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Noonan, Devon

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.P.H. 2008

M.P.H. — University of Virginia

Ph.D. 2010

Ph.D. — University of Virginia

Grants:

Addressing Tobacco Use Disparities through an Innovative Mobile Phone Intervention: The textto4gosmokelesstobacco

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2015
End Date
July 31, 2018

Publications:

Understanding Multiple Behavioral Risk Factors for Cancer in Rural Women.

To examine the demographic and health-related factors associated with risk behaviors that have been linked to cancer including smoking, high BMI, and low physical activity.A secondary analysis was conducted using data from Rural Families Speak about Health, a multistate, epidemiologic study of rural American women and their families (N = 444).Validated measures for various demographic and health-related items including tobacco use, BMI, physical activity, and depression were used.Of the total sample with complete data (n = 399), the mean age was 32 years and the majority were White (64%), married (67%), had a high school education or higher (73%), and had an annual household income of less than $40,000 (90%). Regarding cancer risk behaviors, 36% of the sample were smokers, 39% reported low levels of physical activity, and 45% had a calculated BMI over 30. Thirty-five percent of participants reported engaging in two or more risk behaviors. There were significant differences in income, perceived health status, and depression depending on the number of risk behaviors reported.Understanding combinations of risk behaviors can assist nurses and other health professionals in tailoring multiple health behavior change interventions to prevent cancer among rural women.

Authors
Noonan, D; Dardas, L; Bice-Wigington, T; Sloane, R; Benjamin, R; Choi, SH; Simmons, LA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Dardas, L, Bice-Wigington, T, Sloane, R, Benjamin, R, Choi, SH, and Simmons, LA. "Understanding Multiple Behavioral Risk Factors for Cancer in Rural Women." Public health nursing (Boston, Mass.) 33.6 (November 2016): 519-528.
PMID
27377312
Source
epmc
Published In
Public Health Nursing
Volume
33
Issue
6
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
519
End Page
528
DOI
10.1111/phn.12282

Unintended Effects of a Smoking Cessation Intervention on Latino Fathers' Binge Drinking In Early Postpartum.

Authors
Noonan, D; Lyna, P; Fish, LJ; Bilheimer, AK; Gordon, KC; Roberson, P; Gonzalez, A; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Lyna, P, Fish, LJ, Bilheimer, AK, Gordon, KC, Roberson, P, Gonzalez, A, and Pollak, KI. "Unintended Effects of a Smoking Cessation Intervention on Latino Fathers' Binge Drinking In Early Postpartum." Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine 50.4 (August 2016): 622-627.
PMID
26868270
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
50
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
622
End Page
627
DOI
10.1007/s12160-016-9781-0

Are lifestyle behavioral factors associated with health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma?

The objective of the current study was to determine whether survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma are meeting select American Cancer Society (ACS) health-related guidelines for cancer survivors, as well as to examine relationships between these lifestyle factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and posttraumatic stress (PTS).A cross-sectional sample of 566 survivors of NHL was identified from the tumor registries of 2 large academic medical centers. Respondents were surveyed regarding physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, body weight, tobacco use, HRQoL using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, and PTS using the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder CheckList-Civilian form. Lifestyle cluster scores were generated based on whether individuals met health guidelines and multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate relationships between lifestyle behaviors and HRQoL scores and PTS scores.Approximately 11% of participants met all 4 ACS health recommendations. Meeting all 4 healthy recommendations was related to better physical and mental QoL (standardized regression coefficient [β], .57 [P<.0001] and β, .47 [P = .002]) and to lower PTS scores (β, -0.41; P = .01).Survivors of NHL who met more ACS health-related guidelines appeared to have better HRQoL and less PTS. Unfortunately, many survivors are not meeting these guidelines, which could impact their overall well-being and longevity.

Authors
Spector, DJ; Noonan, D; Mayer, DK; Benecha, H; Zimmerman, S; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
Spector, DJ, Noonan, D, Mayer, DK, Benecha, H, Zimmerman, S, and Smith, SK. "Are lifestyle behavioral factors associated with health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma?." Cancer 121.18 (September 2015): 3343-3351.
PMID
26036473
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
121
Issue
18
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
3343
End Page
3351
DOI
10.1002/cncr.29490

