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Ostbye, Truls

Overview:

Chronic disease epidemiology; obesity; health services research; population health; public health; social medicine; health information systems; health surveys; programme evaluation; clinical trials; aging; nutrition; dementia; Global Health

Positions:

Professor in Community and Family Medicine

Community and Family Medicine
School of Medicine

Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1979

M.D. — University of Bergen

M.P.H. 1983

M.P.H. — Harvard University

News:

Grants:

Dissemination and Implementation Science in Cardiovascular Outcomes (DISCO)

Administered By
Basic Science Departments
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Faculty Member
Start Date
September 01, 2017
End Date
August 31, 2022

Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health

Administered By
Obstetrics and Gynecology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
September 26, 2002
End Date
July 31, 2022

Maternal obesity, child executive functions and child weight gain

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addictions
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2015
End Date
May 31, 2020

Evaluation of SAS Worksite Health Center

Administered By
Center for Health Policy & Inequalities Research
AwardedBy
SAS Institute
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
September 01, 2015
End Date
February 28, 2020

Early child care and risk of obesity

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
Johns Hopkins University - School of Public Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2015
End Date
June 30, 2018

The Business of Childcare Homes and Child Health

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
May 01, 2012
End Date
April 30, 2018

Preventing obesity in infants and toddlers in child care

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
Johns Hopkins University - School of Public Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
January 01, 2016
End Date
December 31, 2017

Early child care and risk of obesity

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2012
End Date
June 30, 2017

Teen CHAT:Improving physician communication with adolescents about healthy weight

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
September 15, 2009
End Date
June 30, 2016

Steps to Health: Targeting Obesity in the Health Care Workplace

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
June 01, 2010
End Date
May 31, 2016

Preventing obesity in infants and toddlers in child care

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine, Community Health
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
January 01, 2013
End Date
December 31, 2015

Evaluation of SAS Worksite Health Center

Administered By
Center for Health Policy & Inequalities Research
AwardedBy
SAS Institute
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
October 01, 2013
End Date
September 30, 2015

FitFab 4 Survivors

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2011
End Date
June 30, 2014

The Sri Lanka Healthy Minds Study

Administered By
Duke Global Health Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2011
End Date
June 29, 2014

KAN-DO: A Family-Based Intervention to Prevent Childhood Obesity

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 11, 2006
End Date
August 31, 2012

Epidemiology of Dementia in Cache County, Utah (Bridge-Funding Request)

Administered By
Neurology, Behavioral Neurology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
July 15, 2002
End Date
March 31, 2011

Epidemiology of dementia in Cache County, Utah

Administered By
Neurology, Behavioral Neurology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1994
End Date
March 31, 2011

Obesity Prevention in Early Childhood

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 01, 2008
End Date
August 31, 2010

PREMIER Mental Health Interventions Training Program

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Geriatric Behavioral Health
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
July 23, 2002
End Date
June 30, 2010

Obesity as a Barrier to Patient-Physician Communication

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
June 01, 2006
End Date
May 31, 2010

Promoting Postpartum Weight Loss in Overweight Women

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
August 15, 2003
End Date
June 30, 2009

Surveillance Methods for Health Care and Related Workers

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine, Occupational & Environmental Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Epidemiologist
Start Date
September 30, 2001
End Date
September 29, 2006

Residency Training in Family Medicine No. 93.884A

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine, Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Researcher
Start Date
July 01, 2000
End Date
June 30, 2003
Show More

Publications:

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China. (Accepted)" The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China.

Since childhood exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes, the aims of this study were to1) document PAH exposure levels among children in Chongqing, China by measuring urinary concentrations of four PAH metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr), 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNap), 2-hydroxyfluorine (2-OHFlu) and 9-hydroxyphenanthrene (9-OHPhe), and 2) assess the associations of urinary concentrations of these PAH metabolites with risk factors related to sources of PAHs inhalation and ingestion exposures and with personal attributes such as sex, age, and BMI.The present study is a cross-sectional analysis using data drawn from the third follow up of a longitudinal study. Purposive sampling was used with all students in grades one to four in four schools being eligible to participate. The baseline survey included a total of 1237 students 5.8 to 12.2years of age. At the third follow up survey, 1.5years after the baseline survey, 1230 of the children had a physical exam and provided urine samples. Their parents completed a questionnaire including social-demographic information and possible sources of children's exposure to PAHs. Urine samples were measured for the four OH-PAHs using an HPLC-MS/MS technique. Concentrations were corrected by specific gravity. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate factors related to sources of PAHs exposure.The urinary concentrations were highest for 9-OHPhe (median at the range of 3661ng/L), followed by 2-OHNap (3189ng/L), 2-OHFlu (1116ng/L), and 1-OHPyr (250ng/L). In multiple linear regressions, being female (P=0.04), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.02) and higher maternal age at birth (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 1-OHPyr; no significant associations were found for 2-OHNap; school location near a thermal power plant (P<0.01) and lower family income (P<0.01) were associated with increased concentrations of urinary 2-OHFlu; higher age (P<0.01), school location near a thermal power plant (P=0.01), frequent consumption of smoked foods (P=0.04) and lower family income (P=0.07) were all found to be associated with increased concentrations of 9-OHPhe.Urinary concentrations of OH-PAHs, especially 9-OHPhe, were elevated in Chongqing Children compared to children in other countries. Being female, older age, school location near an industrial site, frequent consumption of smoked foods and lower family income were all associated with higher OH-PAHs concentrations. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm the associations between potential exposure sources and children's exposure to PAHs, in order to provide recommendations to reduce exposure.

Authors
Liu, S; Liu, Q; Ostbye, T; Story, M; Deng, X; Chen, Y; Li, W; Wang, H; Qiu, J; Zhang, J
MLA Citation
Liu, S, Liu, Q, Ostbye, T, Story, M, Deng, X, Chen, Y, Li, W, Wang, H, Qiu, J, and Zhang, J. "Levels and risk factors for urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in children living in Chongqing, China." The Science of the total environment 598 (November 2017): 553-561.
PMID
28454027
Source
epmc
Published In
Science of the Total Environment
Volume
598
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
553
End Page
561
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.103

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

A systematic review of quality-of-life domains and items relevant to patients with spondyloarthritis.

To summarize, from the literature, quality-of-life (QoL) domains and items relevant to patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to determine if commonly used SpA patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments include the identified domains.We used PRISMA statement for systematic review and searched Medline® , Embase®, and PsycInfo® using relevant keywords. In addition, hand searches of references of the included articles were conducted. All articles were reviewed for inclusion by 2 independent reviewers. QoL domains and items relevant to patients with axial or peripheral SpA were extracted and presented using the adapted World Health Organization Quality-of-Life (WHOQOL) domain framework. SpA PROs were assessed to determine if they included the domains identified.We retrieved 14,343 articles, of which 34 articles fulfilled inclusion criteria for review. Twenty-five articles were conducted in the European population. Domains such as negative feelings and activities of daily living were found to be present in 28 and 27 articles, respectively. SpA impacted QoL in all domains of the adapted WHOQOL framework. Domains that differed between types of SpA were financial resources, general levels of independence and medication side effects. Embarrassment, self-image, and premature ageing were items that differed by geographical setting. PROs to capture domains for peripheral SpA were similar for axial SpA.We found that a wide range of domains and items of QoL were relevant to patients with SpA with minimal differences between patients with axial and peripheral SpA. Clinicians may consider using peripheral SpA PROs to measure QoL of patients with axial SpA.

Authors
Kwan, YH; Fong, W; Tan, VIC; Lui, NL; Malhotra, R; Østbye, T; Thumboo, J
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Fong, W, Tan, VIC, Lui, NL, Malhotra, R, Østbye, T, and Thumboo, J. "A systematic review of quality-of-life domains and items relevant to patients with spondyloarthritis." Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism 47.2 (October 2017): 175-182.
PMID
28487138
Source
epmc
Published In
Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume
47
Issue
2
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
175
End Page
182
DOI
10.1016/j.semarthrit.2017.04.002

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
crossref
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans. (Accepted)" Preventive medicine reports 8 (December 2017): 116-121.
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans.

Existing evidence on the association between built environment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors focused on the general population, which may not generalize to higher risk subgroups such as those with lower socio-economic status (SES). We examined the associations between distance to 5 public amenities from residential housing (public polyclinic, subsidized private clinic, healthier eatery, public park and train station) and 12 CVD risk factors (physical inactivity, medical histories and unhealthy dietary habits) among a study sample of low income Singaporeans aged ≥ 40 years (N = 1972). Using data from the Singapore Heart Foundation Health Mapping Exercise 2013-2015, we performed a series of logistic mixed effect regressions, accounting for clustering of respondents in residential blocks and multiple comparisons. Each regression analysis used the minimum distance (in km) between residential housing and each public amenity as an independent continuous variable and a single risk factor as the dependent variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Increased distance (geographical inaccessibility) to a train station was significantly associated with lower odds of participation in sports whereas greater distance to a subsidized private clinic was associated with lower odds of having high cholesterol diagnosed. Increasing distance to park was positively associated with higher odds of less vegetable and fruits consumption, deep fried food and fast food consumption in the preceding week/month, high BMI at screening and history of diabetes, albeit not achieving statistical significance. Our findings highlighted potential effects of health-promoting amenities on CVD risk factors in urban low-income setting, suggesting gaps for further investigations.

Authors
Lim, KK; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Low, LL; Chua, AP; Lee, WY; Pang, L; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Low, LL, Chua, AP, Lee, WY, Pang, L, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, and Ostbye, T. "The association between distance to public amenities and cardiovascular risk factors among lower income Singaporeans." Preventive Medicine Reports (September 2017).
PMID
29021948
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
116
End Page
121
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.09.004

Assessment of nutrition and physical activity environments in family child care homes: modification and psychometric testing of the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation.

Early care and education (ECE) settings play an important role in shaping the nutrition and physical activity habits of young children. Increasing research attention is being directed toward family child care homes (FCCHs) specifically. However, existing measures of child care nutrition and physical activity environments are limited in that they have been created for use with center-based programs and require modification for studies involving FCCHs. This paper describes the modification of the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) for use in FCCHs.The EPAO underwent a through modification process that incorporated an updated format for the data collection instrument, assessment of emerging best practices, tailoring to the FCCH environment, and creation of a new scoring rubric. The new instrument was implemented as part of a larger randomized control trial. To assess inter-rater reliability, observations on 61 different days were performed independently by two data collectors. To assess construct validity, associations between EPAO scores and measures of children's dietary intake (Healthy Eating Index (HEI) score) and physical activity (accelerometer-measured minutes per hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity, MVPA) were examined.The modified EPAO assesses 38 nutrition and 27 physical activity best practices, which can be summarized into 7 nutrition-related and 10 physical activity-related environmental sub- scores as well as overall nutrition and overall physical activity scores. There was generally good agreement between data collectors (ICC > 0.60). Reliability was slightly lower for feeding practices and physical activity education and professional development (ICC = 0.56 and 0.22, respectively). Child HEI was significantly correlated with the overall nutrition score (r = 0.23), foods provided (r = 0.28), beverages provided (r = 0.15), nutrition education and professional development (r = 0.21), and nutrition policy (r = 0.18). Child MVPA was significantly associated with overall time provided for activity (r = 0.18) and outdoor playtime (r = 0.20). There was also an unexpected negative association between child MVPA and screen time (-0.16) and screen time practices (r = -0.21).The EPAO for the FCCH instrument is a useful tool for researchers working with this unique type of ECE setting. It has undergone rigorous development and testing and appears to have good psychometric properties.NCT01814215 , March 15, 2013.

Authors
Vaughn, AE; Mazzucca, S; Burney, R; Østbye, T; Benjamin Neelon, SE; Tovar, A; Ward, DS
MLA Citation
Vaughn, AE, Mazzucca, S, Burney, R, Østbye, T, Benjamin Neelon, SE, Tovar, A, and Ward, DS. "Assessment of nutrition and physical activity environments in family child care homes: modification and psychometric testing of the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation." BMC public health 17.1 (August 29, 2017): 680-.
PMID
28851348
Source
epmc
Published In
BMC Public Health
Volume
17
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
680
DOI
10.1186/s12889-017-4686-9

Validity and Reliability of the Positive Aspects of Caregiving (PAC) Scale and Development of Its Shorter Version (S-PAC) Among Family Caregivers of Older Adults.

