human xenografts of brain tumors. A Pediatric Oncology Group (POG 9431) trial tested the activity of two such agents, procarbazine and topotecan in newly diagnosed patients with high-grade glioma who had measurable disease after diagnostic surgery. Neither agent showed efficacy within the confines of the statistical design of the study. This study showed that children with high-grade glioma have an innate resistance to alkylating agents based on mismatch repair deficiency and high levels of alkyguanine transferase (AGT). Future trials should consider strategies to overcome the resistance mechanisms in children with high-grade glioma.

Authors
Chintagumpala, MM; Friedman, HS; Stewart, CF; Kepner, J; McLendon, RE; Modrich, PL; McCluggage, C; Burger, P; Holmes, E; Thompson, S; Rutka, J; Michalski, J; Woo, S; Blaney, SM; Kun, LE; Horowitz, ME; Pediatric Oncology Group Study,
MLA Citation
Chintagumpala, MM, Friedman, HS, Stewart, CF, Kepner, J, McLendon, RE, Modrich, PL, McCluggage, C, Burger, P, Holmes, E, Thompson, S, Rutka, J, Michalski, J, Woo, S, Blaney, SM, Kun, LE, Horowitz, ME, and Pediatric Oncology Group Study, . "A phase II window trial of procarbazine and topotecan in children with high-grade glioma: a report from the children's oncology group." Journal of Neuro Oncology 77.2 (April 2006): 193-198.
PMID
16314955
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Neuro Oncology
Volume
77
Issue
2
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
193
End Page
198
DOI
10.1007/s11060-005-9024-x

Phase 1 trial of gefitinib plus sirolimus in adults with recurrent malignant glioma.

PURPOSE: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of gefitinib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, plus sirolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, among patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Gefitinib and sirolimus were administered on a continuous daily dosing schedule at dose levels that were escalated in successive cohorts of malignant glioma patients at any recurrence who were stratified based on concurrent use of CYP3A-inducing anticonvulsants [enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs, (EIAED)]. Pharmacokinetic and archival tumor biomarker data were also assessed. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients with progressive disease after prior radiation therapy and chemotherapy were enrolled, including 29 (85%) with glioblastoma multiforme and 5 (15%) with anaplastic glioma. The MTD was 500 mg of gefitinib plus 5 mg of sirolimus for patients not on EIAEDs and 1,000 mg of gefitinib plus 10 mg of sirolimus for patients on EIAEDs. DLTs included mucositis, diarrhea, rash, thrombocytopenia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Gefitinib exposure was not affected by sirolimus administration but was significantly lowered by concurrent EIAED use. Two patients (6%) achieved a partial radiographic response, and 13 patients (38%) achieved stable disease. CONCLUSION: We show that gefitinib plus sirolimus can be safely coadministered on a continuous, daily dosing schedule, and established the recommended dose level of these agents in combination for future phase 2 clinical trials.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Quinn, JA; Vredenburgh, JJ; Gururangan, S; Friedman, AH; Desjardins, A; Sathornsumetee, S; Herndon, JE; Dowell, JM; McLendon, RE; Provenzale, JM; Sampson, JH; Smith, RP; Swaisland, AJ; Ochs, JS; Lyons, P; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS; Rich, JN
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Quinn, JA, Vredenburgh, JJ, Gururangan, S, Friedman, AH, Desjardins, A, Sathornsumetee, S, Herndon, JE, Dowell, JM, McLendon, RE, Provenzale, JM, Sampson, JH, Smith, RP, Swaisland, AJ, Ochs, JS, Lyons, P, Tourt-Uhlig, S, Bigner, DD, Friedman, HS, and Rich, JN. "Phase 1 trial of gefitinib plus sirolimus in adults with recurrent malignant glioma." Clin Cancer Res 12.3 Pt 1 (February 1, 2006): 860-868.
PMID
16467100
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
12
Issue
3 Pt 1
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
860
End Page
868
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-05-2215

Salvage radioimmunotherapy with murine iodine-131-labeled antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 for patients with recurrent primary and metastatic malignant brain tumors: phase II study results.