Effectiveness of the tobacco tactics program for psychiatric inpatient veterans: an implementation study.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the inpatient, nurse-administered Tobacco Tactics program for patients admitted for psychiatric conditions in two Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals compared to a control hospital.This is a subgroup analysis of data from the inpatient tobacco tactics effectiveness trial, which was a longitudinal, pre- post-nonrandomized comparison design with 6-month follow-up in the three large Veterans Integrated Service Networks (VISN) 11 hospitals.Six-month self-reported quit rates for patients admitted for psychiatric conditions increased from 3.5% pre-intervention to 10.2% post-intervention compared to a decrease in self-reported quit rates in the control hospital (12% pre-intervention to 1.6% post-intervention). There was significant improvement in self-reported quit rates for the pre- versus post-intervention time periods in the Detroit and Ann Arbor intervention sites compared to the Indianapolis control site (P=0.01) and cotinine results were in the same direction.The implementation of the Tobacco Tactics intervention has the potential to significantly decrease smoking and smoking-related morbidity and mortality among smokers admitted to VA hospitals for psychiatric disorders.

Authors
Duffy, SA; Noonan, D; Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA; Ronis, DL; Ewing, LA; Waltje, AH; Dalack, GW; Smith, PM; Carmody, TP; Hicks, T; Hermann, C
MLA Citation
Duffy, SA, Noonan, D, Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA, Ronis, DL, Ewing, LA, Waltje, AH, Dalack, GW, Smith, PM, Carmody, TP, Hicks, T, and Hermann, C. "Effectiveness of the tobacco tactics program for psychiatric inpatient veterans: an implementation study." Archives of psychiatric nursing 29.2 (April 2015): 120-126.
PMID
25858205
Source
epmc
Published In
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing
Volume
29
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
120
End Page
126
DOI
10.1016/j.apnu.2014.12.002

Effectiveness of the tobacco tactics program for psychiatric inpatient veterans: An implementation study

© 2015.Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the inpatient, nurse-administered Tobacco Tactics program for patients admitted for psychiatric conditions in two Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals compared to a control hospital. Methods: This is a subgroup analysis of data from the inpatient tobacco tactics effectiveness trial, which was a longitudinal, pre- post-nonrandomized comparison design with 6-month follow-up in the three large Veterans Integrated Service Networks (VISN) 11 hospitals. Results: Six-month self-reported quit rates for patients admitted for psychiatric conditions increased from 3.5% pre-intervention to 10.2% post-intervention compared to a decrease in self-reported quit rates in the control hospital (12% pre-intervention to 1.6% post-intervention). There was significant improvement in self-reported quit rates for the pre- versus post-intervention time periods in the Detroit and Ann Arbor intervention sites compared to the Indianapolis control site (P = 0.01) and cotinine results were in the same direction. Conclusion: The implementation of the Tobacco Tactics intervention has the potential to significantly decrease smoking and smoking-related morbidity and mortality among smokers admitted to VA hospitals for psychiatric disorders.

Authors
Duffy, SA; Noonan, D; Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA; Ronis, DL; Ewing, LA; Waltje, AH; Dalack, GW; Smith, PM; Carmody, TP; Hicks, T; Hermann, C
MLA Citation
Duffy, SA, Noonan, D, Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA, Ronis, DL, Ewing, LA, Waltje, AH, Dalack, GW, Smith, PM, Carmody, TP, Hicks, T, and Hermann, C. "Effectiveness of the tobacco tactics program for psychiatric inpatient veterans: An implementation study." Archives of Psychiatric Nursing 29.2 (January 1, 2015): 120-126.
Source
scopus
Published In
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing
Volume
29
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
120
End Page
126
DOI
10.1016/j.apnu.2014.12.002

Web-enhanced tobacco tactics with telephone support versus 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line intervention for operating engineers: randomized controlled trial.

Novel interventions tailored to blue collar workers are needed to reduce the disparities in smoking rates among occupational groups.The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and usage of the Web-enhanced "Tobacco Tactics" intervention targeting operating engineers (heavy equipment operators) compared to the "1-800-QUIT-NOW" telephone line.Operating engineers (N=145) attending one of 25 safety training sessions from 2010 through 2012 were randomized to either the Tobacco Tactics website with nurse counseling by phone and access to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line, which provided an equal number of phone calls and NRT. The primary outcome was self-reported 7-day abstinence at 30-day and 6-month follow-up. The outcomes were compared using chi-square tests, t tests, generalized mixed models, and logistic regression models.The average age was 42 years and most were male (115/145, 79.3%) and white (125/145, 86.2%). Using an intent-to-treat analysis, the Tobacco Tactics website group showed significantly higher quit rates (18/67, 27%) than the 1-800-QUIT NOW group (6/78, 8%) at 30-day follow-up (P=.003), but this difference was no longer significant at 6-month follow-up. There were significantly more positive changes in harm reduction measures (quit attempts, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and nicotine dependence) at both 30-day and 6-month follow-up in the Tobacco Tactics group compared to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW group. Compared to participants in the 1-800-QUIT NOW group, significantly more of those in the Tobacco Tactics website group participated in the interventions, received phone calls and NRT, and found the intervention helpful.The Web-enhanced Tobacco Tactics website with telephone support showed higher efficacy and reach than the 1-800-QUIT-NOW intervention. Longer counseling sessions may be needed to improve 6-month cessation rates.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01124110; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01124110 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6TfKN5iNL).

