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Olsen, Elise Arline

Overview:



Dr. Olsen is director of the Duke Dermatopharmacology Study Center. This clinical trials unit, started in 1983 by Dr. Olsen, has been involved in over 110 clinical studies for dermatological indications. The studies have included both studies with pharmaceutical company support as well as those that have been initiated and carried out by Dr. Olsen with her private clinic patients serving as the study participants. The main foci of Dr. Olsen's work, and she has been Principal Investigator in 109 of these studies, have been hair disorders and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Those studies involving alopecia have mainly focused on androgenetic alopecia, in both men and women, and alopecia areata. The cutaneous T-cell lymphoma work has involved multiple study centers in a cooperative effort and have included both oncological treatment trials as well as efforts to establish a database. Dr. Olsen serves as a frequent consultant to pharmaceutical companies in areas of hair research and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

The Dermatopharmacology Study Center (DSC) staff is well versed in the recruitment of subjects and in the carrying out of various clinical trials. The DSC also includes a Clinical Trials Assistant who is experienced in IRB, FDA and pharmaceutical company interactions and study documentation. Other areas of dermatology, other than hair disorders and CTCL that the DSC has been involved in, include psoriasis, photoaging, atopic dermatitis, acne, fungal infections, and condyloma. In addition, Dr. Olsen has designed, carried out, and prepared for FDA submission, studies involving the Trade Commission and has carried out an FDA-initiated study of topical steroids.

Positions:

Professor of Dermatology

Dermatology
School of Medicine

Professor in Medicine

Medicine, Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1978

M.D. — Baylor University

Grants:

A Controlled Double Blind Research Study Of The Bioavailab

Administered By
Dermatology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
November 01, 1988
End Date
October 01, 1989

Publications:

Primary cutaneous aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphomas: reappraisal of a provisional entity in the 2016 WHO classification of cutaneous lymphomas.

Primary cutaneous CD8-positive aggressive epidermotropic T-cell lymphoma is a rare and poorly characterized variant of cutaneous lymphoma still considered a provisional entity in the latest 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Cutaneous lymphomas. We sought to better characterize and provide diagnostic and therapeutic guidance of this rare cutaneous lymphoma. Thirty-four patients with a median age of 77 years (range 19-89 years) presented primarily with extensive annular necrotic plaques or tumor lesions with frequent mucous membrane involvement. The 5-year survival was 32% with a median survival of 12 months. A subset of 17 patients had a prodrome of chronic patches prior to the development of aggressive ulcerative lesions. We identified cases with lack of CD8 or αβ T-cell receptor expression yet with similar clinical and pathological presentation. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation provided partial or complete remissions in 5/6 patients. We recommend the term primary cutaneous aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma as this more broad designation better describes this clinical-pathologic presentation, which allows the inclusion of cases with CD8 negative and/or αβ/γδ T-cell receptor chain double-positive or double-negative expression. We have identified early skin signs of chronic patch/plaque lesions that are often misdiagnosed as eczema, psoriasis, or mycosis fungoides. Our experience confirms the poor prognosis of this entity and highlights the inefficacy of our standard therapies with the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in selected cases.Modern Pathology advance online publication,27 January 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2016.240.

Authors
Guitart, J; Martinez-Escala, ME; Subtil, A; Duvic, M; Pulitzer, MP; Olsen, EA; Kim, E; Rook, AH; Samimi, SS; Wood, GS; Girardi, M; Junkins-Hopkins, J; Ivan, DS; Selim, MA; Sable, KA; Virmani, P; Pincus, LB; Tetzlaff, MT; Kim, J; Kim, YH
MLA Citation
Guitart, J, Martinez-Escala, ME, Subtil, A, Duvic, M, Pulitzer, MP, Olsen, EA, Kim, E, Rook, AH, Samimi, SS, Wood, GS, Girardi, M, Junkins-Hopkins, J, Ivan, DS, Selim, MA, Sable, KA, Virmani, P, Pincus, LB, Tetzlaff, MT, Kim, J, and Kim, YH. "Primary cutaneous aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphomas: reappraisal of a provisional entity in the 2016 WHO classification of cutaneous lymphomas." Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc (January 27, 2017).
PMID
28128277
Source
epmc
Published In
Modern Pathology
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1038/modpathol.2016.240

SALT II: A new take on the Severity of Alopecia Tool (SALT) for determining percentage scalp hair loss.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Canfield, D
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, and Canfield, D. "SALT II: A new take on the Severity of Alopecia Tool (SALT) for determining percentage scalp hair loss." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 75.6 (December 2016): 1268-1270.
PMID
27846957
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
75
Issue
6
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1268
End Page
1270
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2016.08.042

The state and consequences of dermatology drug prices in the United States.

Authors
Albrecht, J; Lebwohl, M; Asgari, MM; Bennett, DD; Cook, A; Evans, CC; Green, LJ; Hodge, JA; Kourosh, AS; Maloney, ME; Howard, LM; Olsen, EA; Rosenberg, SP; Rubin, A; Stough, DB; Taylor, SC; Brod, BA
MLA Citation
Albrecht, J, Lebwohl, M, Asgari, MM, Bennett, DD, Cook, A, Evans, CC, Green, LJ, Hodge, JA, Kourosh, AS, Maloney, ME, Howard, LM, Olsen, EA, Rosenberg, SP, Rubin, A, Stough, DB, Taylor, SC, and Brod, BA. "The state and consequences of dermatology drug prices in the United States." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 75.3 (September 2016): 603-605.
PMID
27423978
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
75
Issue
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
603
End Page
605
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2016.03.053

Basal cell skin cancer, version 1.2016: Clinical practice guidelines in oncology

© JNCCN-Journal of tha National Comprehensive Cancer Network.Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common cancer, with a higher incidence than all other malignancies combined. Although it is rare to metastasize, patients with multiple or frequently recurring BCC can suffer substantial comorbidity and be difficult to manage. Assessment of risk is a key element of management needed to inform treatment selection. The overall management of BCC primarily consists of surgical approaches, with radiation therapy as an alternate or adjuvant option. Many superficial therapies for BCC have been explored and continue to be developed, including topicals, cryosurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Two hedgehog pathway inhibitors were recently approved by the FDA for systemic treatment of advanced and metastatic BCC, and others are in development. The NCCN Guidelines for Basal Cell Skin Cancer, published in full herein, include recommendations for selecting among the various surgical approaches based on patient-, lesion-, and disease-specific factors, as well as guidance on when to use radiation therapy, superficial therapies, and hedgehog pathway inhibitors.

Authors
Bichakjian, CK; Olencki, T; Aasi, SZ; Alam, M; Andersen, JS; Berg, D; Bowen, GM; Cheney, RT; Daniels, GA; Glass, LF; Grekin, RC; Grossman, K; Higgins, SA; Ho, AL; Lewis, KD; Lydiatt, DD; Nehal, KS; Nghiem, P; Olsen, EA; Schmults, CD; Sekulic, A; Shaha, AR; Thorstad, WL; Tuli, M; Urist, MM; Wang, TS; Wong, SL; Zic, JA; Hoffmann, KG; Engh, A
MLA Citation
Bichakjian, CK, Olencki, T, Aasi, SZ, Alam, M, Andersen, JS, Berg, D, Bowen, GM, Cheney, RT, Daniels, GA, Glass, LF, Grekin, RC, Grossman, K, Higgins, SA, Ho, AL, Lewis, KD, Lydiatt, DD, Nehal, KS, Nghiem, P, Olsen, EA, Schmults, CD, Sekulic, A, Shaha, AR, Thorstad, WL, Tuli, M, Urist, MM, Wang, TS, Wong, SL, Zic, JA, Hoffmann, KG, and Engh, A. "Basal cell skin cancer, version 1.2016: Clinical practice guidelines in oncology." JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network 14.5 (May 1, 2016): 574-597. (Review)
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN
Volume
14
Issue
5
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
574
End Page
597

Guidelines for phototherapy of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A consensus statement of the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium.

Ultraviolet light (UVL) is a long established treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), subtypes of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Treatments have traditionally included broadband, narrowband ultraviolet B light (UVB) and psoralen plus ultraviolet A light photochemotherapy (PUVA), but more recently, treatment options have expanded to include UVA1 and excimer laser. UVL is used either as monotherapy or as an adjuvant to systemic therapy, demonstrating efficacy in many cases that equal or surpass systemic medications. Despite its utility and duration of use, the current practice of using UVL guidelines for psoriasis to treat patients with MF/SS is problematic because the goals of prolonging survival and preventing disease progression are unique to CTCL compared to psoriasis.We sought to develop separate guidelines for phototherapy for MF/SS for both clinical practice and for clinical trials.Literature review and cutaneous lymphoma expert consensus group recommendations.This paper reviews the published literature for UVB and UVA/PUVA in MF/SS and suggests practical standardized guidelines for their use.New standardization of phototherapy.These guidelines should allow the comparison of results with phototherapy in MF/SS across different stages of patients, centers, and in combination with other agents in practice and in clinical trials.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Hodak, E; Anderson, T; Carter, JB; Henderson, M; Cooper, K; Lim, HW
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Hodak, E, Anderson, T, Carter, JB, Henderson, M, Cooper, K, and Lim, HW. "Guidelines for phototherapy of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A consensus statement of the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 74.1 (January 2016): 27-58. (Review)
PMID
26547257
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
74
Issue
1
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
27
End Page
58
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2015.09.033

Disseminated Cutaneous Cytomegalovirus Infection Following Total Body Electron Beam Irradiation for Mycosis Fungoides.

Authors
Kim, JK; Ahmad, A; Selim, MA; Olsen, EA; Cardones, AR
MLA Citation
Kim, JK, Ahmad, A, Selim, MA, Olsen, EA, and Cardones, AR. "Disseminated Cutaneous Cytomegalovirus Infection Following Total Body Electron Beam Irradiation for Mycosis Fungoides." JAMA dermatology 151.12 (December 2015): 1380-1381.
PMID
26266470
Source
epmc
Published In
JAMA Dermatology
Volume
151
Issue
12
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1380
End Page
1381
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.2233

Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Staging of Cutaneous Lymphoma.

Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that manifest in the skin. Their diagnosis is complex and based on clinical lesion type and evaluation of findings on light microscopic examination, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis of representative skin biopsies. The evaluation, classification, and staging system is unique for mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the most common subtypes of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) versus the other subtypes of Non-MF/Non-SS CTCL and the subtypes of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Since current treatment is stage-based, it is particularly important that the correct diagnosis and stage be ascertained initially. The purpose of this article is to review the current evaluation, diagnosis, classification, staging, assessment techniques, and response criteria for the various types of both T-cell and B-cell PCLs.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Staging of Cutaneous Lymphoma." Dermatologic clinics 33.4 (October 2015): 643-654. (Review)
PMID
26433839
Source
epmc
Published In
Dermatologic Clinics
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
643
End Page
654
DOI
10.1016/j.det.2015.06.001

Cutaneous Lymphoma.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Cutaneous Lymphoma." Dermatologic clinics 33.4 (October 2015): xiii-.
PMID
26433854
Source
epmc
Published In
Dermatologic Clinics
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
xiii
DOI
10.1016/j.det.2015.07.001

Final results of a multicenter phase II study of the purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) inhibitor forodesine in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) (Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome).

Forodesine is a potent inhibitor of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) that leads to intracellular accumulation of deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) in T and B cells, resulting in apoptosis. Forodesine has demonstrated impressive antitumor activity in early phase clinical trials in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL).In this phase II study, patients with CTCL who had already failed three or more systemic therapies were recruited. We investigated the response rate, safety and tolerability of oral forodesine treatment in subjects with cutaneous manifestations of CTCL, stages IB, IIA, IIB, III and IVA. The safety population encompassing all stages was used for analysis of accountability, demographics and safety. The efficacy population differed from the safety population by exclusion of stage IB and IIA patients.All 144 patients had performance status 0-2. The median duration of CTCL from diagnosis was 53 months (5-516 months). The median number of pretreatments was 4 (range: 3-15). No complete remissions were observed. In the efficacy group of patients, 11% achieved partial remission and 50% had stable disease. The median time to response was 56 days and the median duration of response was 191 days. A total of 96% of all treated patients reported one or more adverse events (AEs) and 33% reported a serious AE. The majority of AEs were classified as mild or moderate in severity. The most commonly reported AEs (>10%) were peripheral edema, fatigue, insomnia, pruritus, diarrhea, headache and nausea. Overall eight patients died during the study: five due to sepsis and infections, one due to a second malignancy (esophageal cancer), one due to disease progression and one due to liver failure.Oral forodesine at a dose of 200 mg daily is feasible and shows partial efficacy in this highly selected CTCL population and some durable responses.

Authors
Dummer, R; Duvic, M; Scarisbrick, J; Olsen, EA; Rozati, S; Eggmann, N; Goldinger, SM; Hutchinson, K; Geskin, L; Illidge, TM; Giuliano, E; Elder, J; Kim, YH
MLA Citation
Dummer, R, Duvic, M, Scarisbrick, J, Olsen, EA, Rozati, S, Eggmann, N, Goldinger, SM, Hutchinson, K, Geskin, L, Illidge, TM, Giuliano, E, Elder, J, and Kim, YH. "Final results of a multicenter phase II study of the purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) inhibitor forodesine in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) (Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome)." Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology 25.9 (September 2014): 1807-1812.
PMID
24948692
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
9
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1807
End Page
1812
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdu231

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: what has been achieved, current clues for future research.

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is an inflammatory type of central scalp hair loss seen primarily in women of African descent. The prevalence is unknown, but may vary from 2.7% to 5.7% and increases with age. This review outlines the history and current beliefs and identifies clues for future research for this enigmatic condition. Despite that the cause of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is unknown, research is ongoing. The role of cytokeratins, androgens, genetics, and various possible sources of chronic inflammation in disease pathogenesis remain to be elucidated.

Authors
Ogunleye, TA; McMichael, A; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ogunleye, TA, McMichael, A, and Olsen, EA. "Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: what has been achieved, current clues for future research." Dermatologic clinics 32.2 (April 2014): 173-181.
PMID
24680004
Source
epmc
Published In
Dermatologic Clinics
Volume
32
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
173
End Page
181
DOI
10.1016/j.det.2013.12.005

Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia: What Has Been Achieved, Current Clues for Future Research

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is an inflammatory type of central scalp hair loss seen primarily in women of African descent. The prevalence is unknown, but may vary from 2.7% to 5.7% and increases with age. This review outlines the history and current beliefs and identifies clues for future research for this enigmatic condition. Despite that the cause of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is unknown, research is ongoing. The role of cytokeratins, androgens, genetics, and various possible sources of chronic inflammation in disease pathogenesis remain to be elucidated. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

Authors
Ogunleye, TA; McMichael, A; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ogunleye, TA, McMichael, A, and Olsen, EA. "Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia: What Has Been Achieved, Current Clues for Future Research." Dermatologic Clinics 32.2 (January 1, 2014): 173-181. (Review)
Source
scopus
Published In
Dermatologic Clinics
Volume
32
Issue
2
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
173
End Page
181
DOI
10.1016/j.det.2013.12.005

Red fingers syndrome in a patient with pseudolymphoma.

Authors
Ladizinski, B; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ladizinski, B, and Olsen, EA. "Red fingers syndrome in a patient with pseudolymphoma." J Am Acad Dermatol 68.6 (June 2013): e193-e194. (Letter)
PMID
23680219
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
68
Issue
6
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
e193
End Page
e194
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.11.027

Frontal fibrosing alopecia: a retrospective review of 19 patients seen at Duke University.

BACKGROUND: Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a type of scarring hair loss primarily observed in postmenopausal women and characterized by fronto-tempero-parietal hairline recession, perifollicular erythema, and loss of eyebrows. The incidence is unknown, but the number of women presenting with this condition has significantly increased in recent years. No effective therapy has been established. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to present pertinent demographic and clinical findings of patients with FFA seen at an academic hair loss clinic and their responses to various therapeutic interventions. METHODS: Patients seen at the Duke University Hair Disorders Research and Treatment Center, Durham, NC, between 2004 and 2011 who met FFA inclusion criteria and signed an informed consent form for participation in the Duke University Hair Disorders Research and Treatment Center database were included in this review. RESULTS: Nineteen female patients with FFA met our inclusion criteria, the majority of whom were white and postmenopausal. A number of treatments, including topical and intralesional steroids, antibiotics, and immunomodulators, were used with disappointing results in most patients. However, the majority of patients on dutasteride experienced disease stabilization. LIMITATIONS: This was a retrospective review and outside clinic records were occasionally incomplete. CONCLUSIONS: FFA is an increasingly common form of scarring hair loss, but the origin remains unknown. Without clear understanding of the pathogenesis and evolution of this condition, it is not surprising that treatments to date have been minimally or not effective. At our institution, dutasteride was most effective in halting disease progression, although no therapy was associated with significant hair regrowth.

Authors
Ladizinski, B; Bazakas, A; Selim, MA; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ladizinski, B, Bazakas, A, Selim, MA, and Olsen, EA. "Frontal fibrosing alopecia: a retrospective review of 19 patients seen at Duke University." J Am Acad Dermatol 68.5 (May 2013): 749-755.
PMID
23375454
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
68
Issue
5
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
749
End Page
755
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.09.043

Mycosis fungoides.

Authors
Ladizinski, B; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ladizinski, B, and Olsen, EA. "Mycosis fungoides." Mayo Clin Proc 88.3 (March 2013): e27-.
PMID
23489464
Source
pubmed
Published In
Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume
88
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
e27
DOI
10.1016/j.mayocp.2012.12.009

Efficacy and safety of denileukin diftitox retreatment in patients with relapsed cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Authors
Duvic, M; Martin, AG; Olsen, EA; Fivenson, DP; Prince, HM
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Martin, AG, Olsen, EA, Fivenson, DP, and Prince, HM. "Efficacy and safety of denileukin diftitox retreatment in patients with relapsed cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." LEUKEMIA & LYMPHOMA 54.3 (March 2013): 514-519.
PMID
22891708
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Leukemia & Lymphoma (Informa)
Volume
54
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
514
End Page
519
DOI
10.3109/10428194.2012.720372

Denileukin diftitox for the treatment of CD25 low-expression mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome

In a placebo-controlled study, denileukin diftitox (DD) was effective against cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) expressing CD25. An open-label companion study examined the efficacy and safety of DD in 36 patients with skin biopsies containing < 20% CD25 cells by immunohistochemistry staining (CD25 low expression). Patients received DD 18 μg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days every 3 weeks for up to eight courses. The primary endpoint, overall response rate, was 30.6% (95% confidence interval: 16.3, 48.1), 33.3% for stage IIA or lower disease, and 26.7% for stage IIB or greater disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was > 487 days, and median time to treatment failure was 68.5 days. No difference in PFS by disease stage was observed. The safety profile of DD in CD25 low-expression disease was similar to that in CD25+ disease. These findings suggest that CD25 low expression does not preclude a meaningful clinical response to DD in patients with CTCL. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.

Authors
Prince, HM; Martin, AG; Olsen, EA; Fivenson, DP; Duvic, M
MLA Citation
Prince, HM, Martin, AG, Olsen, EA, Fivenson, DP, and Duvic, M. "Denileukin diftitox for the treatment of CD25 low-expression mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome." Leukemia and Lymphoma 54.1 (2013): 69-75.
PMID
22738414
Source
scival
Published In
Leukemia & Lymphoma (Informa)
Volume
54
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
69
End Page
75
DOI
10.3109/10428194.2012.706286

Topical chemotherapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Positive results of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial testing the efficacy and safety of a novel mechlorethamine, 0.02%, gel in mycosis fungoides

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel mechlorethamine hydrochloride, 0.02%, gel in mycosis fungoides. Design: Randomized, controlled, observer-blinded, multicenter trial comparing mechlorethamine, 0.02%, gel with mechlorethamine, 0.02%, compounded ointment. Mechlorethamine was applied once daily for up to 12 months. Tumor response and adverse events were assessed every month between months 1 and 6 and every 2 months between months 7 and 12. Serum drug levels were evaluated in a subset of patients. Setting: Academic medical or cancer centers. Patients: In total, 260 patients with stage IA to IIA mycosis fungoides who had not used topical mechlorethamine within 2 years and were naive to prior use of topical carmustine therapy. Main Outcome Measures: Response rates of all the patients based on a primary clinical end point (Composite Assessment of Index Lesion Severity) and secondary clinical end points (Modified Severity-Weighted Assessment Tool and time-to-response analyses). Results: Response rates for mechlorethamine gel vs ointment were 58.5% vs 47.7% by the Composite Assessment of Index Lesion Severity and 46.9% vs 46.2% by the Modified Severity-Weighted Assessment Tool. By the Composite Assessment of Index Lesion Severity, the ratio of gel response rate to ointment response rate was 1.23 (95% CI, 0.97-1.55), which met the prespecified criterion for noninferiority. Time-to-response analyses demonstrated superiority of mechlorethamine gel to ointment (P<.01). No drug-related serious adverse events were seen. Approximately 20.3% of enrolled patients in the gel treatment arm and 17.3% of enrolled patients in the ointment treatment arm withdrew because of drugrelated skin irritation. No systemic absorption of the study medication was detected. Conclusion: The use of a novel mechlorethamine, 0.02%, gel in the treatment of patients with mycosis fungoides is effective and safe. © 2013 American Medical Association.

Authors
Lessin, SR; Duvic, M; Guitart, J; Pandya, AG; Strober, BE; Olsen, EA; Hull, CM; Knobler, EH; Rook, AH; Kim, EJ; Naylor, MF; Adelson, DM; Kimball, AB; Wood, GS; Sundram, U; Wu, H; Kim, YH
MLA Citation
Lessin, SR, Duvic, M, Guitart, J, Pandya, AG, Strober, BE, Olsen, EA, Hull, CM, Knobler, EH, Rook, AH, Kim, EJ, Naylor, MF, Adelson, DM, Kimball, AB, Wood, GS, Sundram, U, Wu, H, and Kim, YH. "Topical chemotherapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Positive results of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial testing the efficacy and safety of a novel mechlorethamine, 0.02%, gel in mycosis fungoides." JAMA Dermatology 149.1 (2013): 25-32.
PMID
23069814
Source
scival
Published In
JAMA Dermatology
Volume
149
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
25
End Page
32
DOI
10.1001/2013.jamadermatol.541

Frontal fibrosing alopecia: A retrospective review of 19 patients seen at Duke University

Background: Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a type of scarring hair loss primarily observed in postmenopausal women and characterized by fronto-tempero-parietal hairline recession, perifollicular erythema, and loss of eyebrows. The incidence is unknown, but the number of women presenting with this condition has significantly increased in recent years. No effective therapy has been established. Objective: The purpose of this study is to present pertinent demographic and clinical findings of patients with FFA seen at an academic hair loss clinic and their responses to various therapeutic interventions. Methods: Patients seen at the Duke University Hair Disorders Research and Treatment Center, Durham, NC, between 2004 and 2011 who met FFA inclusion criteria and signed an informed consent form for participation in the Duke University Hair Disorders Research and Treatment Center database were included in this review. Results: Nineteen female patients with FFA met our inclusion criteria, the majority of whom were white and postmenopausal. A number of treatments, including topical and intralesional steroids, antibiotics, and immunomodulators, were used with disappointing results in most patients. However, the majority of patients on dutasteride experienced disease stabilization. Limitations: This was a retrospective review and outside clinic records were occasionally incomplete. Conclusions: FFA is an increasingly common form of scarring hair loss, but the origin remains unknown. Without clear understanding of the pathogenesis and evolution of this condition, it is not surprising that treatments to date have been minimally or not effective. At our institution, dutasteride was most effective in halting disease progression, although no therapy was associated with significant hair regrowth. © 2012 by the American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

Authors
Ladizinski, B; Bazakas, A; Selim, MA; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ladizinski, B, Bazakas, A, Selim, MA, and Olsen, EA. "Frontal fibrosing alopecia: A retrospective review of 19 patients seen at Duke University." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 68.5 (2013): 749-755.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
68
Issue
5
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
749
End Page
755
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.09.043

Cutaneous γδ T-cell lymphomas: a spectrum of presentations with overlap with other cytotoxic lymphomas.