To (a) assess the validity and reliability of the 9-item Positive Aspects of Caregiving (PAC) scale among a national sample of caregivers for older adults with functional limitations, (b) develop a shorter version (short-PAC [S-PAC] scale) and assess its psychometric properties, and (c) investigate both scales' measurement equivalence/invariance (ME/I) across language of administration (Chinese/English/Malay).Scale/item measurement property assessment, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), testing the "original" 2-factor model (6 items: first factor; 3 items: second factor), and exploratory FA (EFA) of the 9-item PAC scale was done. Consequently, alternate CFA models were tested. The S-PAC was developed and subjected to CFA. For both scales, convergent (correlation with caregiver esteem) and divergent (correlation with caregiver depressive symptoms) validity, and language ME/I was assessed.For the 9-item PAC scale, the "original" 2-factor CFA model had a poor fit; its EFA and scale/item measurement properties supported a single factor. Among alternate CFA models, a bi-factor model (all nine items: first factor [overall PAC]; six items: second factor [self-affirmation]; three items: third factor [outlook-on-life]) had the best fit. The bi-factor CFA model also had a good fit for the S-PAC scale, developed after eliminating 2 items from the 9-item PAC scale. Both scales demonstrated convergent and divergent validity, and partial ME/I across language of administration.Both the 9-item PAC and 7-item S-PAC scales can be used to assess positive feelings resulting from care provision among family caregivers of older adults with functional limitations.

Authors
Siow, JYM; Chan, A; Østbye, T; Cheng, GH-L; Malhotra, R
MLA Citation
Siow, JYM, Chan, A, Østbye, T, Cheng, GH-L, and Malhotra, R. "Validity and Reliability of the Positive Aspects of Caregiving (PAC) Scale and Development of Its Shorter Version (S-PAC) Among Family Caregivers of Older Adults." The Gerontologist 57.4 (August 2017): e75-e84.
PMID
28082275
Source
epmc
Published In
The Gerontologist
Volume
57
Issue
4
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
e75
End Page
e84
DOI
10.1093/geront/gnw198

Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Among Participants in a Workplace Obesity Intervention.

To characterize barriers to healthy eating (BHE) and physical activity (BPA) among participants in a workplace weight management intervention.Steps to health participants completed a questionnaire to ascertain barriers to physical activity and healthy eating faced. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the factor structure for BPA and BHE. The relationships of these factors with accelerometer data and dietary behaviors were assessed using linear regression.Barriers to physical activity included time constraints and lack of interest and motivation, and to healthy eating, lack of self-control and convenience, and lack of access to healthy foods. Higher BHE correlated with higher sugary beverage intake but not fruit and vegetable and fat intake.To improve their effectiveness, workplace weight management programs should consider addressing and reducing barriers to healthy eating and physical activity.

Authors
Stankevitz, K; Dement, J; Schoenfisch, A; Joyner, J; Clancy, SM; Stroo, M; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Stankevitz, K, Dement, J, Schoenfisch, A, Joyner, J, Clancy, SM, Stroo, M, and Østbye, T. "Perceived Barriers to Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Among Participants in a Workplace Obesity Intervention." Journal of occupational and environmental medicine 59.8 (August 2017): 746-751.
PMID
28692017
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume
59
Issue
8
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
746
End Page
751
DOI
10.1097/jom.0000000000001092

Burden and Seasonality of Viral Acute Respiratory Tract Infections among Outpatients in Southern Sri Lanka.

In tropical and subtropical settings, the epidemiology of viral acute respiratory tract infections varies widely between countries. We determined the etiology, seasonality, and clinical presentation of viral acute respiratory tract infections among outpatients in southern Sri Lanka. From March 2013 to January 2015, we enrolled outpatients presenting with influenza-like illness (ILI). Nasal/nasopharyngeal samples were tested in duplicate using antigen-based rapid influenza testing and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for respiratory viruses. Monthly proportion positive was calculated for each virus. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify associations between sociodemographic/clinical information and viral detection. Of 571 subjects, most (470, 82.3%) were ≥ 5 years of age and 53.1% were male. A respiratory virus was detected by PCR in 63.6% (N = 363). Common viral etiologies included influenza (223, 39%), human enterovirus/rhinovirus (HEV/HRV, 14.5%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 4.2%), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV, 3.9%). Both ILI and influenza showed clear seasonal variation, with peaks from March to June each year. RSV and hMPV activity peaked from May to July, whereas HEV/HRV was seen year-round. Patients with respiratory viruses detected were more likely to report pain with breathing (odds ratio [OR] = 2.60, P = 0.003), anorexia (OR = 2.29, P < 0.001), and fatigue (OR = 2.00, P = 0.002) compared with patients with no respiratory viruses detected. ILI showed clear seasonal variation in southern Sri Lanka, with most activity during March to June; peak activity was largely due to influenza. Targeted infection prevention activities such as influenza vaccination in January-February may have a large public health impact in this region.

Authors
Shapiro, D; Bodinayake, CK; Nagahawatte, A; Devasiri, V; Kurukulasooriya, R; Hsiang, J; Nicholson, B; De Silva, AD; Østbye, T; Reller, ME; Woods, CW; Tillekeratne, LG
MLA Citation
Shapiro, D, Bodinayake, CK, Nagahawatte, A, Devasiri, V, Kurukulasooriya, R, Hsiang, J, Nicholson, B, De Silva, AD, Østbye, T, Reller, ME, Woods, CW, and Tillekeratne, LG. "Burden and Seasonality of Viral Acute Respiratory Tract Infections among Outpatients in Southern Sri Lanka." The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 97.1 (July 2017): 88-96.
PMID
28719323
Source
epmc
Published In
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume
97
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
88
End Page
96
DOI
10.4269/ajtmh.17-0032

Development of the FitSight Fitness Tracker to Increase Time Outdoors to Prevent Myopia.

To develop a fitness tracker (FitSight) to encourage children to increase time spent outdoors. To evaluate the wear pattern for this tracker and outdoor time pattern by estimating light illumination levels among children.The development of the FitSight fitness tracker involved the designing of two components: (1) the smartwatch with custom-made FitSight watch application (app) to log the instant light illuminance levels the wearer is exposed to, and (2) a companion smartphone app that synchronizes the time outdoors recorded by the smartwatch to smartphone via Bluetooth communication. Smartwatch wear patterns and tracker-recorded daily light illuminance levels data were gathered over 7 days from 23 Singapore children (mean ± standard deviation age: 9.2 ± 1.4 years). Feedback about the tracker was obtained from 14 parents using a three-level rating scale: very poor/poor/good.Of the 14 parents, 93% rated the complete "FitSight fitness tracker" as good and 64% rated its wearability as good. While 61% of 23 children wore the watch on all study days (i.e., 0 nonwear days), 26% had 1 nonwear day, and 4.5% children each had 3, 4, and 5 nonwear days, respectively. On average, children spent approximately 1 hour in light levels greater than 1000 lux on weekdays and 1.3 hours on weekends (60 ± 46 vs. 79 ± 53 minutes, P = 0.19). Mean number of outdoor "spurts" (light illuminance levels >1000 lux) per day was 8 ± 3 spurts with spurt duration of 34 ± 32 minutes.The FitSight tracker with its novel features may motivate children to increase time outdoors and play an important role in supplementing community outdoor programs to prevent myopia.If the developed noninvasive, wearable, smartwatch-based fitness tracker, FitSight, promotes daytime outdoor activity among children, it will be beneficial in addressing the epidemic of myopia.

Authors
Verkicharla, PK; Ramamurthy, D; Nguyen, QD; Zhang, X; Pu, S-H; Malhotra, R; Ostbye, T; Lamoureux, EL; Saw, S-M
MLA Citation
Verkicharla, PK, Ramamurthy, D, Nguyen, QD, Zhang, X, Pu, S-H, Malhotra, R, Ostbye, T, Lamoureux, EL, and Saw, S-M. "Development of the FitSight Fitness Tracker to Increase Time Outdoors to Prevent Myopia." Translational vision science & technology 6.3 (June 16, 2017): 20-.
PMID
28660095
Source
epmc
Published In
Translational Vision Science & Technology
Volume
6
Issue
3
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
20
DOI
10.1167/tvst.6.3.20

Lessons from Singapore's national weight management program, Lose To Win.

The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Singapore is lower than in most countries, but it is increasing. There is evidence health complications may appear at lower weights among Asians. We describe the evolution of a national weight management program [Lose To Win (LTW)] organized by the Singapore Health Promotion Board from 2009 to 2013. LTW is a 12-week program comprising nutrition education, physical activity and mental wellbeing sessions and interim assessments. Individuals aged 18-69 years with a body mass index (BMI) between 23 and 37.4 kg/m2 were included. Primary outcomes were change in weight and BMI from baseline to end of 12-weeks. Effectiveness of the weight loss program was assessed using non-randomized control group (delayed intervention) during LTW 2010 and 2012. LTW 2009 enrolled 285 participants from 72 worksites. LTW 2010, expanded to the community, enrolling 952 participants (641 community-based and 311 workplace-based). In LTW 2012 and 2013, 959 and 1412 participants, respectively, were recruited from the community only. Completion rates of the 12-week program varied from 49 to 88%. Average weight loss ranged from 1.3 to 3.6 kg. For rounds including a control group, weight loss was higher in the intervention than in the control group. Competition and incentives were important motivators for participation. The LTW program was well-received and effective in producing short-term weight loss. Enhancements will be done to reinforce success factors in subsequent rounds to boost participation and follow-up rates and to ensure long-term sustainability.

Authors
Vasquez, K; Malhotra, R; Østbye, T; Low, W; Chan, MF; Chew, L; Ling, A
MLA Citation
Vasquez, K, Malhotra, R, Østbye, T, Low, W, Chan, MF, Chew, L, and Ling, A. "Lessons from Singapore's national weight management program, Lose To Win." Health promotion international (May 24, 2017).
PMID
28541435
Source
epmc
Published In
Health Promotion International
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1093/heapro/dax021

The Relationship Between BMI and Work-Related Musculoskeletal (MSK) Injury Rates is Modified by Job-Associated Level of MSK Injury Risk.

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and occupational musculoskeletal (MSK) injury rates, and the statistical interaction between BMI and occupational exposure to MSK hazards (measured by level of MSK injury risk based on job category).Using 17 years of data from 38,214 university and health system employees, multivariate Poisson regression modeled the interaction between BMI and MSK injury risk on injury rates.A significant interaction between BMI and MSK injury risk was observed. Although the effect of BMI was strongest for 'low' MSK injury risk occupations, absolute MSK injury rates for 'mid'/'high' MSK injury risk occupations remained larger.To address the occupational MSK injury burden, initiatives focused on optimal measures of workers' BMI are important but should not be prioritized over (or used in lieu of) interventions targeting job-specific MSK injury hazards.