Authors
Choi, SH; Waltje, AH; Ronis, DL; Noonan, D; Hong, O; Richardson, CR; Meeker, JD; Duffy, SA
MLA Citation
Choi, SH, Waltje, AH, Ronis, DL, Noonan, D, Hong, O, Richardson, CR, Meeker, JD, and Duffy, SA. "Web-enhanced tobacco tactics with telephone support versus 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line intervention for operating engineers: randomized controlled trial." Journal of medical Internet research 16.11 (November 20, 2014): e255-.
PMID
25447467
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Volume
16
Issue
11
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
e255
DOI
10.2196/jmir.3375

A Theoretical Examination of Waterpipe Smoking in College Students

Authors
Noonan, D; Yan, G; Kulbok, P
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Yan, G, and Kulbok, P. "A Theoretical Examination of Waterpipe Smoking in College Students." Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse 23.4 (July 2014): 224-229.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse
Volume
23
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
224
End Page
229
DOI
10.1080/1067828X.2013.786931

Differences in risk perception and quit rates among hospitalized veteran pipe smokers, cigarette smokers, and dual users.

This study examined differences in perception of risk, hospitalization quit rates, and 6-month quit rates between pipe smokers, cigarettes smokers, and those who smoke both in the Department of Veterans Affairs.Before implementing the Tobacco Tactics intervention (among 811 smokers), smoking quit rates were determined (among N = 465 patients with 6-month follow-up data available) in three Midwestern hospitals during 2006-2010.Pipe smokers were less likely to believe that they needed to quit tobacco, that quitting would be difficult, and that quitting tobacco was important to their health. Eighty-five percent of pipe smokers remained tobacco free throughout their hospital stay compared with 59% of dual smokers and 60% of cigarette smokers (p < .10). Twenty-three percent of pipe smokers remained tobacco free at 6 months compared with 19% of dual users and 7% of cigarette smokers (p < .10).Although pipe smokers had higher spontaneous quit rates than dual smokers and cigarette smokers, the perception of the risk of smoking was less among pipe smokers suggesting a need to expel the myths surrounding pipe smoking and increase cessation efforts.

Authors
Noonan, D; Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA; Duffy, SA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA, and Duffy, SA. "Differences in risk perception and quit rates among hospitalized veteran pipe smokers, cigarette smokers, and dual users." Journal of addictions nursing 25.2 (April 2014): 89-93.
PMID
24905759
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Addictions Nursing
Volume
25
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
89
End Page
93
DOI
10.1097/jan.0000000000000028

MULTIPLE BEHAVIORAL RISK FOR CHRONIC DISEASE IN RURALWOMEN

Authors
Noonan, D; Bice-Wigington, T; Huddleston-Casas, C; Sloane, R; Simmons, LA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Bice-Wigington, T, Huddleston-Casas, C, Sloane, R, and Simmons, LA. "MULTIPLE BEHAVIORAL RISK FOR CHRONIC DISEASE IN RURALWOMEN." ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE 47 (April 2014): S222-S222.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
47
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
S222
End Page
S222

Factors associated with smokeless tobacco use and dual use among blue collar workers

Objectives: To examine demographic and substance use factors associated with exclusive smokeless tobacco use (SLT) and dual use of both cigarettes and SLT among blue-collar workers. Design and Sample: This cross-sectional study used data from the United States 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The sample (n = 5,392) was restricted to respondents who were classified as blue collar workers by self-report primary job title. Measures: Various demographic variables, tobacco use and other substance use variables were examined. Results: Respondents in this blue collar sample were 87% male and 64% Non-Hispanic White. An estimated 9.5% (SE = 0.6) of respondents were current SLT users; 5.3% (SE = 0.4) were current exclusive SLT users, and 4.2% (SE = 0.4) were current dual users of both SLT and cigarettes. Factors related to exclusive SLT use were gender, marital status, age, race/ethnicity, type of blue-collar occupation, current binge drinking, and current marijuana use. Significant factors related to dual use were gender, marital status, age, race/ethnicity, type of blue-collar occupation, current cigar smoking, current binge drinking, and current illicit drug use. Conclusions: Rates of SLT use and dual use are high among U.S. blue-collar workers, indicating a need for targeted, workplace cessation interventions. These interventions may also serve as a gateway for addressing other substance use behaviors in this population. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Noonan, D; Duffy, SA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, and Duffy, SA. "Factors associated with smokeless tobacco use and dual use among blue collar workers." Public Health Nursing 31.1 (January 1, 2014): 19-27.
Source
scopus
Published In
Public Health Nursing
Volume
31
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
19
End Page
27
DOI
10.1111/phn.12095

