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Oliver, Jason A

Overview:

Dr. Oliver is a clinical psychologist by training and is currently pursuing licensure in North Carolina. He received his graduate degree from the University of South Florida and completed his doctoral internship at Yale University School of Medicine. His research focuses on understanding of addictive behaviors, with a particular emphasis on tobacco use. His research program is heavily translational and includes both basic and clinical components. He has experience conducting human laboratory research, clinical trials and policy research. Long-term, he aims to identify new neural and behavioral markers for addiction that can serve as targets for novel interventions. 

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addictions
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2015

Ph.D. — University of South Florida

Grants:

Nicotine Withdrawal and Reward Processing: Connecting Neurobiology to Real-World Behavior

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addictions
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
April 01, 2017
End Date
March 31, 2022

Neurobehavioral substrates of propranolol's effects on drug cue reactivity

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addictions
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 01, 2017
End Date
August 31, 2018

Investigating the Effects of E-Cigarette Television Ads on Smokers

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addictions
AwardedBy
Research Triangle Institute International
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2016
End Date
January 31, 2018

Awards:

New Investigator Award for Best Abstract. Society for Research on Nicotine & Tobacco.

Type
National
Awarded By
Society for Research on Nicotine & Tobacco
Date
January 01, 2016

Dissertation Research Award. American Psychological Association.

Type
National
Awarded By
American Psychological Association
Date
January 01, 2013

Graduate Research Scholarship. American Psychological Foundation.

Type
National
Awarded By
American Psychological Foundation
Date
January 01, 2013

Outstanding Graduate Student Research Award. Moffitt Cancer Center.

Type
University
Awarded By
Moffitt Cancer Center
Date
January 01, 2013

Student Grant Competition Winner. Association for Psychological Science.

Type
National
Awarded By
Association for Psychological Science
Date
January 01, 2013

Research Training Fellowship. Society for Psychophysiological Research.

Type
National
Awarded By
Society for Psychophysiological Research
Date
January 01, 2012

Student Merit Award. Research Society on Alcoholism.

Type
National
Awarded By
Research Society on Alcoholism
Date
January 01, 2012

Passed Doctoral Comprehensive Exams with Honors. Department of Psychology, University of South Florida.

Type
Department
Awarded By
Department of Psychology, University of South Florida
Date
January 01, 2011

2nd Place, Student Poster Competition. Division 50, American Psychological Association.

Type
National
Awarded By
Division 50, American Psychological Association
Date
January 01, 2009

APA Psychological Science Graduate Superstars. American Psychological Association.

Type
National
Awarded By
American Psychological Association
Date
January 01, 2009

NIDA/NIAAA Early Career Investigator Travel Award. American Psychological Association.

Type
National
Awarded By
American Psychological Association
Date
January 01, 2009

"Spirit of Moffitt" Team Award. Moffitt Cancer Center.

Type
University
Awarded By
Moffitt Cancer Center
Date
January 01, 2008

Publications:

Nicotine Withdrawal Induces Neural Deficits in Reward Processing.

Nicotine withdrawal reduces neurobiological responses to nonsmoking rewards. Insight into these reward deficits could inform the development of targeted interventions. This study examined the effect of withdrawal on neural and behavioral responses during a reward prediction task.Smokers (N = 48) attended two laboratory sessions following overnight abstinence. Withdrawal was manipulated by having participants smoke three regular nicotine (0.6 mg yield; satiation) or very low nicotine (0.05 mg yield; withdrawal) cigarettes. Electrophysiological recordings of neural activity were obtained while participants completed a reward prediction task that involved viewing four combinations of predictive and reward-determining stimuli: (1) Unexpected Reward; (2) Predicted Reward; (3) Predicted Punishment; (4) Unexpected Punishment. The task evokes a medial frontal negativity that mimics the phasic pattern of dopaminergic firing in ventral tegmental regions associated with reward prediction errors.Nicotine withdrawal decreased the amplitude of the medial frontal negativity equally across all trial types (p < .001). Exploratory analyses indicated withdrawal increased time to initiate the next trial following unexpected punishment trials (p < .001) and response time on reward trials during withdrawal was positively related to nicotine dependence (p < .001).Nicotine withdrawal had equivocal impact across trial types, suggesting reward processing deficits are unlikely to stem from changes in phasic dopaminergic activity during prediction errors. Effects on tonic activity may be more pronounced. Pharmacological interventions directly targeting the dopamine system and behavioral interventions designed to increase reward motivation and responsiveness (eg, behavioral activation) may aid in mitigating withdrawal symptoms and potentially improving smoking cessation outcomes.Findings from this study indicate nicotine withdrawal impacts reward processing signals that are observable in smokers' neural activity. This may play a role in the subjective aversive experience of nicotine withdrawal and potentially contribute to smoking relapse. Interventions that address abnormal responding to both pleasant and unpleasant stimuli may be particularly effective for alleviating nicotine withdrawal.