Authors
Schoenfisch, A; Dement, J; Stankevitz, K; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Schoenfisch, A, Dement, J, Stankevitz, K, and Østbye, T. "The Relationship Between BMI and Work-Related Musculoskeletal (MSK) Injury Rates is Modified by Job-Associated Level of MSK Injury Risk." Journal of occupational and environmental medicine 59.5 (May 2017): 425-433.
PMID
28379879
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume
59
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
425
End Page
433
DOI
10.1097/jom.0000000000000982

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1234
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology (May 2017): 1932296817709797-.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

Authors
Christiansen, EK; Skipenes, E; Hausken, MF; Skeie, S; Østbye, T; Iversen, MM
MLA Citation
Christiansen, EK, Skipenes, E, Hausken, MF, Skeie, S, Østbye, T, and Iversen, MM. "Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges." Journal of diabetes science and technology 11.6 (November 2017): 1234-1239.
PMID
28560899
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Volume
11
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1932296817709797
End Page
1239
DOI
10.1177/1932296817709797

ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ACCESS TO HEALTH-PROMOTING FACILITIES AND PARTICIPATION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) RISK SCREENING AMONG POPULATIONS WITH LOW SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS (SES) IN SINGAPORE

Authors
Lim, KK; Lim, C; Kwan, YH; Ostbye, T; Tay, HY; Chan, SY; Fong, W; Tan, CS
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Lim, C, Kwan, YH, Ostbye, T, Tay, HY, Chan, SY, Fong, W, and Tan, CS. "ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ACCESS TO HEALTH-PROMOTING FACILITIES AND PARTICIPATION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) RISK SCREENING AMONG POPULATIONS WITH LOW SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS (SES) IN SINGAPORE." May 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
20
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
A381
End Page
A382

A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE INITIATION OF BIOLOGICS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOLOGICAL CONDITIONS

Authors
Png, WY; Kwan, YH; Lim, KK; Chew, EH; Lui, NL; Tan, CS; Ostbye, T; Thumboo, J; Fong, W
MLA Citation
Png, WY, Kwan, YH, Lim, KK, Chew, EH, Lui, NL, Tan, CS, Ostbye, T, Thumboo, J, and Fong, W. "A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE INITIATION OF BIOLOGICS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOLOGICAL CONDITIONS." May 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
20
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
A151
End Page
A151

ASSOCIATION OF OBESITY WITH PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY IN AN URBAN ASIAN POPULATION

Authors
Kwan, YH; Lee, YX; Png, WY; Lim, KK; Tan, CS; Lui, NL; Chew, EH; Ostbye, T; Thumboo, J; Fong, W
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Lee, YX, Png, WY, Lim, KK, Tan, CS, Lui, NL, Chew, EH, Ostbye, T, Thumboo, J, and Fong, W. "ASSOCIATION OF OBESITY WITH PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY IN AN URBAN ASIAN POPULATION." May 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
20
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
A149
End Page
A149

FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH INITIATION OF BIOLOGICS IN PATIENTS WITH AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS IN AN URBAN ASIAN CITY: A PRESPOND STUDY

Authors
Kwan, YH; Png, WY; Lee, YX; Lim, KK; Chew, EH; Lui, NL; Tan, CS; Thumboo, J; Ostbye, T; Fong, W
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Png, WY, Lee, YX, Lim, KK, Chew, EH, Lui, NL, Tan, CS, Thumboo, J, Ostbye, T, and Fong, W. "FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH INITIATION OF BIOLOGICS IN PATIENTS WITH AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS IN AN URBAN ASIAN CITY: A PRESPOND STUDY." May 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
20
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
A151
End Page
A151

FACTORS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK SCREENING UPTAKE AMONG POPULATIONS WITH LOW SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

Authors
Lim, KK; Lim, C; Kwan, YH; Tan, CS; Chan, SY; Fong, W; Tay, HY; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Lim, KK, Lim, C, Kwan, YH, Tan, CS, Chan, SY, Fong, W, Tay, HY, and Ostbye, T. "FACTORS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK SCREENING UPTAKE AMONG POPULATIONS WITH LOW SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW." May 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
20
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
A381
End Page
A381

A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN OBESITY AND OUTCOME OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES

Authors
Kwan, YH; Lee, YX; Lim, KK; Tan, CS; Lui, NL; Chew, EH; Ostbye, T; Thumboo, J; Fong, W
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Lee, YX, Lim, KK, Tan, CS, Lui, NL, Chew, EH, Ostbye, T, Thumboo, J, and Fong, W. "A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN OBESITY AND OUTCOME OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES." May 2017.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
20
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
A150
End Page
A150

Association of obesity with patient-reported outcomes in patients with axial spondyloarthritis: a cross-sectional study in an urban Asian population.

To determine if obesity is associated with poorer patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), we conducted a cross-sectional study using data of the PRESPOND registry from a tertiary referral center in Singapore between 2011 and 2015. Demographics, clinical, and PRO variables were collected. Patients were divided into three categories: normal (BMI < 23 kg/m2), overweight (23 kg/m2 ≤ BMI < 27.5 kg/m2) and obese (BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m2), using Asian BMI classification. The dependent variables are Pain score, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Patient Global Score (BAS-G), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 version 2 (SF-36). Multivariate regression analyses were performed with these dependent variables and obesity categories, adjusting for confounders. Among 194 patients with axSpA, 32% are overweight while 22% are obese. We found that obese patients had significant poorer pain (β: 11.87, 95%CI 2.13, 21.60) and BAS-G scores (β: 10.18, 95%CI 1.59, 18.76) when compared to normal BMI patients. However, obesity was not associated with BASDAI (β 0.50, 95%CI -0.22, 1.22), BASFI (β 0.08, 95%CI -0.66, 0.81), HAQ (β -0.07, 95%CI -0.21, 0.06), physical component summary (β -0.02, 95%CI -4.47, 4.44), and mental component summary (β -2.85, 95%CI -7.57, 1.88) of SF-36. Obesity was associated with pain score and BAS-G but not with BASDAI, BASFI, HAQ, and SF-36. Further study is needed to examine the causal relationship between obesity and poorer PROs.

Authors
Lee, YX; Kwan, YH; Png, WY; Lim, KK; Tan, CS; Lui, NL; Chew, EH; Thumboo, J; Østbye, T; Fong, W
MLA Citation
Lee, YX, Kwan, YH, Png, WY, Lim, KK, Tan, CS, Lui, NL, Chew, EH, Thumboo, J, Østbye, T, and Fong, W. "Association of obesity with patient-reported outcomes in patients with axial spondyloarthritis: a cross-sectional study in an urban Asian population." Clinical rheumatology (April 4, 2017).
PMID
28378098
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Rheumatology
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1007/s10067-017-3585-x

Mental health paraprofessional training for filipina foreign domestic workers in Singapore: Feasibility and effects on knowledge about depression and cognitive behavioral therapy skills

Authors
Wong, MHM; Keng, SL; Buck, PJB; Ostbye, T; Wessels, A; Suthendran, S
MLA Citation
Wong, MHM, Keng, SL, Buck, PJB, Ostbye, T, Wessels, A, and Suthendran, S. "Mental health paraprofessional training for filipina foreign domestic workers in Singapore: Feasibility and effects on knowledge about depression and cognitive behavioral therapy skills." April 2017.
Source
crossref
Published In
European Psychiatry
Volume
41
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
S626
End Page
S626
DOI
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.01.1014

Antibiotic overuse for acute respiratory tract infections in Sri Lanka: a qualitative study of outpatients and their physicians.

Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are a common reason for antibiotic overuse worldwide. We previously showed that over 80% of outpatients presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Sri Lanka with influenza-like illness received antibiotic prescriptions, although almost half were later confirmed to have influenza. The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess Sri Lankan patients' and physicians' attitudes towards ARTI diagnosis and treatment.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 50 outpatients with ARTIs and five physicians in the Outpatient Department (OPD) at a large, public tertiary care hospital in southern Sri Lanka. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for themes related to ARTI diagnosis and treatment.Patients frequently sought ARTI care in the public sector due to the receipt of free care and the perception that government hospitals carried a sense of responsibility for patients' health. Patients reported multiple medical visits for their illnesses of short duration and many indicated that they were seeking care in the OPD while at the hospital for another reason. While patients generally expected to receive medication prescriptions at their visit, most patients were not specifically seeking an antibiotic prescription. However, more than 70% of patients received antibiotic prescriptions at their OPD visit. Physicians incorrectly perceived that patients desired antibiotics or "capsules," a common formulation of antibiotics dispensed in this outpatient setting, and cited patient demand as an important cause of antibiotic overuse. Physicians also indicated that high patient volume and fear of bacterial superinfection drove antibiotic overuse.Patients in this study were seeking medication prescriptions for their ARTIs, but physicians incorrectly perceived that antibiotic prescriptions were desired. High patient volume and fear of bacterial superinfection were also important factors in antibiotic overuse. Training of physicians regarding guideline-concordant management and dealing with diagnostic uncertainty, education of patients regarding ARTI etiology and management, and systematic changes in the public outpatient care structure may help decrease unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions for ARTIs in this setting.

Authors
Tillekeratne, LG; Bodinayake, CK; Dabrera, T; Nagahawatte, A; Arachchi, WK; Sooriyaarachchi, A; Stewart, K; Watt, M; Østbye, T; Woods, CW
MLA Citation
Tillekeratne, LG, Bodinayake, CK, Dabrera, T, Nagahawatte, A, Arachchi, WK, Sooriyaarachchi, A, Stewart, K, Watt, M, Østbye, T, and Woods, CW. "Antibiotic overuse for acute respiratory tract infections in Sri Lanka: a qualitative study of outpatients and their physicians." BMC family practice 18.1 (March 16, 2017): 37-.
PMID
28302056
Source
epmc
Published In
BMC Family Practice
Volume
18
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
37
DOI
10.1186/s12875-017-0619-z

Validation of serum progesterone <35nmol/L as a predictor of miscarriage among women with threatened miscarriage.

Our recent paper, based on a pilot cohort of 119 women, showed that serum progesterone <35 nmol/L was prognostic of spontaneous miscarriage by 16 weeks in women with threatened miscarriage in early pregnancy. Using a larger cohort of women from the same setting (validation cohort), we aim to assess the validity of serum progesterone <35 nmol/L with the outcome of spontaneous miscarriage by 16 weeks.In a prospective cohort study, 360 pregnant women presenting with threatened miscarriage between gestation weeks 6-10 at a tertiary hospital emergency unit for women in Singapore were recruited for this study. The main outcome measure measured is spontaneous miscarriage prior to week 16 of gestation. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) and test characteristics (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value) at a serum progesterone cutpoint of <35 nmol/L for predicting high and low risk of spontaneous miscarriage by 16 weeks were compared between the Pilot and Validation cohorts.Test characteristics and AUC values using serum progesterone <35 nmol/L in the validation cohort were not significantly different from those in the Pilot cohort, demonstrating excellent accuracy and reproducibility of the proposed serum progesterone cut-off level.The cut-off value for serum progesterone (35 nmol/L) demonstrated clinical relevance and allow clinicians to stratify patients into high and low risk groups for spontaneous miscarriage.

Authors
Lek, SM; Ku, CW; Allen, JC; Malhotra, R; Tan, NS; Østbye, T; Tan, TC
MLA Citation
Lek, SM, Ku, CW, Allen, JC, Malhotra, R, Tan, NS, Østbye, T, and Tan, TC. "Validation of serum progesterone <35nmol/L as a predictor of miscarriage among women with threatened miscarriage." BMC pregnancy and childbirth 17.1 (March 6, 2017): 78-.
PMID
28264669
Source
epmc
Published In
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Volume
17
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
78
DOI
10.1186/s12884-017-1261-4

Family child care home providers as role models for children: Cause for concern?

Health behaviors associated with chronic disease, particularly healthy eating and regular physical activity, are important role modeling opportunities for individuals working in child care programs. Prior studies have not explored these risk factors in family child care home (FCCH) providers which care for vulnerable and at-risk populations. To address this gap, we describe the socio-demographic and health risk behavior profiles in a sample of providers (n = 166 FCCH) taken from baseline data of an ongoing cluster-randomized controlled intervention (2011-2016) in North Carolina. Data were collected during on-site visits where providers completed self-administered questionnaires (socio-demographics, physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, number of hours of sleep per night and perceived stress) and had their height and weight measured. A risk score (range: 0-6; 0 no risk to 6 high risk) was calculated based on how many of the following were present: not having health insurance, being overweight/obese, not meeting physical activity, fruit and vegetable, and sleep recommendations, and having high stress. Mean and frequency distributions of participant and FCCH characteristics were calculated. Close to one third (29.3%) of providers reported not having health insurance. Almost all providers (89.8%) were overweight or obese with approximately half not meeting guidelines for physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sleep. Over half reported a "high" stress score. The mean risk score was 3.39 (± 1.2), with close to half of the providers having a risk score of 4, 5 or 6 (45.7%). These results stress the need to promote the health of these important care providers.

Authors
Tovar, A; Vaughn, AE; Grummon, A; Burney, R; Erinosho, T; Østbye, T; Ward, DS
MLA Citation
Tovar, A, Vaughn, AE, Grummon, A, Burney, R, Erinosho, T, Østbye, T, and Ward, DS. "Family child care home providers as role models for children: Cause for concern?." Preventive medicine reports 5 (March 2017): 308-313.
PMID
28239538
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
308
End Page
313
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.11.010

Caregiving-related needs of family caregivers of older Singaporeans.