Factors associated with smokeless tobacco use and dual use among blue collar workers.

OBJECTIVES: To examine demographic and substance use factors associated with exclusive smokeless tobacco use (SLT) and dual use of both cigarettes and SLT among blue-collar workers. DESIGN AND SAMPLE: This cross-sectional study used data from the United States 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The sample (n = 5,392) was restricted to respondents who were classified as blue collar workers by self-report primary job title. MEASURES: Various demographic variables, tobacco use and other substance use variables were examined. RESULTS: Respondents in this blue collar sample were 87% male and 64% Non-Hispanic White. An estimated 9.5% (SE = 0.6) of respondents were current SLT users; 5.3% (SE = 0.4) were current exclusive SLT users, and 4.2% (SE = 0.4) were current dual users of both SLT and cigarettes. Factors related to exclusive SLT use were gender, marital status, age, race/ethnicity, type of blue-collar occupation, current binge drinking, and current marijuana use. Significant factors related to dual use were gender, marital status, age, race/ethnicity, type of blue-collar occupation, current cigar smoking, current binge drinking, and current illicit drug use. CONCLUSIONS: Rates of SLT use and dual use are high among U.S. blue-collar workers, indicating a need for targeted, workplace cessation interventions. These interventions may also serve as a gateway for addressing other substance use behaviors in this population.

Authors
Noonan, D; Duffy, SA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, and Duffy, SA. "Factors associated with smokeless tobacco use and dual use among blue collar workers." Public Health Nurs 31.1 (January 2014): 19-27.
PMID
24266896
Source
pubmed
Published In
Public Health Nursing
Volume
31
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
19
End Page
27
DOI
10.1111/phn.12095

Utility of biochemical verification of tobacco cessation in the Department of Veterans Affairs

Research on the validity of self-report tobacco use has varied by the population studied and has yet to be examined among smokers serviced by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of returning a biochemical urine test and the specificity and sensitivity of self-reported tobacco use status compared to biochemical verification. This was a sub-analysis of the larger Tobacco Tactics research study, a pre-/post-non-randomized control design study to implement and evaluate a smoking cessation intervention in three large VA hospitals. Inpatient smokers completed baseline demographic, health history and tobacco use measures. Patients were sent a follow-up survey at six-months to assess tobacco use and urine cotinine levels. A total of 645 patients returned six-month surveys of which 578 also returned a urinary cotinine strip at six-months. Multivariate analysis of the predictors of return rate revealed those more likely to return biochemical verification of their smoking status were younger, more likely to be thinking about quitting smoking, have arthritis, and less likely to have heart disease. The sensitivity and specificity of self-report tobacco use were 97% (95% confidence interval = 0.95-0.98) and 93% (95% confidence interval = 0.84-0.98) respectively. The misclassification rate among self-reported quitters was 21%. The misclassification rate among self-reported tobacco users was 1%. The sensitivity and specificity of self-report tobacco use were high among veteran smokers, yet among self-report quitters that misclassification rate was high at 21% suggesting that validating self-report tobacco measures is warranted in future studies especially in populations that are prone to misclassification. © 2012.

Authors
Noonan, D; Jiang, Y; Duffy, SA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Jiang, Y, and Duffy, SA. "Utility of biochemical verification of tobacco cessation in the Department of Veterans Affairs." Addictive Behaviors 38.3 (2013): 1792-1795.
PMID
23261494
Source
scival
Published In
Addictive Behaviors
Volume
38
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1792
End Page
1795
DOI
10.1016/j.addbeh.2012.11.006

Factors associated with perceptions of hookah addictiveness and harmfulness among young adults

Authors
Noonan, D; Patrick, ME
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, and Patrick, ME. "Factors associated with perceptions of hookah addictiveness and harmfulness among young adults." Substance Abuse 34.1 (2013): 83-85.
PMID
23327511
Source
scival
Published In
Substance Abuse
Volume
34
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
83
End Page
85
DOI
10.1080/08897077.2012.718251