Authors
Oliver, JA; Evans, DE; Addicott, MA; Potts, GF; Brandon, TH; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, Evans, DE, Addicott, MA, Potts, GF, Brandon, TH, and Drobes, DJ. "Nicotine Withdrawal Induces Neural Deficits in Reward Processing." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 19.6 (June 2017): 686-693.
PMID
28371807
Source
epmc
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
19
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
686
End Page
693
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntx067

Post-operative smoking statusPost-operative smoking status in lung and head and neck cancer patients: Association with depressive symptomatology, pain and fatigue in lung and head and neck cancer patients

Authors
Bloom, EL; Oliver, JA; Sutton, SK; Brandon, TH; Jacobsen, PB; Simmons, VN
MLA Citation
Bloom, EL, Oliver, JA, Sutton, SK, Brandon, TH, Jacobsen, PB, and Simmons, VN. "Post-operative smoking statusPost-operative smoking status in lung and head and neck cancer patients: Association with depressive symptomatology, pain and fatigue in lung and head and neck cancer patients." Psycho-Oncology 24 (December 1, 2015): 1012-1019.
Source
manual
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
24
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1012
End Page
1019

Does Extended Pre Quit Bupropion Aid in Extinguishing Smoking Behavior?

Understanding the mechanisms by which bupropion promotes smoking cessation may lead to more effective treatment. To the extent that reduced smoking reinforcement is one such mechanism, a longer duration of pre quit bupropion treatment should promote extinction of smoking behavior. We evaluated whether 4 weeks of pre quit bupropion (extended run-in) results in greater pre quit reductions in smoking rate and cotinine and, secondarily, greater short-term abstinence, than standard 1 week of pre quit bupropion (standard run-in).Adult smokers (n = 95; 48 females) were randomized to a standard run-in group (n = 48; 3-week placebo, then 1-week bupropion pre quit) or an extended run-in group (4-week pre quit bupropion; n = 47). Both groups received group behavioral counseling and 7 weeks of post quit bupropion. Smoking rate (and craving, withdrawal, and subjective effects) was collected daily during the pre quit period; biochemical data (cotinine and carbon monoxide) were collected at study visits.During the pre quit period, the extended run-in group exhibited a greater decrease in smoking rate, compared to the standard run-in group, interaction p = .03. Cigarette craving and salivary cotinine followed a similar pattern, though the latter was evident only among women. Biochemically verified 4-week continuous abstinence rates were higher in the extended run-in group (53%) than the standard run-in group (31%), p = .033.The extended use of bupropion prior to a quit attempt reduces smoking behavior during the pre quit period and improved short-term abstinence rates. The data are consistent with an extinction-of-reinforcement model and support further investigation of extended run-in bupropion therapy for smoking cessation.

Authors
Hawk, LW; Ashare, RL; Rhodes, JD; Oliver, JA; Cummings, KM; Mahoney, MC
MLA Citation
Hawk, LW, Ashare, RL, Rhodes, JD, Oliver, JA, Cummings, KM, and Mahoney, MC. "Does Extended Pre Quit Bupropion Aid in Extinguishing Smoking Behavior?." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 17.11 (November 2015): 1377-1384.
PMID
25589680
Source
epmc
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
17
Issue
11
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1377
End Page
1384
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntu347

Post-operative smoking status in lung and head and neck cancer patients: association with depressive symptomatology, pain, and fatigue.