To describe the extent and correlates of caregiving-related needs among family caregivers of Singaporeans aged 75+ with ≥1 activity of daily living limitations (care-recipients).National survey data of 1181 care-recipient/caregiver dyads were used. Caregiver's report (yes/no) of 16 needs was assessed. Care-recipient and caregiver correlates of each need were determined through logistic regression analysis.Caregiving-related needs were expressed by 42.3% caregivers. The most commonly reported need was keeping care-recipient safe at home (24.5%). Needs concerned with caring for care-recipients were more frequent than those concerned with the caregiver's own needs. The most frequent correlate was care-recipient's extent of mood impairment (associated with 13 needs).Caregivers should not neglect themselves when engaging in care provision. Families and service providers should explore whether reported lack of needs reflects limited awareness and/or under-reporting.

Authors
Ajay, S; Østbye, T; Malhotra, R
MLA Citation
Ajay, S, Østbye, T, and Malhotra, R. "Caregiving-related needs of family caregivers of older Singaporeans." Australasian journal on ageing 36.1 (March 2017): E8-E13.
PMID
28191735
Source
epmc
Published In
Australasian Journal on Ageing
Volume
36
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
E8
End Page
E13
DOI
10.1111/ajag.12370

Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices relating to Leprosy among Public Health Care Providers in Colombo, Sri Lanka

Authors
Wijeratne, MP; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Wijeratne, MP, and Ostbye, T. "Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices relating to Leprosy among Public Health Care Providers in Colombo, Sri Lanka." LEPROSY REVIEW 88.1 (March 2017): 75-84.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Leprosy Review
Volume
88
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
75
End Page
84

Time Trends and Educational Inequalities in Out-of-Hospital Coronary Deaths in Norway 1995-2009: A Cardiovascular Disease in Norway (CVDNOR) Project.

Recent time trends and educational gradients characterizing out-of-hospital coronary deaths (OHCD) are poorly described.We identified all deaths from coronary heart disease occurring outside the hospital in Norway during 1995 to 2009. Time trends were explored using Poisson regression analysis with year as the independent, continuous variable. Information on the highest achieved education was obtained from The National Education Database and classified as primary (up to 10 years of compulsory education), secondary (high school or vocational school), or tertiary (college/university). Educational gradients in OHCD were explored using Poisson regression, stratified by sex and age (<70 and ≥70 years), and results were expressed as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95%CIs. Of 100 783 coronary heart disease deaths, 58.8% were OHCDs. From 1995 to 2009, age-adjusted OHCD rates declined across all education categories (primary, secondary, and tertiary) in younger men (IRR=0.35; 95%CI 0.32-0.38; IRR=0.38; 95%CI 0.35-0.42; IRR=0.33; 95%CI 0.28-0.40), younger women (IRR=0.47; 95% CI 0.40-0.56; IRR=0.55; 95%CI 0.45-0.67; IRR=0.28; 95% CI 0.16-0.47), older men (IRR=0.20; 95%CI 0.19-0.22; IRR=0.20; 95%CI 0.18-0.22; IRR=0.20; 95%CI 0.17-0.23), and older women (IRR=0.26; 95%CI 0.24-0.28; IRR=0.25; 95%CI 0.23-0.28; IRR=0.28; 95%CI 0.22-0.34). Tertiary education was associated with lower risk of OHCD compared to primary education (IRR=0.37; 95%CI 0.35-0.40 in younger men, IRR=0.26; 95%CI 0.22-0.30 in younger women, IRR=0.52; 95%CI 0.49-0.55 in older men, and IRR=0.61; 95%CI 0.57-0.66 in older women). These gradients did not change over time (P interaction=0.25).Although OHCD rates declined substantially during 1995 to 2009, they displayed educational gradients that remained constant over time.

Authors
Sulo, E; Nygård, O; Vollset, SE; Igland, J; Ebbing, M; Østbye, T; Jørgensen, T; Sulo, G; Tell, GS
MLA Citation
Sulo, E, Nygård, O, Vollset, SE, Igland, J, Ebbing, M, Østbye, T, Jørgensen, T, Sulo, G, and Tell, GS. "Time Trends and Educational Inequalities in Out-of-Hospital Coronary Deaths in Norway 1995-2009: A Cardiovascular Disease in Norway (CVDNOR) Project." Journal of the American Heart Association 6.2 (February 20, 2017).
PMID
28219924
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the American Heart Association
Volume
6
Issue
2
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1161/jaha.116.005236

Cohort profile for the Nurture Observational Study examining associations of multiple caregivers on infant growth in the Southeastern USA.

Childcare has been associated with obesity in children in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, although some observed no association. Few studies have focused on care during infancy, a period when children may be especially vulnerable.The Nurture Study is an observational birth cohort designed to assess longitudinal associations of childcare and the presence of multiple caregivers on infant adiposity and weight trajectories throughout the first year of life. We examine as potential mediators feeding, physical activity, sleep and stress. We completed recruitment in 2015. Of the 860 women who enrolled during pregnancy, 799 delivered a single live infant who met our inclusion criteria. Of those, 666 mothers (77.4%) agreed to participate in the study for themselves and their infants.Among the 666 women in the study, 472 (71%) identified as black, 127 (19%) as white, 7 (1%) as Asian or Asian American, 6 (1%) as Native American and 49 (7%) as other race or more than one race; 43 (7%) identified as Hispanic/Latina. Just under half (48%) had a high school diploma or less, 61% had household incomes <$20 000/year and 59% were married or living with a partner. The mean (SD) infant gestational age was 41.28 weeks (2.29) and birth weight for gestational age z-score was -0.31 (0.93). Just under half (49%) of infants were females, 69% received some human milk and 40% were exclusively breast fed at hospital discharge. Data collection began in 2013, is currently underway, and is scheduled to conclude in late 2016.Results will help assess the magnitude of associations between childcare in infancy and subsequent obesity. Findings will also inform intervention and policy efforts to improve childcare environments and help prevent obesity in settings where many infants spend time.Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01788644.

Authors
Benjamin Neelon, SE; Østbye, T; Bennett, GG; Kravitz, RM; Clancy, SM; Stroo, M; Iversen, E; Hoyo, C
MLA Citation
Benjamin Neelon, SE, Østbye, T, Bennett, GG, Kravitz, RM, Clancy, SM, Stroo, M, Iversen, E, and Hoyo, C. "Cohort profile for the Nurture Observational Study examining associations of multiple caregivers on infant growth in the Southeastern USA." BMJ open 7.2 (February 8, 2017): e013939-.
PMID
28179416
Source
epmc
Published In
BMJ Open
Volume
7
Issue
2
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
e013939
DOI
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013939

Cohort profile for the Nurture Observational Study examining associations of multiple caregivers on infant growth in the Southeastern USA

Authors
Benjamin Neelon, SE; Østbye, T; Bennett, GG; Kravitz, RM; Clancy, SM; Stroo, M; Iversen, E; Hoyo, C
MLA Citation
Benjamin Neelon, SE, Østbye, T, Bennett, GG, Kravitz, RM, Clancy, SM, Stroo, M, Iversen, E, and Hoyo, C. "Cohort profile for the Nurture Observational Study examining associations of multiple caregivers on infant growth in the Southeastern USA." BMJ Open 7.2 (February 2017): e013939-e013939.
Source
crossref
Published In
BMJ Open
Volume
7
Issue
2
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
e013939
End Page
e013939
DOI
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013939

Challenges faced by older nurses in Singapore: a mixed methods study.

In Singapore, employees aged 62-65 can continue to be employed if they meet the re-employment eligibility criteria. This policy, coupled with an ageing workforce, calls for age-friendly initiatives, specific to work-related challenges faced by older nurses.To determine work-related challenges faced by older nurses.A mixed method sequential explanatory study was conducted with nurses, aged 50 and above, working in a healthcare cluster in Singapore. In the quantitative phase, a questionnaire was administered to 534 nurses to elicit work-related challenges, then in-depth interviews with 30 nurses were carried out to help explain why certain tasks and work circumstances became harder.Results of the survey indicated that the top three challenges were coping with changes, working with computers and reading labels. Place of work, salary range, gender and race were significantly associated with different work-related challenges. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data: physical demands of work and workload, new technology, need for further education, working with younger nurses and in intercultural teams, and changing public expectations and professional image.The study supports the current literature on the challenges older nurses face with technological advancement. However, older nurses in our study reported less aches and pain as compared to that reported elsewhere. There is a need for specific strategies that will address changes in work processes and environment in order to retain older nurses.When devising age-friendly work improvement initiatives, it is important for nurse leaders to factor in the needs of nurses working in different care environments, who are of different ranks, or are from different ethnic backgrounds.

Authors
Ang, SY; Ayoob, SBM; Hussain, NBS; Uthaman, T; Adenan, H; Chiang, P; Ong, LT; Fong, MK; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Ang, SY, Ayoob, SBM, Hussain, NBS, Uthaman, T, Adenan, H, Chiang, P, Ong, LT, Fong, MK, and Ostbye, T. "Challenges faced by older nurses in Singapore: a mixed methods study." International nursing review (January 17, 2017).
PMID
28093735
Source
epmc
Published In
International Nursing Review
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1111/inr.12348

Severity and duration of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) before seeking care as predictors of healing time: A retrospective cohort study.

To investigate whether A) duration of ulcer before start of treatment in specialist health care, and B) severity of ulcer according to University of Texas classification system (UT) at start of treatment (baseline), are independent predictors of healing time.This retrospective cohort study, based on electronic medical record data, included 105 patients from two outpatient clinics in Western Norway with a new diabetic foot ulcer during 2009-2011. The associations of duration of ulcer and ulcer severity with healing time were assessed using cumulative incidence curves and subdistribution hazard ratio estimated using competing risk regression with adjustment for potential confounders.Of the 105 participants, 45.7% achieved ulcer healing, 36.2% underwent amputations, 9.5% died before ulcer healing and 8.5% were lost to follow-up. Patients who were referred to specialist health care by a general practitioner ≥ 52 days after ulcer onset had a 58% (SHR 0.42, CI 0.18-0.98) decreased healing rate compared to patients who were referred earlier, in the adjusted model. High severity (grade 2/3, stage C/D) according to the UT classification system was associated with a decreased healing rate compared to low severity (grade1, stage A/B or grade 2, stage A) with SHR (95% CI) equal to 0.14 (0.05-0.43) after adjustment for referral time and other potential confounders.Early detection and referral by both the patient and general practitioner are crucial for optimal foot ulcer healing. Ulcer grade and severity are also important predictors for healing time, and early screening to assess the severity and initiation of prompt treatment is important.

Authors
Smith-Strøm, H; Iversen, MM; Igland, J; Østbye, T; Graue, M; Skeie, S; Wu, B; Rokne, B
MLA Citation
Smith-Strøm, H, Iversen, MM, Igland, J, Østbye, T, Graue, M, Skeie, S, Wu, B, and Rokne, B. "Severity and duration of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) before seeking care as predictors of healing time: A retrospective cohort study." PloS one 12.5 (January 2017): e0177176-.
PMID
28498862
Source
epmc
Published In
PloS one
Volume
12
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
e0177176
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0177176

Validity and reliability of the Short Form 36 Health Surveys (SF-36) among patients with spondyloarthritis in Singapore.

The Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) is a popular health-related quality of life (HrQoL) tool. However, few studies have assessed its psychometric properties in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). We therefore aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the SF-36 in patients with SpA in Singapore. Cross-sectional data from a registry of 196 SpA patients recruited from a dedicated tertiary referral clinic in Singapore from 2011 to 2014 was used. Analyses were guided by the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments framework. Internal consistency reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity was assessed through 33 a priori hypotheses by correlations of the eight subscales and two summary scores of SF-36 with other health outcomes. Known-group construct validity was assessed by comparison of the means of the subscales and summary scores of the SF-36 of SpA patients and the general population of Singapore using student's t tests. Among 196 patients (155 males (79.0 %), median (range) age: 36 (17-70), 166 Chinese (84.6 %)), SF-36 scales showed high internal consistency ranging from 0.88 to 0.90. Convergent construct validity was supported as shown by fulfillment of all hypotheses. Divergent construct validity was supported, as SF-36 MCS was not associated with PGA, pain and HAQ. Known-group construct validity showed SpA patients had lower scores of 3.8-12.5 when compared to the general population at p < 0.001. This study supports the SF-36 as a valid and reliable measure of HrQoL for use in patients with SpA at a single time point.