A descriptive study of waterpipe smoking among college students

Purpose: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine waterpipe smoking and beliefs about waterpipe smoking in a sample of college students from a public university in Virginia. Data sources: A web-based survey was sent to 1000 undergraduate students recruiting them to participate in the study. Measures from the investigator-developed Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) Waterpipe Questionnaire were used to capture belief-based components of the TRA related to waterpipe use. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the prevalence of waterpipe smoking and beliefs associated with waterpipe smoking. Conclusions: Of the sample (n = 223), 71% of males and 52% of females reporting ever smoking tobacco using a waterpipe and 22% of males and 5% of females reporting current waterpipe smoking. Of the sample, 28% of males and 10% of females were current cigarette smokers and 25% of males and 10% of females were current marijuana users. Common beliefs associated with waterpipe smoking are also presented. Implications for practice: Nurse practitioners working with college students need to be aware of the multiple forms of tobacco that students may engage in. They also should be aware of the common beliefs about waterpipe smoking. This information is useful when targeting and counseling patients about alternative tobacco products like waterpipe smoking. © 2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

Authors
Noonan, D
MLA Citation
Noonan, D. "A descriptive study of waterpipe smoking among college students." Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners 25.1 (2013): 11-15.
PMID
23279274
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
Volume
25
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
11
End Page
15
DOI
10.1111/j.1745-7599.2012.00781.x

Predictors of obesity in Michigan operating engineers

Blue collar workers are at risk for obesity. Little is known about obesity in Operating Engineers, a group of blue collar workers, who operate heavy earthmoving equipment in road building and construction. Therefore, 498 Operating Engineers in Michigan were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional survey to determine variables related to obesity in this group. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine personal, psychological, and behavioral factors predicting obesity. Approximately 45% of the Operating Engineers screened positive for obesity, and another 40% were overweight. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age, male sex, higher numbers of self-reported comorbidities, not smoking, and low physical activity levels were significantly associated with obesity among Operating Engineers. Operating Engineers are significantly at risk for obesity, and workplace interventions are needed to address this problem. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.

Authors
Duffy, SA; Cohen, KA; Choi, SH; McCullagh, MC; Noonan, D
MLA Citation
Duffy, SA, Cohen, KA, Choi, SH, McCullagh, MC, and Noonan, D. "Predictors of obesity in Michigan operating engineers." Journal of Community Health 37.3 (2012): 619-625.
PMID
22005801
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Community Health
Volume
37
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
619
End Page
625
DOI
10.1007/s10900-011-9492-1

Beliefs and norms associated with smoking tobacco using a waterpipe among college students

This web-based, cross-sectional survey guided by the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), examined behavioral beliefs and normative beliefs associated with smoking tobacco using a waterpipe in a sample of 223 undergraduate college students. Beliefs and norms associated with waterpipe smoking intention were captured using the investigator-developed TRA Waterpipe Questionnaire. Significant behavioral beliefs that contributed to the prediction of smoking intentions included smoking tobacco with a waterpipe "will taste pleasant" and "will allow me to have a good time with my friends." Significant norms that emerged were perceived approval of waterpipe smoking from friends and significant others. Current smoking status, both waterpipe and cigarette, also contributed to the prediction of smoking intention. The variables of the TRA represent prime targets for intervention and provide useful information that can be used to tailor waterpipe prevention messages. © 2012 International Nurses Society on Addictions.

Authors
Noonan, D; Kulbok, PA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, and Kulbok, PA. "Beliefs and norms associated with smoking tobacco using a waterpipe among college students." Journal of Addictions Nursing 23.2 (2012): 123-128.
PMID
22471778
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Addictions Nursing
Volume
23
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
123
End Page
128
DOI
10.3109/10884602.2012.669420

Smokeless tobacco use among operating engineers

Workers in blue collar occupations have been shown to have higher rates of smokeless tobacco (ST) use compared to other occupational groups. Guided by the Health Promotion Model, the purpose of this study was to understand various factors that predict ST use in Operating Engineers. A cross-sectional design was used to determine variables related to ST use among Operating Engineers. Engineers (N 498) were recruited during their 3-day apprentice certification course to participate in the study. Logistic regression was used to assess the associations between personal, psychological and behavioral characteristics associated with ST use. Past month ST use was reported among 13% of operating engineers surveyed. Multivariate analysis showed that younger age and lower rates of past month cigarette use were significantly associated with ST use, while higher rates of problem drinking were marginally associated with ST use. Operating Engineers are at high risk for using ST products with rates in this sample well over the national average. Work site interventions, which have shown promise in other studies, may be useful in decreasing ST use among this population. © 2012 International Nurses Society on Addictions.