We reviewed our multicenter experience with gamma-delta (γδ) T-cell lymphomas first presenting in the skin. Fifty-three subjects with a median age of 61 years (range, 25 to 91 y) were diagnosed with this disorder. The median duration of the skin lesions at presentation was 1.25 years (range, 1 mo to 20 y). The most common presentation was deep plaques (38 cases) often resembling a panniculitis, followed by patches resembling psoriasis or mycosis fungoides (10 cases). These lesions tended to ulcerate overtime (27 cases). Single lesions or localized areas of involvement resembling cellulitis or pyoderma were reported in 8 cases. The most common anatomic site of involvement was the legs (40 cases), followed by the torso (30 cases) and arms (28 cases). Constitutional symptoms were reported in 54% (25/46) of the patients, including some with limited skin involvement. Significant comorbidities included autoimmunity (12 cases), other lymphoproliferative disorders (5 cases), internal carcinomas (4 cases), and viral hepatitis (2 cases). Lymphadenopathy (3/42 cases) and bone marrow involvement (5/28 cases) were uncommon, but serum lactose dehydrogenase (LDH) was elevated in 55% (22/39) of the patients. Abnormal positron emission tomography and/or computed tomography scans in 20/37 subjects mostly highlighted soft tissue or lymph nodes. Disease progression was associated with extensive ulcerated lesions resulting in 27 deaths including complications of hemophagocytic syndrome (4) and cerebral nervous system involvement (3). Median survival time from diagnosis was 31 months. Skin biopsies varied from a pagetoid pattern to purely dermal or panniculitic infiltrates composed of intermediate-sized lymphocytes with tissue evidence of cytotoxicity. The most common immunophenotype was CD3+/CD4⁻/CD5⁻/CD8⁻/BF1⁻/γ-M1+/TIA-1+/granzyme-B+/CD45RA-/CD7-, and 4 cases were Epstein-Barr virus positive. This is the largest study to date of cutaneous γδ T-cell lymphomas and demonstrates a variety of clinical and pathologic presentations with a predictable poor outcome.

Authors
Guitart, J; Weisenburger, DD; Subtil, A; Kim, E; Wood, G; Duvic, M; Olsen, E; Junkins-Hopkins, J; Rosen, S; Sundram, U; Ivan, D; Selim, MA; Pincus, L; Deonizio, JMD; Kwasny, M; Kim, YH
MLA Citation
Guitart, J, Weisenburger, DD, Subtil, A, Kim, E, Wood, G, Duvic, M, Olsen, E, Junkins-Hopkins, J, Rosen, S, Sundram, U, Ivan, D, Selim, MA, Pincus, L, Deonizio, JMD, Kwasny, M, and Kim, YH. "Cutaneous γδ T-cell lymphomas: a spectrum of presentations with overlap with other cytotoxic lymphomas." Am J Surg Pathol 36.11 (November 2012): 1656-1665.
PMID
23073324
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume
36
Issue
11
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
1656
End Page
1665
DOI
10.1097/PAS.0b013e31826a5038

Aprepitant: A novel neurokinin-1 receptor/substance P antagonist as antipruritic therapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Authors
Ladizinski, B; Bazakas, A; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ladizinski, B, Bazakas, A, and Olsen, EA. "Aprepitant: A novel neurokinin-1 receptor/substance P antagonist as antipruritic therapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY 67.5 (November 2012): E197-E198.
PMID
23062910
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
67
Issue
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
E197
End Page
E198
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.02.008

Global photographic assessment of men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss receiving finasteride 1 mg or placebo.

BACKGROUND: Finasteride (1 mg) has been shown to increase vertex hair growth in men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss and to increase frontal scalp hair growth in subjects aged 18 to 41 years. OBJECTIVE: A secondary efficacy analysis was conducted to determine effects of finasteride (1 mg) on scalp hair growth in the 4 distinct scalp regions affected by male pattern hair loss. METHODS: Multicenter, double-blind studies randomized patients with vertex hair loss (men aged 18-41 and 41-60 years) to finasteride (1 mg/d) or placebo. Efficacy was evaluated by review of standardized clinical photographs (global photographic assessment) of the vertex, anterior/mid scalp regions, and frontal and temporal hairlines over 24 months relative to baseline. RESULTS: At 24 months, treatment with finasteride resulted in statistically significant (P ≤ .05) hair growth versus placebo in all scalp regions. There was also a significant decrease in hair loss in the younger men treated with finasteride in all areas, but only in the vertex and anterior/mid scalp regions in the older men. A slightly higher incidence of drug-related sexual adverse experiences was reported in the finasteride group than in the placebo group, irrespective of age. LIMITATIONS: These studies enrolled men with vertex pattern hair loss; therefore, the findings may not be extrapolated to men with predominantly anterior/mid scalp, frontal, or temporal hair loss. CONCLUSION: Based on global photographic assessment, finasteride (1 mg) is able to increase hair growth in all areas of the scalp affected by male pattern hair loss.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Whiting, DA; Savin, R; Rodgers, A; Johnson-Levonas, AO; Round, E; Rotonda, J; Kaufman, KD; Male Pattern Hair Loss Study Group,
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Whiting, DA, Savin, R, Rodgers, A, Johnson-Levonas, AO, Round, E, Rotonda, J, Kaufman, KD, and Male Pattern Hair Loss Study Group, . "Global photographic assessment of men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss receiving finasteride 1 mg or placebo." J Am Acad Dermatol 67.3 (September 2012): 379-386.
PMID
22325459
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
67
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
379
End Page
386
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2011.10.027

Subcutaneous interferon alfa for the treatment of cutaneous pseudolymphoma.

Authors
Singletary, HL; Selim, MA; Olsen, E
MLA Citation
Singletary, HL, Selim, MA, and Olsen, E. "Subcutaneous interferon alfa for the treatment of cutaneous pseudolymphoma." Arch Dermatol 148.5 (May 2012): 572-574.
PMID
22782150
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Dermatology
Volume
148
Issue
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
572
End Page
574
DOI
10.1001/archdermatol.2011.1016

Global photographic assessment of men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss receiving finasteride 1 mg or placebo

Background: Finasteride (1 mg) has been shown to increase vertex hair growth in men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss and to increase frontal scalp hair growth in subjects aged 18 to 41 years. Objective: A secondary efficacy analysis was conducted to determine effects of finasteride (1 mg) on scalp hair growth in the 4 distinct scalp regions affected by male pattern hair loss. Methods: Multicenter, double-blind studies randomized patients with vertex hair loss (men aged 18-41 and 41-60 years) to finasteride (1 mg/d) or placebo. Efficacy was evaluated by review of standardized clinical photographs (global photographic assessment) of the vertex, anterior/mid scalp regions, and frontal and temporal hairlines over 24 months relative to baseline. Results: At 24 months, treatment with finasteride resulted in statistically significant (P ≤.05) hair growth versus placebo in all scalp regions. There was also a significant decrease in hair loss in the younger men treated with finasteride in all areas, but only in the vertex and anterior/mid scalp regions in the older men. A slightly higher incidence of drug-related sexual adverse experiences was reported in the finasteride group than in the placebo group, irrespective of age. Limitations: These studies enrolled men with vertex pattern hair loss; therefore, the findings may not be extrapolated to men with predominantly anterior/mid scalp, frontal, or temporal hair loss. Conclusion: Based on global photographic assessment, finasteride (1 mg) is able to increase hair growth in all areas of the scalp affected by male pattern hair loss. © 2011 by the American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Whiting, DA; Savin, R; Rodgers, A; Johnson-Levonas, AO; Round, E; Rotonda, J; Kaufman, KD
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Whiting, DA, Savin, R, Rodgers, A, Johnson-Levonas, AO, Round, E, Rotonda, J, and Kaufman, KD. "Global photographic assessment of men aged 18 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss receiving finasteride 1 mg or placebo." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 67.3 (2012): 379-386.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
67
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
379
End Page
386
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2011.10.027

Grading dermatologic adverse events of cancer treatments: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0

Dermatologic adverse events to cancer therapies have become more prevalent and may to lead to dose modifications or discontinuation of life-saving or prolonging treatments. This has resulted in a new collaboration between oncologists and dermatologists, which requires accurate cataloging and grading of side effects. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 is a descriptive terminology and grading system that can be used for uniform reporting of adverse events. A proper understanding of this standardized classification system is essential for dermatologists to properly communicate with all physicians caring for patients with cancer. © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

Authors
Chen, AP; Setser, A; Anadkat, MJ; Cotliar, J; Olsen, EA; Garden, BC; Lacouture, ME
MLA Citation
Chen, AP, Setser, A, Anadkat, MJ, Cotliar, J, Olsen, EA, Garden, BC, and Lacouture, ME. "Grading dermatologic adverse events of cancer treatments: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology (2012).
PMID
22502948
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Publish Date
2012
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.02.010

Aprepitant: a novel neurokinin-1 receptor/substance P antagonist as antipruritic therapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

Authors
Ladizinski, B; Bazakas, A; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Ladizinski, B, Bazakas, A, and Olsen, EA. "Aprepitant: a novel neurokinin-1 receptor/substance P antagonist as antipruritic therapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 67.5 (2012): e198-e199.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
67
Issue
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
e198
End Page
e199
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.02.008

Grading dermatologic adverse events of cancer treatments: the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0.

Dermatologic adverse events to cancer therapies have become more prevalent and may to lead to dose modifications or discontinuation of life-saving or prolonging treatments. This has resulted in a new collaboration between oncologists and dermatologists, which requires accurate cataloging and grading of side effects. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 is a descriptive terminology and grading system that can be used for uniform reporting of adverse events. A proper understanding of this standardized classification system is essential for dermatologists to properly communicate with all physicians caring for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

Authors
Chen, AP; Setser, A; Anadkat, MJ; Cotliar, J; Olsen, EA; Garden, BC; Lacouture, ME
MLA Citation
Chen, AP, Setser, A, Anadkat, MJ, Cotliar, J, Olsen, EA, Garden, BC, and Lacouture, ME. "Grading dermatologic adverse events of cancer treatments: the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 67.5 (2012): 1025-1039.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
67
Issue
5
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
1025
End Page
1039
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2012.02.010

Treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

Chemotherapy-induced alopecia has been well documented as a cause of distress to patients undergoing cancer treatment. Despite the importance of hair loss to patients, however, patients often receive little more counseling than the advice to purchase a wig or other head covering for the duration of their treatment. Research into non-camouflage (wigs, turbans, and head scarves) treatment methods has been complicated both by a lack of a standardized methodology for evaluating hair loss and hair regrowth and by a lack of human trials. Nevertheless, scalp cooling as a method of preventing hair loss during chemotherapy and 2% topical minoxidil as a therapy for accelerating regrowth after chemotherapy are both effective non-camouflage options for treatment. Other proposed treatments for prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy have demonstrated promise in early trials, but these findings will need validation from rigorous further studies. The increasing number of reports of permanent alopecia not just with pre-bone marrow transplant, high-dose busulfan, and cyclophosphamide regimens but also with standard breast cancer chemotherapy regimens illustrates the importance of further research into treatment methods for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

Authors
Yeager, CE; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Yeager, CE, and Olsen, EA. "Treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia." Dermatol Ther 24.4 (July 2011): 432-442. (Review)
PMID
21910801
Source
pubmed
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
24
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
432
End Page
442
DOI
10.1111/j.1529-8019.2011.01430.x

Clinical end points and response criteria in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: a consensus statement of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium, and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the major forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, have unique characteristics that distinguish them from other types of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Clinical trials in MF/SS have suffered from a lack of standardization in evaluation, staging, assessment, end points, and response criteria. Recently defined criteria for the diagnosis of early MF, guidelines for initial evaluation, and revised staging and classification criteria for MF and SS now offer the potential for uniform staging of patients enrolled in clinical trials for MF/SS. This article presents consensus recommendations for the general conduct of clinical trials of patients with MF/SS as well as methods for standardized assessment of potential disease manifestations in skin, lymph nodes, blood, and visceral organs, and definition of end points and response criteria. These guidelines should facilitate collaboration among investigators and collation of data from sponsor-generated or investigator-initiated clinical trials involving patients with MF or SS.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Whittaker, S; Kim, YH; Duvic, M; Prince, HM; Lessin, SR; Wood, GS; Willemze, R; Demierre, M-F; Pimpinelli, N; Bernengo, MG; Ortiz-Romero, PL; Bagot, M; Estrach, T; Guitart, J; Knobler, R; Sanches, JA; Iwatsuki, K; Sugaya, M; Dummer, R; Pittelkow, M; Hoppe, R; Parker, S; Geskin, L; Pinter-Brown, L; Girardi, M; Burg, G; Ranki, A; Vermeer, M; Horwitz, S; Heald, P; Rosen, S; Cerroni, L; Dreno, B; Vonderheid, EC; International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, et al.
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Whittaker, S, Kim, YH, Duvic, M, Prince, HM, Lessin, SR, Wood, GS, Willemze, R, Demierre, M-F, Pimpinelli, N, Bernengo, MG, Ortiz-Romero, PL, Bagot, M, Estrach, T, Guitart, J, Knobler, R, Sanches, JA, Iwatsuki, K, Sugaya, M, Dummer, R, Pittelkow, M, Hoppe, R, Parker, S, Geskin, L, Pinter-Brown, L, Girardi, M, Burg, G, Ranki, A, Vermeer, M, Horwitz, S, Heald, P, Rosen, S, Cerroni, L, Dreno, B, Vonderheid, EC, and International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, et al. "Clinical end points and response criteria in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: a consensus statement of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium, and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer." J Clin Oncol 29.18 (June 20, 2011): 2598-2607.
PMID
21576639
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
29
Issue
18
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
2598
End Page
2607
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2010.32.0630

Hair Disorders

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Hair Disorders." 2 (May 24, 2011): 1-35. (Chapter)
Source
scopus
Volume
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
1
End Page
35
DOI
10.1002/9781444345384.ch148

Investigative guidelines for alopecia areata.

The reported efficacy of various treatments for alopecia is difficult to compare based on a general lack of consideration in case reports/series and clinical trials of the spontaneous regrowth or baseline prognostic factors seen in alopecia areata and a general lack of quantification of hair growth. This report will give both the investigator and clinician guidelines for clinical trial design that will take into account variables known to effect efficacy results such as baseline severity, pattern, and duration of hair loss, age of the subject, and concomitant conditions that may impact on potential regrowth. Reliable methods of assessment of efficacy and response criteria that will enable direct comparison of results between agents will also be discussed.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Investigative guidelines for alopecia areata." Dermatol Ther 24.3 (May 2011): 311-319.
PMID
21689240
Source
pubmed
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
24
Issue
3
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
311
End Page
319
DOI
10.1111/j.1529-8019.2011.01415.x

Central hair loss in African American women: incidence and potential risk factors.

BACKGROUND: Although central scalp hair loss is a common problem in African American women, data on etiology or incidence are limited. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the frequency of various patterns and degree of central scalp hair loss in African American women and to correlate this with information on hair care practices, family history of hair loss, and medical history. METHODS: Five hundred twenty-nine subjects at six different workshops held at four different sites in the central and/or southeast United States participated in this study. The subjects' patterns and degree of central scalp hair loss were independently assessed by both subject and investigator using a standardized photographic scale. Subjects also completed a detailed questionnaire and had standardized photographs taken. Statistical analysis was performed evaluating answers to the questionnaire relative to pattern of central hair loss. RESULTS: Extensive central scalp hair loss was seen in 5.6% of subjects. There was no obvious association of extensive hair loss with relaxer or hot comb use, history of seborrheic dermatitis or reaction to a hair care product, bacterial infection, or male pattern hair loss in fathers of subjects; however, there was an association with a history of tinea capitis. LIMITATIONS: There was no scalp biopsy correlation with clinical pattern of hair loss and further information on specifics of hair care practices is needed. CONCLUSIONS: This central scalp photographic scale and questionnaire provide a valid template by which to further explore potential etiologic factors and relationships to central scalp hair loss in African American women.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Callender, V; McMichael, A; Sperling, L; Anstrom, KJ; Shapiro, J; Roberts, J; Durden, F; Whiting, D; Bergfeld, W
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Callender, V, McMichael, A, Sperling, L, Anstrom, KJ, Shapiro, J, Roberts, J, Durden, F, Whiting, D, and Bergfeld, W. "Central hair loss in African American women: incidence and potential risk factors." J Am Acad Dermatol 64.2 (February 2011): 245-252.
PMID
21075478
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
64
Issue
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
245
End Page
252
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2009.11.693

Sézary syndrome: immunopathogenesis, literature review of therapeutic options, and recommendations for therapy by the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium (USCLC).

Sézary syndrome (SS) has a poor prognosis and few guidelines for optimizing therapy. The US Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium, to improve clinical care of patients with SS and encourage controlled clinical trials of promising treatments, undertook a review of the published literature on therapeutic options for SS. An overview of the immunopathogenesis and standardized review of potential current treatment options for SS including metabolism, mechanism of action, overall efficacy in mycosis fungoides and SS, and common or concerning adverse effects is first discussed. The specific efficacy of each treatment for SS, both as monotherapy and combination therapy, is then reported using standardized criteria for both SS and response to therapy with the type of study defined by a modification of the US Preventive Services guidelines for evidence-based medicine. Finally, guidelines for the treatment of SS and suggestions for adjuvant treatment are noted.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Rook, AH; Zic, J; Kim, Y; Porcu, P; Querfeld, C; Wood, G; Demierre, M-F; Pittelkow, M; Wilson, LD; Pinter-Brown, L; Advani, R; Parker, S; Kim, EJ; Junkins-Hopkins, JM; Foss, F; Cacchio, P; Duvic, M
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Rook, AH, Zic, J, Kim, Y, Porcu, P, Querfeld, C, Wood, G, Demierre, M-F, Pittelkow, M, Wilson, LD, Pinter-Brown, L, Advani, R, Parker, S, Kim, EJ, Junkins-Hopkins, JM, Foss, F, Cacchio, P, and Duvic, M. "Sézary syndrome: immunopathogenesis, literature review of therapeutic options, and recommendations for therapy by the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium (USCLC)." J Am Acad Dermatol 64.2 (February 2011): 352-404. (Review)
PMID
21145619
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
64
Issue
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
352
End Page
404
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2010.08.037

EORTC, ISCL, and USCLC consensus recommendations for the treatment of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders: Lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

Primary cutaneous CD30 + lymphoproliferative disorders (CD30 + LPDs) are the second most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and include lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Despite the anaplastic cytomorphology of tumor cells that suggest an aggressive course, CD30 + LPDs are characterized by an excellent prognosis. Although a broad spectrum of therapeutic strategies has been reported, these have been limited mostly to small retrospective cohort series or case reports, and only very few prospective controlled or multicenter studies have been performed, which results in a low level of evidence for most therapies. The response rates to treatment, recurrence rates, and outcome have not been analyzed in a systematic review. Moreover, international guidelines for staging and treatment of CD30 + LPDs have not yet been presented. Based on a literature analysis and discussions, recommendations were elaborated by a multidisciplinary expert panel of the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, and the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium. The recommendations represent the state-of-the-art management of CD30 + PDs and include definitions for clinical endpoints as well as response criteria for future clinical trials in CD30 + LPDs. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.

Authors
Kempf, W; Pfaltz, K; Vermeer, MH; Cozzio, A; Ortiz-Romero, PL; Bagot, M; Olsen, E; Kim, YH; Dummer, R; Pimpinelli, N; Whittaker, S; Hodak, E; Cerroni, L; Berti, E; Horwitz, S; Prince, HM; Guitart, J; Estrach, T; Sanches, JA; Duvic, M; Ranki, A; Dreno, B; Ostheeren-Michaelis, S; Knobler, R; Wood, G; Willemze, R
MLA Citation
Kempf, W, Pfaltz, K, Vermeer, MH, Cozzio, A, Ortiz-Romero, PL, Bagot, M, Olsen, E, Kim, YH, Dummer, R, Pimpinelli, N, Whittaker, S, Hodak, E, Cerroni, L, Berti, E, Horwitz, S, Prince, HM, Guitart, J, Estrach, T, Sanches, JA, Duvic, M, Ranki, A, Dreno, B, Ostheeren-Michaelis, S, Knobler, R, Wood, G, and Willemze, R. "EORTC, ISCL, and USCLC consensus recommendations for the treatment of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders: Lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma." Blood 118.15 (2011): 4024-4035.
PMID
21841159
Source
scival
Published In
Blood
Volume
118
Issue
15
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
4024
End Page
4035
DOI
10.1182/blood-2011-05-351346

Predictors of complete responses with denileukin diftitox in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Authors
Foss, F; Duvic, M; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Foss, F, Duvic, M, and Olsen, EA. "Predictors of complete responses with denileukin diftitox in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." American Journal of Hematology 86.7 (2011): 627-630.
PMID
21674574
Source
scival
Published In
American Journal of Hematology
Volume
86
Issue
7
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
627
End Page
630
DOI
10.1002/ajh.22039

Untangling the hairy issue of iron deficiency: Making progress

Authors
Olsen, EA; Reed, KB
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, and Reed, KB. "Untangling the hairy issue of iron deficiency: Making progress." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 65.1 (2011): 204-206.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
65
Issue
1
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
204
End Page
206
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2011.03.001

An in-depth assessment of the impact of pruritus on health-related quality of life of patients with mycosis fungoides/sézary syndrome

To quantify pruritus and assess its impact on the quality of life of patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), investigators at 2 centers conducted in-depth interviews of MF/SS patients aged ≥18 years who experienced pruritus associated with their disease. The relevance of a dermatologic-specific health-related quality-of-life instrument, Skindex-16, was also assessed. Among 19 patients who were interviewed, the most common effects were self-consciousness about their physical appearance and frustration and worry about the disease worsening. The majority of patients cited pruritus as the most bothersome physical symptom they experienced, with roughly half of the participants indicating that their sleep had been negatively affected because of itching. Other effects cited were embarrassment about scratching in public settings and the need to avoid potential triggers of itching, such as exposure to the sun or certain types of clothing. Patients found the measures of pruritus severity easy to complete, except for estimating the number of days they experienced itching. Skindex-16 was highly relevant for these patients. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

Authors
Demierre, M-F; Olsen, EA; Williams, CA; Arduino, JM; McNaughton, KS
MLA Citation
Demierre, M-F, Olsen, EA, Williams, CA, Arduino, JM, and McNaughton, KS. "An in-depth assessment of the impact of pruritus on health-related quality of life of patients with mycosis fungoides/sézary syndrome." Journal of Supportive Oncology 9.3 (2011): e13-e19.
Source
scival
Published In
The Journal of Supportive Oncology
Volume
9
Issue
3
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
e13
End Page
e19
DOI
10.1016/j.suponc.2011.02.001

Iron deficiency in female pattern hair loss, chronic telogen effluvium, and control groups.