An estimated 35-50% of lung and head and neck cancer patients are smoking at diagnosis; most try to quit; however, a substantial proportion resumes smoking. As cancer treatments improve, attention to the effects of continued smoking on quality of life in the survivorship period is increasing. The current study examines if smoking abstinence following surgical treatment is associated with better quality of life.Participants were 134 patients with head and neck or lung cancer who received surgical treatment. Smoking status and indices of quality of life (depressive symptoms, fatigue, and pain) were assessed at the time of surgery (baseline) and at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months post-surgery. Analyses were performed using a generalized estimating equations approach. A series of models examined the correlation between smoking status and post-surgery quality of life while adjusting for demographics, clinical variables, and baseline smoking status and quality of life.Continuous post-surgery abstinence was associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms and fatigue; however, the relationship with fatigue became nonsignificant after adjusting for baseline fatigue and income. There was no significant relationship observed between smoking status and pain.Findings add to a growing literature showing that smoking cessation is not associated with detrimental effects on quality of life and may have beneficial effects, particularly with regard to depressive symptoms. Such information can be used to motivate smoking cessation and continued abstinence among cancer patients and increase provider comfort in recommending cessation.

Authors
Bloom, EL; Oliver, JA; Sutton, SK; Brandon, TH; Jacobsen, PB; Simmons, VN
MLA Citation
Bloom, EL, Oliver, JA, Sutton, SK, Brandon, TH, Jacobsen, PB, and Simmons, VN. "Post-operative smoking status in lung and head and neck cancer patients: association with depressive symptomatology, pain, and fatigue." Psycho-oncology 24.9 (September 2015): 1012-1019.
PMID
25257853
Source
epmc
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
24
Issue
9
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1012
End Page
1019
DOI
10.1002/pon.3682

Statewide dissemination of an evidence-based practice using Breakthrough Series Collaboratives

Authors
Lang, JM; Franks, RP; Epstein, C; Stover, C; Oliver, JA
MLA Citation
Lang, JM, Franks, RP, Epstein, C, Stover, C, and Oliver, JA. "Statewide dissemination of an evidence-based practice using Breakthrough Series Collaboratives." Children and Youth Services Review 55 (August 2015): 201-209.
Source
crossref
Published In
Children and Youth Services Review
Volume
55
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
201
End Page
209
DOI
10.1016/j.childyouth.2015.06.005

Cortical activity differs during nicotine deprivation versus satiation in heavy smokers.

Research suggests that nicotine deprivation among smokers is associated with lesser resting cortical activity (i.e., greater power density in theta and alpha-1 EEG bands and lesser power in beta bands). These changes in cortical activity may be indicative of withdrawal-related cognitive deficits, yet the markers of differences in cortical activity are not well-established.The objective of the study was to clarify the EEG frequency bands affected by nicotine deprivation and assess prospective moderators.One hundred twenty-four heavy smokers visited the laboratory on two occasions following overnight smoking/nicotine deprivation. Prior to collecting 3 min of resting EEG data, participants smoked two very low nicotine cigarettes (<0.05 mg nicotine yield) at one session and two moderate nicotine cigarettes (0.60 mg nicotine yield) at the other.Theta and alpha-1 band (4-7 and 8-10 Hz) was greater in the very low nicotine (deprivation) relative to higher nicotine (satiation) condition. There were no condition differences in the beta-1 and beta-2 bands (14-20 and 21-30 Hz).Greater slow wave resting EEG may serve as a reliable marker of decreased cortical activity during smoking deprivation and, in turn, of withdrawal-related deficits in cognitive functioning. This research may inform the development of adjunct strategies for smoking cessation.