PURPOSE: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of intraresection cavity iodine-131-labeled murine antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 (131I-m81C6) among recurrent malignant brain tumor patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this phase II trial, 100 mCi of 131I-m81C6 was injected directly into the surgically created resection cavity (SCRC) of 43 patients with recurrent malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM], n = 33; anaplastic astrocytoma [AA], n = 6; anaplastic oligodendroglioma [AO], n = 2; gliosarcoma [GS], n = 1; and metastatic adenocarcinoma, n = 1) followed by chemotherapy. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 172 weeks, 63% and 59% of patients with GBM/GS and AA/AO tumors were alive at 1 year. Median overall survival for patients with GBM/GS and AA/AO tumors was 64 and 99 weeks, respectively. Ten patients (23%) developed acute hematologic toxicity. Five patients (12%) developed acute reversible neurotoxicity. One patient (2%) developed irreversible neurotoxicity. No patients required reoperation for radionecrosis. CONCLUSION: In this single-institution phase II study, administration of 100 mCi of 131I-m81C6 to recurrent malignant glioma patients followed by chemotherapy is associated with a median survival that is greater than that of historical controls treated with surgery plus iodine-125 brachytherapy. Furthermore, toxicity was acceptable. Administration of a fixed millicurie dose resulted in a wide range of absorbed radiation doses to the SCRC. We are now conducting a phase II trial, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, using patient-specific 131I-m81C6 dosing, to deliver 44 Gy to the SCRC followed by standardized chemotherapy. A phase III multicenter trial with patient-specific dosing is planned.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Akabani, G; Coleman, RE; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS; Herndon, JE; McLendon, RE; Pegram, CN; Provenzale, JM; Quinn, JA; Rich, JN; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; Gururangan, S; Badruddoja, M; Dowell, JM; Wong, TZ; Zhao, X-G; Zalutsky, MR; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Akabani, G, Coleman, RE, Friedman, AH, Friedman, HS, Herndon, JE, McLendon, RE, Pegram, CN, Provenzale, JM, Quinn, JA, Rich, JN, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, Gururangan, S, Badruddoja, M, Dowell, JM, Wong, TZ, Zhao, X-G, Zalutsky, MR, and Bigner, DD. "Salvage radioimmunotherapy with murine iodine-131-labeled antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 for patients with recurrent primary and metastatic malignant brain tumors: phase II study results." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 24.1 (January 2006): 115-122.
PMID
16382120
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
24
Issue
1
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
115
End Page
122
DOI
10.1200/jco.2005.03.4082

Phase II study of imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

PURPOSE: We performed a phase II study to evaluate the combination of imatinib mesylate, an adenosine triphosphate mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with GBM at any recurrence received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Assessments were performed every 28 days. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). RESULTS: Thirty-three patients enrolled with progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 58 weeks, 27% of patients were progression-free at 6 months, and the median PFS was 14.4 weeks. Three patients (9%) achieved radiographic response, and 14 (42%) achieved stable disease. Cox regression analysis identified concurrent EIAED use and no more than one prior progression as independent positive prognostic factors of PFS. The most common toxicities included grade 3 neutropenia (16%), thrombocytopenia (6%), and edema (6%). There were no grade 4 or 5 events. Concurrent EIAED use lowered imatinib mesylate exposure. Imatinib mesylate clearance was decreased at day 28 compared with day 1 in all patients, suggesting an effect of hydroxyurea. CONCLUSION: Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea is well tolerated and associated with durable antitumor activity in some patients with recurrent GBM.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Egorin, MJ; Quinn, JA; Rich, JN; Gururangan, S; Vredenburgh, JJ; Desjardins, A; Sathornsumetee, S; Provenzale, JM; Herndon, JE; Dowell, JM; Badruddoja, MA; McLendon, RE; Lagattuta, TF; Kicielinski, KP; Dresemann, G; Sampson, JH; Friedman, AH; Salvado, AJ; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Egorin, MJ, Quinn, JA, Rich, JN, Gururangan, S, Vredenburgh, JJ, Desjardins, A, Sathornsumetee, S, Provenzale, JM, Herndon, JE, Dowell, JM, Badruddoja, MA, McLendon, RE, Lagattuta, TF, Kicielinski, KP, Dresemann, G, Sampson, JH, Friedman, AH, Salvado, AJ, and Friedman, HS. "Phase II study of imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 23.36 (December 2005): 9359-9368.
PMID
16361636
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
23
Issue
36
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
9359
End Page
9368
DOI
10.1200/jco.2005.03.2185

ZD6474, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor, inhibits tumor growth of multiple nervous system tumors.