BACKGROUND: The literature suggests that iron deficiency (ID) may play a role in female pattern hair loss (FPHL) or in chronic telogen effluvium (CTE). OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine if ID is more common in women with FPHL and/or CTE than in control subjects without hair loss. METHODS: This was a controlled study of 381 Caucasian women aged 18 years or older with FPHL or CTE seen in the Duke University Hair Disorders Clinic, Durham, NC, and 76 Caucasian women aged 18 years or older from the university environs who had no history or physical findings of hair loss (control subjects). All participants had to have at least a serum ferritin and hemoglobin reading and history of menopausal status. RESULTS: When ferritin less than or equal to 15 μg/L was used as the definition, ID occurred in 12.4%, 12.1%, and 29.8% of premenopausal women with FPHL (n = 170), CTE (n = 58), and control subjects (n = 47), respectively, and in 1.7%, 10.5%, and 6.9% of postmenopausal women with FPHL (n = 115), CTE (n = 38), and control subjects (n = 29), respectively. When ferritin less than or equal to 40 μg/L was used as the definition, ID occurred in 58.8%, 63.8%, and 72.3% of premenopausal women with FPHL, CTE, and control subjects, respectively, and in 26.1%, 36.8%, and 20.7% of postmenopausal women with FPHL, CTE, and control subjects, respectively. There was no statistically significant increase in the incidence of ID in premenopausal or postmenopausal women with FPHL or CTE versus control subjects. LIMITATIONS: The effect of correction of ID on hair loss is unknown. CONCLUSION: ID is common in women but not increased in patients with FPHL or CTE compared with control subjects.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Reed, KB; Cacchio, PB; Caudill, L
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Reed, KB, Cacchio, PB, and Caudill, L. "Iron deficiency in female pattern hair loss, chronic telogen effluvium, and control groups." J Am Acad Dermatol 63.6 (December 2010): 991-999.
PMID
20947203
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
63
Issue
6
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
991
End Page
999
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2009.12.006

The United States cutaneous lymphoma Consortium (USCLC)

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "The United States cutaneous lymphoma Consortium (USCLC)." Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia 10.SUPPL. 2 (2010): S88-S89.
PMID
20826405
Source
scival
Published In
Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia
Volume
10
Issue
SUPPL. 2
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
S88
End Page
S89
DOI
10.3816/CLML.2010.s.015

A proposed EGFR inhibitor dermatologic adverse event-specific grading scale from the MASCC skin toxicity study group

Background Accurate grading of dermatologic adverse events (AE) due to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (EGFRIs) is necessary for drug toxicity determinations, interagent comparisons, and supportive care trials. The most widely used severity grading scale, the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (NCI-CTCAE v4.0), was not designed specifically for this class of agents and may result in underreporting and poor grading of distinctive adverse events. We believe a class-specific grading scale is needed to help standardize assessment and improve reporting of EGFRI-associated dermatologic AEs. Methods The Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Skin Toxicity Study Group conducted an international multidisciplinary meeting that included 20 clinicians and researchers from academic centers and government agencies. Experts from different disciplines presented current information specific to EGFRI-induced dermatologic toxicities: grading scale development, pharmacovigilance safety reporting, health-related quality of life, patient reporting, and pharmacology. Group discussions, literature reviews, and professional expertise established the theoretical foundation for the proposed grading scale. Results A new grading system is proposed for the most common events associated with EGFRI-induced dermatologic AEs: papulopustular reaction or acneiform rash, nail changes, erythema, pruritus, xerosis, hair changes, telangiectasias, hyperpigmentation, mucositis, flushing, radiation dermatitis, hyposalivation, and taste changes. The proposed scale maintains consistency with the grading principles and language of the existing CTCAE version 4.0 and MedDRA terminology and includes relevant patient-reported healthrelated quality of life factors. Conclusions A grading scale specific to EGFR inhibitor dermatologic AEs is presented for formal integration into future versions of CTCAE and for validation in clinical trial settings. The study group designed this scale to detect and report EGFRI-related toxicities with greater sensitivity, specificity, and range than the scales currently used. This scale should serve as a foundation for efforts to perform objective interdrug comparisons and assessments of supportive care treatment strategiesmore effectively than with currentmethods. © Springer-Verlag 2009.

Authors
Lacouture, ME; Maitland, ML; Segaert, S; Setser, A; Baran, R; Fox, LP; Epstein, JB; Barasch, A; Einhorn, L; Wagner, L; West, DP; Rapoport, BL; Kris, MG; Basch, E; Eaby, B; Kurtin, S; Olsen, EA; Chen, A; Dancey, JE; Trotti, A
MLA Citation
Lacouture, ME, Maitland, ML, Segaert, S, Setser, A, Baran, R, Fox, LP, Epstein, JB, Barasch, A, Einhorn, L, Wagner, L, West, DP, Rapoport, BL, Kris, MG, Basch, E, Eaby, B, Kurtin, S, Olsen, EA, Chen, A, Dancey, JE, and Trotti, A. "A proposed EGFR inhibitor dermatologic adverse event-specific grading scale from the MASCC skin toxicity study group." Supportive Care in Cancer 18.4 (2010): 509-522.
PMID
20145956
Source
scival
Published In
Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume
18
Issue
4
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
509
End Page
522
DOI
10.1007/s00520-009-0744-x

Leukonychia related to vorinostat

Authors
Anderson, KA; Bartell, HL; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Anderson, KA, Bartell, HL, and Olsen, EA. "Leukonychia related to vorinostat." Archives of Dermatology 145.11 (2009): 1338-1339.
PMID
19917975
Source
scival
Published In
Archives of Dermatology
Volume
145
Issue
11
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1338
End Page
1339
DOI
10.1001/archdermatol.2009.272

Evaluation of the long-term tolerability and clinical benefit of vorinostat in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Introduction: Vorinostat, an orally active histone deacetylase inhibitor, was approved in October 2006 by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease during or after treatment with 2 systemic therapies. Patients and Methods: A multicenter, open-label phase IIb trial evaluated the activity and safety of vorinostat 400 mg orally daily in patients with ≥ stage IB, persistent, progressive, or treatment-refractory mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome CTCL subtypes. We report the safety and tolerability of long-term vorinostat therapy in patients who experienced clinical benefit in the previous phase IIb study. Results: As of December 11, 2008, 6 of 74 patients enrolled in the original study had received vorinostat for ≥ 2 years: median age, 65 years; median number of previous therapies, 2.5; median time from diagnosis to enrollment, 1.8 years. At enrollment into the continuation phase, 5 of the 6 patients had achieved an objective response, and 1 patient had prolonged stable disease. During the follow-up study, the most common drug-related grade 1-4 adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea, nausea, fatigue, and alopecia (6, 5, 4, and 3 patients, respectively). Incidence of grade 3/4 AEs was low: anorexia (n = 1), increased creatinine phosphokinase (n = 1), pulmonary embolism (n = 1), rash (n = 1), and thrombocytopenia (n = 1). Five patients have discontinued the study drug, and 1 patient is continuing therapy. Conclusion: This post hoc subset analysis provides evidence for the long-term safety and clinical benefit of vorinostat in heavily pretreated patients with CTCL, regardless of previous treatment failures.

Authors
Duvic, M; Olsen, E; Breneman, D; Pacheco, T; Parker, S; Vonderheid, E; Abuav, R; Ricker, J; Rizvi, S; Chen, C; Boileau, K; Gunchenko, A; Sanz-Rodriguez, C; Geskin, L
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Olsen, E, Breneman, D, Pacheco, T, Parker, S, Vonderheid, E, Abuav, R, Ricker, J, Rizvi, S, Chen, C, Boileau, K, Gunchenko, A, Sanz-Rodriguez, C, and Geskin, L. "Evaluation of the long-term tolerability and clinical benefit of vorinostat in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." Clinical Lymphoma and Myeloma 9.6 (2009): 412-416.
PMID
19951879
Source
scival
Published In
Clinical lymphoma & myeloma
Volume
9
Issue
6
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
412
End Page
416
DOI
10.3816/CLM.2009.n.082

Forodesine

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Forodesine." Haematologica Meeting Reports 3.1 (2009): 89--.
Source
scival
Published In
Haematologica Meeting Reports
Volume
3
Issue
1
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
89-

Female pattern hair loss

• Decrease in hair density in the central (vertex, mid and frontal) scalp, bitemporal and parietal regions in women. • Miniaturization of affected hairs. • Two ages of onset: early (post-puberty to third decade) and late (age 40+ years). • Signs of hyperandrogenism (hirsutism, irregular periods) or hyperandrogenemia occur in a subset of women with female pattern hair loss (FPHL) but most women with FPHL have neither. • Many, but not all, affected women respond to antiandrogens or 5α-reductase inhibitors with increased hair growth indicating an androgen etiology in at least some cases of FPHL. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Female pattern hair loss." (December 1, 2008): 171-186. (Chapter)
Source
scopus
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
171
End Page
186
DOI
10.1007/978-3-540-46911-7_10

Evaluation and treatment of hirsutism. Introduction.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Evaluation and treatment of hirsutism. Introduction." Dermatol Ther 21.5 (September 2008): 313-.
PMID
18844709
Source
pubmed
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
21
Issue
5
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
313
DOI
10.1111/j.1529-8019.2008.00213.x

Central scalp alopecia photographic scale in African American women.

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a common but poorly understood cause of hair loss in African American women. A photographic scale was developed that captures the pattern and severity of the central hair loss seen with CCCA in order to help identify this problem in the general community and to potentially correlate clinical data with hair loss. The utility and reproducibility of this photographic scale was determined in a group of 150 African American women gathered for a health and beauty day who were evaluated by both four investigators experienced in the diagnosis of hair disorders and by the subjects themselves.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Callender, V; Sperling, L; McMichael, A; Anstrom, KJ; Bergfeld, W; Durden, F; Roberts, J; Shapiro, J; Whiting, DA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Callender, V, Sperling, L, McMichael, A, Anstrom, KJ, Bergfeld, W, Durden, F, Roberts, J, Shapiro, J, and Whiting, DA. "Central scalp alopecia photographic scale in African American women." Dermatol Ther 21.4 (July 2008): 264-267.
PMID
18715296
Source
pubmed
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
21
Issue
4
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
264
End Page
267
DOI
10.1111/j.1529-8019.2008.00208.x

SUMMARY OF THE CLINICAL BENEFIT OF VORINOSTAT IN RELAPSED/REFRACTORY CTCL

Authors
Olsen, EA; Rizvi, S; Garcia-Vargas, J; Sanz-Rodriguez, C; Viscusi, J; Gates, M; Duvic, M
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Rizvi, S, Garcia-Vargas, J, Sanz-Rodriguez, C, Viscusi, J, Gates, M, and Duvic, M. "SUMMARY OF THE CLINICAL BENEFIT OF VORINOSTAT IN RELAPSED/REFRACTORY CTCL." HAEMATOLOGICA-THE HEMATOLOGY JOURNAL 93 (June 2008): 176-176.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Haematologica
Volume
93
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
176
End Page
176

VORINOSTAT PROVIDES PROLONGED SAFETY AND CLINICAL BENEFIT TO PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA (CTCL)

Authors
Duvic, M; Olsen, EA; Breneman, D; Pacheco, TR; Parker, S; Vonderheid, EC; Ricker, JL; Rizvi, S; Chen, C; Boileau, K; Gunchenko, A; Sanz-Rodriguez, C; Geskin, LJ
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Olsen, EA, Breneman, D, Pacheco, TR, Parker, S, Vonderheid, EC, Ricker, JL, Rizvi, S, Chen, C, Boileau, K, Gunchenko, A, Sanz-Rodriguez, C, and Geskin, LJ. "VORINOSTAT PROVIDES PROLONGED SAFETY AND CLINICAL BENEFIT TO PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA (CTCL)." HAEMATOLOGICA-THE HEMATOLOGY JOURNAL 93 (June 2008): 107-108.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Haematologica
Volume
93
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
107
End Page
108

Vorinostat provides prolonged safety and clinical benefit to patients with advanced cutaneous t-cell lymphoma (CTCL)

Authors
Olsen, EA; Duvic, M; Breneman, D; Pacheco, TR; Parker, S; Vonderheid, EC; Ricker, JL; Rizvi, S; Boileau, K; Geskin, LJ
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Duvic, M, Breneman, D, Pacheco, TR, Parker, S, Vonderheid, EC, Ricker, JL, Rizvi, S, Boileau, K, and Geskin, LJ. "Vorinostat provides prolonged safety and clinical benefit to patients with advanced cutaneous t-cell lymphoma (CTCL)." JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY 26.15 (May 20, 2008).
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
26
Issue
15
Publish Date
2008

Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

Authors
Zelenetz, AD; Advani, RH; Byrd, JC; Czuczman, MS; Damon, LE; Duvic, M; Fayad, L; Forero, A; Glenn, MJ; Gockerman, JP; Gordon, LI; Harris, NL; Hoppe, RT; Horwitz, SM; Kaminski, MS; Kim, YH; Lacasce, AS; Nademanee, A; Olsen, EA; Porcu, P; Press, O; Prosnitz, L; Smith, MR; Sotomayor, EM; Vose, JM; Yahalom, J; Yunus, F; National Comprehensive Cancer Network,
MLA Citation
Zelenetz, AD, Advani, RH, Byrd, JC, Czuczman, MS, Damon, LE, Duvic, M, Fayad, L, Forero, A, Glenn, MJ, Gockerman, JP, Gordon, LI, Harris, NL, Hoppe, RT, Horwitz, SM, Kaminski, MS, Kim, YH, Lacasce, AS, Nademanee, A, Olsen, EA, Porcu, P, Press, O, Prosnitz, L, Smith, MR, Sotomayor, EM, Vose, JM, Yahalom, J, Yunus, F, and National Comprehensive Cancer Network, . "Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas." J Natl Compr Canc Netw 6.4 (April 2008): 356-421.
PMID
18433606
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN
Volume
6
Issue
4
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
356
End Page
421

Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans in a family.

Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is a rare condition characterized by diffuse keratosis pilaris with a scarring alopecia of the scalp and associated photophobia, facial erythema, and palmoplantar keratoderma. Although initially described as a sex-linked disorder, several different inheritance patterns have been observed. We describe a patient whose father and sister were also affected with this condition, consistent with an autosomal dominant genetic transmission. Multiple topical and systemic treatments have been unsuccessful in this patient, attesting to the treatment refractoriness typically seen in KFSD.

Authors
Bellet, JS; Kaplan, AL; Selim, MA; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Bellet, JS, Kaplan, AL, Selim, MA, and Olsen, EA. "Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans in a family." J Am Acad Dermatol 58.3 (March 2008): 499-502.
PMID
18280351
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
58
Issue
3
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
499
End Page
502
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2007.03.028

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia

A progressive scarring alopecia of the central scalp is commonly seen in young to middle-aged females of African descent. It usually starts at the vertex or mid top of the scalp and gradually spreads centrifugally, hence, the unifying term of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia. The clinical pattern is suggestive of female pattern alopecia, but a lack of follicular pores indicative of scarring is present. It can progress for years before slowly burning out. The etiology is unknown but genetic factors may be important. It is often associated with a history of traumatic hairstyling involving heat, traction, and chemicals. However, most patients of African descent without this disorder have similar styling habits. Nonetheless, avoidance of physical and chemical trauma to the scalp hair, the use of suitable shampoos and conditioners, and the encouragement of natural hairstyles may be helpful. Any infection should be treated. Topical or intralesional corticosteroids and systemic antibiotics may be useful and topical minoxidil should be tried with the hope of preventing further scarring and encouraging regrowth of recovering follicles. Current research into the etiology of this disorder will help to foster much-needed clinical trials of therapeutic agents. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Whiting, DA; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Whiting, DA, and Olsen, EA. "Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia." Dermatologic Therapy 21.4 (2008): 268-278.
PMID
18715297
Source
scival
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
21
Issue
4
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
268
End Page
278
DOI
10.1111/j.1529-8019.2008.00209.x

Review of the treatment of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A stage-based approach

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Non-Hodgkin's Disease were recently revised to include recommendations for treating mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. These uncommon lymphomas require a specialized evaluation and use a unique TNMB staging system. Unlike the other forms of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, stage overwhelmingly determines prognosis and defines radically different treatment approaches. For patients with early-stage disease, initial treatment with skin-directed therapies is preferred, and many patients never require systemic therapy. For patients with refractory or advanced-stage disease, biologic therapies are often the first choices, whereas chemotherapies are reserved for later in the disease course. Many milder therapies may be repeated several times in the disease course, and maintenance and tapering strategies are common. This article also discusses the emerging role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. © Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Authors
Horwitz, SM; Olsen, EA; Duvic, M; Porcu, P; Kim, YH
MLA Citation
Horwitz, SM, Olsen, EA, Duvic, M, Porcu, P, and Kim, YH. "Review of the treatment of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A stage-based approach." JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network 6.4 (2008): 436-442.
PMID
18433609
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN
Volume
6
Issue
4
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
436
End Page
442

Subcutaneous efalizumab is not effective in the treatment of alopecia areata

Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Efalizumab is a T-cell-targeted therapy approved for the treatment of psoriasis. Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of efalizumab in the treatment of moderate-to-severe AA. Methods: Sixty-two patients were enrolled into this phase II, placebo-controlled trial. The trial consisted of three 12-week periods-a double-blind treatment period, an open-label efalizumab treatment period, and a safety follow-up. Results: There were no statistical differences between treatment groups in percent hair regrowth, quality-of-life measures, or changes in biologic markers of disease severity after 12 or 24 weeks. In both groups, there was an approximately 8% response rate for hair regrowth (at 12 weeks). Efalizumab was well tolerated. Limitations: Numbers were too small for certain analyses. Conclusion: A 3- to 6-month trial of efalizumab was not effective in promoting hair regrowth in this small cohort of patients with moderate-to-severe AA. © 2008 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

Authors
Price, VH; Hordinsky, MK; Olsen, EA; Roberts, JL; Siegfried, EC; Rafal, ES; Korman, NJ; Altrabulsi, B; Leung, HM; Garovoy, MR; Caro, I; Whiting, DA
MLA Citation
Price, VH, Hordinsky, MK, Olsen, EA, Roberts, JL, Siegfried, EC, Rafal, ES, Korman, NJ, Altrabulsi, B, Leung, HM, Garovoy, MR, Caro, I, and Whiting, DA. "Subcutaneous efalizumab is not effective in the treatment of alopecia areata." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 58.3 (2008): 395-402.
PMID
18280336
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
58
Issue
3
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
395
End Page
402
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2007.10.645

A multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial of a novel formulation of 5% minoxidil topical foam versus placebo in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men.

BACKGROUND: An alternative to currently marketed topical minoxidil solutions is desirable. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of a new 5% minoxidil topical formulation in a propylene glycol-free foam vehicle in men with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). METHODS: This was a 16-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 5% minoxidil topical foam (MTF) in 352 men, 18 to 49 years old. At week 16, 143 subjects continued on an open-label phase to collect 52 weeks of safety information on 5% MTF. RESULTS: At week 16 compared with baseline, there was a statistically significant increase in (1) hair counts in the 5% MTF group versus placebo (P < .0001) and (2) subjective assessment of improved hair loss condition (P < .0001) in the 5% MTF group versus placebo. The 5% MTF was well tolerated over a 52-week period. LIMITATIONS: There was no collection of efficacy data beyond 16 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that 5% MTF is a safe and effective treatment for men with AGA.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Whiting, D; Bergfeld, W; Miller, J; Hordinsky, M; Wanser, R; Zhang, P; Kohut, B
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Whiting, D, Bergfeld, W, Miller, J, Hordinsky, M, Wanser, R, Zhang, P, and Kohut, B. "A multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial of a novel formulation of 5% minoxidil topical foam versus placebo in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men." J Am Acad Dermatol 57.5 (November 2007): 767-774.
PMID
17761356
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
57
Issue
5
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
767
End Page
774
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2007.04.012

Revisions to the staging and classification of mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome: a proposal of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the cutaneous lymphoma task force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC).

The ISCL/EORTC recommends revisions to the Mycosis Fungoides Cooperative Group classification and staging system for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). These revisions are made to incorporate advances related to tumor cell biology and diagnostic techniques as pertains to mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) since the 1979 publication of the original guidelines, to clarify certain variables that currently impede effective interinstitution and interinvestigator communication and/or the development of standardized clinical trials in MF and SS, and to provide a platform for tracking other variables of potential prognostic significance. Moreover, given the difference in prognosis and clinical characteristics of the non-MF/non-SS subtypes of cutaneous lymphoma, this revision pertains specifically to MF and SS. The evidence supporting the revisions is discussed as well as recommendations for evaluation and staging procedures based on these revisions.

Authors
Olsen, E; Vonderheid, E; Pimpinelli, N; Willemze, R; Kim, Y; Knobler, R; Zackheim, H; Duvic, M; Estrach, T; Lamberg, S; Wood, G; Dummer, R; Ranki, A; Burg, G; Heald, P; Pittelkow, M; Bernengo, M-G; Sterry, W; Laroche, L; Trautinger, F; Whittaker, S; ISCL/EORTC,
MLA Citation
Olsen, E, Vonderheid, E, Pimpinelli, N, Willemze, R, Kim, Y, Knobler, R, Zackheim, H, Duvic, M, Estrach, T, Lamberg, S, Wood, G, Dummer, R, Ranki, A, Burg, G, Heald, P, Pittelkow, M, Bernengo, M-G, Sterry, W, Laroche, L, Trautinger, F, Whittaker, S, and ISCL/EORTC, . "Revisions to the staging and classification of mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome: a proposal of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the cutaneous lymphoma task force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)." Blood 110.6 (September 15, 2007): 1713-1722. (Review)
PMID
17540844
Source
pubmed
Published In
Blood
Volume
110
Issue
6
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
1713
End Page
1722
DOI
10.1182/blood-2007-03-055749

Phase IIb multicenter trial of vorinostat in patients with persistent, progressive, or treatment refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the activity and safety of the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) in persistent, progressive, or recurrent mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) cutaneous t-cell lymphoma (CTCL) subtypes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with stage IB-IVA MF/SS were treated with 400 mg of oral vorinostat daily until disease progression or intolerable toxicity in this open-label phase IIb trial (NCT00091559). Patients must have received at least two prior systemic therapies at least one of which included bexarotene unless intolerable. The primary end point was the objective response rate (ORR) measured by the modified severity weighted assessment tool and secondary end points were time to response (TTR), time to progression (TTP), duration of response (DOR), and pruritus relief ( > or = 3-point improvement on a 10-point visual analog scale). Safety and tolerability were also evaluated. RESULTS: Seventy-four patients were enrolled, including 61 with at least stage IIB disease. The ORR was 29.7% overall; 29.5% in stage IIB or higher patients. Median TTR in stage IIB or higher patients was 56 days. Median DOR was not reached but estimated to be >or = 185 days (34+ to 441+). Median TTP was 4.9 months overall, and 9.8 months for stage IIB or higher responders. Overall, 32% of patients had pruritus relief. The most common drug-related adverse experiences (AE) were diarrhea (49%), fatigue (46%), nausea (43%), and anorexia (26%); most were grade 2 or lower but those grade 3 or higher included fatigue (5%), pulmonary embolism (5%), thrombocytopenia (5%), and nausea (4%). Eleven patients required dose modification and nine discontinued due to AE. CONCLUSION: Oral vorinostat was effective in treatment refractory MF/SS with an acceptable safety profile.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Kim, YH; Kuzel, TM; Pacheco, TR; Foss, FM; Parker, S; Frankel, SR; Chen, C; Ricker, JL; Arduino, JM; Duvic, M
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Kim, YH, Kuzel, TM, Pacheco, TR, Foss, FM, Parker, S, Frankel, SR, Chen, C, Ricker, JL, Arduino, JM, and Duvic, M. "Phase IIb multicenter trial of vorinostat in patients with persistent, progressive, or treatment refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." J Clin Oncol 25.21 (July 20, 2007): 3109-3115.
PMID
17577020
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
21
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
3109
End Page
3115
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2006.10.2434

TNM classification system for primary cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A proposal of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)

Currently available staging systems for non-Hodgkin lymphomas are not useful for clinical staging classification of most primary cutaneous lymphomas. The tumor, node, metastases (TNM) system used for mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) is not appropriate for other primary cutaneous lymphomas. A usable, unified staging system would improve the communication about the state of disease, selection of appropriate management, standardization of enrollment/response criteria in clinical trials, and collection/ analysis of prospective survival data. Toward this goal, during the recent meetings of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the cutaneous lymphoma task force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the representatives have established a consensus proposal of a TNM classification system applicable for all primary cutaneous lymphomas other than MF and SS. Due to the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of the cutaneous lymphomas, the currently proposed TNM system is meant to be primarily an anatomic documentation of disease extent and not to be used as a prognostic guide. © 2007 by The American Society of Hematology.