Authors
Noonan, D; Duffy, SA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, and Duffy, SA. "Smokeless tobacco use among operating engineers." Journal of Addictions Nursing 23.2 (2012): 132-136.
PMID
22471777
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Addictions Nursing
Volume
23
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
132
End Page
136
DOI
10.3109/10884602.2012.669421

Risk of smoking and receipt of cessation services among veterans with mental disorders

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine rates of smoking and receipt of provider recommendations to quit smoking among patients with mental disorders treated in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) treatment settings. Methods: The authors conducted a secondary analysis of the yearly, cross-sectional 2007 Veterans Health Administration Outpatient Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (N=224,193). Logistic regression was used to determine the independent association of mental health diagnosis and the dependent variables of smoking and receipt of provider recommendations to quit smoking. Results: Patients with mental disorders had greater odds of smoking, compared with those without mental disorders (p<.05). Those with various mental disorders reported similar rates of receiving services (more than 60% to 80% reported receiving selected services), compared with those without these disorders, except that those with schizophrenia had more than 30% lower odds of receiving advice to quit smoking from their physicians (p<.05). Moreover, those who had co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder or substance use disorders had significantly greater odds of reporting that they received advice to quit, recommendations for medications, and physician discussions of quitting methods, compared with those without these disorders (p<.05). Older patients, male patients, members of ethnic minority groups, those who were unmarried, those who were disabled or unemployed, and those living in rural areas had lower odds of receiving selected services (p<.05). Conclusions: The majority of patients with mental disorders served by the VA reported receiving cessation services, yet their smoking rates remained high, and selected groups were at risk for receiving fewer cessation services, suggesting the continued need to disseminate cessation services.

Authors
Duffy, SA; Kilbourne, AM; Austin, KL; Dalack, GW; Woltmann, EM; Waxmonsky, J; Noonan, D
MLA Citation
Duffy, SA, Kilbourne, AM, Austin, KL, Dalack, GW, Woltmann, EM, Waxmonsky, J, and Noonan, D. "Risk of smoking and receipt of cessation services among veterans with mental disorders." Psychiatric Services 63.4 (2012): 325-332.
PMID
22337005
Source
scival
Published In
Psychiatric Services
Volume
63
Issue
4
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
325
End Page
332
DOI
10.1176/appi.ps.201100097

Protocol of a randomized controlled trial of the Tobacco Tactics website for operating engineers

Background: Recent research indicates that 35 percent of blue-collar workers in the US currently smoke while only 20 percent of white-collar workers smoke. Over the last year, we have been working with heavy equipment operators, specifically the Local 324 Training Center of the International Union of Operating Engineers, to study the epidemiology of smoking, which is 29% compared to 21% among the general population. For the current study funded by the National Cancer Institute (1R21CA152247-01A1), we have developed the Tobacco Tactics website which will be compared to the state supported 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line. Outcome evaluation will compare those randomized to the Tobacco Tactics web-based intervention to those randomized to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW control condition on: a) 30-day and 6-month quit rates; b) cotinine levels; c) cigarettes smoked/day; d) number of quit attempts; and e) nicotine addiction. Process evaluation will compare the two groups on the: a) contacts with intervention; b) medications used; c) helpfulness of the nurse/coach; and d) willingness to recommend the intervention to others. Methods/Design: This will be a randomized controlled trial (N = 184). Both interventions will be offered during regularly scheduled safety training at Local 324 Training Center of the International Union of Operating Engineers and both will include optional provision of over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy and the same number of telephone contacts. However, the Tobacco Tactics website has graphics tailored to Operating Engineers, tailored cessation feedback from the website, and follow up nurse counseling offered by multimedia options including phone and/or email, and/or e-community. Primary Analysis of Aim 1 will be conducted by using logistic regression to compare smoking habits (e.g., quit rates) of those in the intervention arm to those in the control arm. Primary analyses for Aim 2 will compare process measures (e.g., medications used) between the two groups by linear, logistic, and Poisson regression. Discussion: Dissemination of an efficacious work-site, web-based smoking cessation intervention has the potential to substantially impact cancer rates among this population. Based on the outcome of this smaller study, wider scale testing in conjunction with the International Environment Technology Testing Center which services Operating Engineers across North America (including US, Mexico, and Canada) will be conducted. © 2012 Li et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Authors
Duffy, SA; Ronis, DL; Richardson, C; Waltje, AH; Ewing, LA; Noonan, D; Hong, O; Meeker, JD
MLA Citation
Duffy, SA, Ronis, DL, Richardson, C, Waltje, AH, Ewing, LA, Noonan, D, Hong, O, and Meeker, JD. "Protocol of a randomized controlled trial of the Tobacco Tactics website for operating engineers." BMC Public Health 12.1 (2012).
PMID
22569211
Source
scival
Published In
BMC Public Health
Volume
12
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
DOI
10.1186/1471-2458-12-335