PURPOSE: Primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors represent a diverse group of tumor types with heterogeneous molecular mechanisms that underlie their formation and maintenance. CNS tumors depend on angiogenesis and often display increased activity of ErbB-associated pathways. Current nonspecific therapies frequently have poor efficacy in many of these tumor types, so there is a pressing need for the development of novel targeted therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: ZD6474 is a novel, orally available low molecular weight inhibitor of the kinase activities associated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor. We hypothesized that ZD6474 may provide benefit in the treatment of several CNS tumor types. RESULTS: In mice bearing established s.c. tumor xenografts of CNS tumors (malignant glioma and ependymoma) or rhabdomyosarcoma, a limited course of ZD6474 treatment produced significant tumor growth delays and a high rate of partial tumor regression in most models examined. Mice with i.c. malignant glioma xenografts treated with ZD6474 experienced a significant prolongation of survival. Tumors from mice treated with ZD6474 displayed a lower proliferative index and disrupted tumor vascularity. Notably, some of these models are insensitive to low molecular weight kinase inhibitors targeting only vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 or epidermal growth factor receptor functions, suggesting that the combined disruption of both epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 activities may significantly increase tumor control. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, ZD6474 shows significant activity against xenograft models of several primary human CNS tumor types. Consideration for clinical development in this disease setting seems warranted.

Authors
Rich, JN; Sathornsumetee, S; Keir, ST; Kieran, MW; Laforme, A; Kaipainen, A; McLendon, RE; Graner, MW; Rasheed, BKA; Wang, L; Reardon, DA; Ryan, AJ; Wheeler, C; Dimery, I; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Rich, JN, Sathornsumetee, S, Keir, ST, Kieran, MW, Laforme, A, Kaipainen, A, McLendon, RE, Graner, MW, Rasheed, BKA, Wang, L, Reardon, DA, Ryan, AJ, Wheeler, C, Dimery, I, Bigner, DD, and Friedman, HS. "ZD6474, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor, inhibits tumor growth of multiple nervous system tumors." Clin Cancer Res 11.22 (November 15, 2005): 8145-8157.
PMID
16299247
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
11
Issue
22
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
8145
End Page
8157
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-05-0319

Survival analysis of presumptive prognostic markers among oligodendrogliomas.

BACKGROUND: Allelic losses of 1p and 19q arms correlate with the oligodendroglial phenotype as well as with sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Furthermore, the DNA repair gene, methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), is diminished in 80% of oligodendroglial tumors and represents a possible mechanism for this therapeutic sensitivity. However, the authors questioned the relevance of genetic testing and measuring MGMT levels in tumors that were diagnostic of oligodendroglioma. METHODS: The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 1p, 19q, 9p21, TP53, and MGMT status in 46 patients with oligodendrogliomas to address any relations that may exist among these markers with regard to progression-free survival (PFS) and total survival. Methodologies included comparative genomic hybridization; loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 1p, 19q, and 9p21; TP53 mutational analysis; and immunohistochemistry for MGMT. RESULTS: The authors found that survival among patients with light microscopically diagnosed oligodendroglial tumors demonstrating LOH of 1p and 19q trended toward statistical significance (P = 0.102 and P = 0.058, respectively). 9p21 LOH was significant as a predictor of PFS only among anaplastic oligodendrogliomas in this cohort (P = 0.033). TP53 mutation was found to be significantly predictive of a shorter survival (P = 0.027) among all patients and exhibited a strong trend toward a shorter PFS (P = 0.060). Low-level MGMT labeling index (LI) (< 20%) was noted in 86% of all oligodendroglial tumors. MGMT LI was not found to correlate with an improved PFS or total survival in this cohort, recognizing that median survival was not reached after a median follow-up of 104 months. CONCLUSIONS: 9p21 and TP53 mutational status assisted in developing a stricter subclassification of these tumors with prognostic significance. MGMT levels were decreased in a majority of oligodendrogliomas.

Authors
McLendon, RE; Herndon, JE; West, B; Reardon, D; Wiltshire, R; Rasheed, BKA; Quinn, J; Friedman, HS; Friedman, AH; Bigner, DD
MLA Citation
McLendon, RE, Herndon, JE, West, B, Reardon, D, Wiltshire, R, Rasheed, BKA, Quinn, J, Friedman, HS, Friedman, AH, and Bigner, DD. "Survival analysis of presumptive prognostic markers among oligodendrogliomas." Cancer 104.8 (October 15, 2005): 1693-1699.
PMID
16116609
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
104
Issue
8
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
1693
End Page
1699
DOI
10.1002/cncr.21362

Phase I trial of irinotecan plus temozolomide in adults with recurrent malignant glioma.