Authors
Kim, YH; Willemze, R; Pimpinelli, N; Whittaker, S; Olsen, EA; Ranki, A; Dummer, R; Hoppe, RT
MLA Citation
Kim, YH, Willemze, R, Pimpinelli, N, Whittaker, S, Olsen, EA, Ranki, A, Dummer, R, and Hoppe, RT. "TNM classification system for primary cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A proposal of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)." Blood 110.2 (2007): 479-484.
PMID
17339420
Source
scival
Published In
Blood
Volume
110
Issue
2
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
479
End Page
484
DOI
10.1182/blood-2006-10-054601

The importance of dual 5alpha-reductase inhibition in the treatment of male pattern hair loss: results of a randomized placebo-controlled study of dutasteride versus finasteride.

BACKGROUND: Male pattern hair loss (MPHL) is a potentially reversible condition in which dihydrotestosterone is an important etiologic factor. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the type 1 and 2 5alpha-reductase inhibitor dutasteride in men with MPHL. METHODS: Four hundred sixteen men, 21 to 45 years old, were randomized to receive dutasteride 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg, finasteride 5 mg, or placebo daily for 24 weeks. RESULTS: Dutasteride increased target area hair count versus placebo in a dose-dependent fashion and dutasteride 2.5 mg was superior to finasteride at 12 and 24 weeks. Expert panel photographic review and investigator assessment of hair growth confirmed these results. Scalp and serum dihydrotestosterone levels decreased, and testosterone levels increased, in a dose-dependent fashion with dutasteride. LIMITATIONS: The study was limited to 24 weeks. CONCLUSION: Dutasteride increases scalp hair growth in men with MPHL. Type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase may be important in the pathogenesis and treatment of MPHL.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Hordinsky, M; Whiting, D; Stough, D; Hobbs, S; Ellis, ML; Wilson, T; Rittmaster, RS; Dutasteride Alopecia Research Team,
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Hordinsky, M, Whiting, D, Stough, D, Hobbs, S, Ellis, ML, Wilson, T, Rittmaster, RS, and Dutasteride Alopecia Research Team, . "The importance of dual 5alpha-reductase inhibition in the treatment of male pattern hair loss: results of a randomized placebo-controlled study of dutasteride versus finasteride." J Am Acad Dermatol 55.6 (December 2006): 1014-1023.
PMID
17110217
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
55
Issue
6
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
1014
End Page
1023
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2006.05.007

Oral forodesine (Bcx-1777) is clinically active in refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Results of a phase I/II study.

Authors
Duvic, M; Forero-Torres, A; Foss, F; Olsen, EA; Kim, Y
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Forero-Torres, A, Foss, F, Olsen, EA, and Kim, Y. "Oral forodesine (Bcx-1777) is clinically active in refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Results of a phase I/II study." BLOOD 108.11 (November 16, 2006): 698A-698A.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Blood
Volume
108
Issue
11
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
698A
End Page
698A

A phase II open-label study of recombinant human interleukin-12 in patients with stage IA, IB, or IIA mycosis fungoides

Background: Interleukin-12 (IL-12) increases Th 1 cytokines, natural killer (NK) cells, and cytotoxic T-cell activities. Progression of mycosis fungoides is associated with Th 2 cytokines produced by a clonal proliferation of epidermotropic T-helper cells. Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of subcutaneous recombinant human IL-12 (rhIL-12) in early mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IA-IIA) in a multi-center, open label clinical trial. Methods: rhIL-12 was administered biweekly (100 ng/kg for 2 weeks; 300 ng/kg thereafter). A modified severity-weighted assessment tool (SWAT) and the longest diameter of 5 index lesions measured efficacy. Results: Twenty-three MF patients (stage IA, 12 patients; IB, 9; and IIA, 2) had previously received >3 therapies. Ten of 23 patients (43%) achieved partial responses (PR); 7 (30%) achieved minor responses; and 5 (22%) had stable disease. The duration of PRs ranged from 3 to more than 45 weeks. Twelve (52%) ultimately progressed with mean time to progressive disease of 57 days (range, 28-805). Ten completed 6 months of therapy; 1 completed 24 months. Of patients not completing 6 months of therapy, 6 progressed and 6 others discontinued because of adverse events or withdrew consent. Seventeen patients had treatment-related adverse events that were generally mild or moderate in severity, including asthenia, headache, chills, fever, injection site reaction, pain, myalgia, arthralgia, elevated aspartate and alanine aminotransferase levels, anorexia, and sweating. One patient in PR died of hemolytic anemia, possibly exacerbated by rhIL-12 treatment. Limitations: The original company was purchased during the conduct of the trial and rhIL-12 is currently unavailable. The quality of life data were not available for inclusion. Conclusion: Twice-weekly subcutaneously administered rhIL-12 (100 ng/kg escalated to 300 ng/kg) showed antitumor activity with a response rate of 43% in refractory patients. It was relatively well-tolerated in early-stage MF. © 2006 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

Authors
Duvic, M; Sherman, ML; Wood, GS; Kuzel, TM; Olsen, E; Foss, F; Laliberté, RJ; Ryan, JL; Zonno, K; Rook, AH
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Sherman, ML, Wood, GS, Kuzel, TM, Olsen, E, Foss, F, Laliberté, RJ, Ryan, JL, Zonno, K, and Rook, AH. "A phase II open-label study of recombinant human interleukin-12 in patients with stage IA, IB, or IIA mycosis fungoides." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 55.5 (2006): 807-813.
PMID
17052486
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
55
Issue
5
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
807
End Page
813
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2006.06.038

Iron deficiency and hair loss: The jury is still out

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Iron deficiency and hair loss: The jury is still out." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 54.5 (2006): 903-906.
PMID
16635680
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
54
Issue
5
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
903
End Page
906
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2005.10.038

Female pattern hair loss and its relationship to permanent/cicatricial alopecia: a new perspective.

Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common hair disorder of the central scalp. The clinical change in hair density, related to a change in the hair cycle and miniaturization of the hair follicle, is generally considered to be potentially reversible. However, there is now evidence of a permanent hair loss that develops in a subset of women with FPHL. The presence of a perifollicular lymphohistiocytic infiltrate and fibrosis is seen without follicular drop-out in biopsies of women with FPHL and with a notable follicular drop-out in a cicatricial form of this condition (heretofore called cicatricial pattern hair loss) as well as in fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution, currently classified as a subset of lichen planopilaris. The potential relationship of these conditions as well as frontal fibrosing alopecia and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, two other conditions of permanent hair loss seen primary in women, is discussed.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Female pattern hair loss and its relationship to permanent/cicatricial alopecia: a new perspective." J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc 10.3 (December 2005): 217-221.
PMID
16382668
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings
Volume
10
Issue
3
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
217
End Page
221
DOI
10.1111/j.1087-0024.2005.10109.x

Evaluation and treatment of male and female pattern hair loss.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Messenger, AG; Shapiro, J; Bergfeld, WF; Hordinsky, MK; Roberts, JL; Stough, D; Washenik, K; Whiting, DA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Messenger, AG, Shapiro, J, Bergfeld, WF, Hordinsky, MK, Roberts, JL, Stough, D, Washenik, K, and Whiting, DA. "Evaluation and treatment of male and female pattern hair loss." J Am Acad Dermatol 52.2 (February 2005): 301-311.
PMID
15692478
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
52
Issue
2
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
301
End Page
311
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2004.04.008

Defining early mycosis fungoides

This editorial review summarizes the results of 5 meetings sponsored by the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphoma at which the clinicopathologic and ancillary features of early mycosis fungoides were critically examined. Based on this analysis, an algorithm was developed for the diagnosis of early mycosis fungoides involving a holistic integration of clinical, histopathologic, immunopathologic, and molecular biological characteristics. A novel aspect of this algorithm is that it relies on multiple types of criteria rather than just one, for example, histopathology. Before its finalization, the proposed diagnostic algorithm will require validation and possibly further refinement at multiple centers during the next several years. It is anticipated that a more standardized approach to the diagnosis of early mycosis fungoides will have a beneficial impact on the epidemiology, prognostication, treatment, and analysis of clinical trials pertaining to this most common type of cutaneous lymphoma. © 2005 by the American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

Authors
Pimpinelli, N; Olsen, EA; Santucci, M; Vonderheid, E; Haeffner, AC; Stevens, S; Burg, G; Cerroni, L; Dreno, B; Glusac, E; Guitart, J; Heald, PW; Kempf, W; Knobler, R; Lessin, S; Sander, C; Smoller, BS; Telang, G; Whittaker, S; Iwatsuki, K; Obitz, E; Takigawa, M; Turner, ML; Wood, GS
MLA Citation
Pimpinelli, N, Olsen, EA, Santucci, M, Vonderheid, E, Haeffner, AC, Stevens, S, Burg, G, Cerroni, L, Dreno, B, Glusac, E, Guitart, J, Heald, PW, Kempf, W, Knobler, R, Lessin, S, Sander, C, Smoller, BS, Telang, G, Whittaker, S, Iwatsuki, K, Obitz, E, Takigawa, M, Turner, ML, and Wood, GS. "Defining early mycosis fungoides." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 53.6 (2005): 1053-1063.
PMID
16310068
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
53
Issue
6
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
1053
End Page
1063
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2005.08.057

Short anagen syndrome

Short anagen syndrome is an uncommon, probably underreported, condition whose clinical characteristics are poorly recognized and whose incidence is poorly documented in the medical literature. We describe the clinicopathologic features of a child with short anagen syndrome and propose methods for diagnosing this entity by clinical examination, trichogram, light microscopic examination of the hair shaft, scalp biopsy, and measurement of scalp hair growth rate. © 2005 by the American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

Authors
Antaya, RJ; Sideridou, E; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Antaya, RJ, Sideridou, E, and Olsen, EA. "Short anagen syndrome." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 53.2 SUPPL. (2005): S130-S134.
PMID
16021162
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
53
Issue
2 SUPPL.
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
S130
End Page
S134
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2004.12.029

Alopecia areata investigational assessment guidelines--Part II. National Alopecia Areata Foundation.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Hordinsky, MK; Price, VH; Roberts, JL; Shapiro, J; Canfield, D; Duvic, M; King, LE; McMichael, AJ; Randall, VA; Turner, ML; Sperling, L; Whiting, DA; Norris, D; National Alopecia Areata Foundation,
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Hordinsky, MK, Price, VH, Roberts, JL, Shapiro, J, Canfield, D, Duvic, M, King, LE, McMichael, AJ, Randall, VA, Turner, ML, Sperling, L, Whiting, DA, Norris, D, and National Alopecia Areata Foundation, . "Alopecia areata investigational assessment guidelines--Part II. National Alopecia Areata Foundation." J Am Acad Dermatol 51.3 (September 2004): 440-447.
PMID
15337988
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
51
Issue
3
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
440
End Page
447
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2003.09.032

Topical 5-fluorouracil is ineffective in the treatment of extensive alopecia areata.

We report the results of a pilot study of topical 5% 5-fluorouracil (FU) cream for the treatment of alopecia areata, an immunologically modulated disorder of hair growth. Patients with extensive (>50% scalp surface area involvement) alopecia areata that was refractory to previous treatments applied 5-FU to one side of their scalp twice daily for 3 to 6 months. In all, 9 patients enrolled, and 8 completed the study. No patient experienced measurable hair growth on the treated side. Only mild irritation was observed in a subset of patients with application of 5-FU to the nonphotodamaged scalp skin. Based on these results, we cannot recommend the use of topical 5-FU for treatment of alopecia areata without further evidence of therapeutic benefit.

Authors
Kaplan, AL; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Kaplan, AL, and Olsen, EA. "Topical 5-fluorouracil is ineffective in the treatment of extensive alopecia areata." J Am Acad Dermatol 50.6 (June 2004): 941-943.
PMID
15153898
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
50
Issue
6
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
941
End Page
943
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2004.01.046

Update on the diagnosis and treatment of common causes of alopecia and potential interaction of hair cosmetics

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Update on the diagnosis and treatment of common causes of alopecia and potential interaction of hair cosmetics." Journal of Cosmetic Science 55.5 (2004): 492-493.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists
Volume
55
Issue
5
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
492
End Page
493

Alopecia areata investigational assessment guidelines-Part II

Authors
Olsen, EA; Hordinsky, MK; Price, VH; Roberts, JL; Shapiro, J; Canfield, D; Duvic, M; Jr, LEK; McMichael, AJ; Randall, VA; Turner, ML; Sperling, L; Whiting, DA; Norris, D
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Hordinsky, MK, Price, VH, Roberts, JL, Shapiro, J, Canfield, D, Duvic, M, Jr, LEK, McMichael, AJ, Randall, VA, Turner, ML, Sperling, L, Whiting, DA, and Norris, D. "Alopecia areata investigational assessment guidelines-Part II." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 51.3 (2004): 448-451.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
51
Issue
3
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
448
End Page
451
DOI
10.1016/j.jaad.2004.04.005

Current and novel methods for assessing efficacy of hair growth promoters in pattern hair loss.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Current and novel methods for assessing efficacy of hair growth promoters in pattern hair loss." J Am Acad Dermatol 48.2 (February 2003): 253-262. (Review)
PMID
12582397
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
48
Issue
2
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
253
End Page
262
DOI
10.1067/mjd.2003.81

Summary of North American Hair Research Society (NAHRS)-sponsored Workshop on Cicatricial Alopecia, Duke University Medical Center, February 10 and 11, 2001.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Bergfeld, WF; Cotsarelis, G; Price, VH; Shapiro, J; Sinclair, R; Solomon, A; Sperling, L; Stenn, K; Whiting, DA; Bernardo, O; Bettencourt, M; Bolduc, C; Callendar, V; Elston, D; Hickman, J; Ioffreda, M; King, L; Linzon, C; McMichael, A; Miller, J; Mulinari, F; Trancik, R; Workshop on Cicatricial Alopecia,
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Bergfeld, WF, Cotsarelis, G, Price, VH, Shapiro, J, Sinclair, R, Solomon, A, Sperling, L, Stenn, K, Whiting, DA, Bernardo, O, Bettencourt, M, Bolduc, C, Callendar, V, Elston, D, Hickman, J, Ioffreda, M, King, L, Linzon, C, McMichael, A, Miller, J, Mulinari, F, Trancik, R, and Workshop on Cicatricial Alopecia, . "Summary of North American Hair Research Society (NAHRS)-sponsored Workshop on Cicatricial Alopecia, Duke University Medical Center, February 10 and 11, 2001." J Am Acad Dermatol 48.1 (January 2003): 103-110.
PMID
12522378
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
48
Issue
1
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
103
End Page
110
DOI
10.1067/mjd.2003.68

Update on cicatricial alopecia

Cicatricial alopecia is an enigmatic group of hair disorders linked by the potential permanent loss of scalp hair follicles in involved areas. Progress in our understanding and treatment of these disorders has been stymied by the lack of clear diagnostic criteria for the current terms used to describe the various hair loss entities. Since all of these conditions evolve as the hair is destroyed or replaced, diagnosis is further made difficult by a lack of clinical and pathologic "snapshots" over the evolution of each disorder. Without some acceptance of general clinical and histological presentations in the early, mid and late stage of these disorders, one cannot begin to explore ways to make the diagnosis at a very early stage before significant follicular destraction has occurred (making the clinical diagnosis obvious) and when the damage is potentially repairable or progression preventable.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Stenn, K; Bergfeld, W; Cotsarelis, G; Price, V; Shapiro, J; Sinclair, R; Solomon, A; Sperling, L; Whiting, D
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Stenn, K, Bergfeld, W, Cotsarelis, G, Price, V, Shapiro, J, Sinclair, R, Solomon, A, Sperling, L, and Whiting, D. "Update on cicatricial alopecia." Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings 8.1 (2003): 18-19.
PMID
12894989
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings
Volume
8
Issue
1
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
18
End Page
19
DOI
10.1046/j.1523-1747.2003.12166.x

Cytokine therapy of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Interferons, interleukin-12, and interleukin-2

It is well accepted that cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL), including mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome, represent lymphomas that are highly responsive to immune modifying agents. Furthermore, the recent emphasis on the use of cytokine-related therapeutics is based upon the exceedingly important role of the host immune response in effecting progression of disease. In this article we discuss the data that support the importance of the host immune response in the control of progression of CTCL and the role that cytokine therapy has in supporting the host immune response and the effects of this approach to induce regression of skin and systemic disease.

Authors
Rook, AH; Kuzel, TM; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Rook, AH, Kuzel, TM, and Olsen, EA. "Cytokine therapy of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Interferons, interleukin-12, and interleukin-2." Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America 17.6 (2003): 1435-1448.
PMID
14710894
Source
scival
Published In
Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America
Volume
17
Issue
6
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
1435
End Page
1448
DOI
10.1016/S0889-8588(03)00109-6

Efficacy and tolerability of finasteride 1 mg in men aged 41 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss

A 24-month double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter study of 424 men was conducted to determine the efficacy and tolerability of finasteride 1 mg on hair growth/loss in men aged 41 to 60 years with mild-to-moderate, predominantly vertex male pattern hair loss. Efficacy was evaluated by review of global photographs of the vertex scalp taken at baseline and at Months 6, 12, 18, and 24 and by patient self-assessments and investigator clinical assessments of change from baseline in hair growth/loss collected at Months 6, 12, 18, and 24. Safety analyses included assessment of clinical and laboratory adverse experiences, including sexual adverse experiences. Analysis of global photographic assessment data showed significant improvement in hair growth for men in the finasteride group compared with those taking placebo beginning at Month 6 (p < 0.001) and maintained through Month 24 (p < 0.001). Results of the patient self-assessment and investigator assessments were consistent with those from the global photographic assessment. Finasteride 1 mg improved scalp hair growth in men aged 41 to 60 years with predominantly vertex male pattern hair loss compared with results seen with placebo. Improvement was evident by 6 months of treatment and continued through 24 months. Treatment with finasteride 1 mg was generally well tolerated.

Authors
Whiting, DA; Olsen, EA; Savin, R; Halper, L; Rodgers, A; Wang, L; Hustad, C; Palmisano, J
MLA Citation
Whiting, DA, Olsen, EA, Savin, R, Halper, L, Rodgers, A, Wang, L, Hustad, C, and Palmisano, J. "Efficacy and tolerability of finasteride 1 mg in men aged 41 to 60 years with male pattern hair loss." European Journal of Dermatology 13.2 (2003): 150-160.
PMID
12695131
Source
scival
Published In
European journal of dermatology : EJD
Volume
13
Issue
2
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
150
End Page
160

Interferon in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

Interferons are polypeptides with a broad range of in vivo effects that have shown efficacy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Particularly useful is alfa interferon (IFN) which, as a single agent, has shown partial remission rates of > 50% and complete responses of > 20%. Side-effects are predictable, generally well tolerated and dose-related. The efficacy of IFN has increased with combination therapy without any significant increase in attendant side-effects. An update on the specifics of the different IFN subtypes, their inherent biologic activity, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety in CTCL is presented in this paper.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Interferon in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." Dermatol Ther 16.4 (2003): 311-321. (Review)
PMID
14686974
Source
pubmed
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
16
Issue
4
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
311
End Page
321

Female pattern hair loss.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Hordinsky, M; Roberts, JL; Whiting, DA; Dermatologic Consortium for Women's Health,
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Hordinsky, M, Roberts, JL, Whiting, DA, and Dermatologic Consortium for Women's Health, . "Female pattern hair loss." J Am Acad Dermatol 47.5 (November 2002): 795-.
PMID
12399780
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
47
Issue
5
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
795

A randomized clinical trial of 5% topical minoxidil versus 2% topical minoxidil and placebo in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men.

BACKGROUND: Topical minoxidil solution 2% stimulates new hair growth and helps stop the loss of hair in individuals with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Results can be variable, and historical experience suggests that higher concentrations of topical minoxidil may enhance efficacy. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this 48-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, multicenter trial was to compare 5% topical minoxidil with 2% topical minoxidil and placebo in the treatment of men with AGA. METHODS: A total of 393 men (18-49 years old) with AGA applied 5% topical minoxidil solution (n = 157), 2% topical minoxidil solution (n = 158), or placebo (vehicle for 5% solution; n = 78) twice daily. Efficacy was evaluated by scalp target area hair counts and patient and investigator assessments of change in scalp coverage and benefit of treatment. RESULTS: After 48 weeks of therapy, 5% topical minoxidil was significantly superior to 2% topical minoxidil and placebo in terms of change from baseline in nonvellus hair count, patient rating of scalp coverage and treatment benefit, and investigator rating of scalp coverage. Hair count data indicate that response to treatment occurred earlier with 5% compared with 2% topical minoxidil. Additionally, data from a patient questionnaire on quality of life, global benefit, hair growth, and hair styling demonstrated that 5% topical minoxidil helped improve patients' psychosocial perceptions of hair loss. An increased occurrence of pruritus and local irritation was observed with 5% topical minoxidil compared with 2% topical minoxidil. CONCLUSION: In men with AGA, 5% topical minoxidil was clearly superior to 2% topical minoxidil and placebo in increasing hair regrowth, and the magnitude of its effect was marked (45% more hair regrowth than 2% topical minoxidil at week 48). Men who used 5% topical minoxidil also had an earlier response to treatment than those who used 2% topical minoxidil. Psychosocial perceptions of hair loss in men with AGA were also improved. Topical minoxidil (5% and 2%) was well tolerated by the men in this trial without evidence of systemic effects.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Dunlap, FE; Funicella, T; Koperski, JA; Swinehart, JM; Tschen, EH; Trancik, RJ
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Dunlap, FE, Funicella, T, Koperski, JA, Swinehart, JM, Tschen, EH, and Trancik, RJ. "A randomized clinical trial of 5% topical minoxidil versus 2% topical minoxidil and placebo in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men." J Am Acad Dermatol 47.3 (September 2002): 377-385.
PMID
12196747
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
47
Issue
3
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
377
End Page
385

My hair is thinning on the top of my head. What treatments are available for hair loss in women?

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "My hair is thinning on the top of my head. What treatments are available for hair loss in women?." Health News 8.3 (March 2002): 12-.
PMID
11910844
Source
pubmed
Published In
Health news (Waltham, Mass.)
Volume
8
Issue
3
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
12

Occupational alopecia or alopecia areata? [5]

Authors
Tosti, A; Piraccini, BM; Bergfeld, WF; Camacho, F; Dawber, RPR; Happle, R; Olsen, EA; Price, VH; Rebora, A; Shapiro, J; Sinclair, R; VanNeste, D; Whiting, DA
MLA Citation
Tosti, A, Piraccini, BM, Bergfeld, WF, Camacho, F, Dawber, RPR, Happle, R, Olsen, EA, Price, VH, Rebora, A, Shapiro, J, Sinclair, R, VanNeste, D, and Whiting, DA. "Occupational alopecia or alopecia areata? [5]." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 47.4 (2002): 636-637.
PMID
12271321
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
47
Issue
4
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
636
End Page
637

Update on erythrodermic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Report of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas

Two conferences were sponsored by the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) to gain consensus on definitions and terminology for clinical use in erythrodermic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (E-CTCL). Three subsets of E-CTCL were defined: Sézary syndrome ("leukemic phase" E-CTCL), erythrodermic mycosis fungoides (secondary E-CTCL that develops in patients with mycosis fungoides), and E-CTCL, not otherwise defined. The hematologic criteria recommended for Sézary syndrome are intended to identify patients with a worse prognosis compared with the other E-CTCL subsets and consist of one or more of the following: (1) an absolute Sézary cell count of 1000 cells/mm3 or more; (2) a CD4/CD8 ratio of 10 or higher caused by an increase in circulating T cells and/or an aberrant loss or expression of pan-T cell markers by flow cytometry; (3) increased lymphocyte counts with evidence of a T-cell clone in the blood by the Southern blot or polymerase chain reaction technique; or (4) a chromosomally abnormal T-cell clone. For staging purposes, it is proposed that these criteria define the B2 blood rating and that the B2 rating be considered equivalent to nodal involvement.