Authors
Evans, DE; Sutton, SK; Oliver, JA; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Evans, DE, Sutton, SK, Oliver, JA, and Drobes, DJ. "Cortical activity differs during nicotine deprivation versus satiation in heavy smokers." Psychopharmacology 232.11 (June 2015): 1879-1885.
PMID
25491928
Source
epmc
Published In
Psychopharmacology
Volume
232
Issue
11
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1879
End Page
1885
DOI
10.1007/s00213-014-3821-x

Cognitive manifestations of drinking-smoking associations: preliminary findings with a cross-primed Stroop task.

Despite tremendous growth in research examining the role of cognitive bias in addictive behaviors, scant consideration has been paid to the close association between smoking and drinking behavior. This study sought to determine whether an association between smoking and drinking could be observed at an implicit level using a novel cognitive bias task, as well as characterize the relationship between performance on this task and clinically relevant variables (i.e., heaviness of use/dependence).Individuals (N=51) with a range of smoking and drinking patterns completed a modified Stroop task in which participants identified the color of drinking, smoking and neutral words that were each preceded by drinking, smoking or neutral picture primes. Participants also provided information regarding the heaviness of their smoking and drinking behavior and completed self-report measures of alcohol and nicotine dependence.Response times to smoking and drinking words were significantly slowed following the presentation of either smoking or drinking picture primes. This effect did not differ across subgroups. However, the strength of the coupling between smoking and drinking prime effects was greater among heavier drinkers, who also exhibited a concordant looser coupling of the effects of smoking and drinking primes on smoking words.Associations between smoking and drinking can be observed at an implicit level and may be strongest for heavier drinkers.

Authors
Oliver, JA; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, and Drobes, DJ. "Cognitive manifestations of drinking-smoking associations: preliminary findings with a cross-primed Stroop task." Drug and alcohol dependence 147 (February 2015): 81-88.
PMID
25561386
Source
epmc
Published In
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume
147
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
81
End Page
88
DOI
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.12.010

Prison tobacco policies and litigation

Authors
Oliver, JA; Cipriano, T
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, and Cipriano, T. "Prison tobacco policies and litigation." Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law 43.1 (January 1, 2015): 110-112.
Source
scopus
Published In
The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Volume
43
Issue
1
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
110
End Page
112

Mentoring the earliest-career psychologists: Role models, knowledge of internship issues, and attitudes toward research and science.

Authors
Parent, MC; Oliver, JA
MLA Citation
Parent, MC, and Oliver, JA. "Mentoring the earliest-career psychologists: Role models, knowledge of internship issues, and attitudes toward research and science." Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 46.1 (2015): 55-61.
Source
crossref
Published In
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume
46
Issue
1
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
55
End Page
61
DOI
10.1037/a0038839

Nicotine interactions with low-dose alcohol: pharmacological influences on smoking and drinking motivation.

An extensive literature documents a close association between cigarette and alcohol use. The joint pharmacological effects of alcohol and nicotine on smoking and drinking motivation may help explain this relationship. This experiment was designed to test the separate and combined pharmacological effects of nicotine and a low dose of alcohol (equivalent to 1-2 standard drinks) on substance use motivation using a double-blind and fully crossed within-subjects design. Participants (N = 87) with a wide range of smoking and drinking patterns completed 4 counterbalanced experimental sessions during which they consumed an alcohol (male: 0.3g/kg; female: 0.27g/kg) or placebo beverage and smoked a nicotine (.6 mg) or placebo cigarette. Outcome measures assessed the impact of drug administration (alcohol or nicotine) on craving to smoke, craving to drink, affect, and liking of the beverage and cigarette. Results indicated that combined administration produced higher cravings to smoke for the entire sample, as well as higher cravings to drink among women and lighter drinkers. Heavier users of either alcohol or cigarettes also exhibited enhanced sensitivity to the effects of either drug in isolation. Separate, but not interactive, effects of alcohol and nicotine on mood were observed as well as both same-drug and cross-drug effects on beverage and cigarette liking. Together, these findings support the notion that the interactive pharmacological effects of nicotine and low doses of alcohol play an important role in motivating contemporaneous use and suggest roles for cross-reinforcement and cross-tolerance in the development and maintenance of alcohol and nicotine use and dependence.