The authors determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of irinotecan (CPT-11), a topoisomerase I inhibitor, when administered with temozolomide among patients with recurrent malignant glioma (MG).Patients with MG at any recurrence received temozolomide (TMZ) at a dose of 200 mg/m(2)/day on Days 1-5 plus CPT-11 administered as a 90-minute intravenous infusion during Weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5 of each 6-week cycle. Patients were stratified based on concurrent administration of CYP3A4-inducing anticonvulsants (enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs [EIAEDs]). The CPT-11 dose was escalated in successive cohorts of patients independently for each stratum.CPT-11, at doses ranging from 40 mg/m(2) to 375 mg/m(2), was administered with TMZ to 107 patients. Ninety-one patients (85%) had recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 16 (15%) had recurrent anaplastic glioma. Sixty-eight patients (64%) were given EIAEDs. The MTD of CPT-11 for patients concurrently receiving and not receiving EIAEDs was 325 mg/m(2) and 125 mg/m(2), respectively. The DLTs were hematologic, gastrointestinal, and hepatic. Fifteen patients (14%) achieved either a radiographic complete (n = 5) or partial (n = 10) response across a wide range of CPT-11 dose levels. Patients with recurrent GBM who achieved radiographic response had a median time to disease progression of 54.9 weeks.The current study built on preclinical observations designed to increase the clinical activity of topoisomerase I inhibitors. CPT-11, administered at full dose levels, was well tolerated in combination with TMZ. Furthermore, durable responses were observed in this recurrent population. Ongoing Phase II studies will evaluate the efficacy of this regimen and its application to other malignancies.

Authors
Reardon, DA; Quinn, JA; Rich, JN; Desjardins, A; Vredenburgh, J; Gururangan, S; Sathornsumetee, S; Badruddoja, M; McLendon, R; Provenzale, J; Herndon, JE; Dowell, JM; Burkart, JL; Newton, HB; Friedman, AH; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Reardon, DA, Quinn, JA, Rich, JN, Desjardins, A, Vredenburgh, J, Gururangan, S, Sathornsumetee, S, Badruddoja, M, McLendon, R, Provenzale, J, Herndon, JE, Dowell, JM, Burkart, JL, Newton, HB, Friedman, AH, and Friedman, HS. "Phase I trial of irinotecan plus temozolomide in adults with recurrent malignant glioma." Cancer 104.7 (October 2005): 1478-1486.
PMID
16088964
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
104
Issue
7
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
1478
End Page
1486
DOI
10.1002/cncr.21316

Phase I trial of temozolomide plus O6-benzylguanine for patients with recurrent or progressive malignant glioma.

We conducted a two-phase clinical trial in patients with progressive malignant glioma (MG). The first phase of this trial was designed to determine the dose of O6-BG effective in producing complete depletion of tumor AGT activity for 48 hours. The second phase of the trial was designed to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of temozolomide when combined with O6-BG. In addition, plasma concentrations of O6-BG and O6-benzyl-8-oxoguanine were evaluated after O6-BG.For our first phase of the clinical trial, patients were scheduled to undergo craniotomy for AGT determination after receiving a 1-hour O6-BG infusion at 120 mg/m2 followed by a continuous infusion at an initial dose of 30 mg/m2/d for 48 hours. The dose of the continuous infusion of O6-BG escalated until tumor AGT was depleted. Once the O6-BG dose was established a separate group of patients was enrolled in the second phase of clinical trial, in which temozolomide, administered as a single dose at the end of the 1-hour O6-BG infusion, was escalated until the MTD was determined.The O6-BG dose found to be effective in depleting tumor AGT activity at 48 hours was an IV bolus of 120 mg/m2 over 1 hour followed by a continuous infusion of 30 mg/m2/d for 48 hours. On enrolling 38 patients in six dose levels of temozolomide, the MTD was established at 472 mg/m2 with dose-limiting toxicities limited to myelosuppression.This study provides the foundation for a phase II trial of O6-BG plus temozolomide in temozolomide-resistant MG.

Authors
Quinn, JA; Desjardins, A; Weingart, J; Brem, H; Dolan, ME; Delaney, SM; Vredenburgh, J; Rich, J; Friedman, AH; Reardon, DA; Sampson, JH; Pegg, AE; Moschel, RC; Birch, R; McLendon, RE; Provenzale, JM; Gururangan, S; Dancey, JE; Maxwell, J; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Herndon, JE; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Quinn, JA, Desjardins, A, Weingart, J, Brem, H, Dolan, ME, Delaney, SM, Vredenburgh, J, Rich, J, Friedman, AH, Reardon, DA, Sampson, JH, Pegg, AE, Moschel, RC, Birch, R, McLendon, RE, Provenzale, JM, Gururangan, S, Dancey, JE, Maxwell, J, Tourt-Uhlig, S, Herndon, JE, Bigner, DD, and Friedman, HS. "Phase I trial of temozolomide plus O6-benzylguanine for patients with recurrent or progressive malignant glioma." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 23.28 (October 2005): 7178-7187.
PMID
16192602
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
23
Issue
28
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
7178
End Page
7187
DOI
10.1200/jco.2005.06.502