Authors
Vonderheid, EC; Bernengo, MG; Burg, G; Duvic, M; Heald, P; Laroche, L; Olsen, E; Pittelkow, M; Russell-Jones, R; Takigawa, M; Willemze, R
MLA Citation
Vonderheid, EC, Bernengo, MG, Burg, G, Duvic, M, Heald, P, Laroche, L, Olsen, E, Pittelkow, M, Russell-Jones, R, Takigawa, M, and Willemze, R. "Update on erythrodermic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Report of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 46.1 (2002): 95-106.
PMID
11756953
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
46
Issue
1
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
95
End Page
106
DOI
10.1067/mjd.2002.118538

Quality-of-life improvements in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients treated with denileukin diftitox (ONTAK®)

Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) can be associated with painful, pruritic, disfiguring lesions. As part of a multicenter, randomized phase III trial in patients with heavily pretreated advanced and/or recurrent CTCL, the effects of an interleukin-2 receptor-targeted fusion protein, denileukin diftitox (DAB389IL-2, ONTAK®), on patient-rated overall quality of life (QOL), skin appearance, and pruritus severity were evaluated. A total of 71 patients with stage IB-IVA CTCL received intravenous denileukin diftitox 9 μg/kg/day or 18 μg/kg/day over 15-60 minutes for 5 consecutive days on an outpatient basis; cycles were planned for every 21 days for a total of 8 cycles over 6 months. Prior to each treatment cycle, patients were evaluated for disease response and were asked to self-rate their overall QOL via the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) questionnaire, skin appearance (7-point scale), and pruritus severity (10-cm visual analogue scale). Composite FACT-G and most individual subscale scores (physical, social/family, emotional, and functional well being) in documented responders (n = 21) gradually increased during the study period, generally reaching statistical significance (P < 0.05) by cycle 3, and were significantly (P ≤ 0.041) higher than the scores of nonresponders at endpoint. Additionally for responders, assessments of skin severity and pruritus severity showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) improvements at study endpoint compared with baseline. Adverse transfusion-related events (eg, hypersensitivity reactions, flu-like syndrome) were common during cycles 1 and 2, and vascular-leak syndrome occurred in 25% of patients. Denileukin diftitox was not associated with any clinically significant myelosuppression. Heavily pretreated patients with advanced and/or recurrent CTCL who responded to denileukin diftitox therapy showed significant improvements in self-rated overall QOL, skin appearance, and pruritus severity.

Authors
Duvic, M; Kuzel, TM; Olsen, EA; Martin, AG; Foss, FM; Kim, YH; Heald, PW; Bacha, P; Nichols, J; Liepa, A
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Kuzel, TM, Olsen, EA, Martin, AG, Foss, FM, Kim, YH, Heald, PW, Bacha, P, Nichols, J, and Liepa, A. "Quality-of-life improvements in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients treated with denileukin diftitox (ONTAK®)." Clinical Lymphoma 2.4 (2002): 222-228.
PMID
11970761
Source
scival
Published In
Clinical lymphoma
Volume
2
Issue
4
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
222
End Page
228

Pivotal phase III trial of two dose levels of denileukin diftitox for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

PURPOSE: The objective of this phase III study was to determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of denileukin diftitox (DAB389IL-2, Ontak [Ligand Pharmaceuticals Inc, San Diego, CA]) in patients with stage Ib to IVa cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) who have previously received other therapeutic interventions. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven CTCL that expressed CD25 on > or = 20% of lymphocytes were assigned to one of two dose levels (9 or 18 microg/kg/d) of denileukin diftitox administered 5 consecutive days every 3 weeks for up to 8 cycles. Patients were monitored for toxicity and clinical efficacy, the latter assessed by changes in disease burden and quality of life measurements. Antibody levels of antidenileukin diftitox and anti-interleukin-2 and serum concentrations of denileukin diftitox were also measured. RESULTS: Overall, 30% of the 71 patients with CTCL treated with denileukin diftitox had an objective response (20% partial response; 10% complete response). The response rate and duration of response based on the time of the first dose of study drug for all responders (median of 6.9 months with a range of 2.7 to more than 46.1 months) were not statistically different between the two doses. Adverse events consisted of flu-like symptoms (fever/chills, nausea/vomiting, and myalgias/arthralgias), acute infusion-related events (hypotension, dyspnea, chest pain, and back pain), and a vascular leak syndrome (hypotension, hypoalbuminemia, edema). In addition, 61% of the patients experienced transient elevations of hepatic transaminase levels with 17% grade 3 or 4. Hypoalbuminemia occurred in 79%, including 15% with grade 3 or 4 changes. Tolerability at 9 and 18 microg/kg/d was similar, and there was no evidence of cumulative toxicity. CONCLUSION: Denileukin diftitox has been shown to be a useful and important agent in the treatment of patients whose CTCL is persistent or recurrent despite other therapeutic interventions.

Authors
Olsen, E; Duvic, M; Frankel, A; Kim, Y; Martin, A; Vonderheid, E; Jegasothy, B; Wood, G; Gordon, M; Heald, P; Oseroff, A; Pinter-Brown, L; Bowen, G; Kuzel, T; Fivenson, D; Foss, F; Glode, M; Molina, A; Knobler, E; Stewart, S; Cooper, K; Stevens, S; Craig, F; Reuben, J; Bacha, P; Nichols, J
MLA Citation
Olsen, E, Duvic, M, Frankel, A, Kim, Y, Martin, A, Vonderheid, E, Jegasothy, B, Wood, G, Gordon, M, Heald, P, Oseroff, A, Pinter-Brown, L, Bowen, G, Kuzel, T, Fivenson, D, Foss, F, Glode, M, Molina, A, Knobler, E, Stewart, S, Cooper, K, Stevens, S, Craig, F, Reuben, J, Bacha, P, and Nichols, J. "Pivotal phase III trial of two dose levels of denileukin diftitox for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." J Clin Oncol 19.2 (January 15, 2001): 376-388.
PMID
11208829
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
19
Issue
2
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
376
End Page
388
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2001.19.2.376

Female pattern hair loss: Clinical features and potential hormonal factors

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Female pattern hair loss: Clinical features and potential hormonal factors." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 45.3 SUPPL. (2001): S69-.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
45
Issue
3 SUPPL.
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
S69
DOI
10.1067/mjd.2001.117631

Phase 2 and 3 clinical trial of oral bexarotene (Targretin capsules) for the treatment of refractory or persistent early-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Objectives: To determine the safety and efficacy of oral bexarotene (Targretin capsules; Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated, San Diego, Calif). Design: The effects of 2 randomized doses of 6.5 mg/m2 per day (with crossover for progression) vs 650 mg/m2 per day (later modified to 300 mg/m2 per day) were evaluated in an open-label, multicenter, phase 2 and 3 study conducted between February 1997 and November 1998. Setting: Eighteen international cutaneous T-cell lymphoma clinics at academic referral centers. Patients: Fifty-eight patients with biopsy-proven stage IA through ILA cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that was refractory to (or patients were intolerant of) treatment or had reached at least a 6-month response plateau under at least 2 forms of prior therapy (median of 3.5 prior therapies). Intervention: Bexarotene (Targretin capsules) administered once daily with meal for 16 weeks or longer. Main Outcome Measures: Primary end point classification of overall response rate of complete and partial remissions determined by either the Physician's Global Assessment of Clinical Condition or the objective Composite Assessment of Index Lesion Severity. Body surface area, time to response, duration of disease control, time to disease progression, individual index lesion signs and symptoms, and quality of life parameters were secondary outcomes. Results: Responses (≥50% improvement) were seen in 3 (20%) of 15 patients with an initial dose at 6.5 mg/m2 per day (95% confidence interval [CI], 0%-40%), 15 (54%) of 28 patients at 300 mg/m2 per day (95% CI, 35%-72%), and 10 (67%) of 15 patients at above 300 mg/m2 per day (95% CI, 43%-91%). The rate of progressive disease was 47%, 21%, and 13% at the same dose levels, respectively. Eight (73%) of 11 patients crossing over from 6.5 mg/m2 per day to higher doses subsequently responded. The median duration of response from start of therapy could not be estimated for the 15 patients at 300 mg/m2 per day owing to low relapse rates in 2 patients (13%); at higher doses it was 516 days. The following drug-related adverse effects were reversible and treatable: hypertriglyceridemia (46 patients [79%]), hypercholesterolemia (28 patients [48%]), headache (27 patients [47%]), central hypothyroidism (23 patients [40%]), asthenia (21 patients [36%]), and leukopenia (16 patients [28%]). No cases of drug-related neutropenic fever, sepsis, or death occurred. Pancreatitis occurred in 3 patients with triglyceride levels higher than 14.69 mmol/L (1300 mg/dL), all of whom were taking 300 mg/m2 or more of oral bexarotene per day. Conclusions: Bexarotene (Targretin capsules) (the first retinoid X receptor-selective rexinoid) was well tolerated and effective as an oral treatment for 15 (54%) of 28 patients with refractory or persistent early-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma at doses of 300 mg/m2 per day. Hypertriglyceridemia and hypothyroidism require monitoring but are reversible and manageable with concomitant medication.

Authors
Duvic, M; Martin, AG; Kim, Y; Olsen, E; Wood, GS; Crowley, CA; Yocum, RC
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Martin, AG, Kim, Y, Olsen, E, Wood, GS, Crowley, CA, and Yocum, RC. "Phase 2 and 3 clinical trial of oral bexarotene (Targretin capsules) for the treatment of refractory or persistent early-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." Archives of Dermatology 137.5 (2001): 581-593.
PMID
11346336
Source
scival
Published In
Archives of Dermatology
Volume
137
Issue
5
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
581
End Page
593

A phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of peldesine (BCX-34) cream as topical therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Background: The purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor peldesine is a new agent being evaluated as a T-cell inhibitor. Objective: We attempted to determine the efficacy of peldesine (BCX-34) in a 1% dermal cream formulation as a treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Methods: Ninety patients with patch and plaque phase CTCL, histologically confirmed by a referee dermatopathologist, were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. BCX-34 dermal cream 1% or the vehicle cream (as a placebo control) was applied twice daily to the entire skin surface for up to 24 weeks. Efficacy of the topical therapy was assessed in terms of complete or partial (≥ 50%) clearing of patches and plaques. Results: Of the 89 patients able to be examined, 43 received BCX-34 and 46 received the placebo vehicle cream. One patient withdrew early and was not analyzed. The two groups were well balanced for potential prognostic factors. A total of 28% (12/43) of the patients treated with BCX-34 showed a response, but 24% (11/46) of patients who received vehicle also responded (P = .677). Conclusion: Although BCX-34 dermal cream 1% was not significantly better than the control as therapy for patch and plaque-phase CTCL, this appears to be the first published placebo-controlled trial evaluating treatment for CTCL. Whether the vehicle cream has more than a placebo therapeutic effect is unclear. The relatively high (24%) placebo response rate should be kept in mind in assessing other treatments for early-stage CTCL.

Authors
Duvic, M; Olsen, EA; Omura, GA; Maize, JC; Vonderheid, EC; Elmets, CA; Shupack, JL; Demierre, M-F; Kuzel, TM; Sanders, DY
MLA Citation
Duvic, M, Olsen, EA, Omura, GA, Maize, JC, Vonderheid, EC, Elmets, CA, Shupack, JL, Demierre, M-F, Kuzel, TM, and Sanders, DY. "A phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of peldesine (BCX-34) cream as topical therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 44.6 (2001): 940-947.
PMID
11369904
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
44
Issue
6
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
940
End Page
947
DOI
10.1067/mjd.2001.113478

Female pattern hair loss

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Female pattern hair loss." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 45.3 SUPPL. (2001): S70-S80.
PMID
11511856
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
45
Issue
3 SUPPL.
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
S70
End Page
S80
DOI
10.1067/mjd.2001.117426

The role for interleukin-12 therapy of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

Recent phase I and phase II trials using recombinant human interleukin-12 (rhIL-12) for cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) have been completed. Observations on 32 evaluable patients revealed an overall response rate approaching 50 percent. Biopsy of regressing lesions revealed an increase in numbers of CD8+ and/or TIA-1+ T cells. These results suggest that rhIL-12 may induce lesion regression by augmenting antitumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Future trials will be focused on strategies for further immune enhancement by the concomitant use of additional immune augmenting cytokines with rhIL-12.

Authors
Rook, AH; Zaki, MH; Wysocka, M; Wood, GS; Duvic, M; Showe, LC; Foss, F; Shapiro, M; Kuzel, TM; Olsen, EA; Vonderheid, EC; Laliberte, R; Sherman, ML
MLA Citation
Rook, AH, Zaki, MH, Wysocka, M, Wood, GS, Duvic, M, Showe, LC, Foss, F, Shapiro, M, Kuzel, TM, Olsen, EA, Vonderheid, EC, Laliberte, R, and Sherman, ML. "The role for interleukin-12 therapy of cutaneous T cell lymphoma." Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 941 (2001): 177-184.
PMID
11594571
Source
scival
Published In
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume
941
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
177
End Page
184

Lack of efficacy of finasteride in postmenopausal women with androgenetic alopecia

Background: Finasteride, an inhibitor of type 2 5α-reductase, decreases serum and scalp dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by inhibiting conversion of testosterone to DHT and has been shown to be effective in men with androgenetic alopecia (AGA). The effects of finasteride in women with AGA have not been evaluated. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of finasteride in postmenopausal women with AGA. Methods: In this 1-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, multicenter trial, 137 post-menopausal women (41-60 years of age) with AGA received finasteride 1 mg/day or placebo. Efficacy was evaluated by scalp hair counts, patient and investigator assessments, assessment of global photographs by a blinded expert panel, and histologic analysis of scalp biopsy specimens. Results: After 1 year of therapy, there was no significant difference in the change in hair count between the finasteride and placebo groups. Both treatment groups had significant decreases in hair count in the frontal/parietal (anterior/mid) scalp during the 1-year study period. Similarly, patient, investigator, and photographic assessments as well as scalp biopsy analysis did not demonstrate any improvement in slowing hair thinning, increasing hair growth, or improving the appearance of the hair in finasteride-treated subjects compared with the placebo group. Finasteride was generally well tolerated. Conclusion: In postmenopausal women with AGA, finasteride 1 mg/day taken for 12 months did not not increase hair growth or slow the progression of hair thinning.

Authors
Price, VH; Roberts, JL; Hordinsky, M; Olsen, EA; Savin, R; Bergfeld, W; Fiedler, V; Lucky, A; Whiting, DA; Pappas, F; Culbertson, J; Kotey, P; Meehan, A; Waldstreicher, J
MLA Citation
Price, VH, Roberts, JL, Hordinsky, M, Olsen, EA, Savin, R, Bergfeld, W, Fiedler, V, Lucky, A, Whiting, DA, Pappas, F, Culbertson, J, Kotey, P, Meehan, A, and Waldstreicher, J. "Lack of efficacy of finasteride in postmenopausal women with androgenetic alopecia." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 43.5 (2000): 768-776.
PMID
11050579
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
43
Issue
5
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
768
End Page
776

The presence of loose anagen hairs obtained by hair pull in the normal population.

To help determine the specificity of "loose anagen" (LA) hairs in Loose Anagen Syndrome, the presence or absence of LA hairs on a gentle but firm hair pull was evaluated in 110 normal subjects from a 0.5 to 83 y old. In children < or =10 y old, 61% had LA hairs on hair pull evaluation and 73% of all hairs obtained were LA hairs. In contrast, LA hairs were found in only two of 87 (2%) normal postpubescent subjects. The number of LA hairs was small in normal children (1-2 per hair pull) and a maximum of one out of every 6-7 hair pulls in adults, far less than that reported with Loose Anagen Syndrome. Although the mere presence of LA hairs on a hair pull test is thus not specific for LAS in children, the number per hair pull may have diagnostic significance. Correlation of these findings with the various hair disorder phenotypes currently termed Loose Anagen Syndrome will be important.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Bettencourt, MS; Coté, NL
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Bettencourt, MS, and Coté, NL. "The presence of loose anagen hairs obtained by hair pull in the normal population." J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc 4.3 (December 1999): 258-260.
PMID
10674377
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings
Volume
4
Issue
3
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
258
End Page
260

Pityriasis amiantacea: a report of two cases in adults.

Pityriasis amiantacea is a scaly condition of the scalp that is usually seen in children. It is most often associated with an underlying primary dermatosis. We describe two adult patients who did not present with concomitant scalp or cutaneous diseases.

Authors
Bettencourt, MS; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Bettencourt, MS, and Olsen, EA. "Pityriasis amiantacea: a report of two cases in adults." Cutis 64.3 (September 1999): 187-189.
PMID
10500922
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cutis; cutaneous medicine for the practitioner
Volume
64
Issue
3
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
187
End Page
189

Efficacy of finasteride 1 mg in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Efficacy of finasteride 1 mg in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men." Exp Dermatol 8.4 (August 1999): 302-303.
PMID
10439233
Source
pubmed
Published In
Experimental Dermatology
Volume
8
Issue
4
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
302
End Page
303

Methods of hair removal.

The methods of hair removal vary between simple inexpensive means of home treatment (shaving, plucking, depilatories) to expensive and potentially time-consuming means used by paraprofessionals, nurses, and/or physicians (electrolysis, lasers, x-ray). The ways in which these different methods induce hair removal, the duration of such removal, and the nuances between devices within the same category of methods are discussed.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Methods of hair removal." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 40.2 Pt 1 (February 1999): 143-155. (Review)
PMID
10025738
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
40
Issue
2 Pt 1
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
143
End Page
155
DOI
10.1016/s0190-9622(99)70181-7

The midline part: an important physical clue to the clinical diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia in women.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "The midline part: an important physical clue to the clinical diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia in women." J Am Acad Dermatol 40.1 (January 1999): 106-109.
PMID
9922024
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
40
Issue
1
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
106
End Page
109

Methods of hair removal

The methods of hair removal vary between simple inexpensive means of home treatment (shaving, plucking, depilatories) to expensive and potentially time-consuming means used by paraprofessionals, nurses, and/or physicians (electrolysis, lasers, x-ray). The ways in which these different methods induce hair removal, the duration of such removal, and the nuances between devices within the same category of methods are discussed.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Methods of hair removal." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 40.2 I (1999): 143-155.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
40
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
143
End Page
155
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(99)70181-7

Alopecia areata investigational assessment guidelines

Authors
Olsen, E; Hordinsky, M; McDonald-Hull, S; Price, V; Roberts, J; Shapiro, J; Stenn, K
MLA Citation
Olsen, E, Hordinsky, M, McDonald-Hull, S, Price, V, Roberts, J, Shapiro, J, and Stenn, K. "Alopecia areata investigational assessment guidelines." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 40.2 I (1999): 242-246.
PMID
10025752
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
40
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
242
End Page
246
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(99)70195-7

Clinical dose ranging studies with finasteride, a type 2 5α-reductase inhibitor, in men with male pattern hair loss

Background: Androgenetic alopecia is a common condition of adult men. Finasteride, a type 2 5α-reductase inhibitor, decreases the formation of dihydrotestosterone from testosterone. Objective: Two separate clinical studies were conducted to establish the optimal dose of finasteride in men with this condition. Methods: Men from 18 to 36 years of age with moderate vertex male pattern hair loss received finasteride 5, 1, 0.2, or 0.01 mg/day or placebo based on random assignment. Efficacy was determined by scalp hair counts, patient self-assessment, investigator assessment, and assessment of clinical photographs. Safety was assessed by clinical and laboratory measurements and by analysis of adverse experiences. Results: Efficacy was demonstrated for all end points for finasteride at doses of 0.2 mg/day or higher, with 1 and 5 mg demonstrating similar efficacy that was superior to lower doses. Efficacy of the 0.01 mg dose was similar to placebo. No significant safety issues were identified in the trials. Conclusion: Finasteride 1 mg/day is the optimal dose for the treatment of men with male pattern hair loss and was subsequently identified for further clinical development.

Authors
Roberts, JL; Fiedler, V; Imperato-McGinley, J; Whiting, D; Olsen, E; Shupack, J; Stough, D; DeVillez, R; Rietschel, R; Savin, R; Bergfeld, W; Swinehart, J; Funicella, T; Hordinsky, M; Lowe, N; Katz, I; Lucky, A; Drake, L; Price, VH; Weiss, D; Whitmore, E; Millikan, L; Muller, S; Gencheff, C; Carrington, P; Binkowitz, B; Kotey, P; He, W; Bruno, K; Jacobsen, C; Terranella, L; Gormley, GJ; Kaufman, KD
MLA Citation
Roberts, JL, Fiedler, V, Imperato-McGinley, J, Whiting, D, Olsen, E, Shupack, J, Stough, D, DeVillez, R, Rietschel, R, Savin, R, Bergfeld, W, Swinehart, J, Funicella, T, Hordinsky, M, Lowe, N, Katz, I, Lucky, A, Drake, L, Price, VH, Weiss, D, Whitmore, E, Millikan, L, Muller, S, Gencheff, C, Carrington, P, Binkowitz, B, Kotey, P, He, W, Bruno, K, Jacobsen, C, Terranella, L, Gormley, GJ, and Kaufman, KD. "Clinical dose ranging studies with finasteride, a type 2 5α-reductase inhibitor, in men with male pattern hair loss." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 41.4 (1999): 555-563.
PMID
10495375
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
41
Issue
4
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
555
End Page
563

Pivotal phase III trial of two dose levels of DAB(389)IL-2 (ONTAK (TM)) for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL)

Authors
Olsen, EA; Duvic, M; Martin, A; Grp, DIL
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Duvic, M, Martin, A, and Grp, DIL. "Pivotal phase III trial of two dose levels of DAB(389)IL-2 (ONTAK (TM)) for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL)." JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY 110.4 (April 1998): 678-678.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume
110
Issue
4
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
678
End Page
678

Hair removal in hirsutism

Patients with hirsutism can and do use physical means to remove terminal hair growth on the face, but medical assessment should be done prior to proceeding with expensive methods such as electrolysis or laser. Conditions such as hyperandrogenemia associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, prolactinemia or polycystic ovarian syndrome should have medical treatment instituted first to prevent further vellus to terminal transformation since both electrolysis and laser generally target only terminal hairs. Although electrolysis may initially seem more time consuming and expensive than laser, the final judgment must be determined by comparison of total treatment time, spread out over what duration of time, at what total cost and, of course, the potential for permanent versus transient hair removal. Well controlled comparative trials for the same body site in the same patient are needed to determine relative efficacy and cost of the various hair removal methods. Further information regarding the biology of hair growth as pertains to hair removal and a more detailed discussion of the various methods of hair removal will be published in an article by Elise A. Olsen in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Hair removal in hirsutism." Dermatologic Therapy 8 (1998): 68-72.
Source
scival
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
8
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
68
End Page
72

The diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "The diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia." Dermatologic Therapy 8 (1998): 18-23.
Source
scival
Published In
Dermatologic Therapy
Volume
8
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
18
End Page
23

Finasteride in the treatment of men with androgenetic alopecia

Background: Androgenetic alopecia (male pattern hair loss) is caused by androgen-dependent miniaturization of scalp hair follicles, with scalp dihydrotestosterone (DHT) implicated as a contributing cause. Finasteride, an inhibitor of type II 5α-reductase, decreases serum and scalp DHT by inhibiting conversion of testosterone to DHT. Objective: Our purpose was to determine whether finasteride treatment leads to clinical improvement in men with male pattern hair loss. Methods: In two 1-year trials, 1553 men (18 to 41 years of age) with male pattern hair loss received oral finasteride 1 mg/d or placebo, and 1215 men continued in blinded extension studies for a second year. Efficacy was evaluated by scalp hair counts, patient and investigator assessments, and review of photographs by an expert panel. Results: Finasteride treatment improved scalp hair by all evaluation techniques at 1 and 2 years (P < .001 vs placebo, all comparisons). Clinically significant increases in hair count (baseline = 876 hairs), measured in a 1-inch diameter circular area (5.1 cm2) of balding vertex scalp, were observed with finasteride treatment (107 and 138 hairs vs placebo at 1 and 2 years, respectively; P < .001). Treatment with placebo resulted in progressive hair loss. Patients' self-assessment demonstrated that finasteride treatment slowed hair loss, increased hair growth, and improved appearance of hair. These improvements were corroborated by investigator assessments and assessments of photographs. Adverse effects were minimal. Conclusion: In men with male pattern hair loss, finasteride 1 mg/d slowed the progression of hair loss and increased hair growth in clinical trials over 2 years.

