Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Core Faculty Member, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy

Duke - Margolis Center For Health Policy
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School, Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

3D Biology Signatures defined by Nanostring Max System

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
North Carolina Biotechnology Center
Role
Major User
Start Date
End Date

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Targeting RNA splicing in race-related aggressive and lethal prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Prostate Cancer Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PC150506: Small molecule targeting of RNA splice variants driving tumor aggressiveness

Administered By
Chemistry
Awarded By
United States Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Abstract PL02-02: Spliceomics: Alternative RNA splicing as a source of ancestry-related molecular targets in precision oncology and cancer disparities

Authors
MLA Citation
Patierno, Steven R. “Abstract PL02-02: Spliceomics: Alternative RNA splicing as a source of ancestry-related molecular targets in precision oncology and cancer disparities.” Experimental and Molecular Therapeutics, American Association for Cancer Research, 2019. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs18-pl02-02.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417391
Source
crossref
Published In
Experimental and Molecular Therapeutics
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs18-pl02-02

Modifiable patient-reported factors associated with cancer-screening knowledge and participation in a community-based health assessment.

BACKGROUND: We sought to identify modifiable factors associated with cancer screening in a community-based health assessment. METHODS: 24 organizations at 47 community events in central North Carolina distributed a 91-item survey from April-December 2017. Responses about (1) interest in disease prevention, (2) lifestyle choices (e.g., diet, tobacco), and (3) perceptions of primary care access/quality were abstracted to examine their association with self-reported screening participation and knowledge about breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. RESULTS: 2135/2315 participants (92%; 38.5% White, 38% Black, 9.9% Asian) completed screening questions. >70% of screen-eligible respondents reported guideline-concordant screening. Healthy dietary habits were associated with greater knowledge about breast and colorectal cancer screening; reporting negative attitudes about and barriers to healthcare were associated with less breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer screening. Having a place to seek medical care (a proxy for primary care access) was independently associated with being ∼5 times as likely to undergo colorectal screening (OR 4.66, 95% CI 1.58-13.79, all p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In this diverse, community-based sample, modifiable factors were associated with screening engagement, highlighting opportunities for behavioral intervention.
Authors
MLA Citation
Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M., et al. “Modifiable patient-reported factors associated with cancer-screening knowledge and participation in a community-based health assessment.Am J Surg, Nov. 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2022.10.059.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1555407
PMID
36411107
Source
pubmed
Published In
Am J Surg
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2022.10.059

Changing the landscape of non-small cell lung cancer disparities.

In the United States, lung and bronchus cancers are the second most common types of cancer and are responsible for the largest number of deaths from cancer, with African Americans suffering disproportionately from lung and bronchus cancers. This disparity likely results from a complex interplay among social, psycho-social, lifestyle, environmental, health system, and biological determinants of health. Toward improving outcomes for lung cancer patients of all races and ethnicities and mitigating lung cancer disparities, in this commentary, we bring forward biological factors that contribute to lung cancer disparities, efforts to identify, functionally characterize, and modulate novel ancestry-related RNA splicing-related targets in lung cancer for precision intervention, and translational and clinical research needs to improve outcomes for lung cancer patients of all races and ethnicities and mitigate lung cancer disparities.
Authors
Odera, JO; Abo, MA; Patierno, SR; Clarke, JM; Freedman, JA
MLA Citation
Odera, Joab O., et al. “Changing the landscape of non-small cell lung cancer disparities.J Cancer Biol, vol. 2, no. 2, 2021, pp. 33–38. Pubmed, doi:10.46439/cancerbiology.2.020.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1532536
PMID
35929605
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Cancer Biol
Volume
2
Published Date
Start Page
33
End Page
38
DOI
10.46439/cancerbiology.2.020

Assessing the relationship between self-efficacy and socioeconomic status using the communication and attitudinal self-efficacy general scale

Authors
Rodday, AM; Parsons, SK; Calhoun, E; Dudley, D; Patierno, SR; Post, DM; Simon, MA; Warren-Mears, V; Freund, K
MLA Citation
Rodday, Angie Mae, et al. “Assessing the relationship between self-efficacy and socioeconomic status using the communication and attitudinal self-efficacy general scale.” Quality of Life Research, vol. 25, SPRINGER, 2016, pp. 156–57.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1250671
Source
wos
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
156
End Page
157

A widespread length-dependent splicing dysregulation in cancer.

Dysregulation of alternative splicing is a key molecular hallmark of cancer. However, the common features and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report an intriguing length-dependent splicing regulation in cancers. By systematically analyzing the transcriptome of thousands of cancer patients, we found that short exons are more likely to be mis-spliced and preferentially excluded in cancers. Compared to other exons, cancer-associated short exons (CASEs) are more conserved and likely to encode in-frame low-complexity peptides, with functional enrichment in GTPase regulators and cell adhesion. We developed a CASE-based panel as reliable cancer stratification markers and strong predictors for survival, which is clinically useful because the detection of short exon splicing is practical. Mechanistically, mis-splicing of CASEs is regulated by elevated transcription and alteration of certain RNA binding proteins in cancers. Our findings uncover a common feature of cancer-specific splicing dysregulation with important clinical implications in cancer diagnosis and therapies.
Authors
Zhang, S; Mao, M; Lv, Y; Yang, Y; He, W; Song, Y; Wang, Y; Yang, Y; Al Abo, M; Freedman, JA; Patierno, SR; Wang, Y; Wang, Z
MLA Citation
Zhang, Sirui, et al. “A widespread length-dependent splicing dysregulation in cancer.Sci Adv, vol. 8, no. 33, Aug. 2022, p. eabn9232. Pubmed, doi:10.1126/sciadv.abn9232.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1533213
PMID
35977015
Source
pubmed
Published In
Science Advances
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
eabn9232
DOI
10.1126/sciadv.abn9232