PIK3CA is mutated in oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas, and medulloblastomas and associated with chromosome 1p, 19q LOH in oligodendrogliomas

Authors
Adamson, DC; Broderick, DK; Di, C; Samuels, YR; McLendon, RE; Fults, DW; Velculescu, VE; Rasheed, A; Bigner, DD; Yan, H
MLA Citation
Adamson, DC, Broderick, DK, Di, C, Samuels, YR, McLendon, RE, Fults, DW, Velculescu, VE, Rasheed, A, Bigner, DD, and Yan, H. "PIK3CA is mutated in oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas, and medulloblastomas and associated with chromosome 1p, 19q LOH in oligodendrogliomas." July 2005.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
7
Issue
3
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
345
End Page
345

Dosimetry and radiographic analysis of 131I-labeled anti-tenascin 81C6 murine monoclonal antibody in newly diagnosed patients with malignant gliomas: a phase II study.

UNLABELLED: The objective was to perform dosimetry and evaluate dose-response relationships in newly diagnosed patients with malignant brain tumors treated with direct injections of (131)I-labeled anti-tenascin murine 81C6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) into surgically created resection cavities (SCRCs) followed by conventional external-beam radiotherapy and chemotherapy. METHODS: Absorbed doses to the 2-cm-thick shell, measured from the margins of the resection cavity interface, were estimated for 33 patients with primary brain tumors. MRI/SPECT registrations were used to assess the distribution of the radiolabeled mAb in brain parenchyma. Results from biopsies obtained from 15 patients were classified as tumor, radionecrosis, or tumor and radionecrosis, and these were correlated with absorbed dose and dose rate. Also, MRI/PET registrations were used to assess radiographic progression among patients. RESULTS: This therapeutic strategy yielded a median survival of 86 and 79 wk for all patients and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients, respectively. The average SCRC residence time of (131)I-mu81C6 mAb was 76 h (range, 34-169 h). The average absorbed dose to the 2-cm cavity margins was 48 Gy (range, 25-116 Gy) for all patients and 51 Gy (range, 27-116 Gy) for GBM patients. In MRI/SPECT registrations, we observed a preferential distribution of (131)I-mu81C6 mAb through regions of vasogenic edema. An analysis of the relationship between the absorbed dose and dose rate and the first biopsy results yielded a most favorable absorbed dose of 44 Gy. A correlation between decreased survival and irreversible neurotoxicity was noted. A comparative analysis, in terms of median survival, was performed with previous brachytherapy clinical studies, which showed a proportional relationship between the average boost absorbed dose and the median survival. CONCLUSION: This study shows that (131)I-mu81C6 mAb increases the median survival of GBM patients. An optimal absorbed dose of 44 Gy to the 2-cm cavity margins is suggested to reduce the incidence of neurologic toxicity. Further clinical studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of (131)I-mu81C6 mAb based on a target dose of 44 Gy rather than a fixed administered activity.

Authors
Akabani, G; Reardon, DA; Coleman, RE; Wong, TZ; Metzler, SD; Bowsher, JE; Barboriak, DP; Provenzale, JM; Greer, KL; DeLong, D; Friedman, HS; Friedman, AH; Zhao, X-G; Pegram, CN; McLendon, RE; Bigner, DD; Zalutsky, MR
MLA Citation
Akabani, G, Reardon, DA, Coleman, RE, Wong, TZ, Metzler, SD, Bowsher, JE, Barboriak, DP, Provenzale, JM, Greer, KL, DeLong, D, Friedman, HS, Friedman, AH, Zhao, X-G, Pegram, CN, McLendon, RE, Bigner, DD, and Zalutsky, MR. "Dosimetry and radiographic analysis of 131I-labeled anti-tenascin 81C6 murine monoclonal antibody in newly diagnosed patients with malignant gliomas: a phase II study." Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine 46.6 (June 2005): 1042-1051.
PMID
15937318
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
Volume
46
Issue
6
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
1042
End Page
1051

Gene expression profiling and genetic markers in glioblastoma survival.

Despite the strikingly grave prognosis for older patients with glioblastomas, significant variability in patient outcome is experienced. To explore the potential for developing improved prognostic capabilities based on the elucidation of potential biological relationships, we did analyses of genes commonly mutated, ampli