Authors
Kaufman, KD; Olsen, EA; Whiting, D; Savin, R; DeVillez, R; Bergfeld, W; Price, VH; Neste, DV; Roberts, JL; Hordinsky, M; Shapiro, J; Binkowitz, B; Gormley, GJ; Asarch, R; Birchall, N; Boersma, IH; Brenner, S; Bruno, K; Buntin, D; Burg, G; Cilliers, J; Cotterill, P; Cunliffe, WJ; Ferguson, D; Fiedler, V; Fivenson, D; Funicella, T; Gencheff, C; Gratton, D; He, W; Horwitz, S; Imperato-McGinley, J; Santa-Cruz, FJ; Katz, I; Kelly, AP; Kopera, D; Kotey, P; Lachapelle, J-M; Ling, M; Lopez-Bran, E et al.
MLA Citation
Kaufman, KD, Olsen, EA, Whiting, D, Savin, R, DeVillez, R, Bergfeld, W, Price, VH, Neste, DV, Roberts, JL, Hordinsky, M, Shapiro, J, Binkowitz, B, Gormley, GJ, Asarch, R, Birchall, N, Boersma, IH, Brenner, S, Bruno, K, Buntin, D, Burg, G, Cilliers, J, Cotterill, P, Cunliffe, WJ, Ferguson, D, Fiedler, V, Fivenson, D, Funicella, T, Gencheff, C, Gratton, D, He, W, Horwitz, S, Imperato-McGinley, J, Santa-Cruz, FJ, Katz, I, Kelly, AP, Kopera, D, Kotey, P, Lachapelle, J-M, Ling, M, and Lopez-Bran, E et al. "Finasteride in the treatment of men with androgenetic alopecia." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 39.4 I (1998): 578-589.
PMID
9777765
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
39
Issue
4 I
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
578
End Page
589
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(98)70007-6

A randomized, double-blind study comparing the efficacy, safety and optimal dose of two formulations of cyclosporin, Neoral and Sandimmun, in patients with severe psoriasis

This study compared the efficacy, safety and optimal dose of two formulations of cyclosporin, Sandimmun® and Neoral®, in patients with severe, chronic plaque-type psoriasis. Patients were randomized on a 1:1 basis to 24 weeks of treatment with Neoral (n=152) or Sandimmun (n=157). The starting dose of each formulation was 2.5 mg/kg per day. Dose increases to maintain efficacy were allowed after 4 weeks. In patients who achieved remission, the dose was down-titrated at 4-week intervals from week 16. The maximum permitted dose for each formulation was 5.0 mg/kg per day. Neoral produced a more rapid response than Sandimmun: remission rates were higher for Neoral during the first 8 weeks of treatment. The number of dose reductions for safety was similar in both treatment groups, but there were more dose increases to maintain efficacy in the Sandimmun group (198) than the Neoral group (146). The number of patients with dose reductions after week 16 was higher for Neoral (n=83) than for Sandimmun (n=73). The frequency and nature of adverse events were similar for both treatment groups. The mean dose required to control the disease was ≃ 10% lower with Neoral and fewer dose changes were needed. The increased bioavailability and reduced pharmacokinetic variability of cyclosporin provided by the Neoral formulation may facilitate short-course, intermittent therapy.

Authors
Koo, J; Abrams, B; Albrecht, G; Altmeyer, P; Bahmer, FA; Belaich, S; Berth-Jones, J; Bjerke, JR; Bos, JD; Braathen, L; Burg, G; Burrows, D; Claudy, A; Drake, LA; Dubertret, L; Engst, R; Ettelt, MI; Frenk, E; Frosch, PJ; Ganslandt, J; Goos, M; Graham-Brown, RAC; Guilhou, JJ; Haustein, UF; Helland, S; Hutchinson, K; Jacobi, H; Jung, EG; Kang, S; Kind, P; Knop, J; Lowe, NJ; Luger, T; Mahrle, G; Marks, R; Meffert, H; Meyer, J; Mørk, NJ; Mrowietz, U; Neumann, HAM; Olsen, EA; Rogers, S; Ruzicka, T et al.
MLA Citation
Koo, J, Abrams, B, Albrecht, G, Altmeyer, P, Bahmer, FA, Belaich, S, Berth-Jones, J, Bjerke, JR, Bos, JD, Braathen, L, Burg, G, Burrows, D, Claudy, A, Drake, LA, Dubertret, L, Engst, R, Ettelt, MI, Frenk, E, Frosch, PJ, Ganslandt, J, Goos, M, Graham-Brown, RAC, Guilhou, JJ, Haustein, UF, Helland, S, Hutchinson, K, Jacobi, H, Jung, EG, Kang, S, Kind, P, Knop, J, Lowe, NJ, Luger, T, Mahrle, G, Marks, R, Meffert, H, Meyer, J, Mørk, NJ, Mrowietz, U, Neumann, HAM, Olsen, EA, Rogers, S, and Ruzicka, T et al. "A randomized, double-blind study comparing the efficacy, safety and optimal dose of two formulations of cyclosporin, Neoral and Sandimmun, in patients with severe psoriasis." British Journal of Dermatology 139.1 (1998): 88-95.
PMID
9764154
Source
scival
Published In
British Journal of Dermatology
Volume
139
Issue
1
Publish Date
1998
Start Page
88
End Page
95
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2133.1998.02319.x

Sustained improvement in photodamaged skin with reduced tretinoin emollient cream treatment regimen: effect of once-weekly and three-times-weekly applications.

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have documented reversal of long-term photodamage with once-daily applications of topical tretinoin. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of tretinoin emollient cream in maintaining improvement in photodamage with a reduced frequency of applications. METHODS: A total of 126 subjects who completed 48 weeks of once-daily treatment with tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% were enrolled for an additional 24 weeks of tretinoin once weekly, three times weekly, or no therapy. RESULTS: The clinical improvement observed during 48 weeks of once-daily treatment was sustained with three-times weekly applications and to a lesser extent with once-weekly dosing, whereas effects tended to regress in subjects off therapy. The overall incidence of adverse events in the skin and subcutaneous tissues appeared to vary with dose frequency. CONCLUSION: After 48 weeks of once-daily treatment, the continued use of tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% at a dose of three times per week maintains and, in some cases, may further enhance improvement in photodamage. Discontinuation of therapy results in some reversal of beneficial effects.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Katz, HI; Levine, N; Nigra, TP; Pochi, PE; Savin, RC; Shupack, J; Weinstein, GD; Lufrano, L; Jou, HC
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Katz, HI, Levine, N, Nigra, TP, Pochi, PE, Savin, RC, Shupack, J, Weinstein, GD, Lufrano, L, and Jou, HC. "Sustained improvement in photodamaged skin with reduced tretinoin emollient cream treatment regimen: effect of once-weekly and three-times-weekly applications." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 37.2 Pt 1 (August 1997): 227-230.
PMID
9270508
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
37
Issue
2 Pt 1
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
227
End Page
230
DOI
10.1016/s0190-9622(97)80129-6

Pentostatin (2'-deoxycoformycin) in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Background: The treatment of patients with advanced or therapy- refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) remains a challenge. Pentostatin is a potent inhibitor of adenosine deaminase and is selectively toxic to lymphocytes. In a small number of patients with CTCL, it previously has been shown to be effective. Objective: Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pentostatin in the treatment of patients with advanced and/or therapy-refractory CTCL. Methods: Eighteen patients with stage 1 to IVb CTCL were treated with 4 to 5 mg/m2 of in travenous pentostatin every 1 to 4 weeks. Results: Two patients (11%) had complete responses of 4 months and 6 years, respectively. These patients had stage III and IVa CTCL and had previously received many different external or systemic treatments. Partial remission (50% to 99% clearing) lasting for 1.5 to 6 months occurred in five patients (28%) with stage IIa (n = 3), stage IIb, and stage IVa CTCL. These patients had received a median of three prior external or systemic treatments. No major side effects were observed, and bone marrow suppression was mild. Conclusion: Single-agent pentostatin in intravenous doses of 4 to 5 mg/m2 is an effective systemic treatment of CTCL (39% objective response rate) with little toxicity.

Authors
Greiner, D; Olsen, EA; Petroni, G
MLA Citation
Greiner, D, Olsen, EA, and Petroni, G. "Pentostatin (2'-deoxycoformycin) in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 36.6 I (1997): 950-955.
PMID
9204061
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
36
Issue
6 I
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
950
End Page
955
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(97)80279-4

Tretinoin emollient cream for photodamaged skin: Results of 48-week, multicenter, double-blind studies

Background: The ability of topical tretinoin to improve certain signs of skin photodamage has been shown previously. Objective: Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of tretinoin emollient cream in maintaining or further improving photodamaged skin during extended use. Methods: Photodamaged subjects who completed 24 weeks of once-daily use of tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% (n =149) or 0.01% (n = 149) continued to use the same strength formulation in a 24-week double-blind extension. Results: Maintenance of improvement or continued reduction in signs of photodamage was noted in both investigators' and subjects' evaluations of the 0.05% and 0.01% preparations; these results were confirmed by skin replica analyses. Cutaneous side effects were less common during the extension study than during the first 24 weeks of therapy. Conclusion: Both strengths of tretinoin emollient cream (0.05% and 0.01%) appeared safe and effective in the treatment of photodamaged skin during a 48-week treatment period.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Katz, IH; Levine, N; Nigra, TP; Pochi, PE; Savin, RC; Shupack, J; Weinstein, GD; Lufrano, L; Perry, BH
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Katz, IH, Levine, N, Nigra, TP, Pochi, PE, Savin, RC, Shupack, J, Weinstein, GD, Lufrano, L, and Perry, BH. "Tretinoin emollient cream for photodamaged skin: Results of 48-week, multicenter, double-blind studies." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 37.2 I (1997): 217-226.
PMID
9270507
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
37
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
217
End Page
226
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(97)80128-4

Sustained improvement in photodamaged skin with reduced tretinoin emollient cream treatment regimen: Effect of once-weekly and three-times- weekly applications

Background: Previous studies have documented reversal of long-term photodamage with once-daily applications of topical tretinoin. Objective: Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of tretinoin emollient cream in maintaining improvement in photodamage with a reduced frequency of applications. Methods: A total of 126 subjects who completed 48 weeks of once-daily treatment with tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% were enrolled for an additional 24 weeks of tretinoin once weekly, three times weekly, or no therapy. Results: The clinical improvement observed during 48 weeks of once- daily treatment was sustained with three-times weekly applications and to a lesser extent with once-weekly dosing, whereas effects tended to regress in subjects off therapy. The overall incidence of adverse events in the skin and subcutaneous tissues appeared to vary with dose frequency. Conclusion: After 48 weeks of once-daily treatment, the continued use of tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% at a dose of three times per week maintains and, in some cases, may further enhance improvement in photodamage. Discontinuation of therapy results in some reversal of beneficial effects.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Katz, IH; Levine, N; Nigra, TP; Pochi, PE; Savin, RC; Shupack, J; Weinstein, GD; Lufrano, L; Hann-Chang, J
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Katz, IH, Levine, N, Nigra, TP, Pochi, PE, Savin, RC, Shupack, J, Weinstein, GD, Lufrano, L, and Hann-Chang, J. "Sustained improvement in photodamaged skin with reduced tretinoin emollient cream treatment regimen: Effect of once-weekly and three-times- weekly applications." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 37.2 I (1997): 227-230.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
37
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1997
Start Page
227
End Page
230
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(97)80129-6

Guidelines of care for the use of topical glucocorticosteroids

Authors
Drake, LA; Dinehart, SM; Farmer, ER; Goltz, RW; Graham, GF; Hordinsky, MK; Lewis, CW; Pariser, DM; Webster, SB; Whitaker, DC; Butler, B; Lowery, BJ; Raimer, SA; Krafchik, BR; Olsen, E; Weston, WL
MLA Citation
Drake, LA, Dinehart, SM, Farmer, ER, Goltz, RW, Graham, GF, Hordinsky, MK, Lewis, CW, Pariser, DM, Webster, SB, Whitaker, DC, Butler, B, Lowery, BJ, Raimer, SA, Krafchik, BR, Olsen, E, and Weston, WL. "Guidelines of care for the use of topical glucocorticosteroids." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 35.4 (1996): 615-619.
PMID
8859293
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
35
Issue
4
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
615
End Page
619
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(96)90690-8

Efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate 0.005% ointment in the treatment of psoriasis

Two multicenter, double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled parallel-group trials involving 388 patients were conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate 0.005% ointment to those of its vehicle in the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. The study medication (up to 100 gm/week) was applied topically to the affected target areas of the body twice daily for up to four consecutive weeks. Efficacy and safety were evaluated after one, two, three, and four weeks of treatment. In both studies, fluticasone ointment was clearly shown to be superior to vehicle throughout the four weeks of treatment At the end of the treatment period, the superiority of fluticasone ointment was statistically significant for all efficacy measures. At the end of study 1, the skin of ten of eighty-eight patients (11%) who received fluticasone were rated as cleared by the investigators and fifty (57%) were rated as excellent or good. Of those who received vehicle, the skin of one of ninety (1%) was rated cleared and twenty-five (28%) were rated excellent or good. In study 2, the skin of three of 105 (3%) patients who received fluticasone were rated as cleared and sixty-nine (66%) were rated as excellent or good at the end of the study. Of those who were treated with vehicle, no patient's skin was rated cleared and thirty of 100 (30%) were rated excellent or good. Adverse events were few and mild. The most common drug-related adverse events were burning and pruritus at the site of application, which occurred in 6% of both the fluticasone-treated patients and those who received vehicle. These findings support the conclusion that fluticasone, 0.005%, ointment is clinically superior to its vehicle in the treatment of psoriasis.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate 0.005% ointment in the treatment of psoriasis." Cutis 57.2 SUPPL. (1996): 57-61.
PMID
8646872
Source
scival
Published In
Cutis
Volume
57
Issue
2 SUPPL.
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
57
End Page
61

Histologic evaluation of the long term effects of tretinoin on photodamaged skin

Sustained improvement with prolonged topical tretinoin for photodamaged skin has been well documented for up to 22 months of continuous treatment. We now report long-term (4 years) histologic effects of topical tretinoin in photodamaged skin of 27 patients, the longest study to date. The observed decreases in dermal elastin content and perivascular inflammation and increase in epidermal mucin in facial biopsies obtained after up to 4 years of treatment may be partly responsible for the continued clinical improvement. Furthermore, the study shows that there are no untoward effects on keratinocytes or melanocytes during long-term use of topical tretinoin.

Authors
Bhawan, J; Olsen, E; Lufrano, L; Thorne, EG; Schwab, B; Gilchrest, BA
MLA Citation
Bhawan, J, Olsen, E, Lufrano, L, Thorne, EG, Schwab, B, and Gilchrest, BA. "Histologic evaluation of the long term effects of tretinoin on photodamaged skin." Journal of Dermatological Science 11.3 (1996): 177-182.
PMID
8785167
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Dermatological Science
Volume
11
Issue
3
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
177
End Page
182
DOI
10.1016/0923-1811(95)00432-7

Guidelines of care for androgenetic alopecia

Authors
Drake, LA; Dinehart, SM; Farmer, ER; Goltz, RW; Graham, GF; Hordinsky, MK; Lewis, CW; Pariser, DM; Webster, SB; Whitaker, DC; Butler, B; Lowery, BJ; Price, VH; Baden, H; DeVillez, RL; Drake, LA; Hordinsky, MK; Olsen, E; Shupack, JL
MLA Citation
Drake, LA, Dinehart, SM, Farmer, ER, Goltz, RW, Graham, GF, Hordinsky, MK, Lewis, CW, Pariser, DM, Webster, SB, Whitaker, DC, Butler, B, Lowery, BJ, Price, VH, Baden, H, DeVillez, RL, Drake, LA, Hordinsky, MK, Olsen, E, and Shupack, JL. "Guidelines of care for androgenetic alopecia." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 35.3 (1996): 465-469.
PMID
8784287
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
35
Issue
3
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
465
End Page
469
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(96)90627-1

Eccrine gland infiltration by mycosis fungoides

After identifying prominent eccrine infiltration by atypical lymphocytes in a biopsy of tumor stage mycosis fungoides (MF), we sought to determine the pattern of eccrine epithelial infiltration in MF. The frequency, intensity, and distribution of infiltration of eccrine gland structures, including acrosyringium, duct and coil epithelium, was studied by examining 71 biopsy specimens from 42 patients with MF in which eccrine structures were present. These were obtained from a retrospective review of pathologic specimens from Duke University Medical Center from 1992 and 1993. At least focal eccrine infiltration was noted in 23 of the 71 biopsy specimens (32%). Immunohistochemical confirmation of T-lymphocyte phenotype was performed in the 23 cases with positive reaction to antibodies CD3 and CD45RO and negative reaction with CD20. Folliculosebaceous units were present in 22 of the 71 biopsy specimens and were at least focally involved by MF in 11 (50%) in this series. A control group of biopsy specimens of reactive dermatoses were characterized by more superficial location of lymphocytes, with more spongiosis and epithelial degenerative changes. These findings further illustrate the epitheliotropic behavior of MF.

Authors
Hitchcock, MG; Jr, JLB; Olsen, EA; Ratech, H; Kamino, H
MLA Citation
Hitchcock, MG, Jr, JLB, Olsen, EA, Ratech, H, and Kamino, H. "Eccrine gland infiltration by mycosis fungoides." American Journal of Dermatopathology 18.5 (1996): 447-453.
PMID
8902089
Source
scival
Published In
American Journal of Dermatopathology
Volume
18
Issue
5
Publish Date
1996
Start Page
447
End Page
453
DOI
10.1097/00000372-199610000-00001

Interferon in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

All of the recombinant interferons are active agents for the systemic treatment of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. The response rates are similar to those observed with systemic chemotherapy. There is no clear evidence that combining interferons with other systemic therapies increases the response rates. The combination of interferon with PUVA provides provocative results. The optimal role of interferons in the treatment of mycosis fungoides and Sézary's syndrome is undefined.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Bunn, PA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, and Bunn, PA. "Interferon in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma." Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 9.5 (October 1995): 1089-1107. (Review)
PMID
8522486
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America
Volume
9
Issue
5
Publish Date
1995
Start Page
1089
End Page
1107

Warning! Masoprocol is a potent sensitizer [2]

Authors
Epstein, E; Olsen, EA; Abernethy, ML; Kulp-Shorten, CL; Callen, JP; Glazer, SD; Huntley, A; McCray, M; Monroe, AB; Tschen, E; Jr, JEW
MLA Citation
Epstein, E, Olsen, EA, Abernethy, ML, Kulp-Shorten, CL, Callen, JP, Glazer, SD, Huntley, A, McCray, M, Monroe, AB, Tschen, E, and Jr, JEW. "Warning! Masoprocol is a potent sensitizer [2]." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 31.2 I (1994): 295-297.
PMID
8040425
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
31
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1994
Start Page
295
End Page
297

Abnormalities of circulating T-cell subpopulations in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen expression on T cells correlates with extent of disease.

The recent characterization of the cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) as a skin-selective homing receptor for skin-associated memory T cells has suggested a possible mechanism for the tropism demonstrated by the neoplastic T cells in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). In this study, we used five parameter flow cytometry to evaluate expression of CLA and the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin on circulating T cells in a series of patients with CTCL. Because CTCL cells were previously shown to be CD7-, we looked at expression of these receptors on the CD7- T-cell subset as well as on total T cells. Our results indicate that CTCL patients have increased levels of both CLA+ and CD7- cells in their peripheral blood and that these abnormalities are not seen in patients with other cutaneous disorders. The levels of the CLA-bearing subset correlated with extent of cutaneous but not lymph node disease. By contrast, the CD7- L-selectin+ subset correlated with peripheral lymph node involvement by CTCL. Only the CD7- L-selectin- subset correlated with the number of morphologically abnormal lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. The results support the hypothesis that expression of tissue-selective homing receptors contributes to the unique pattern of tissue involvement seen in patients with CTCL.

Authors
Borowitz, MJ; Weidner, A; Olsen, EA; Picker, LJ
MLA Citation
Borowitz, MJ, Weidner, A, Olsen, EA, and Picker, LJ. "Abnormalities of circulating T-cell subpopulations in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen expression on T cells correlates with extent of disease." Leukemia 7.6 (June 1993): 859-863.
PMID
7684799
Source
pubmed
Published In
Leukemia
Volume
7
Issue
6
Publish Date
1993
Start Page
859
End Page
863

Tretinoin emollient cream [6]

Authors
Hill, TG; Olsen, EA; Katz, HI; Levine, N; Shupack, J; Prawer, S; Stiller, M; Lufrano, L; Thorne, EG
MLA Citation
Hill, TG, Olsen, EA, Katz, HI, Levine, N, Shupack, J, Prawer, S, Stiller, M, Lufrano, L, and Thorne, EG. "Tretinoin emollient cream [6]." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 28.2 I (1993): 283-284.
PMID
8432938
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
28
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1993
Start Page
283
End Page
284

Systemic steroids with or without 2% topical minoxidil in the treatment of alopecia areata.

BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: Thirty-two patients with mild to extensive alopecia areata, including 16 patients with alopecia totalis or universalis, entered a randomized, controlled trial of a 6-week taper of prednisone followed by either 2% topical minoxidil or vehicle applied three times daily for an additional 14 weeks. The results of this study were compared with an open trial of 48 patients with alopecia areata treated with a similar taper of prednisone with concomitant 2% topical minoxidil applied twice daily. Only terminal hair growth was considered and was quantitated as 1% to 24%, 25% to 49%, 50% to 74%, and 75% to 100%: only those with more than 25% terminal hair regrowth were considered to have had an objective response. RESULTS: At the end of 6 weeks of prednisone, 47% (15/32) of patients had more than 25% regrowth, including nine of 20 patients who had had at least 75% hair loss at baseline. Side effects of prednisone were primarily weight gain and mood changes/emotional lability. At 3 months, six of seven minoxidil-treated patients vs one of six vehicle-treated patients who had an objective response to prednisone maintained or augmented this hair growth: at the 20-week visit, these numbers were three of seven and zero of four patients, respectively. In the open trial, objective hair growth with prednisone was 30%, related to the extent of hair loss at baseline, and this growth persisted in more than 50% of patients at 6 months with the use of 2% topical minoxidil. CONCLUSIONS: A 6-week taper of prednisone offers potential for more than 25% regrowth in 30% to 47% of patients with alopecia areata with predictable and transient side effects. Two percent topical minoxidil three times daily appears to help limit poststeroid hair loss.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Carson, SC; Turney, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Carson, SC, and Turney, EA. "Systemic steroids with or without 2% topical minoxidil in the treatment of alopecia areata." Arch Dermatol 128.11 (November 1992): 1467-1473.
PMID
1444500
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Dermatology
Volume
128
Issue
11
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
1467
End Page
1473

Human test models for bioequivalence of topical corticosteroids: a review.

It would be useful to have a safe, reliable, reproducible, and inexpensive human test model to determine the potency of topical corticosteroids and the bioequivalence of generic agents. Existing human test systems include erythema or inflammation induced by irritants or other stimuli, experimentally induced cutaneous disease-like states, and bioassays in patients with psoriasis. None of these systems is currently reliable enough to warrant general use. Among the shortcomings of existing test systems are the difficulty of producing a uniform, steroid-responsive test condition, the requirement to use occlusion in several of the systems, and the lack of agreement among the results of different tests. Despite these shortcomings, some of the tests may prove useful in comparing innovator and generic topical corticosteroids and in screening the potency of new agents.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Human test models for bioequivalence of topical corticosteroids: a review." Int J Dermatol 31 Suppl 1 (October 1992): 9-13. (Review)
PMID
1428469
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Dermatology
Volume
31 Suppl 1
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
9
End Page
13

Tretinoin emollient cream: a new therapy for photodamaged skin.