Authors
Kwan, YH; Fong, WWS; Lui, NL; Yong, ST; Cheung, YB; Malhotra, R; Østbye, T; Thumboo, J
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Fong, WWS, Lui, NL, Yong, ST, Cheung, YB, Malhotra, R, Østbye, T, and Thumboo, J. "Validity and reliability of the Short Form 36 Health Surveys (SF-36) among patients with spondyloarthritis in Singapore." Rheumatology international 36.12 (December 2016): 1759-1765.
PMID
27664139
Source
epmc
Published In
Rheumatology International
Volume
36
Issue
12
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1759
End Page
1765
DOI
10.1007/s00296-016-3567-3

Older nurses in Singapore: Factors associated with attitudes towards extending working life

Authors
Ang, SY; Ayoob, SBM; Hussain, NBS; Uthaman, T; Adenan, H; Chiang, P; Ong, LT; Fong, MK; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Ang, SY, Ayoob, SBM, Hussain, NBS, Uthaman, T, Adenan, H, Chiang, P, Ong, LT, Fong, MK, and Ostbye, T. "Older nurses in Singapore: Factors associated with attitudes towards extending working life." Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare 25.4 (December 2016): 222-229.
Source
crossref
Published In
Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare
Volume
25
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
222
End Page
229
DOI
10.1177/2010105816655553

Association Between Exercise Frequency and Health Care Costs Among Employees at a Large University and Academic Medical Center.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between exercise frequency and health care costs associated with medical and pharmacy claims among a 10-year employee cohort.The relationship between self-reported exercise (days/week) and health care costs was analyzed with negative binomial regression, using an integrated database involving 32,044 person-years and linking employee demographics, health risk appraisal information, and health insurance claims.An association demonstrating exercise frequency lowering health care costs was present in most medical and prescription drug categories and was strongest among employees reporting 2 to 3 and 4 to 5 days/week of exercise. Increased exercise was associated with statistically significant reductions in endocrine disease costs and gastrointestinal prescription drug costs.This cohort demonstrates lower health care costs in employee populations when exercise frequency is increased. Employers may lower modifiable risk factors for chronic disease and reduce health care costs by promoting exercise among their employee population.

Authors
Caretto, DC; Ostbye, T; Stroo, M; Darcey, DJ; Dement, J
MLA Citation
Caretto, DC, Ostbye, T, Stroo, M, Darcey, DJ, and Dement, J. "Association Between Exercise Frequency and Health Care Costs Among Employees at a Large University and Academic Medical Center." Journal of occupational and environmental medicine 58.12 (December 2016): 1167-1174.
PMID
27930473
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume
58
Issue
12
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1167
End Page
1174
DOI
10.1097/jom.0000000000000882

Challenges for strengthening the health workforce in the Lao People's Democratic Republic: perspectives from key stakeholders.

The Lao People's Democratic Republic is facing a critical shortage and maldistribution of health workers. Strengthening of the health workforce has been adopted as one of the five priorities of the National Health Sector Strategy (2013-2025). This study aims to identify, explore, and better understand the key challenges for strengthening the Laotian health workforce.This study applied exploratory and descriptive qualitative methods and adapted a working life-span framework. Twenty-three key stakeholders with particular insights into the current situation of the health workforce were purposively recruited for in-depth interviews. Important policy documents were also collected from key informants during the interviews. Thematic analysis was employed for the textual data using MAXQDA 10.The overarching problem is that there is a perceived severe shortage of skilled health workers (doctors, nurses, and midwives) and lab technicians, especially in primary health facilities and rural areas. Key informants also identified five problems: insufficient production of health workers both in quantity and quality, a limited national budget to recruit enough health staff and provide sufficient and equitable salaries and incentives, limited management capacity, poor recruitment for work in rural areas, and lack of well-designed continuing education programs for professional development. These problems are interrelated, both in how the issues arise and in the effect they have on one another.To improve the distribution of health workers in rural areas, strategies for increasing production and strengthening retention should be well integrated for better effectiveness. It is also essential to take the Laotian-specific context into consideration during intervention development and implementation. Furthermore, the government should acknowledge the inadequate health management capacity and invest to improve human resource management capacity at all levels. Finally, assessment of interventions for health workforce strengthening should be developed as early as possible to learn from the experiences and lessons in the Lao People's Democratic Republic.

Authors
Qian, Y; Yan, F; Wang, W; Clancy, S; Akkhavong, K; Vonglokham, M; Outhensackda, S; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Qian, Y, Yan, F, Wang, W, Clancy, S, Akkhavong, K, Vonglokham, M, Outhensackda, S, and Østbye, T. "Challenges for strengthening the health workforce in the Lao People's Democratic Republic: perspectives from key stakeholders." Human resources for health 14.1 (November 29, 2016): 72-.
PMID
27899109
Source
epmc
Published In
Human Resources for Health
Volume
14
Issue
1
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
72
DOI
10.1186/s12960-016-0167-y

Validity and reliability of the Health Assessment Questionnaire among patients with spondyloarthritis in Singapore.

The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) is a popular tool used to measure disability. Few studies have assessed its psychometric properties in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). We therefore aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the HAQ in patients with SpA in Singapore.Cross-sectional data from a registry of 196 patients with SpA recruited from a dedicated tertiary referral clinic in Singapore from 2011 to 2014 was used. Analyses were guided by the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) framework. Internal consistency reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Convergent construct validity was assessed by 30 a priori hypotheses through correlation of the summary score and the eight domain scores of the HAQ with other health outcome measures: Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BASG), pain, Patient's Global Assessment (PGA) and Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Divergent construct validity was assessed by poor correlation of HAQ with SF-36 Mental component score (MCS).Among 196 patients (155 males [79.1%] median [range] age: 36 [17-70]; 166 Chinese [84.7%]), the HAQ showed a high internal consistency of 0.78-0.84. Convergent validity was supported by achieving 26 out of the 30 a priori hypotheses. Divergent validity was also established- correlation of SF-36 MCS with seven domains and summary scores of the HAQ were not statistically significant.This study supports the HAQ as a valid and reliable measure of disability for use in patients with SpA.

Authors
Kwan, YH; Fong, W; Lui, NL; Yong, ST; Cheung, YB; Malhotra, R; Thumboo, J; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Fong, W, Lui, NL, Yong, ST, Cheung, YB, Malhotra, R, Thumboo, J, and Østbye, T. "Validity and reliability of the Health Assessment Questionnaire among patients with spondyloarthritis in Singapore." International journal of rheumatic diseases (November 14, 2016).
PMID
27860306
Source
epmc
Published In
International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases
Publish Date
2016
DOI
10.1111/1756-185x.12989

POSITIVE ASPECTS OF CAREGIVING SCALE: PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES IN CAREGIVERS OF ELDERLY SINGAPOREANS

MLA Citation
"POSITIVE ASPECTS OF CAREGIVING SCALE: PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES IN CAREGIVERS OF ELDERLY SINGAPOREANS." The Gerontologist 56.Suppl_3 (November 2016): 44-44.
Source
crossref
Published In
The Gerontologist
Volume
56
Issue
Suppl_3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
44
End Page
44
DOI
10.1093/geront/gnw162.183

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN OLDER SINGAPOREANS RECEIVING AND PROVIDING SUPPORT WHILE IN NEED

MLA Citation
"GENDER DIFFERENCES IN OLDER SINGAPOREANS RECEIVING AND PROVIDING SUPPORT WHILE IN NEED." The Gerontologist 56.Suppl_3 (November 2016): 227-227.
Source
crossref
Published In
The Gerontologist
Volume
56
Issue
Suppl_3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
227
End Page
227
DOI
10.1093/geront/gnw162.900

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE SHORT-FORM 36 (SF-36) HEALTH SURVEY IN PATIENTS WITH SPONDYL ARTHRITIS

Authors
Kwan, YH; Yong, ST; Fong, W; Lui, NL; Malhotra, R; Ostbye, T; Thumboo, J
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Yong, ST, Fong, W, Lui, NL, Malhotra, R, Ostbye, T, and Thumboo, J. "RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE SHORT-FORM 36 (SF-36) HEALTH SURVEY IN PATIENTS WITH SPONDYL ARTHRITIS." November 2016.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
19
Issue
7
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
A854
End Page
A854

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE HEALTH ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE (HAQ) IN PATIENTS WITH SPONDYLOARTHRITIS

Authors
Kwan, YH; Yong, ST; Fong, W; Lui, NL; Malhotra, R; Thumboo, J; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Kwan, YH, Yong, ST, Fong, W, Lui, NL, Malhotra, R, Thumboo, J, and Ostbye, T. "RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE HEALTH ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE (HAQ) IN PATIENTS WITH SPONDYLOARTHRITIS." November 2016.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
19
Issue
7
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
A810
End Page
A811

Prevalence of occupational injury and its contributing factors among rubber tappers in Galle, Sri Lanka.

Rubber tapping involves carrying heavy loads, navigating rough terrain, and using sharp tools. However, little is known about occupational injury among this vulnerable working population.To assesses the prevalence, severity, and contributing factors associated with occupational injury among Sri Lankan rubber tappers and to identify possible interventions to improve occupational safety.A questionnaire was administered to 300 Sri Lankan rubber tappers. The associations between tapper characteristics and injury within the last year were examined using log-binomial regression models. Short response answers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.300 tappers reported 594 injuries in the previous 12 months, and missed 1,080 days of work. The prevalence of one or more injuries was 49%. Factors associated with injury were being female, working an additional job, tapping with a two-handed approach, and depressive symptomology. Qualitative findings suggest three interventions to address injuries: (1) landscaping, (2) personal protective equipment, and (3) provision of eyeglasses.Work-related injuries are common among Sri Lankan rubber tappers. These results highlight the importance of working with and including informal workers in the creation of Sri Lankan occupational health and safety regulations. We believe that the three interventions identified by respondents could help to reduce the risk of occupational injury among rubber tappers.

Authors
Stankevitz, K; Staton, C; Schoenfisch, A; de Silva, V; Tharindra, H; Stroo, M; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Stankevitz, K, Staton, C, Schoenfisch, A, de Silva, V, Tharindra, H, Stroo, M, and Ostbye, T. "Prevalence of occupational injury and its contributing factors among rubber tappers in Galle, Sri Lanka." International journal of occupational and environmental health 22.4 (October 27, 2016): 333-340.
PMID
27784205
Source
epmc
Published In
International journal of occupational and environmental health
Volume
22
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
333
End Page
340

Emergence of Epidemic Dengue-1 Virus in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka.

Dengue is a frequent cause of acute febrile illness with an expanding global distribution. Since the 1960s, dengue in Sri Lanka has been documented primarily along the heavily urbanized western coast with periodic shifting of serotypes. Outbreaks from 2005-2008 were attributed to a new clade of DENV-3 and more recently to a newly introduced genotype of DENV-1. In 2007, we conducted etiologic surveillance of acute febrile illness in the Southern Province and confirmed dengue in only 6.3% of febrile patients, with no cases of DENV-1 identified. To re-evaluate the importance of dengue as an etiology of acute febrile illness in this region, we renewed fever surveillance in the Southern Province to newly identify and characterize dengue.A cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted at the largest tertiary care hospital in the Southern Province from 2012-2013. A total of 976 patients hospitalized with acute undifferentiated fever were enrolled, with 64.3% male and 31.4% children. Convalescent blood samples were collected from 877 (89.6%). Dengue virus isolation, dengue RT-PCR, and paired IgG ELISA were performed. Acute dengue was confirmed as the etiology for 388 (39.8%) of 976 hospitalizations, with most cases (291, 75.0%) confirmed virologically and by multiple methods. Among 351 cases of virologically confirmed dengue, 320 (91.2%) were due to DENV-1. Acute dengue was associated with self-reported rural residence, travel, and months having greatest rainfall. Sequencing of selected dengue viruses revealed that sequences were most closely related to those described from China and Southeast Asia, not nearby India.We describe the first epidemic of DENV-1 in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka in a population known to be susceptible to this serotype because of prior study. Dengue accounted for 40% of acute febrile illnesses in the current study. The emergence of DENV-1 as the foremost serotype in this densely populated but agrarian population highlights the changing epidemiology of dengue and the need for continued surveillance and prevention.