Development of the Tobacco Tactics logo: From thumb prints to press

Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the development and evaluation of the image-based Veterans Affairs (VA) Tobacco Tactics program logo and campaign character using principles of social marketing. Methods: Four cross-sectional surveys with open- and closed-ended questions were used to gather participant demographic information, smoking behavior, and feedback on the development and evaluation of the Tobacco Tactics program logo and campaign character. The first 3 surveys were conducted with 229 veterans, visitors, and staff to obtain feedback for the final logo and character choice. The fourth survey was conducted with 47 inpatient veteran smokers to evaluate the Tobacco Tactics manual which was illustrated with the logo and campaign character. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses comparing demographic characteristics and tobacco use variables to opinions about the pictures for each round of testing were computed. Results: After three rounds of testing to modify the logo and character choices based on participant feedback and survey data, the bulldog logo was chosen to represent the VA Tobacco Tactics program as it was viewed as strong and tough by the majority of participants. About 80% of the participants rated the manual highly on items such as logo, color, and pictures/illustrations. Almost 90% said they would recommend the manual to someone trying to quit smoking. Conclusion: Social marketing techniques that include consumer feedback to develop appealing tobacco cessation campaigns can increase consumer engagement and enhance the development of compelling tobacco cessation campaigns to compete with the influential marketing of tobacco companies. © 2012 Ewing et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Authors
Ewing, LA; Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA; Noonan, D; Duffy, SA
MLA Citation
Ewing, LA, Karvonen-Gutierrez, CA, Noonan, D, and Duffy, SA. "Development of the Tobacco Tactics logo: From thumb prints to press." Tobacco Induced Diseases 10.1 (2012).
Source
scival
Published In
Tobacco Induced Diseases
Volume
10
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
DOI
10.1186/1617-9625-10-6

Intention to smoke tobacco using a waterpipe among students in a Southeastern U.S. College

Objective: Guided by the Theory of Reasoned Action, this study examined the association of behavioral beliefs, attitudes, normative beliefs, and subjective norms with waterpipe tobacco smoking intention in college students. Design and Sample: A cross-sectional design was used. A Web-based survey was sent to a random sample of 1,000 undergraduate students from a public institution in the southeast to recruit participants. Measures: The Theory of Reasoned Action Waterpipe Questionnaire, a modified version of the Fishbein-Ajzen-Hanson Questionnaire, was used to capture modal constructs of the Theory of Reasoned Action related to waterpipe use. Cronbach's α coefficients for the scales of the Theory of Reasoned Action Waterpipe Questionnaire ranged from .76 to .95. Results: Of the sample (n=223), 13.5% currently smoked a waterpipe and 61% had ever done so. Using multiple regression, attitudes, behavioral beliefs, and subjective norms were associated with intention to smoke a waterpipe in the next 3 months and collectively explained 35% of the variance in intention. The full model, which included all the constructs of the Theory of Reasoned Action, demographic variables, and tobacco use variables, explained 83% of the variance in intention to smoke a waterpipe in the next 3 months. Conclusions: This study provides valuable information that may be used to target students at risk for waterpipe smoking and serves as a starting point in developing theoretically driven interventions to prevent waterpipe smoking. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Noonan, D; Kulbok, P; Yan, G
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, Kulbok, P, and Yan, G. "Intention to smoke tobacco using a waterpipe among students in a Southeastern U.S. College." Public Health Nursing 28.6 (2011): 494-502.
PMID
22092459
Source
scival
Published In
Public Health Nursing
Volume
28
Issue
6
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
494
End Page
502
DOI
10.1111/j.1525-1446.2011.00945.x

Getting to the Patient First: Smokeless Tobacco Advertisements That Target Smokers

Authors
Noonan, D
MLA Citation
Noonan, D. "Getting to the Patient First: Smokeless Tobacco Advertisements That Target Smokers." Journal for Nurse Practitioners 7.8 (2011): 697-698.
Source
scival
Published In
The Journal for Nurse Practitioners
Volume
7
Issue
8
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
697
End Page
698
DOI
10.1016/j.nurpra.2011.07.017