BACKGROUND: Tretinoin administered topically in 0.1% concentration has been shown to improve the wrinkling and irregular pigmentation of photoaged skin. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of various concentrations of tretinoin in a new emollient cream base in the treatment of photoaged skin. METHODS: Three concentrations of tretinoin (0.05%, 0.01%, and 0.001%) in a new emollient cream formulation were compared with vehicle in a 24-week, double-blind, randomized, multicenter study of 296 subjects with photodamaged facial skin. RESULTS: Tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% gave a significantly better global response to therapy than vehicle (p less than 0.001), with 68% of subjects exhibiting improvement at the end of therapy, compared with 43% of subjects in the vehicle group. An excellent or good response was found in 26% of subjects treated with tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% versus 11% of vehicle-treated subjects. Fine wrinkling, mottled hyperpigmentation, and roughness were more improved in subjects who received tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% than in vehicle-treated subjects (p less than 0.05). No significant difference was found between vehicle and tretinoin emollient cream 0.01% or 0.001%. Histologic examination showed increases in epidermal and granular layer thickness, decreased melanin content and compaction of the stratum corneum after therapy with tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% or 0.01%. Mild to moderate skin reactions, such as erythema, peeling, and burning, were the most common side effects and, although most prevalent in the group using the 0.05% concentration, generally did not limit tretinoin use. CONCLUSION: Tretinoin emollient cream 0.05% appears to be safe and effective in the treatment of photodamaged skin.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Katz, HI; Levine, N; Shupack, J; Billys, MM; Prawer, S; Gold, J; Stiller, M; Lufrano, L; Thorne, EG
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Katz, HI, Levine, N, Shupack, J, Billys, MM, Prawer, S, Gold, J, Stiller, M, Lufrano, L, and Thorne, EG. "Tretinoin emollient cream: a new therapy for photodamaged skin." J Am Acad Dermatol 26.2 Pt 1 (February 1992): 215-224.
PMID
1552056
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
26
Issue
2 Pt 1
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
215
End Page
224

Generalized papular xanthomatosis in mycosis fungoides

Xanthomas can occur in association with underlying lymphoproliferative disease, or they can result from lipid deposition in damaged or altered skin. We report a case of generalized papular xanthomas that developed in a patient with Sezary syndrome. The xanthomas were composed of foamy histiocytes that were shown by immunoperoxidase staining to be of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Electron microscopic studies revealed lipid vacuoles, lysosomes, and myelin figures but no Birbeck granules, features that are consistent with a non-X histiocytosis. Generalized papular xanthomatosis has not been previously described in a patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

Authors
Darwin, BS; Herzberg, AJ; Murray, JC; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Darwin, BS, Herzberg, AJ, Murray, JC, and Olsen, EA. "Generalized papular xanthomatosis in mycosis fungoides." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 26.5 II SUPPL. (1992): 828-832.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
26
Issue
5 II SUPPL.
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
828
End Page
832

Effectiveness of various barrier preparations in preventing and/or ameliorating experimentally produced Toxicodendron dermatitis

Background: Despite extensive research on hyposensitization and prior application of topical barrier preparations, efforts to prevent Toxicodendron dermatitis have been only minimally successful. Objective: Seven different barrier creams were evaluated for topical protection against experimentally produced Toxicodendron dermatitis in a randomized, double-blind study. Methods: Twenty patients had the seven barrier creams randomly applied to eight test sites (one untreated area as control) on each forearm before application of the Toxicodendron extract. Development of Toxicodendron dermatitis was followed for 8 days, with measurements of erythema, induration, vesiculation, and global severity taken at each site on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 after Toxicodendron application. Results: The barrier creams Stokogard, Hollister Moisture Barrier, and Hydropel significantly reduced the erythema, induration, and global severity of Toxicodendron dermatitis and did not differ from each other. The percent reductions in global dermatitis severity per day of assessment for the seven barriers in order of effectiveness were as follows: Stokogard, 59%; Hollister Moisture Barrier, 52%; Hydropel, 48%; Ivy Shield, 22%; Shield Skin, 13%; Dermofilm, 13%; and Uniderm, -9%. During the 8-day period, a significantly greater number of test sites pretreated with Stokogard, Hollister Moisture Barrier, and Hydropel were free of dermatitis compared with control sites and sites treated with the other four barriers. Conclusion: The results indicate that Stokogard, Hollister Moisture Barrier, and Hydropel are effective in the prevention of Toxicodendron dermatitis.

Authors
Grevelink, SA; Murrell, DF; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Grevelink, SA, Murrell, DF, and Olsen, EA. "Effectiveness of various barrier preparations in preventing and/or ameliorating experimentally produced Toxicodendron dermatitis." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 27.2 I (1992): 182-188.
PMID
1430354
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
27
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
182
End Page
188

Comparison of oral fluconazole and topical clotrimazole in the treatment of fungal infections of the skin: European and American experience

An open, comparative, multicenter study conducted in Europe and the United States evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral fluconazole and topical clotrimazole in fungal infections of the skin. Patients were randomized to receive fluconazole, 50 mg per day, or clotrimazole 1% topical cream, twice daily, for up to 6 weeks. Clinical response at the end of therapy was similar in both treatment groups. In the European trial, 96% and 95% of evaluable sites were cured or improved following treatment with fluconazole or clotrimazole, respectively. Results of the US trial revealed response rates of 94% and 89%, respectively. Improvement was maintained at follow-up 2 to 4 weeks after the end of treatment. Mycologic cure at the end of treatment in the European trial, which was observed in 85% and 86% of fluconazole-treated and clotrimazole-treated sites, respectively, was maintained at follow-up. A similar trend was seen in the US trial with cure rates of 66% and 72%, respectively. Both drugs were well tolerated. Whereas side effects in the fluconazole group consisted mainly of headaches and gastrointestinal disorders, the clotrimazole group exhibited local hypersensitivity reactions. Laboratory test abnormalities occurred with equal frequency within both treatment groups, with no evidence of clinically significant adverse changes. The results of these studies confirm that fluconazole is as efficacious as the established agent clotrimazole in the treatment of patients with fungal infections of the skin.

Authors
Bersaques, JD; Bjerke, JR; Borelli, S; Brown, AC; Cottenot, F; Daniel, F; Dupont, B; Gschnait, F; Heenen, M; Jegasothy, BV; Kramer, M; Lapiere, C; Neldner, KH; Olsen, EA; Parish, LC; Privat, Y; Savin, RC; Schnabel, P; Shubert, B
MLA Citation
Bersaques, JD, Bjerke, JR, Borelli, S, Brown, AC, Cottenot, F, Daniel, F, Dupont, B, Gschnait, F, Heenen, M, Jegasothy, BV, Kramer, M, Lapiere, C, Neldner, KH, Olsen, EA, Parish, LC, Privat, Y, Savin, RC, Schnabel, P, and Shubert, B. "Comparison of oral fluconazole and topical clotrimazole in the treatment of fungal infections of the skin: European and American experience." International Journal of Dermatology 31.SUPPL. 2 (1992): 21-26.
Source
scival
Published In
International Journal of Dermatology
Volume
31
Issue
SUPPL. 2
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
21
End Page
26

Central nervous system involvement by cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

Central nervous system disease in cutaneous T cell lymphoma is uncommon and is usually not considered in standard therapeutic regimens. We report three patients who had cutaneous T cell lymphoma with involvement of the central nervous system and review the cases of 28 such patients reported in the literature. Potential risk factors, the reliability of various diagnostic tests, and potential therapeutic modalities are discussed.

Authors
Grevelink, SA; Fuller, GN; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Grevelink, SA, Fuller, GN, and Olsen, EA. "Central nervous system involvement by cutaneous T cell lymphoma." J Am Acad Dermatol 25.3 (September 1991): 542-549.
PMID
1918492
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
25
Issue
3
Publish Date
1991
Start Page
542
End Page
549

Topical minoxidil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in women.

Twenty-eight women with mild to moderate androgenetic alopecia were randomly assigned to apply either 2 percent topical minoxidil or placebo (vehicle) to their involved scalp areas twice daily. At the end of thirty-two weeks, there was a statistically significant increase of nonvellus target area hairs in the minoxidil-treated versus the vehicle-treated group (p = 0.006). Investigator assessment of moderate regrowth showed better results in subjects who used 2 percent topical minoxidil solution than those who used vehicle (p = 0.007), although subjects discerned no difference between treatment groups. Two percent topical minoxidil appears to be effective in the treatment of female androgenetic alopecia.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Topical minoxidil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in women." Cutis 48.3 (September 1991): 243-248.
PMID
1935254
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cutis; cutaneous medicine for the practitioner
Volume
48
Issue
3
Publish Date
1991
Start Page
243
End Page
248

A double-blind, vehicle-controlled study of clobetasol propionate 0.05% (Temovate) scalp application in the treatment of moderate to severe scalp psoriasis.

The efficacy and safety of clobetasol propionate 0.05% scalp application was evaluated in 378 patients with moderate to severe scalp psoriasis in a double-blind vehicle-controlled parallel group study. After 2 weeks of twice-daily applications, 81% receiving active drug versus 22% receiving vehicle had clearing of 50% or greater. Complete clearing was seen in 26% with active drug and 1% with vehicle. Local side effects were primarily burning or stinging in 11% and 10% of patients treated on an active or a vehicle regimen, respectively. The morning cortisol levels of 168 patients were checked at baseline and again after 2 weeks of drug therapy. Subnormal morning plasma cortisol values were seen in 5% of the patients receiving active drug and in 5% receiving vehicle; 13% of those taking active drug versus 5% taking vehicle had a 50% or greater decrease in morning cortisol at the 2-week visit compared with baseline values. Clobetasol propionate 0.05% scalp application appears to be a safe and an effective treatment for scalp psoriasis.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Cram, DL; Ellis, CN; Hickman, JG; Jacobson, C; Jenkins, EE; Lasser, AE; Lebwohl, M; Leibsohn, E; Medansky, RS
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Cram, DL, Ellis, CN, Hickman, JG, Jacobson, C, Jenkins, EE, Lasser, AE, Lebwohl, M, Leibsohn, E, and Medansky, RS. "A double-blind, vehicle-controlled study of clobetasol propionate 0.05% (Temovate) scalp application in the treatment of moderate to severe scalp psoriasis." J Am Acad Dermatol 24.3 (March 1991): 443-447.
PMID
2061442
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
24
Issue
3
Publish Date
1991
Start Page
443
End Page
447

A double-blind controlled comparison of generic and trade-name topical steroids using the vasoconstriction assay.

Six generic formulations of five topical steroids were compared for bioequivalence with their trade-name counterparts using an in vivo vasoconstriction assay. Two of six generic formulations were found to show significantly less vasoconstriction than the respective trade-name topical steroids. The issue of generic equivalence of topical steroids is discussed, with particular emphasis on the vagaries of the vasoconstriction assay.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "A double-blind controlled comparison of generic and trade-name topical steroids using the vasoconstriction assay." Arch Dermatol 127.2 (February 1991): 197-201.
PMID
1990984
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Dermatology
Volume
127
Issue
2
Publish Date
1991
Start Page
197
End Page
201

A double-blind, vehicle-controlled study evaluating masoprocol cream in the treatment of actinic keratoses on the head and neck

This double-blind, vehicle-controlled, multicenter study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new topical antineoplastic agent, masoprocol, in the treatment of actinic keratoses of the head and neck. Of the 113 patients who applied topical masoprocol twice a day for 14 to 28 days, there was a mean decrease in actinic keratoses from 15.0 to 5.4 and a median percent reduction from baseline actinic keratosis count of 71.4% at the 1-month follow-up visit. Comparable numbers for the vehicle-treated group were 13.4 to 11.1 actinic keratosis and 4.3% median percent reduction. Irritation, as manifested by erythema or flaking, occurred in 61.5% of topical masoprocol-treated patients versus 26.7% of those treated with vehicle and did not correlate with clinical response. Topical masoprocol appears to be useful in the treatment of actinic keratoses.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Abernethy, ML; Kulp-Shorten, C; Callen, JP; Glazer, SD; Huntley, A; McCray, M; Monroe, AB; Tschen, E; Jr, JEW
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Abernethy, ML, Kulp-Shorten, C, Callen, JP, Glazer, SD, Huntley, A, McCray, M, Monroe, AB, Tschen, E, and Jr, JEW. "A double-blind, vehicle-controlled study evaluating masoprocol cream in the treatment of actinic keratoses on the head and neck." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 24.5 I (1991): 738-743.
PMID
1869646
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
24
Issue
5 I
Publish Date
1991
Start Page
738
End Page
743

The pharmacology of methotrexate

Methotrexate is a useful antimetabolite for the treatment of both benign and malignant proliferative disorders. When the pharmacokinetics and potential toxicity of this drug are understood, treatment regimens can be tailored to the underlying kinetics of the target population. With the appropriate knowledge of the importance of urinary excretion of methotrexate and factors that influence this and with the ready availability of leucovorin, toxicity can be avoided in all but the most unusual of circumstances.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "The pharmacology of methotrexate." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 25.2 I (1991): 306-318.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
25
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1991
Start Page
306
End Page
318

Sweating in ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. A review.

Ectodermal dysplasia syndromes are currently classified based on constellations of clinical features, a major one of which is the presence or absence of normal sweating. The evaluation of sweating in these disorders has not been performed in a standardized manner, as is shown here in this literature review of a sampling of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. Accurate evaluation of sweating is important not only in enabling more effective diagnosis and classification of patients with these syndromes, but also in aiding genetic counseling by potential detection of carrier states. A review of the variety of sweat tests currently in use is presented.

Authors
Berg, D; Weingold, DH; Abson, KG; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Berg, D, Weingold, DH, Abson, KG, and Olsen, EA. "Sweating in ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. A review." Arch Dermatol 126.8 (August 1990): 1075-1079. (Review)
PMID
2200347
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Dermatology
Volume
126
Issue
8
Publish Date
1990
Start Page
1075
End Page
1079

Five-year follow-up of men with androgenetic alopecia treated with topical minoxidil.

Thirty-one men with androgenetic alopecia completed 4 1/2 to 5 years of therapy with 2% and 3% topical minoxidil. Hair regrowth with topical minoxidil tended to peak at 1 year with a slow decline in regrowth over subsequent years. However, at 4 1/2 to 5 years, maintenance of nonvellus hairs beyond that seen at baseline was still evident. Topical minoxidil appears to be effective in helping to maintain nonvellus hair growth in men with androgenetic alopecia.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Weiner, MS; Amara, IA; DeLong, ER
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Weiner, MS, Amara, IA, and DeLong, ER. "Five-year follow-up of men with androgenetic alopecia treated with topical minoxidil." J Am Acad Dermatol 22.4 (April 1990): 643-646.
PMID
2180995
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
22
Issue
4
Publish Date
1990
Start Page
643
End Page
646

Natural history of androgenetic alopecia.

Twenty-two men with patterns III-Va androgenetic alopecia were entered into a 10-month study aimed at establishing information on the natural progression of hair loss over a period of time typical of studies of hair growth promoters. The methodology employed was the same as that in published clinical trials of topical minoxidil, but the men refrained from application of either active drug or vehicle to their scalps. As one of the potential explanations for the observed 'placebo-effect' seen in non-vellus hair counts in the topical minoxidil trials was a learning curve of novice hair counters, we were particularly interested in evaluating this in our 'no-treatment' trial. To that end, both a novice (Observer I) and an experienced (Observer II) hair counter independently performed the hair counts. There was a mean decline in the number of vertex target area non-vellus hairs (-17.2 +/- 80.3 for Observer I and -26.6 +/- 63.5 for Observer II) at the end of 10 months; this was not significant. The novice's hair counts were lower than the experienced observer's counts at baseline, and the difference remained relatively constant during the study. Without the application of a placebo, there was no increase in hair growth, making it unlikely that the methods of hair counting led to the 'placebo-effect' seen in prior topical minoxidil studies.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Buller, TA; Weiner, S; Delong, ER
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Buller, TA, Weiner, S, and Delong, ER. "Natural history of androgenetic alopecia." Clin Exp Dermatol 15.1 (January 1990): 34-36.
PMID
2311277
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical & Experimental Dermatology
Volume
15
Issue
1
Publish Date
1990
Start Page
34
End Page
36

Transdermal viprostol in the treatment of male pattern baldness

Fifty-seven men were randomly assigned for treatment of androgenetic alopecia with viprostol, vehicle, or placebo twice daily for 24 weeks. Nonvellus hair growth was assessed subjectively by both patient and investigator and objectively through hair counts from macrophotography of the target area. Nonvellus target area hair counts declined in all three treatment groups at the end of the 6-month study. Viprostol is not an effective hair growth promoter in androgenetic alopecia.

Authors
Olsen, EA; DeLong, E
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, and DeLong, E. "Transdermal viprostol in the treatment of male pattern baldness." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 23.3 I (1990): 470-472.
PMID
2212146
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
23
Issue
3 I
Publish Date
1990
Start Page
470
End Page
472

A controlled trial of clobetasol propionate ointment 0.05% in the treatment of experimentally induced Rhus dermatitis

We studied the effectiveness of clobetasol propionate ointment 0.05% in experimentally induced Rhus dermatitis. Clobetasol rapidly decreased the vesiculation at each treated site, although the effect was most prominent at the site to which clobetasol was applied the earliest, that is, at 12 hours after exposure to Rhus extract. On the basis of this experimental model, clobetasol propionate ointment 0.05% may be effective therapy for naturally occurring Rhus dermatitis.

Authors
Vernon, HJ; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Vernon, HJ, and Olsen, EA. "A controlled trial of clobetasol propionate ointment 0.05% in the treatment of experimentally induced Rhus dermatitis." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 23.5 I (1990): 829-832.
PMID
2147698
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
23
Issue
5 I
Publish Date
1990
Start Page
829
End Page
832

A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acitretin for the treatment of psoriasis.

Acitretin, the active metabolite of etretinate, has the clinical advantage of a much shorter terminal elimination half-life. We report the results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acitretin (Soriatane) in 15 patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Patients received 25 mg or 50 mg daily of acitretin or placebo in a double-blind fashion for 8 weeks and then were given 25 to 75 mg acitretin daily during an open study. Only two placebo patients completed the double-blind phase; one patient's psoriasis worsened, and one showed no significant change. All 15 patients then completed at least 8 weeks with 25 to 75 mg acitretin daily, with a moderate change in erythema, scaling, and induration (mean 28% to 37% improvement) but with minimal change in the percentage of body surface area involved. Prolonged treatment (greater than or equal to 20 weeks) with acitretin resulted in further significant improvement and a 44% reduction of involved surface area from baseline.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Weed, WW; Meyer, CJ; Cobo, LM
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Weed, WW, Meyer, CJ, and Cobo, LM. "A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acitretin for the treatment of psoriasis." J Am Acad Dermatol 21.4 Pt 1 (October 1989): 681-686.
PMID
2530251
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
21
Issue
4 Pt 1
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
681
End Page
686

Alopecia: evaluation and management.

The patient presenting with hair loss may have a primary dermatologic disease, a genetically engineered process, an infectious disease, an underlying systemic illness, a drug reaction, or a psychological disorder. By first dividing the process into one of three categories, scarring, diffuse-nonscarring, or patchy-nonscarring, one then can approach the evaluation in a rational manner. Using the bedside techniques of a hair pull, hair pluck, and microscopic hair examination and directed laboratory tests, one can narrow the differential diagnosis and can recommend directed therapy.

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "Alopecia: evaluation and management." Prim Care 16.3 (September 1989): 765-787. (Review)
PMID
2678179
Source
pubmed
Published In
Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice
Volume
16
Issue
3
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
765
End Page
787

Comparative study of systemic interferon alfa-nl and isotretinoin in the treatment of resistant condylomata acuminata.

This study evaluated the effectiveness of systemic interferon alfa-nl versus isotretinoin in the treatment of condylomata acuminata. Patients were randomly assigned interferon alfa-nl, 5 million units, subcutaneously daily for 2 weeks then twice weekly for 4 weeks, or isotretinoin, 1 mg/kg by mouth daily for 6 weeks. Seventeen otherwise healthy men with histologically confirmed condylomata acuminata refractory to standard treatment completed 6 study weeks. Five of nine men (56%) treated with interferon alfa-nl had an objective clinical response (greater than or equal to 50% clearance of baseline disease), with one patient clearing completely. None of the patients treated with isotretinoin alone had an objective response (p = 0.009). Those whose clearing was incomplete with interferon alone were then assigned to interferon therapy three times weekly in combination with daily isotretinoin for 6 weeks, and those receiving isotretinoin were switched to interferon three times weekly for 6 weeks. There was continued clearing in all patients in the combination treatment group but in only three of seven in the sequential treatment group. Side effects were common and generally predictable for each drug but were generally not exacerbated when interferon and isotretinoin were used in combination. Parenteral interferon alfa-nl is an effective alternative treatment modality for patients with refractory condylomata acuminata.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Kelly, FF; Vollmer, RT; Buddin, DA; Weck, PK
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Kelly, FF, Vollmer, RT, Buddin, DA, and Weck, PK. "Comparative study of systemic interferon alfa-nl and isotretinoin in the treatment of resistant condylomata acuminata." J Am Acad Dermatol 20.6 (June 1989): 1023-1030.
PMID
2754052
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
20
Issue
6
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
1023
End Page
1030

Interferon alfa-2a in the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

Twenty-two patients with Stages Ia to IVa cutaneous T cell lymphoma were entered into a controlled trial of interferon alfa-2a (Roferon-A). Patients initially received either 3 million IU interferon alfa-2a, or their dosage was escalated to 36 million IU intramuscularly daily for a 10-week induction period. At the end of induction, 14/22 (64%) of patients had an objective antitumor response: three patients had a complete response, ten patients had a partial response (greater than or equal to 50% resolution of clinical disease), and one patient had a minor response. Responders included those with Stages Ia to IVa cutaneous T cell lymphoma, and remissions have lasted at least 4 to 27.5 months. Three patients progressed from a partial to complete response with further treatment, for an overall complete response rate of 27%. Acute flu-like side effects were generally minor and transient. Malaise/fatigue, depression, anorexia, and weight loss were common chronic dose-related side effects and the most frequent reasons for dose reduction or discontinuation of drug. Leukopenia was the most common laboratory side effect and was also dose-related. Recombinant human leukocyte interferon alfa-2a is an effective and well-tolerated single-agent therapy for early and advanced cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Rosen, ST; Vollmer, RT; Variakojis, D; Roenigk, HH; Diab, N; Zeffren, J
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Rosen, ST, Vollmer, RT, Variakojis, D, Roenigk, HH, Diab, N, and Zeffren, J. "Interferon alfa-2a in the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma." J Am Acad Dermatol 20.3 (March 1989): 395-407.
PMID
2783939
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
20
Issue
3
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
395
End Page
407

BALD SCALPS AND WRINKLES - REPLY

Authors
OLSEN, EA
MLA Citation
OLSEN, EA. "BALD SCALPS AND WRINKLES - REPLY." JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY 20.1 (January 1989): 139-139.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
20
Issue
1
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
139
End Page
139
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(89)80017-9

Topical methotrexate therapy for psoriasis

In vitro percutaneous penetration of methotrexate is enhanced with 1-dodecylazacycloheptan-2-one (laurocapram [Azone]). Laurocapram-containing methotrexate formulations provide effective local inhibition of epidermal DNA synthesis in the in vivo hairless mouse and minipig models, providing the biochemical rationale for topical use in the treatment of psoriasis. Topical methotrexate (0.1%, 0.5%, and 1%) in a laurocapram-containing formulation was tested in a two-center double-blind pilot clinical study of 42 patients with plaque psoriasis. Drugs were applied twice a day for six weeks, and lesions were scored weekly for erythema, scale, and elevation. An overall improvement of 50% or more in the combined scores for erythema, scale, and elevation was obtained with 0.1% methotrexate (64% of patients), 0.5% methotrexate (59%), and 1% methotrexate (56%) vs the vehicle alone (25%). These preliminary findings suggest that methotrexate preparations that provide adequate percutaneous absorption may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of psoriasis.