Authors
Bodinayake, CK; Tillekeratne, LG; Nagahawatte, A; Devasiri, V; Kodikara Arachichi, W; Strouse, JJ; Sessions, OM; Kurukulasooriya, R; Uehara, A; Howe, S; Ong, XM; Tan, S; Chow, A; Tummalapalli, P; De Silva, AD; Østbye, T; Woods, CW; Gubler, DJ; Reller, ME
MLA Citation
Bodinayake, CK, Tillekeratne, LG, Nagahawatte, A, Devasiri, V, Kodikara Arachichi, W, Strouse, JJ, Sessions, OM, Kurukulasooriya, R, Uehara, A, Howe, S, Ong, XM, Tan, S, Chow, A, Tummalapalli, P, De Silva, AD, Østbye, T, Woods, CW, Gubler, DJ, and Reller, ME. "Emergence of Epidemic Dengue-1 Virus in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka." PLoS neglected tropical diseases 10.10 (October 6, 2016): e0004995-.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/13031
PMID
27711206
Source
epmc
Published In
PLoS neglected tropical diseases
Volume
10
Issue
10
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
e0004995
DOI
10.1371/journal.pntd.0004995

Teaching primary care physicians the 5 A's for discussing weight with overweight and obese adolescents.

We developed an online intervention to teach physicians both MI (addressed in outcomes paper) and the 5 A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) when discussing weight with overweight/obese adolescents.We audio recorded 527 encounters between adolescents and physicians and coded the 5 A's during weight/BMI discussions. Half of physicians were randomized to receive a tailored, intervention that included their own audio-recorded clips. To examine arm differences, we used multilevel linear mixed-effects models for sum of 5 A's and generalized estimating equations (GEE) models with a logit link for each of the A's separately.Intervention arm physicians used more A's than control physicians (estimated difference=0.6; 95%CI(0.2,1.0);p=0.001). Intervention physicians used Assess (p=0.004), Assist (p=0.001) and Arrange (p=0.02) more when compared to control arm physicians.An online intervention increased physicians' use of the 5 A's when discussing weight with overweight adolescents. These results are promising as the online intervention improved performance for the three A's that are infrequently used (Assess, Assist, and Arrange) yet have the most impact.A tailored online program can increase physicians' use of the 5 A's behavioral counseling approach in clinical practice with adolescents.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Tulsky, JA; Bravender, T; Østbye, T; Lyna, P; Dolor, RJ; Coffman, CJ; Bilheimer, A; Lin, P-H; Farrell, D; Bodner, ME; Alexander, SC
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Tulsky, JA, Bravender, T, Østbye, T, Lyna, P, Dolor, RJ, Coffman, CJ, Bilheimer, A, Lin, P-H, Farrell, D, Bodner, ME, and Alexander, SC. "Teaching primary care physicians the 5 A's for discussing weight with overweight and obese adolescents." Patient education and counseling 99.10 (October 2016): 1620-1625.
PMID
27228899
Source
epmc
Published In
Patient Education and Counseling
Volume
99
Issue
10
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1620
End Page
1625
DOI
10.1016/j.pec.2016.05.007

Providers' response to child eating behaviors: A direct observation study.

Child care providers play an important role in feeding young children, yet little is known about children's influence on providers' feeding practices. This qualitative study examines provider and child (18 months -4 years) feeding interactions. Trained data collectors observed 200 eating occasions in 48 family child care homes and recorded providers' responses to children's meal and snack time behaviors. Child behaviors initiating provider feeding practices were identified and practices were coded according to higher order constructs identified in a recent feeding practices content map. Analysis examined the most common feeding practices providers used to respond to each child behavior. Providers were predominately female (100%), African-American (75%), and obese (77%) and a third of children were overweight/obese (33%). Commonly observed child behaviors were: verbal and non-verbal refusals, verbal and non-verbal acceptance, being "all done", attempts for praise/attention, and asking for seconds. Children's acceptance of food elicited more autonomy supportive practices vs. coercive controlling. Requests for seconds was the most common behavior, resulting in coercive controlling practices (e.g., insisting child eat certain food or clean plate). Future interventions should train providers on responding to children's behaviors and helping children become more aware of internal satiety and hunger cues.

Authors
Tovar, A; Vaughn, AE; Fallon, M; Hennessy, E; Burney, R; Østbye, T; Ward, DS
MLA Citation
Tovar, A, Vaughn, AE, Fallon, M, Hennessy, E, Burney, R, Østbye, T, and Ward, DS. "Providers' response to child eating behaviors: A direct observation study." Appetite 105 (October 2016): 534-541.
PMID
27328098
Source
epmc
Published In
Appetite
Volume
105
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
534
End Page
541
DOI
10.1016/j.appet.2016.06.020

Prevalence and Correlates of Leprosy in a High-Risk Community Setting in Sri Lanka.

Leprosy is caused by the Mycobacterium leprae bacillus. Pockets of high endemicity remain in a number of countries including Sri Lanka, in spite of the fact that elimination has been achieved at the national level. In 2012, in a village in the Puttlam district, dermatologists reported an increase in individuals with leprosy. This village had been established in the 1990s for people displaced from Northern Sri Lanka during a civil war. A comprehensive household survey was conducted by district health officials from June to July 2012, and all household members present during the survey period were examined for leprosy lesions. Patients with suspected leprosy were referred to a dermatology clinic for clinical or pathological confirmation. The prevalence of leprosy was high (511 per 10 000 population). Household contact with another patient with leprosy increased the risk of leprosy (odds ratio = 6.69; P < .001). Continued vigilance is needed to keep leprosy at bay in high-risk communities.

Authors
Dabrera, TME; Tillekeratne, LG; Fernando, MSN; Kasturiaratchi, STK; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Dabrera, TME, Tillekeratne, LG, Fernando, MSN, Kasturiaratchi, STK, and Østbye, T. "Prevalence and Correlates of Leprosy in a High-Risk Community Setting in Sri Lanka." Asia-Pacific journal of public health 28.7 (October 2016): 586-591.
PMID
27605468
Source
epmc
Published In
Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
Volume
28
Issue
7
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
586
End Page
591
DOI
10.1177/1010539516666360

Normative Values of Hand Grip Strength for Elderly Singaporeans Aged 60 to 89 Years: A Cross-Sectional Study.

What are normative values for hand grip strength (HGS) for elderly Singaporeans? Which elderly characteristics influence the normative values of HGS for elderly Singaporeans?Nationally representative, cross-sectional observational study.Singapore.A total of 2664 community-dwelling elderly Singaporeans aged 60 to 89 years.HGS was measured in a standing position with elbows extended twice for each hand; a Smedley spring-type dynamometer was used. Elderly characteristics known to affect HGS, including age, sex, hand dominance, height, weight, occupation, education, and ethnicity, were also assessed.We present single-year age, sex-, and hand-specific graphs for normative values (5th, 20th, and 50th percentiles) of HGS. The influence of specific elderly characteristics on the normative values of HGS varies by sex, hand, and considered percentile. We present equations for considered percentiles of HGS that account for such influences.This study uses a large, nationally representative sample to establish normative values for HGS for elderly Singaporeans aged 60 to 89 years. These results will facilitate the interpretation of HGS measurements conducted using Smedley spring-type dynamometers in clinical and research settings in Singapore, and potentially other Asian countries.

Authors
Malhotra, R; Ang, S; Allen, JC; Tan, NC; Østbye, T; Saito, Y; Chan, A
MLA Citation
Malhotra, R, Ang, S, Allen, JC, Tan, NC, Østbye, T, Saito, Y, and Chan, A. "Normative Values of Hand Grip Strength for Elderly Singaporeans Aged 60 to 89 Years: A Cross-Sectional Study." Journal of the American Medical Directors Association 17.9 (September 2016): 864.e1-864.e7.
PMID
27569714
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume
17
Issue
9
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
864.e1
End Page
864.e7
DOI
10.1016/j.jamda.2016.06.013

580 Prevalence and associated factors of work-related injuries among rubber tappers in Sri Lanka

Authors
Stankevitz, K; Staton, C; Schoenfisch, A; Silva, VD; Tharindra, H; Stroo, M; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Stankevitz, K, Staton, C, Schoenfisch, A, Silva, VD, Tharindra, H, Stroo, M, and Ostbye, T. "580 Prevalence and associated factors of work-related injuries among rubber tappers in Sri Lanka." September 2016.
Source
crossref
Published In
Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention
Volume
22
Issue
Suppl 2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
A208.3
End Page
A209
DOI
10.1136/injuryprev-2016-042156.580

500 The effect of comorbidity and gender on in-hospital mortality in patients with falls: results from a large asian tertiary care hospital

Authors
Yang, Y; Ho, E; Thumboo, J; Østbye, T; Ng, YS; Fong, CHJ; Fong, KY
MLA Citation
Yang, Y, Ho, E, Thumboo, J, Østbye, T, Ng, YS, Fong, CHJ, and Fong, KY. "500 The effect of comorbidity and gender on in-hospital mortality in patients with falls: results from a large asian tertiary care hospital." September 2016.
Source
crossref
Published In
Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention
Volume
22
Issue
Suppl 2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
A181.1
End Page
A181
DOI
10.1136/injuryprev-2016-042156.500

Recruitment of Family Child Care Homes for an Obesity Prevention Intervention Study.

Critical to the success of any intervention study is successful recruitment. The aim of this paper was to examine the recruitment process of a randomized controlled trial evaluating an intervention conducted with family child care home providers. Specifically, the recruitment challenges, the efforts employed to address the challenges, and their impact on participant recruitment are discussed.The study's original recruitment protocol was employed during waves 1 and 2 (out of 5). However, recruitment tracking showed a failure to meet enrollment targets, particularly in wave 2. Low enrollment prompted an all-day retreat to discuss potential revisions and enhancements to recruitment strategies. Four strategies to enhance the recruitment protocol emerged from the retreat: improving recruitment materials to enhance communication, increasing engagement with community partners, addressing provider concerns about participation and study burden, and facilitating parent engagement.The study successfully recruited 166 family child care home providers across the 5 waves. There was a significant impact on the recruitment of waves 3-5 versus waves 1-2 using the enhanced recruitment protocol. There was a dramatic increase in those who "consented" (43% vs. 60%, respectively) and a corresponding decrease in the percent of "interested and eligible" who then "failed to consent" (57% vs. 40%, respectively).Results of these enhanced recruitment strategies demonstrate the many lessons learned about successful recruitment of a difficult-to-reach population, family child care homes; specifically, the importance of building relationships, communicating clearly, and identifying key motivators.

Authors
Ward, DS; Vaughn, AE; Burney, RV; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Ward, DS, Vaughn, AE, Burney, RV, and Østbye, T. "Recruitment of Family Child Care Homes for an Obesity Prevention Intervention Study." Contemporary clinical trials communications 3 (August 2016): 131-138.
PMID
27617326
Source
epmc
Published In
Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications
Volume
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
131
End Page
138

Telemedicine Versus Standard Follow-Up Care for Diabetes-Related Foot Ulcers: Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial (DiaFOTo).

This paper presents the protocol for an ongoing study to evaluate a telemedicine follow-up intervention for patients with diabetes-related foot ulcers. Diabetes-related foot ulcers represent challenges for patients and the health services. The large increase in the prevalence of diabetes, combined with the aging population, means that the absolute number of patients with diabetes-related foot ulcers is likely to continue to increase. Health care services therefore need to provide close clinical follow-up care for people with diabetes both in primary and specialist care. Information and communication technologies may enable more integrated treatment and care pathways across organizational boundaries. However, we lack knowledge about the effect of telemedicine follow-up and how such services can be optimally organized.To present the design and methods of a study evaluating a telemedicine follow-up intervention for patients with diabetes-related foot ulcers.The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial (noninferiority trial) involving municipalities or municipality districts (clusters) belonging to one clinical site in Western Norway. The study includes patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes presenting with a new foot ulcer at the initial visit to the clinic. Patients in the intervention group receive telemedicine follow-up care in the community. The key ingredient in the intervention is the close integration between health care levels. The intervention is facilitated by the use of an interactive wound platform consisting of a Web-based ulcer record combined with a mobile phone, enabling counseling and communication between nurses in the community and specialist health care. Patients in the control group receive standard hospital outpatient care. The primary endpoint in the trial is healing time; secondary outcomes include amputation and death, patient-reported outcome measures, and follow-up data on the recurrence of foot ulcers. In addition, qualitative substudies are being performed to provide a more comprehensive evaluation of the ongoing processes during the trial with the patients in the intervention and control groups and those health care professionals either working in primary care or in specialist care delivering the intervention.The project has been funded. The inclusion of patients started in September 2012. Because recruitment goals were not met in the initial period, two more clinical sites have been included to meet sample size requirements. Patient recruitment will continue until June 2016. Data collection in the qualitative substudies has been completed.This telemedicine trial operates in a novel setting and targets patients with diabetes-related foot ulcers during a 12-month follow-up period. The trial addresses whether integrated care using telemedicine between primary and specialist health care can be an equivalent alternative to standard outpatient care.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01710774; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01710774 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6im6KfFov).