Mother-daughter communication: A protective factor for nonsmoking among rural adolescents

Rural adolescent females are at-risk for smoking at rates nearly equal to those of boys, and girls are at increased risk for smoking related diseases, reproductive, and pregnancy problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate protective factors related to nonsmoking in African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) female adolescents residing in rural tobacco-producing counties in Virginia. This qualitative study targeted rural female adolescent nonsmokers and their parents because of the importance of promoting tobacco-free, healthy lifestyles into adulthood. Participants were 18 adolescent female nonsmokers 16-17 years of age (6 AA and 12 CA) and 10 mothers (5 AA and 5 CA). Semi-structured questionnaires based on a health behavior framework and communication theory guided four in-depth group interviews of female adolescents and two group interviews of mothers. Protective factors identified by youth and parent groups were: frequent and open communication about smoking dangers and risks, mothers' intentionality in messages about nonsmoking; repeated patterns of oversight of daughter's activities and friends; mothers' pride in their daughters; close knit family of support; and daughter's explicit desire not to disappoint their parents. Directions for future research include the nature and type of female adolescents' communication with parents and a parallel study of protective factors of tobacco-free rural male adolescents to design parent-child communication interventions for tobacco prevention. © 2010 International Nurses Society on Addictions.

Authors
Kulbok, PA; Bovbjerg, V; Meszaros, PS; Botchwey, N; Hinton, I; Anderson, NLR; Rhee, H; Bond, DC; Noonan, D; Hartman, K
MLA Citation
Kulbok, PA, Bovbjerg, V, Meszaros, PS, Botchwey, N, Hinton, I, Anderson, NLR, Rhee, H, Bond, DC, Noonan, D, and Hartman, K. "Mother-daughter communication: A protective factor for nonsmoking among rural adolescents." Journal of Addictions Nursing 21.2-3 (2010): 69-78.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Addictions Nursing
Volume
21
Issue
2-3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
69
End Page
78
DOI
10.3109/10884601003777604

Exemptions for hookah bars in clean indoor air legislation: A public health concern

Popularity of waterpipe smoking or hookah smoking in the United States has been growing for some time now among youth and young adults. Currently, many cities and states have exemptions that allow hookah bars to remain in operation despite the passage of clean indoor air legislation. From a public health perspective this is concerning for many reasons. One public health concern with the increase in popularity of this type of tobacco use is the associated health effects. Another concern is that hookah smoke produces a sweet smelling aroma making it less obvious that patrons and employees of hookah bars are inhaling noxious fumes from mainstream smoke, as well as the toxins from the charcoal that is used to heat the tobacco. The purpose of this paper is to discuss smoke-free air legislation in relation to hookah use, the public health implications of exempting hookah bars from current smoke-free legislation, and implications for the public health nurse in protecting the public from the dangers of second-hand smoke, and limiting this new form of tobacco use. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Noonan, D
MLA Citation
Noonan, D. "Exemptions for hookah bars in clean indoor air legislation: A public health concern." Public Health Nursing 27.1 (2010): 49-53.
PMID
20055968
Source
scival
Published In
Public Health Nursing
Volume
27
Issue
1
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
49
End Page
53
DOI
10.1111/j.1525-1446.2009.00826.x

New tobacco trends: Waterpipe (hookah) smoking and implications for healthcare providers

Purpose: To inform healthcare providers about waterpipe smoking, a new trend in tobacco use that is gaining popularity among adolescents and young adults. Data sources: American Lung Association Tobacco Policy Alert on Waterpipe Smoking, World Health Organization Tobacco Regulation Advisory Note on Waterpipe Smoking, and pertinent publications available in the literature. Conclusions: Waterpipe smoking is a new trend in tobacco use that is associated with multiple health problems, including addiction. Healthcare providers should be aware of new tobacco trends that may affect patients, such as waterpipe smoking, that are potential gateways to nicotine addiction. Implications for practice: Tobacco comes in many forms, all of which are addicting. Healthcare providers must be knowledgeable about new forms of tobacco to address all types of tobacco use with patients. Healthcare providers also have a responsibility to educate patients about the health risks inherent in these products to help prevent the long-lasting problem of nicotine addiction. © 2009 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

Authors
Noonan, D; Kulbok, PA
MLA Citation
Noonan, D, and Kulbok, PA. "New tobacco trends: Waterpipe (hookah) smoking and implications for healthcare providers." Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners 21.5 (2009): 258-260.
PMID
19432909
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
Volume
21
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
258
End Page
260
DOI
10.1111/j.1745-7599.2009.00402.x
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