Authors
Weinstein, GD; McCullough, JL; Olsen, E
MLA Citation
Weinstein, GD, McCullough, JL, and Olsen, E. "Topical methotrexate therapy for psoriasis." Archives of Dermatology 125.2 (1989): 227-230.
PMID
2913960
Source
scival
Published In
Archives of Dermatology
Volume
125
Issue
2
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
227
End Page
230

A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acitretin for the treatment of psoriasis

Acitretin, the active metabolite of etretinate, has the clinical advantage of a much shorter terminal elimination half-life. We report the results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acitretin (Soriatane) in 15 patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Patients received 25 mg or 50 mg daily of acitretin or placebo in a double-blind fashion for 8 weeks and then were given 25 to 75 mg acitretin daily during an open study. Only two placebo patients completed the double-blind phase; one patient's psoriasis worsened, and one showed no significant change. All 15 patients then completed at least 8 weeks with 25 to 75 mg acitretin daily, with a moderate change in erythema, scaling, and induration (mean 28% to 37% improvement) but with minimal change in the percentage of body surface are involved. Prolonged treatment (≥20 weeks) with acitretin resulted in further significant improvement and a 44% reduction of involved surface area from baseline.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Weed, WW; Meyer, CJ; Cobo, LM
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Weed, WW, Meyer, CJ, and Cobo, LM. "A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of acitretin for the treatment of psoriasis." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 21.4 I (1989): 681-686.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
21
Issue
4 I
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
681
End Page
686

Treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma with 2'-deoxycoformycin (pentostatin).

2'-Deoxycoformycin, a potent inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, was administered to three patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma refractory to multiple treatment modalities. Patient 1, who received 5 mg/m2/day for 3 days at 35- to 71-day intervals, has achieved a complete remission greater than 16 months in duration. Patient 2 had progressive disease despite two courses of 2'-deoxycoformycin at a dose of 5 mg/m2/day for 3 days at 28-day intervals. The third patient, who was treated with 4 mg/m2 2'-deoxycoformycin weekly to biweekly, had an initial response, but the disease progressed after eight treatments. Only one patient had any side effects: Patient 1 developed reversible episcleritis, mild elevation of liver enzymes, and persistent nausea and vomiting. In red blood cells of all patients, there was near complete inhibition of adenosine deaminase (91% to 96%) and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (89% to 95%) activities with treatment. In peripheral blood lymphocytes, adenosine deaminase was inhibited by 85% to 98% and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase by 51% to 88%. The deoxyadenosine triphosphate level, reflected by the total cellular adenine deoxyribonucleotide measurement in erythrocytes, was noted to be modestly elevated during treatment, with the highest level in the patient who demonstrated the only complete response and the only toxic effects. Low-dose 2'-deoxycoformycin appears to be safe but may be an insufficiently intensive regimen to treat refractory cutaneous T cell lymphoma. With proper biochemical monitoring, higher doses may be both safe and more effective.

Authors
Dang-Vu, AP; Olsen, EA; Vollmer, RT; Greenberg, ML; Hershfield, MS
MLA Citation
Dang-Vu, AP, Olsen, EA, Vollmer, RT, Greenberg, ML, and Hershfield, MS. "Treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma with 2'-deoxycoformycin (pentostatin)." J Am Acad Dermatol 19.4 (October 1988): 692-698.
PMID
3263401
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
19
Issue
4
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
692
End Page
698

Changes in serum lipids in patients with condylomata acuminata treated with interferon alfa-n1 (Wellferon).

Nine men with refractory condylomata acuminata were treated with intramuscular interferon alfa-n1 and the effect on their serum lipid levels was noted. Comparison of lipid panels before and after interferon revealed that all nine patients had an increase (median 62 mg/dl, p = 0.004) in their triglyceride level and a decrease (median 21 mg/dl, p = 0.004) in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Total cholesterol levels tended to decrease but the change was not statistically significant. This effect on serum lipids should be considered when interferon alfa-n1 is used in the treatment of genital warts.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Lichtenstein, GR; Wilkinson, WE
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Lichtenstein, GR, and Wilkinson, WE. "Changes in serum lipids in patients with condylomata acuminata treated with interferon alfa-n1 (Wellferon)." J Am Acad Dermatol 19.2 Pt 1 (August 1988): 286-289.
PMID
3170795
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
19
Issue
2 Pt 1
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
286
End Page
289

Autosomal dominant multiple cylindromas associated with solitary lung cylindroma.

The occurrence of multiple cutaneous cylindromas constitutes an uncommon autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder whose associations usually are limited to other cutaneous tumors. We report here the first case of a patient with multiple cutaneous cylindromas, who concurrently had a benign lung cylindroma with histologic features identical to her skin lesions. She also had a family history of early death from cardiac disease.

Authors
Vernon, HJ; Olsen, EA; Vollmer, RT
MLA Citation
Vernon, HJ, Olsen, EA, and Vollmer, RT. "Autosomal dominant multiple cylindromas associated with solitary lung cylindroma." J Am Acad Dermatol 19.2 Pt 2 (August 1988): 397-400.
PMID
2842382
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
19
Issue
2 Pt 2
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
397
End Page
400

Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy. Case report and review of a multisystemic disease with cutaneous infiltrates.

A report of a patient with the rare syndrome of sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy is presented here. This patient is unusual in several respects, including his longevity after diagnosis, the presence of a benign monoclonal gammopathy, and the characterization of his cutaneous infiltrates by immunofluorescent monoclonal antibody markers. A review of the literature on sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, with particular emphasis on cutaneous manifestations, is given.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Crawford, JR; Vollmer, RT
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Crawford, JR, and Vollmer, RT. "Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy. Case report and review of a multisystemic disease with cutaneous infiltrates." J Am Acad Dermatol 18.6 (June 1988): 1322-1332. (Review)
PMID
3290288
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
18
Issue
6
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
1322
End Page
1332

Erosion of psoriatic plaques after chronic methotrexate administration.

A 43-year-old white man developed a shallow erosion of a psoriatic plaque after chronic administration of methotrexate. This unusual cutaneous sign may be the first sign of methotrexate toxicity.

Authors
Kaplan, DL; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Kaplan, DL, and Olsen, EA. "Erosion of psoriatic plaques after chronic methotrexate administration." Int J Dermatol 27.1 (January 1988): 59-62.
PMID
3346128
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Dermatology
Volume
27
Issue
1
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
59
End Page
62

Autosomal dominant multiple cylindromas associated with solitary lung cylindroma

The occurrence of multiple cutaneous cylindroma constitutes an uncommon autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder whose associations usually are limited to other cutaneous tumors. We report here the first case of a patient with multiple cutaneous cylindromas, who concurrently had a benign lung cylindroma with histologic features identical to her skin lesions. She also had a family history of early death from cardiac disease.

Authors
Vernon, HJ; Olsen, EA; Vollmer, RT
MLA Citation
Vernon, HJ, Olsen, EA, and Vollmer, RT. "Autosomal dominant multiple cylindromas associated with solitary lung cylindroma." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 19.2 II SUPPL. (1988): 397-400.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
19
Issue
2 II SUPPL.
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
397
End Page
400

Changes in serum lipids in patients with condylomata acuminata treated with interferon alfa-n1 (Wellferon)

Nine men with refractory condylomata acuminata were treated with intramuscular interferon alfa-n1 and the effect on their serum lipid levels was noted. Comparison of lipid panels before and after interferon revealed that all nine patients had an increase (median 62 mg/dl, p = 0.004) in their triglyceride level and a decrease (median 21 mg/dl, p = 0.004) in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Total cholesterol levels tended to decrease but the change was not statistically significant. This effect on serum lipids should be considered when interferon alfa-n1 is used in the treatment of genital warts.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Lichtenstein, GR; Wilkinson, WE
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Lichtenstein, GR, and Wilkinson, WE. "Changes in serum lipids in patients with condylomata acuminata treated with interferon alfa-n1 (Wellferon)." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 19.2 I (1988): 286-289.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
19
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
286
End Page
289

RX treatment for hair loss. Upjohn's Rogaine is the first FDA-approved product to treat male pattern baldness

Authors
Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA. "RX treatment for hair loss. Upjohn's Rogaine is the first FDA-approved product to treat male pattern baldness." American Druggist 198.4 (1988): 75-76.
Source
scival
Published In
American Druggist
Volume
198
Issue
4
Publish Date
1988
Start Page
75
End Page
76

EFFECT OF ULTRAVIOLET-LIGHT ON TOPICAL MINOXIDIL-INDUCED HAIR-GROWTH IN ADVANCED MALE PATTERN BALDNESS

Authors
PESTANA, A; OLSEN, EA; DELONG, ER; MURRAY, JC
MLA Citation
PESTANA, A, OLSEN, EA, DELONG, ER, and MURRAY, JC. "EFFECT OF ULTRAVIOLET-LIGHT ON TOPICAL MINOXIDIL-INDUCED HAIR-GROWTH IN ADVANCED MALE PATTERN BALDNESS." JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY 16.5 (May 1987): 971-976.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
16
Issue
5
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
971
End Page
976
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(87)70123-6

LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF MEN WITH MALE PATTERN BALDNESS TREATED WITH TOPICAL MINOXIDIL

Authors
OLSEN, EA; DELONG, ER; WEINER, MS
MLA Citation
OLSEN, EA, DELONG, ER, and WEINER, MS. "LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF MEN WITH MALE PATTERN BALDNESS TREATED WITH TOPICAL MINOXIDIL." JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY 16.3 (March 1987): 688-695.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
16
Issue
3
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
688
End Page
695
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(87)70089-9

EFFECT OF TIME ON MALE PATTERN BALDNESS - REPLY

Authors
OLSEN, EA; DELONG, E; WEINER, MS
MLA Citation
OLSEN, EA, DELONG, E, and WEINER, MS. "EFFECT OF TIME ON MALE PATTERN BALDNESS - REPLY." JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY 16.2 (February 1987): 393-394.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
16
Issue
2
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
393
End Page
394
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(87)80142-1

Generalized pustular psoriasis associated with withdrawal of topical clobetasol-17-propionate

Authors
Telfer, NR; Dawber, RPR; Olsen, EA; Cornell, RC
MLA Citation
Telfer, NR, Dawber, RPR, Olsen, EA, and Cornell, RC. "Generalized pustular psoriasis associated with withdrawal of topical clobetasol-17-propionate." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 17.1 (1987): 144-145.
PMID
3611449
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
17
Issue
1
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
144
End Page
145

Topical minoxidil in male pattern baldness: Effects of discontinuation of treatment

Ten men with male pattern baldness who had been treated with 2% or 3% minoxidil for at least 4 months were evaluated for any changes in scalp hair growth on and off drug. Objective assessments by hair counts showed a mean doubling of nonvellus target scalp hairs on topical minoxidil and loss of most of these recruited hairs when the drug was discontinued. Four of ten men had nonvellus hair counts off topical minoxidil that fell below baseline levels. Thus, hair growth on topical minoxidil is not sustained when the drug is discontinued.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Weiner, MS
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, and Weiner, MS. "Topical minoxidil in male pattern baldness: Effects of discontinuation of treatment." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 17.1 (1987): 97-101.
PMID
3301926
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
17
Issue
1
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
97
End Page
101

A falling out following minoxidil: Telogen effluvium

Authors
Bamford, JT; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Bamford, JT, and Olsen, EA. "A falling out following minoxidil: Telogen effluvium." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 16.1 PART I (1987): 144-146.
PMID
3805386
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
16
Issue
1 PART I
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
144
End Page
146

Letterer-Siwe disease in an adult

Letterer-Siwe disease, a proliferative disorder of Langerhans' cells, usually affects children during the first year of life. A 67-year-old woman is described here whose initial manifestation was a characteristic skin eruption. The clinical, pathologic, and ultrastructural features of Letterer-Siwe disease are reviewed and their role in diagnosis discussed.

Authors
Kuttner, BJ; Friedman, KJ; III, CSB; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Kuttner, BJ, Friedman, KJ, III, CSB, and Olsen, EA. "Letterer-Siwe disease in an adult." Cutis 39.2 (1987): 142-146.
PMID
3829721
Source
scival
Published In
Cutis
Volume
39
Issue
2
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
142
End Page
146

Effect of ultraviolet light on topical minoxidil-induced hair growth in advanced male pattern baldness

Nine healthy men with type IVa or Va male pattern baldness completed a 4-month single-blinded controlled pilot study designed to assess the effect of ultraviolet light (UVL) on topical minoxidil-induced hair growth. Subjects applied 2% topical minoxidil solution twice daily to their balding scalps and to one target area on the upper arm. These men, all of whom had either skin type II or III, were randomized to also receive either incremental doses of UVB or PUVA (topical psoralen) twice weekly to one side of their scalp and to a 2.5 cm target area on the nonminoxidil-treated upper ipsilateral arm. Vellus, nonvellus, and total hair counts were done in two 1-inch in diameter circular target areas in symmetric regions of the scalp and on each upper arm at regular intervals. All nine subjects had an increase in target nonvellus hair and a net loss of vellus hair in scalp target areas treated with topical minoxidil. Concomitant UVL did not have a significant synergistic nor adverse effect on topical minoxidil-induced hair growth.

Authors
Pestana, A; Olsen, EA; Delong, ER; Murray, JC
MLA Citation
Pestana, A, Olsen, EA, Delong, ER, and Murray, JC. "Effect of ultraviolet light on topical minoxidil-induced hair growth in advanced male pattern baldness." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 16.5 I (1987): 971-976.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
16
Issue
5 I
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
971
End Page
976

Long-term follow-up of men with male pattern baldness treated with topical minoxidil

Forty-one men with male pattern baldness completed 132 study weeks (2 years 9 months) with topical minoxidil and had follow-up 1-inch target-area vertex scalp hair counts. Initially these men were treated with either twice-daily 2% topical minoxidil for 12 months or 3% topical minoxidil for 8 to 12 months (one third of the subjects received placebo for the first 4 months). After 12 months all subjects continued to apply 3% topical minoxidil twice daily for 1 more year, after which they were randomized to once- versus twice-daily topical minoxidil for an additional 9 months. Those subjects who changed to once-daily application of topical minoxidil at 2 years had a mean change from baseline nonvellus hair count at 1 year of 291.2 (range of hairs four to 553) and at 2 years 9 months of 235 (two to 592 hairs). Those subjects who continued with twice-daily application of topical minoxidil throughout the study had a mean change from baseline nonvellus hair count at 1 year of 323 (15 to 589 hairs) and 335 (13 to 808 hairs) at 2 years 9 months with maintenance topical minoxidil. There were subjects on both maintenance schedules of topical minoxidil who lost some of the nonvellus hair they had initially gained with topical minoxidil; however, there was a greater mean loss in those patients following the once-daily versus twice-daily topical minoxidil regimen (p = 0.05). No subject los nonvellus target hair as compared with baseline. Subject and investigator assessments of hair growth as compared with baseline diminished during the maintenance course of treatment with topical minoxidil; this was not related to the frequency of topical minoxidil application. However, by the completion of the 2-year 9-month period, the investigator felt that 82.9% of subjects still had minimal regrowth and 4.9% had moderate regrowth over baseline; subjects consistently graded their hair growth as greater than did the investigator. Side effects were minimal and well tolerated. These results indicate that continued use of topical minoxidil sustains the majority of vertex nonvellus hair growth initiated during the first 12-month period of topical minoxidil use and that twice-daily application of topical minoxidil is preferable to once-daily application for maintenance therapy.

Authors
Olsen, EA; DeLong, ER; Weiner, MS
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, DeLong, ER, and Weiner, MS. "Long-term follow-up of men with male pattern baldness treated with topical minoxidil." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 16.3 II SUPPL. (1987): 688-695.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
16
Issue
3 II SUPPL.
Publish Date
1987
Start Page
688
End Page
695

Dose-response study of topical minoxidil in male pattern baldness.

Eighty-nine healthy men with male pattern baldness completed a 6-month double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, and 2% topical minoxidil. Subjects on 2% topical minoxidil had a statistically significant increase in mean total target area hair count over baseline compared to the placebo, 0.01%, and 0.1% topical minoxidil groups (p = 0.04). Changes from baseline were more impressive with the 2% topical minoxidil group but not significantly different from the 1% topical minoxidil group in all parameters of objective response to treatment. The investigator, however, rated more subjects as having at least a moderate cosmetic response to treatment in the 2% versus 1% topical minoxidil treatment group. These results indicate that 1% topical minoxidil is the lowest effective concentration of topical minoxidil for male pattern baldness of those tested. Because of the more impressive changes in hair counts and the cosmetic preference for the 2% versus 1% topical minoxidil, 2% topical minoxidil may be the standard preferred treatment for male pattern baldness.

Authors
Olsen, EA; DeLong, ER; Weiner, MS
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, DeLong, ER, and Weiner, MS. "Dose-response study of topical minoxidil in male pattern baldness." J Am Acad Dermatol 15.1 (July 1986): 30-37.
PMID
3722507
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
15
Issue
1
Publish Date
1986
Start Page
30
End Page
37

EVALUATION TECHNIQUES FOR MALE PATTERN BALDNESS - REPLY

Authors
OLSEN, EA; PINNELL, SR; WEINER, MS; DELONG, E
MLA Citation
OLSEN, EA, PINNELL, SR, WEINER, MS, and DELONG, E. "EVALUATION TECHNIQUES FOR MALE PATTERN BALDNESS - REPLY." JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY 14.5 (May 1986): 850-851.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of The American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
14
Issue
5
Publish Date
1986
Start Page
850
End Page
851
DOI
10.1016/S0190-9622(86)80550-3

INTERFERON ALFA-2A IN THE TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA

Authors
OLSEN, EA; DIAB, NG
MLA Citation
OLSEN, EA, and DIAB, NG. "INTERFERON ALFA-2A IN THE TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA." JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY 86.4 (April 1986): 498-498.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume
86
Issue
4
Publish Date
1986
Start Page
498
End Page
498

Topical clobetasol-17-propionate: Review of its clinical efficacy and safety

Clobetasol-17-propionate, the most potent of currently available topical steroids as predicted by the vasoconstrictor assay, has just been approved in the United States. In psoriasis, it has proved significantly more effective than class II steroids and as or more effective than the only marketed class I steroid. In the more steroid-responsive eczemas, the superior efficacy of clobetasol is also apparent, but less striking. Clobetasol prolongs remission rates, making intermittent treatment schedules feasible and minimizing inherent potential steroid side effects. Clobetasol may also be useful in the treatment of a myriad of other skin conditions. A review of the pharmacology, efficacy, and side effects of this addition to our dermatologic armamentarium is presented here.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Cornell, RC
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, and Cornell, RC. "Topical clobetasol-17-propionate: Review of its clinical efficacy and safety." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 15.2 I (1986): 246-255.
PMID
3528243
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
15
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1986
Start Page
246
End Page
255

Clobetasol propionate versus fluocinonide creams in psoriasis and eczema.

A double-blind, parallel comparison was made of the short-term efficacy and safety of three times daily regimens of 0.05% clobetasol propionate cream and 0.05% fluocinonide cream in 114 adolescent and adult patients with psoriasis and 113 with eczema. After 2 weeks of topical applications, patients were assessed according to (1) investigators' overall judgment of clinical response, (2) degree of severity of specific signs and symptoms, and (3) patients' evaluation of improvement. In all three response categories in psoriasis, and in two of three in eczema, clobetasol was statistically significantly superior to fluocinonide (p less than 0.05-p less than 0.001). Healing commenced more rapidly with clobetasol and there was no indication of tachyphylaxis. In contrast, the healing rate with fluocinonide slowed noticeably after the first week, and there was a greater tendency to relapse following fluocinonide treatment. Both regimens were safe: drug-related side effects were generally mild and occurred most commonly with fluocinonide therapy in eczema patients. Overall, drug-related effects occurred in 4% of patients receiving clobetasol and 12% receiving fluocinonide (p less than 0.05). Transient morning plasma cortisol reductions below 5 micrograms/dl occurred in 6% of clobetasol-treated patients, reverting to normal within 1 week of the end of treatment.

Authors
Jegasothy, B; Jacobson, C; Levine, N; Millikan, L; Olsen, E; Pinnell, S; Cole, G; Weinstein, G; Porter, M
MLA Citation
Jegasothy, B, Jacobson, C, Levine, N, Millikan, L, Olsen, E, Pinnell, S, Cole, G, Weinstein, G, and Porter, M. "Clobetasol propionate versus fluocinonide creams in psoriasis and eczema." International journal of dermatology 24.7 (September 1985): 461-465.
PMID
3902682
Source
epmc
Published In
International Journal of Dermatology
Volume
24
Issue
7
Publish Date
1985
Start Page
461
End Page
465
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-4362.1985.tb05821.x

HUMAN-LYMPHOBLASTOID ALPHA-INTERFERON IN THE TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY CONDYLOMA ACUMINATA

Authors
OLSEN, EA; TROFATTER, KF; GALL, SA; MEDOFF, JR; HUGHES, CE; WEINER, MS; KELLY, FF
MLA Citation
OLSEN, EA, TROFATTER, KF, GALL, SA, MEDOFF, JR, HUGHES, CE, WEINER, MS, and KELLY, FF. "HUMAN-LYMPHOBLASTOID ALPHA-INTERFERON IN THE TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY CONDYLOMA ACUMINATA." JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY 84.4 (1985): 359-359.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume
84
Issue
4
Publish Date
1985
Start Page
359
End Page
359

Topical minoxidil in early male pattern baldness

One-hundred twenty-six healthy men with early male pattern baldness completed a 12-month double-blind, controlled trial of 2% and 3% topical minoxidil. Subjects were initially randomly assigned to use placebo or 2% or 3% topical minoxidil. After 4 months of study, the placebo group was crossed over to 3% topical minoxidil. Both objective measurement of hair growth by counting of vellus, terminal, and total hairs in a vertex target balding area and subjective assessment by subject and investigator were done. Treatment of subjects with topical minoxidil for 4 months resulted in a statistically significant increase in terminal hair growth in comparison with placebo therapy. In addition, subjects initially treated with placebo, when crossed over to topical minoxidil, showed a significant increase in the number of terminal hairs. No subject had a net hair loss in the target area during the study. These results indicate that topical minoxidil can increase terminal hair growth in early male pattern baldness.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Weiner, MS; Delong, ER; Pinnell, SR
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Weiner, MS, Delong, ER, and Pinnell, SR. "Topical minoxidil in early male pattern baldness." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 13.2 I (1985): 185-192.
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
13
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1985
Start Page
185
End Page
192

Scalp comedones after topical minoxidil

Authors
Baral, J; Olsen, EA
MLA Citation
Baral, J, and Olsen, EA. "Scalp comedones after topical minoxidil." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 13.6 (1985): 1051-1052.
PMID
2934443
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
13
Issue
6
Publish Date
1985
Start Page
1051
End Page
1052

Second malignancies in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

Among sixty-three cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) patients seen over a 15-year period at the Duke University Medical Center (DUMC), 15.9% had a second malignancy. This is a higher frequency of second malignancies than has been documented previously in any series of CTCL patients. We evaluated the incidence of subsequent primary malignancies in these CTCL patients by comparing our series of patients to a general population. The overall cancer incidence rate in the CTCL patients was 2.4 times, and in white male patients 3.3 times, greater than expected. We also compared various characteristics of CTCL patients with and without a second malignancy to evaluate potential predisposing factors. A history of prior chemotherapy and a family history of malignancy among first order relatives were more common among CTCL patients who developed a second malignancy.

Authors
Olsen, EA; Delzell, E; Jegasothy, BV
MLA Citation
Olsen, EA, Delzell, E, and Jegasothy, BV. "Second malignancies in cutaneous T cell lymphoma." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 10.2 I (1984): 197-204.
PMID
6609176
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume
10
Issue
2 I
Publish Date
1984
Start Page
197
End Page
204
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