Authors
Iversen, MM; Espehaug, B; Hausken, MF; Graue, M; Østbye, T; Skeie, S; Cooper, JG; Tell, GS; Günther, BE; Dale, H; Smith-Strøm, H; Kolltveit, B-CH; Kirkevold, M; Rokne, B
MLA Citation
Iversen, MM, Espehaug, B, Hausken, MF, Graue, M, Østbye, T, Skeie, S, Cooper, JG, Tell, GS, Günther, BE, Dale, H, Smith-Strøm, H, Kolltveit, B-CH, Kirkevold, M, and Rokne, B. "Telemedicine Versus Standard Follow-Up Care for Diabetes-Related Foot Ulcers: Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial (DiaFOTo)." JMIR research protocols 5.3 (July 18, 2016): e148-.
PMID
27430301
Source
epmc
Published In
JMIR Research Protocols
Volume
5
Issue
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
e148
DOI
10.2196/resprot.5646

Health-related quality of life in older depressed psychogeriatric patients: one year follow-up.

Knowledge about long-term change in health related quality of life (HQoL) among older adults after hospitalization for treatment of depression has clinical relevance. The aim was firstly to describe the change of HQoL one year after admission for treatment of depression, secondly to explore if improved HQoL was associated with remission of depression at follow-up and lastly to study how HQoL in patients with remission from depression were compared to a reference group of older persons without depression.This study had the one year follow-up information of 108 older patients (≥60 years), all hospitalized for depression at baseline, and a reference sample of 106 community-living older adults (≥60 years) without depression. HQoL was measured using the EuroQol Group's EQ-5D Index and a visual analog scale (EQ-VAS). Depression and remission were diagnosed according to ICD-10. Socio-demographic variables (age, gender, and education), depressive symptom score (Montgomery-Aasberg Depression Rating Scale), cognitive functioning (Mini Mental State Examination scale), instrumental activities of daily living (the Lawton and Brody's Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale), and poor general physical health (General Medical Health Rating) were included as covariates.HQoL had improved at follow-up for the total group of depressed patients, as indicated by better scores on the EQ-5D Index and EQ-VAS. In the multivariate linear regression model, improved EQ-5D Index and EQ-VAS was significantly better in those with remission of depression and those with better baseline physical health. In adjusted analyses, the HQoL in patients with remission from depression at follow-up did not differ from the HQoL in a reference group without depression.Older hospital patients with depression who experienced remission one year after admission gained HQoL and their HQoL was comparable with the HQoL in a reference group of older adults without depression when adjusting for differences in socio-demographics and health conditions.

Authors
Helvik, A-S; Corazzini, K; Selbæk, G; Bjørkløf, GH; Laks, J; Šaltytė Benth, J; Østbye, T; Engedal, K
MLA Citation
Helvik, A-S, Corazzini, K, Selbæk, G, Bjørkløf, GH, Laks, J, Šaltytė Benth, J, Østbye, T, and Engedal, K. "Health-related quality of life in older depressed psychogeriatric patients: one year follow-up." BMC geriatrics 16 (July 7, 2016): 131-.
PMID
27388445
Source
epmc
Published In
BMC Geriatrics
Volume
16
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
131
DOI
10.1186/s12877-016-0310-6

Teaching Physicians Motivational Interviewing for Discussing Weight With Overweight Adolescents.

We tested whether an online intervention combined with a patient feedback report improved physicians' use of motivational interviewing (MI) techniques when discussing weight with overweight and obese adolescents.We randomized 46 pediatricians and family physicians and audio recorded 527 patient encounters. Half of the physicians received an individually tailored, online intervention. Then, all physicians received a summary report detailing patient's weight-related behaviors. We coded MI techniques and used multilevel linear mixed-effects models to examine arm differences. We assessed patients' motivation to change and perceived empathy after encounter.We found arm differences in the Intervention Phase and the Summary Report Phase: Empathy (p < .001), MI Spirit (p < .001), open questions (p = .02), and MI consistent behaviors (p = .04). Across all three phases (Baseline, Intervention, and Summary Report), when physicians had higher Empathy scores, patients were more motivated to change diet (p = .03) and physical activity (p = .03). In addition, patients rated physicians as more empathic when physicians used more MI consistent techniques (p = .02).An individually tailored, online intervention coupled with a Summary Report improved physicians' use of MI, which improved the patient experience.

Authors
Pollak, KI; Coffman, CJ; Tulsky, JA; Alexander, SC; Østbye, T; Farrell, D; Lyna, P; Dolor, RJ; Bilheimer, A; Lin, P-H; Bodner, ME; Bravender, TD
MLA Citation
Pollak, KI, Coffman, CJ, Tulsky, JA, Alexander, SC, Østbye, T, Farrell, D, Lyna, P, Dolor, RJ, Bilheimer, A, Lin, P-H, Bodner, ME, and Bravender, TD. "Teaching Physicians Motivational Interviewing for Discussing Weight With Overweight Adolescents." The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine 59.1 (July 2016): 96-103.
PMID
27155958
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Adolescent Health
Volume
59
Issue
1
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
96
End Page
103
DOI
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.03.026

Improvements in Functional Exercise Capacity after a Residential Behavioural Change, Diet and Fitness Program for Obese Adults.

Obese adults are at an increased risk for mobility-related problems. National guidelines recommend calorie restrictions and exercise for obese adults as a means to improve functional fitness capacity and to increase mobility. Yet, lifestyle weight loss interventions often fail to measure fitness changes. The aim of this study was to assess whether a 1-month, intensive behavioural change, diet and fitness intervention for overweight and obese adults would result in statistically significant and clinically meaningful changes in functional exercise.A pre-post test design was used in this study. Seventy-two participants (40 women, 32 men; mean baseline body mass index (BMI) = 42.6 + 9.0; mean age = 45.8 + 16.8) completed a modified 6-minute walk test (6MWT), performed on a treadmill, at baseline and at end of treatment.Significant improvements included decreased BMI (2.7 + 1.7 kg m(-2) , p < 0.001) and increased 6MWT distance (66.4 + 73.0 m, p < 0.001). The 6MWT improved by 66 m on average, a reported clinically meaningful difference. Greater improvements in the 6MWT were significantly correlated with greater weight loss and BMI reduction.Our findings suggest that rehabilitation beyond weight loss may be derived from participation in a brief, intensive behavioural change, diet and fitness programme. Physiotherapists are in a prime position to address the physical and motivational challenges participants face while living with severe obesity: targeting functional exercise capacity is one key strategy for addressing immobility associated with obesity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Authors
Errickson, SP; Kolotkin, RL; Skidmore, MS; Endress, G; Østbye, T; Crosby, R; Eisenson, H
MLA Citation
Errickson, SP, Kolotkin, RL, Skidmore, MS, Endress, G, Østbye, T, Crosby, R, and Eisenson, H. "Improvements in Functional Exercise Capacity after a Residential Behavioural Change, Diet and Fitness Program for Obese Adults." Physiotherapy research international : the journal for researchers and clinicians in physical therapy 21.2 (June 2016): 84-90.
PMID
25781859
Source
epmc
Published In
Physiotherapy Research International
Volume
21
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
84
End Page
90
DOI
10.1002/pri.1623

Validation of the use of serum progesterone cut off value and progesterone - risk of miscarriage index (Prog-RMI) as predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes among women with threatened miscarriage

Authors
Lek, SM; Ku, CW; Allen, JC; Malhotra, R; Tan, NS; Ostbye, T; Tan, TC
MLA Citation
Lek, SM, Ku, CW, Allen, JC, Malhotra, R, Tan, NS, Ostbye, T, and Tan, TC. "Validation of the use of serum progesterone cut off value and progesterone - risk of miscarriage index (Prog-RMI) as predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes among women with threatened miscarriage." BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY 123 (June 2016): 73-73.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Bjog : An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Volume
123
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
73
End Page
73

Are coping strategies and locus of control orientation associated with health-related quality of life in older adults with and without depression?

The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between coping and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in older adults (aged ≥60 years) with and without depression. This cross-sectional study included 144 depressed inpatients from seven psychogeriatric hospital units in Norway and 106 community-living older adults without depression. HRQoL was measured using Euro Qol Group's EQ-5D Index and visual analog scale (EQ-VAS). Two aspects of coping were of primary interest for HRQoL: locus of control (LOC) and ways of coping (WOC). Measures of depressive symptoms, cognitive functioning, instrumental activities of daily living, and general physical health were included as covariates. In linear regression analyses adjusted for age, stronger external LOC was associated with poorer HRQoL in both depressed and non-depressed older adults. In the fully-specified regression models for both groups, the association between stronger external LOC and poorer HRQoL remained significant for the EQ-VAS score but not the EQ-5D Index. WOC was not associated with HRQoL in either group. Total amount of explained variance in fully-specified models was considerably lower in the sample of depressed, hospitalized older adults (17.1% and 15.5% for EQ-5D index and EQ-VAS, respectively), than in the sample of non-depressed, community-based older adults (45.8% and 48.9% for EQ-5D Index and EQ-VAS, respectively). One aspect of coping (LOC orientation) was associated with HRQoL in both depressed and non-depressed older adult samples, and therefore may be an important target for intervention for both groups. Differences in the amount of variance explained in models for the two groups warrant further research.

Authors
Helvik, A-S; Bjørkløf, GH; Corazzini, K; Selbæk, G; Laks, J; Østbye, T; Engedal, K
MLA Citation
Helvik, A-S, Bjørkløf, GH, Corazzini, K, Selbæk, G, Laks, J, Østbye, T, and Engedal, K. "Are coping strategies and locus of control orientation associated with health-related quality of life in older adults with and without depression?." Archives of gerontology and geriatrics 64 (May 2016): 130-137.
PMID
26874239
Source
epmc
Published In
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume
64
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
130
End Page
137
DOI
10.1016/j.archger.2016.01.014

Preventing childhood obesity in early care and education settings: lessons from two intervention studies.

Obesity prevention in young children is a public health priority. In the USA, nearly 10% of children less than 5 years of age are obese, and most attend some form of out-of-home child care. While a number of interventions have been conducted in early care and education settings, few have targeted the youngest children in care or the less formal types of child care like family child care homes. Additionally, only two previous studies provided recommendations to help inform future interventions.This paper presents lessons learned from two distinct intervention studies in early care and education settings to help guide researchers and public health professionals interested in implementing and evaluating similar interventions. We highlight two studies: one targeting children ages 4 to 24 months in child care centres and the other intervening in children 18 months to 4 years in family child care homes. We include lessons from our pilot studies and the ongoing larger trials.To date, our experiences suggest that an intervention should have a firm basis in behaviour change theory; an advisory group should help evaluate intervention materials and plan for delivery; and realistic recruitment goals should recognize economic challenges of the business of child care. A flexible data collection approach and realistic sample size calculations are needed because of high rates of child (and sometimes facility) turnover. An intervention that is relatively easy to implement is more likely to appeal to a wide variety of early care and education providers.Interventions to prevent obesity in early care and education have the potential to reach large numbers of children. It is important to consider the unique features and similarities of centres and family child care homes and take advantage of lessons learned from current studies in order to develop effective, evidence-based interventions.