Authors
Oliver, JA; Blank, MD; Van Rensburg, KJ; MacQueen, DA; Brandon, TH; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, Blank, MD, Van Rensburg, KJ, MacQueen, DA, Brandon, TH, and Drobes, DJ. "Nicotine interactions with low-dose alcohol: pharmacological influences on smoking and drinking motivation." Journal of abnormal psychology 122.4 (November 2013): 1154-1165.
PMID
24364618
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume
122
Issue
4
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1154
End Page
1165
DOI
10.1037/a0034538

Nicotine deprivation influences P300 markers of cognitive control.

Studies suggest that reduced cognitive control due to nicotine withdrawal may have a critical role in promoting tobacco use. The P3 family of event-related brain potential (ERP) components is thought to serve as markers of cognitive control processes. Unfortunately, existing research that examines the effects of nicotine deprivation on P3 amplitude has been marred by small sample sizes and other design limitations. The present study sought to determine the effects of nicotine deprivation on P3b and P3a amplitudes, which index task relevant target detection and orienting responses to novelty, respectively. A secondary aim was to examine self-reported trait cognitive control as a moderator of nicotine deprivation-induced reductions in P3b and P3a amplitudes. In all, 121 nicotine-dependent smokers attended two experimental sessions following 12-h smoking/nicotine deprivation. In a counterbalanced manner, participants smoked nicotine cigarettes during one session and placebo cigarettes during the other session. Findings indicated that nicotine deprivation reduced P3b amplitude (p<0.00001) during a three-stimulus oddball task independent of trait cognitive control. In contrast, nicotine deprivation reduced P3a only among participants who scored lower on measures of trait cognitive control. Implications for conceptualizing risk for nicotine dependence, and its treatment, are discussed.

Authors
Evans, DE; Maxfield, ND; Van Rensburg, KJ; Oliver, JA; Jentink, KG; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Evans, DE, Maxfield, ND, Van Rensburg, KJ, Oliver, JA, Jentink, KG, and Drobes, DJ. "Nicotine deprivation influences P300 markers of cognitive control." Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 38.12 (November 2013): 2525-2531.
PMID
23807239
Source
epmc
Published In
Neuropsychopharmacology (Nature)
Volume
38
Issue
12
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
2525
End Page
2531
DOI
10.1038/npp.2013.159

Deprivation, Craving, and Affect: Intersecting Constructs in Addiction

Authors
Oliver, JA; MacQueen, DA; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, MacQueen, DA, and Drobes, DJ. "Deprivation, Craving, and Affect: Intersecting Constructs in Addiction." Principles of Addiction. August 27, 2013. 395-403.
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
395
End Page
403
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-12-398336-7.00041-3

Deprivation, affect, and craving: Intersecting constructs in addiction

Authors
Oliver, JA; MacQueen, DA; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, MacQueen, DA, and Drobes, DJ. "Deprivation, affect, and craving: Intersecting constructs in addiction." Principles of Addiction: Comprehensive Addictive Behaviors and Disorders. New York, NY: Academic Press, June 1, 2013. (Chapter)
Source
manual
Publish Date
2013

Predictors of smoking relapse in patients with thoracic cancer or head and neck cancer.

