Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Targeting RNA splicing in race-related aggressive and lethal prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PC150506: Small molecule targeting of RNA splice variants driving tumor aggressiveness

Administered By
Chemistry
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Detection of Novel Alternative Splicing Biomarkers of Hypoxia in Breast and Lung Tumors

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training.

Authors
Valverde, PA; Burhansstipanov, L; Patierno, S; Gentry, S; Dwyer, A; Wysocki, KL; Patterson, AK; Krebs, LU; Sellers, J; Johnston, D
MLA Citation
Valverde, Patricia A., et al. “Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training..” Cancer, vol. 125, no. 24, Dec. 2019, pp. 4350–59. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32470.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1409904
PMID
31503340
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
125
Published Date
Start Page
4350
End Page
4359
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32470

Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium.

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an understudied and aggressive form of breast cancer with a poor prognosis, accounting for 2-6% of new breast cancer diagnoses but 10% of all breast cancer-related deaths in the United States. Currently there are no therapeutic regimens developed specifically for IBC, and it is critical to recognize that all aspects of treating IBC - including staging, diagnosis, and therapy - are vastly different than other breast cancers. In December 2014, under the umbrella of an interdisciplinary initiative supported by the Duke School of Medicine, researchers, clinicians, research administrators, and patient advocates formed the Duke Consortium for IBC to address the needs of patients in North Carolina (an ethnically and economically diverse state with 100 counties) and across the Southeastern United States. The primary goal of this group is to translate research into action and improve both awareness and patient care through collaborations with local, national and international IBC programs. The consortium held its inaugural meeting on Feb 28, 2018, which also marked Rare Disease Day and convened national research experts, clinicians, patients, advocates, government representatives, foundation leaders, staff, and trainees. The meeting focused on new developments and challenges in the clinical management of IBC, research challenges and opportunities, and an interactive session to garner input from patients, advocates, and community partners that would inform a strategic plan toward continuing improvements in IBC patient care, research, and education.
Authors
Devi, GR; Hough, H; Barrett, N; Cristofanilli, M; Overmoyer, B; Spector, N; Ueno, NT; Woodward, W; Kirkpatrick, J; Vincent, B; Williams, KP; Finley, C; Duff, B; Worthy, V; McCall, S; Hollister, BA; Palmer, G; Force, J; Westbrook, K; Fayanju, O; Suneja, G; Dent, SF; Hwang, ES; Patierno, SR; Marcom, PK
MLA Citation
Devi, Gayathri R., et al. “Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium..” J Cancer, vol. 10, no. 15, 2019, pp. 3344–51. Pubmed, doi:10.7150/jca.31176.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1395729
PMID
31293637
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Cancer
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
3344
End Page
3351
DOI
10.7150/jca.31176

Corrigendum: Alternative splicing promotes tumour aggressiveness and drug resistance in African American prostate cancer.

This corrects the article DOI: 10.1038/ncomms15921.
Authors
Wang, B-D; Ceniccola, K; Hwang, S; Andrawis, R; Horvath, A; Freedman, JA; Olender, J; Knapp, S; Ching, T; Garmire, L; Patel, V; Garcia-Blanco, MA; Patierno, SR; Lee, NH
MLA Citation
Wang, Bi-Dar, et al. “Corrigendum: Alternative splicing promotes tumour aggressiveness and drug resistance in African American prostate cancer..” Nat Commun, vol. 8, Sept. 2017. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/ncomms16161.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1277855
PMID
28952599
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nature Communications
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
16161
DOI
10.1038/ncomms16161

Can patient navigation improve receipt of recommended breast cancer care? Evidence from the National Patient Navigation Research Program.

PURPOSE: Poor and underserved women face barriers in receiving timely and appropriate breast cancer care. Patient navigators help individuals overcome these barriers, but little is known about whether patient navigation improves quality of care. The purpose of this study is to examine whether navigated women with breast cancer are more likely to receive recommended standard breast cancer care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Women with breast cancer who participated in the national Patient Navigation Research Program were examined to determine whether the care they received included the following: initiation of antiestrogen therapy in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer; initiation of postlumpectomy radiation therapy; and initiation of chemotherapy in women younger than age 70 years with triple-negative tumors more than 1 cm. This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter quasi-experimental study funded by the National Cancer Institute to evaluate patient navigation. Multiple logistic regression was performed to compare differences in receipt of care between navigated and non-navigated participants. RESULTS: Among participants eligible for antiestrogen therapy, navigated participants (n = 380) had a statistically significant higher likelihood of receiving antiestrogen therapy compared with non-navigated controls (n = 381; odds ratio [OR], 1.73; P = .004) in a multivariable analysis. Among the participants eligible for radiation therapy after lumpectomy, navigated participants (n = 255) were no more likely to receive radiation (OR, 1.42; P = .22) than control participants (n = 297). CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that navigated participants were more likely than non-navigated participants to receive antiestrogen therapy. Future studies are required to determine the full impact patient navigation may have on ensuring that vulnerable populations receive quality care.
Authors
Ko, NY; Darnell, JS; Calhoun, E; Freund, KM; Wells, KJ; Shapiro, CL; Dudley, DJ; Patierno, SR; Fiscella, K; Raich, P; Battaglia, TA
MLA Citation
Ko, Naomi Y., et al. “Can patient navigation improve receipt of recommended breast cancer care? Evidence from the National Patient Navigation Research Program..” J Clin Oncol, vol. 32, no. 25, Sept. 2014, pp. 2758–64. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.53.6037.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1046024
PMID
25071111
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
2758
End Page
2764
DOI
10.1200/JCO.2013.53.6037

Understanding Cancer Survivors' Needs to Improve Quality of Life

Authors
Cannady, RS; Willis, A; Wiatrek, D; Stein, K; Cowens-Alvarado, R; Pratt-Chapman, M; Patierno, S; Sharpe, K
MLA Citation
Cannady, R. S., et al. “Understanding Cancer Survivors' Needs to Improve Quality of Life.” Psycho Oncology, vol. 21, Feb. 2012, pp. 1–1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub904229
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Psycho Oncology
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
1