Authors
Benjamin Neelon, SE; Østbye, T; Hales, D; Vaughn, A; Ward, DS
MLA Citation
Benjamin Neelon, SE, Østbye, T, Hales, D, Vaughn, A, and Ward, DS. "Preventing childhood obesity in early care and education settings: lessons from two intervention studies." Child: care, health and development 42.3 (May 2016): 351-358.
PMID
26987658
Source
epmc
Published In
Child: Care, Health and Development
Volume
42
Issue
3
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
351
End Page
358
DOI
10.1111/cch.12329

The Affordable Care Act, State Policies and Demand for Primary Care Physicians

Authors
Huesch, M; Ostbye, T; Michener, JL
MLA Citation
Huesch, M, Ostbye, T, and Michener, JL. "The Affordable Care Act, State Policies and Demand for Primary Care Physicians." (April 20, 2016).
Source
ssrn
Publish Date
2016

Prevalence and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders among Sri Lankan rubber tappers.

Rubber tapping exposes workers to risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence and factors associated with MSDs among Sri Lankan rubber tappers.Questionnaires were administered to 300 rubber tappers to measure MSDs and potential associated factors. Ergonomic exposure levels were measured for 90 tappers using the Quick Exposure Check instrument. MSD prevalence and prevalence ratios were calculated using log-binomial regression.In the past 12 months, 66% of rubber tappers in our sample experienced an MSD. Ergonomic exposure levels were high or very high in the back (94.4%), shoulders (96.7%), and neck (83.3%). Being female, older, Tamil, working two jobs, alternating tapping hands, and depression were significantly associated with increased risk of MSDs.MSDs are common among rubber tappers in Sri Lanka. These results suggest a need for work process modifications to prevent MSDs.

Authors
Stankevitz, K; Schoenfisch, A; de Silva, V; Tharindra, H; Stroo, M; Ostbye, T
MLA Citation
Stankevitz, K, Schoenfisch, A, de Silva, V, Tharindra, H, Stroo, M, and Ostbye, T. "Prevalence and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders among Sri Lankan rubber tappers." International journal of occupational and environmental health 22.2 (April 19, 2016): 91-98.
PMID
27092589
Source
epmc
Published In
International journal of occupational and environmental health
Volume
22
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
91
End Page
98
DOI
10.1080/10773525.2016.1168073

Identifying types of sex conversations in adolescent health maintenance visits.

Background Physician-adolescent sexuality discussions are a recommended element in health maintenance visits, but such discussions - if they occur at all - probably vary by adolescents' characteristics and situations, and physicians' personal beliefs and training. However, little is known about the form and content of physician-adolescent sexuality discussions during health maintenance visits.We evaluated 245 physician-adolescent sexuality conversations. Using latent class analysis, we identified conversation types based on 13 sexually related topics, which occurred in at least 10% of all conversations.We found four discrete types of sexuality conversations, which differed in terms of emphasis, topics addressed as part of the sexual history and risk assessment, and topics addressed in anticipatory guidance. Inquiry about partnered sexual experience was typical across all conversation types, as well as over half including discussions about body development and protective behaviours. In all four types of conversation, sexuality discussions were typically embedded in a sequence of psychosocial and behavioural topics recommended for health maintenance visits.The presence of sexuality conversations in the majority of these visits suggests that physicians consider sexuality to be an important issue and part of their responsibility in caring for their adolescent patients. However, the substantial variability in the types of sexuality conversations, particularly the notable omissions of many key topics, supports the importance of teaching sexual health interview skills in medical school and residency, and as part of continuing medical education and quality improvement.

Authors
Alexander, SC; Christ, SL; Fortenberry, JD; Pollak, KI; Østbye, T; Bravender, T; Shields, CG
MLA Citation
Alexander, SC, Christ, SL, Fortenberry, JD, Pollak, KI, Østbye, T, Bravender, T, and Shields, CG. "Identifying types of sex conversations in adolescent health maintenance visits." Sexual health 13.1 (February 2016): 22-28.
PMID
26370470
Source
epmc
Published In
Sexual Health
Volume
13
Issue
1
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
22
End Page
28
DOI
10.1071/sh15080

The Effects of Two Workplace Weight Management Programs and Weight Loss on Health Care Utilization and Costs.

The aim of this study was to compare the impact of two worksite weight management (WM [education] and WM+ [education plus counseling]) programs, on health care utilization and costs. Secondarily, compare the intervention groups to an observational control group of obese workers. Finally, evaluate the impact of actual weight loss on these outcomes.Estimate the change in the WM and WM+ intervention groups. Using propensity score adjustment compare the two intervention groups with the observational control group; and compare those who lost weight with those who did not.No significant differences between the two intervention groups, or between these intervention groups and the observational control group. Those who lost weight reduced their overall health care costs.To achieve weight loss and associated morbidity reductions, more extensive and intensive interventions, with more attention to motivation and compliance, are required.

Authors
Østbye, T; Stroo, M; Eisenstein, EL; Dement, JM
MLA Citation
Østbye, T, Stroo, M, Eisenstein, EL, and Dement, JM. "The Effects of Two Workplace Weight Management Programs and Weight Loss on Health Care Utilization and Costs." Journal of occupational and environmental medicine 58.2 (February 2016): 162-169.
PMID
26849260
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume
58
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
162
End Page
169
DOI
10.1097/jom.0000000000000586

High road utilizers surveys compared to police data for road traffic crash hotspot localization in Rwanda and Sri Lanka.

Road traffic crashes (RTCs) are a leading cause of death. In low and middle income countries (LMIC) data to conduct hotspot analyses and safety audits are usually incomplete, poor quality, and not computerized. Police data are often limited, but there are no alternative gold standards. This project evaluates high road utilizer surveys as an alternative to police data to identify RTC hotspots.Retrospective police RTC data was compared to prospective data from high road utilizer surveys regarding dangerous road locations. Spatial analysis using geographic information systems was used to map dangerous locations and identify RTC hotspots. We assessed agreement (Cohen's Kappa), sensitivity/specificity, and cost differences.In Rwanda police data identified 1866 RTC locations from 2589 records while surveys identified 1264 locations from 602 surveys. In Sri Lanka, police data identified 721 RTC locations from 752 records while survey data found 3000 locations from 300 surveys. There was high agreement (97 %, 83 %) and kappa (0.60, 0.60) for Rwanda and Sri Lanka respectively. Sensitivity and specificity are 92 % and 95 % for Rwanda and 74 % and 93 % for Sri Lanka. The cost per crash location identified was $2.88 for police and $2.75 for survey data in Rwanda and $2.75 for police and $1.21 for survey data in Sri Lanka.Surveys to locate RTC hotspots have high sensitivity and specificity compared to police data. Therefore, surveys can be a viable, inexpensive, and rapid alternative to the use of police data in LMIC.

Authors
Staton, CA; De Silva, V; Krebs, E; Andrade, L; Rulisa, S; Mallawaarachchi, BC; Jin, K; RicardoVissoci, J; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Staton, CA, De Silva, V, Krebs, E, Andrade, L, Rulisa, S, Mallawaarachchi, BC, Jin, K, RicardoVissoci, J, and Østbye, T. "High road utilizers surveys compared to police data for road traffic crash hotspot localization in Rwanda and Sri Lanka." BMC public health 16 (January 20, 2016): 53-.
PMID
26792526
Source
epmc
Published In
BMC Public Health
Volume
16
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
53
DOI
10.1186/s12889-015-2609-1

Association of maternal serum progesterone in early pregnancy with low birth weight and other adverse pregnancy outcomes.

To investigate the association of serum progesterone in first trimester with low birth weight (LBW, birth weight <2500 g) and other adverse pregnancy outcomes including hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, preterm delivery, premature rupture of membranes at term, and preterm premature rupture of membranes in a general population.We conducted a cohort study of 263 women with low-risk singleton intrauterine pregnancies who had a spot serum progesterone measurement in the first trimester in a Singapore tertiary maternity hospital. Study outcomes were retrieved from clinical records. Follow-up data were available for 131 women. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association of low serum progesterone (<35 nmol/L) with LBW and other adverse pregnancy outcomes.Low serum progesterone was associated with a significantly increased risk of LBW (adjusted odds ratio: 5.28 [1.02, 27.3]; p=0.047). Low serum progesterone was associated with a significantly increased risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in univariate analysis (unadjusted odds ratio: 8.43 [1.31, 54.2]; p=0.025).Low serum progesterone in the first trimester is a significant risk factor for LBW and possibly other placental dysfunction disorders such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the associations.

Authors
He, S; Allen, JC; Malhotra, R; Østbye, T; Tan, TC
MLA Citation
He, S, Allen, JC, Malhotra, R, Østbye, T, and Tan, TC. "Association of maternal serum progesterone in early pregnancy with low birth weight and other adverse pregnancy outcomes." The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 29.12 (January 2016): 1999-2004.
PMID
26335272
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine (Informa)
Volume
29
Issue
12
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1999
End Page
2004
DOI
10.3109/14767058.2015.1072159

Application of the Intervention Mapping protocol to develop Keys, a family child care home intervention to prevent early childhood obesity.

Many families rely on child care outside the home, making these settings important influences on child development. Nearly 1.5 million children in the U.S. spend time in family child care homes (FCCHs), where providers care for children in their own residences. There is some evidence that children in FCCHs are heavier than those cared for in centers. However, few interventions have targeted FCCHs for obesity prevention. This paper will describe the application of the Intervention Mapping (IM) framework to the development of a childhood obesity prevention intervention for FCCHsFollowing the IM protocol, six steps were completed in the planning and development of an intervention targeting FCCHs: needs assessment, formulation of change objectives matrices, selection of theory-based methods and strategies, creation of intervention components and materials, adoption and implementation planning, and evaluation planningApplication of the IM process resulted in the creation of the Keys to Healthy Family Child Care Homes program (Keys), which includes three modules: Healthy You, Healthy Home, and Healthy Business. Delivery of each module includes a workshop, educational binder and tool-kit resources, and four coaching contacts. Social Cognitive Theory and Self-Determination Theory helped guide development of change objective matrices, selection of behavior change strategies, and identification of outcome measures. The Keys program is currently being evaluated through a cluster-randomized controlled trialThe IM process, while time-consuming, enabled rigorous and systematic development of intervention components that are directly tied to behavior change theory and may increase the potential for behavior change within the FCCHs.

Authors
Mann, CM; Ward, DS; Vaughn, A; Benjamin Neelon, SE; Long Vidal, LJ; Omar, S; Namenek Brouwer, RJ; Østbye, T
MLA Citation
Mann, CM, Ward, DS, Vaughn, A, Benjamin Neelon, SE, Long Vidal, LJ, Omar, S, Namenek Brouwer, RJ, and Østbye, T. "Application of the Intervention Mapping protocol to develop Keys, a family child care home intervention to prevent early childhood obesity." BMC public health 15 (December 10, 2015): 1227-.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/11437
PMID
26654726
Source
epmc
Published In
BMC Public Health
Volume
15
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1227
DOI
10.1186/s12889-015-2573-9

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase.Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761).Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period.These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." J Prev Med Public Health 48.6 (November 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberberg, M. "The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea." Journal of preventive medicine and public health = Yebang Uihakhoe chi 48.6 (November 17, 2015): 310-318.
PMID
26639745
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health
Volume
48
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
310
End Page
318
DOI
10.3961/jpmph.15.001

The Relationship of Socioeconomic and Behavioral Risk Factors With Trends of Overweight in Korea.

OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have shown that overweight (including obesity) has increased significantly in Korea in recent decades. However, it remains unclear whether this change has been uniform among all Koreans and to what extent socioeconomic and behavioral factors have contributed to this increase. METHODS: Changes in overweight were estimated using data from the 1998, 2001, 2005, 2007-2009, and 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=55 761). RESULTS: Overweight increased significantly among men but not among women between 1998 and 2012. Changes in socioeconomic and behavioral factors over the time period were not associated with overall trends for both men and women. However, we found significant differences in the prevalence of overweight relative to key risk factors. For men, overweight increased at a significantly greater rate among the non-exercising (predicted probability [PP] from 0.23 to 0.32] and high-calorie (PP from 0.18 to 0.37) groups compared to their active and lower-calorie counterparts, respectively. For women, overweight increased only among the non-exercising (PP from 0.27 to 0.28) and low-income (PP from 0.31 to 0.36) groups during this period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that programs aimed at reducing overweight should target Korean men and women in specific socioeconomic and behavioral risk groups differentially.

Authors
Shin, JH; Dupre, ME; Østbye, T; Murphy, G; Silberberg, M
MLA Citation
Shin, JH, Dupre, ME, Østbye, T, Murphy, G, and Silberb