Cancer patients who continue smoking are at increased risk for adverse outcomes including reduced treatment efficacy and poorer survival rates. Many patients spontaneously quit smoking after diagnosis; however, relapse is understudied. The goal of this study was to evaluate smoking-related, affective, cognitive, and physical variables as predictors of smoking after surgical treatment among patients with lung cancer and head and neck cancer.A longitudinal study was conducted with 154 patients (57% male) who recently quit smoking. Predictor variables were measured at baseline (ie, time of surgery); smoking behavior was assessed at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Analyses of 7-day point prevalence were performed using a Generalized Estimating Equations approach.Relapse rates varied significantly depending on presurgery smoking status. At 12 months after surgery, 60% of patients who smoked during the week prior to surgery had resumed smoking versus only 13% who were abstinent prior to surgery. Smoking rates among both groups were relatively stable across the 4 follow-ups. For patients smoking before surgery (N = 101), predictors of smoking relapse included lower quitting self-efficacy, higher depression proneness, and greater fears about cancer recurrence. For patients abstinent before surgery (N = 53), higher perceived difficulty quitting and lower cancer-related risk perceptions predicted smoking relapse.Efforts to encourage early cessation at diagnosis, and increased smoking relapse-prevention efforts in the acute period following surgery, may promote long-term abstinence. Several modifiable variables are identified to target in future smoking relapse-prevention interventions for cancer patients.

Authors
Simmons, VN; Litvin, EB; Jacobsen, PB; Patel, RD; McCaffrey, JC; Oliver, JA; Sutton, SK; Brandon, TH
MLA Citation
Simmons, VN, Litvin, EB, Jacobsen, PB, Patel, RD, McCaffrey, JC, Oliver, JA, Sutton, SK, and Brandon, TH. "Predictors of smoking relapse in patients with thoracic cancer or head and neck cancer." Cancer 119.7 (April 2013): 1420-1427.
PMID
23280005
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
119
Issue
7
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1420
End Page
1427
DOI
10.1002/cncr.27880

Visual search and attentional bias for smoking cues: the role of familiarity.

Despite decades of work, the relationship between drug cues and actual drug use remains unclear. One promising area of research that may help explain this disconnect is the role of cognitive processing of drug cues, including attentional bias. This study utilized a visual search task that has previously been used to examine attentional bias in anxiety and eating disorders, but was modified to assess attentional bias for smoking cues. The task was completed by 106 participants (42.5% female), divided among three groups: smokers who continued smoking ad libitum, smokers who had abstained for 12 hours, and nonsmokers. An attentional bias for smoking stimuli was observed for both the initial orienting and maintenance subcomponents of attention. However, maintenance bias depended heavily upon the type of neutral stimuli used for comparison. Neither orienting nor maintenance bias differed across groups, indicating that these effects were not limited to smokers. Critically, the strongest predictor of attentional bias for smoking cues was previous environmental exposure to tobacco smoke. This raises questions about whether the traditional interpretation of attentional bias as an index of the incentive-motivational value of smoking cues is appropriate. Future empirical and theoretical work on smoking-related attentional bias should give greater consideration to the role that environmental exposure may play in its development.

Authors
Oliver, JA; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, and Drobes, DJ. "Visual search and attentional bias for smoking cues: the role of familiarity." Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology 20.6 (December 2012): 489-496.
PMID
22889041
Source
epmc
Published In
Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume
20
Issue
6
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
489
End Page
496
DOI
10.1037/a0029519

Outdoor smoking ban at a cancer center: attitudes and smoking behavior among employees and patients.

Policies restricting indoor worksite tobacco use began being implemented more than a decade ago. More recently, the scope of these policies has been expanding to outdoors, with hospitals leading the trend in restricting smoking throughout their grounds. However, research on the effects such bans have on employees is scarce. The purpose of the current study was to examine the impact of a campus-wide smoking ban on employees and patients at a cancer center. Employees completed anonymous questionnaires during the months before (n = 607; 12% smokers) and 3 months after the ban implementation (n = 511; 10% smokers). Patients (n = 278; 23% smokers) completed an anonymous questionnaire preban. Results showed that 86% of nonsmokers, 20% of employees who smoke, and 57% of patients who smoke supported the ban. More than 70% of smokers were planning or thinking about quitting at both time points and nearly one-third were interested in cessation services following the ban. Before the ban, 32% expected the ban to have a negative effect on job performance and 41% thought their smoking before and after work would increase. Postban, 22% reported a negative impact on job performance, 35% increased smoking before and after work, and 7% quit. Overall, these data revealed an overwhelming support for an outdoor smoking ban by nonsmoker employees and patients. Although a majority of employee smokers opposed the ban, a significant proportion was interested in cessation. Compared with preban expectations, a lower proportion experienced negative effects postban. Findings suggest a need for worksite cessation programs to capitalize on the window of opportunity created by tobacco bans, while also addressing concerns about effects on work performance.

Authors
Unrod, M; Oliver, JA; Heckman, BW; Simmons, VN; Brandon, TH
MLA Citation
Unrod, M, Oliver, JA, Heckman, BW, Simmons, VN, and Brandon, TH. "Outdoor smoking ban at a cancer center: attitudes and smoking behavior among employees and patients." Journal of public health management and practice : JPHMP 18.5 (September 2012): E24-E31.
PMID
22836544
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Public Health Management and Practice
Volume
18
Issue
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
E24
End Page
E31
DOI
10.1097/phh.0b013e31822d4bb5

Effects of divalproex on smoking cue reactivity and cessation outcomes among smokers achieving initial abstinence.

Divalproex, a GABA agonist, may be a useful agent in the treatment of tobacco dependence. Cue reactivity assessment paradigms are ideally suited to explore basic mechanisms underlying the pharmacological effects of medications that purport to have efficacy for smoking cessation. Our primary goal in the current study was to examine the effects of divalproex on in-treatment reactivity to smoking-relevant and affective cues, and to determine if these reactions were predictive of posttreatment smoking behavior. There were 120 nicotine dependent smokers enrolled in an 8-week double-blind clinical trial and randomly assigned to either divalproex or placebo conditions. Of these, 72 smokers (60% female) who achieved a minimal level of abstinence underwent an in-treatment cue reactivity assessment. Contrary to expectations, divalproex was associated with greater craving and arousal during smoking cue presentation. Divalproex also inhibited cardiovascular response to pleasant cues. Although no significant differences in cessation-related outcomes between divalproex- and placebo-treated participants were observed, cue-elicited craving to smoke predicted end-of-treatment and posttreatment smoking rates. These findings suggest that in-treatment cue reactivity assessment may proactively and dynamically inform ongoing treatment as well as provide a tool for screening potential medications for smoking cessation.

Authors
Ditre, JW; Oliver, JA; Myrick, H; Henderson, S; Saladin, ME; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Ditre, JW, Oliver, JA, Myrick, H, Henderson, S, Saladin, ME, and Drobes, DJ. "Effects of divalproex on smoking cue reactivity and cessation outcomes among smokers achieving initial abstinence." Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology 20.4 (August 2012): 293-301.
PMID
22468897
Source
epmc
Published In
Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume
20
Issue
4
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
293
End Page
301
DOI
10.1037/a0027789

Varenicline effects on craving, cue reactivity, and smoking reward.

Varenicline is an α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist that has been found to be effective for treating tobacco dependence. However, the subjective and behavioral mediators of its efficacy are not known.Using multiple sessions of laboratory-based assessment, this double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment was designed to test if varenicline reduced both tonic and cue-provoked tobacco cravings, and if it attenuated perceived reward from smoking.Participants in the present analysis include 100 smokers who were scheduled for three assessment sessions: at baseline, before receiving medication; at mid-run-in, 5-7 days after beginning medication; and after full dosage was reached, 12-15 days. Following overnight abstinence, each session included assessment of tonic craving, reactivity (including craving) to smoking cues, expected value of a cigarette, smoking behavior, and self-reported reward following smoking.Varenicline, compared to placebo, reduced tonic craving, cue-provoked craving by the final assessment, the expected value of cigarettes, number of puffs and time spent smoking, and self-reported reward (i.e., satisfaction) from smoking.Results showing that varenicline reduced tonic craving levels and perceived reward from smoking are consistent with reports from clinical trials, strengthening the evidence in support of these subjective mechanisms of action. This is the first placebo-controlled study to demonstrate that varenicline reduced cue-provoked cravings, thereby offering another potential mediator of its therapeutic effects. Findings may aid in the development of more targeted interventions for tobacco dependence.

Authors
Brandon, TH; Drobes, DJ; Unrod, M; Heckman, BW; Oliver, JA; Roetzheim, RC; Karver, SB; Small, BJ
MLA Citation
Brandon, TH, Drobes, DJ, Unrod, M, Heckman, BW, Oliver, JA, Roetzheim, RC, Karver, SB, and Small, BJ. "Varenicline effects on craving, cue reactivity, and smoking reward." Psychopharmacology 218.2 (November 2011): 391-403.
PMID
21559801
Source
epmc
Published In
Psychopharmacology
Volume
218
Issue
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
391
End Page
403
DOI
10.1007/s00213-011-2327-z

The smoking N-back: a measure of biased cue processing at varying levels of cognitive load.

INTRODUCTION: Recent cognitive models of drug addiction have emphasized attentional bias to drug-related cues. This bias manifests as increased accessibility to affect-laden drug-related content relative to less emotionally evocative stimuli and ideation. We examined whether biased processing of smoking-related content would differentially affect performance on a cognitive task as a function of smoking status and task complexity. METHODS: Twenty-one smokers and 15 nonsmokers completed increasingly difficult 1-, 2-, and 3-back versions of the Smoking N-back task. RESULTS: There were no reaction time effects that included smoking status nor was there an effect for accuracy on the 1-back task. However, smokers showed poorer accuracy on matched trials relative to nonmatched trials for smoking words on the 2- and 3-back tasks, which involve more effortful cognitive processing. Among nonsmokers, this effect was present within the 3-back condition only. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that cognitive bias to drug-related cues may be modulated by task complexity. Future research on cognitive bias should better account for this factor. Additional research will be needed to validate these findings by controlling for various potential confounds (e.g., nicotine withdrawal, task fatigue) as well as determine the clinical relevance of cognitive bias across varying levels of task complexity.

Authors
Evans, DE; Craig, C; Oliver, JA; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Evans, DE, Craig, C, Oliver, JA, and Drobes, DJ. "The smoking N-back: a measure of biased cue processing at varying levels of cognitive load." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 13.2 (February 2011): 88-93.
PMID
21127029
Source
epmc
Published In
Nicotine and Tobacco Research (OUP)
Volume
13
Issue
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
88
End Page
93
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntq214

Nicotine Withdrawal

Authors
Oliver, JA; Drobes, DJ
MLA Citation
Oliver, JA, and Drobes, DJ. "Nicotine Withdrawal." Encyclopedia of Drugs, Alcohol & Addictive Behaviors. Ed. P Korsmeyer and H Kranzler. Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan, June 1, 2008. (Chapter)
Source
manual
Publish Date
2008

Predictors of smoking relapse in thoracic and head and neck cancer patients

Authors
Simmons, VN; Litvin, EB; Jacobsen, PB; Patel, R; McCaffrey, J; Oliver, JA; Sutton, SK; Brandon, TH
MLA Citation
Simmons, VN, Litvin, EB, Jacobsen, PB, Patel, R, McCaffrey, J, Oliver, JA, Sutton, SK, and Brandon, TH. "Predictors of smoking relapse in thoracic and head and neck cancer patients." Cancer 119: 1420-1427.
Source
manual
Published In
Cancer
Volume
119
Start Page
1420
End Page
1427

Varenicline effects on craving, cue reactivity and smoking reward

Authors
Brandon, TH; Drobes, DJ; Unrod, M; Heckman, BW; Oliver, JA; Roetzheim, RC; Karver, SB; Small, BJ
MLA Citation
Brandon, TH, Drobes, DJ, Unrod, M, Heckman, BW, Oliver, JA, Roetzheim, RC, Karver, SB, and Small, BJ. "Varenicline effects on craving, cue reactivity and smoking reward." Psychopharmacology 218.391-403.
Source
manual
Published In
Psychopharmacology
Volume
218
Issue
391-403
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Research Areas:

  • Alcohol
  • Cognition
  • Drug addiction
  • Evoked potentials (Electrophysiology)
  • Functional Neuroimaging
  • Nicotine
  • Psychophysiology
  • Reward