Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Core Faculty Member, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy

Duke - Margolis Center For Health Policy
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Targeting RNA splicing in race-related aggressive and lethal prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PC150506: Small molecule targeting of RNA splice variants driving tumor aggressiveness

Administered By
Chemistry
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Detection of Novel Alternative Splicing Biomarkers of Hypoxia in Breast and Lung Tumors

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Evolution of a longitudinal, multidisciplinary, and scalable patient navigation matrix model.

This Longitudinal patient navigation Matrix Model was developed to overcome barriers across the cancer care continuum by offering prepatients, patients, and their families with support services. The extraordinary heterogeneity of patient needs during cancer screening, risk assessment, treatment, and survivorship as well as the vast heterogeneity of oncology care settings make it nearly impossible to follow a static navigation model. Our model of patient cancer navigation is unique as it enhances the traditional model by being highly adaptable based on both patient and family needs and scalable based on institutional needs and resources (eg, clinical volumes, financial resources, and community-based resources). This relatively new operational model for system-wide and systematic navigation incorporates a carefully cultivated supportive care program that evolved over the last decade from a bottom up approach that identified patient and family needs and developed appropriate resources. A core component of this model includes shifting away from department-centric operations. This model does not require a patient to opt in or independently be able to report their needs or ask for services-it is an opt out model. The multidisciplinary "cross-training" model can also facilitate reimbursement and sustainability by clarifying the differentiating actions that define navigation services: identification of barriers to quality care and specific actions taken to overcome those barriers, across the full continue of cancer care from community engagement to survivorship or end-of-life care.
Authors
Corbett, CM; Somers, TJ; Nuñez, CM; Majestic, CM; Shelby, RA; Worthy, VC; Barrett, NJ; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Corbett, Cheyenne M., et al. “Evolution of a longitudinal, multidisciplinary, and scalable patient navigation matrix model.Cancer Med, vol. 9, no. 9, May 2020, pp. 3202–10. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cam4.2950.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434148
PMID
32129946
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Medicine
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
3202
End Page
3210
DOI
10.1002/cam4.2950

Factors associated with biomedical research participation within community-based samples across 3 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers.

BACKGROUND: Engaging diverse populations in biomedical research, including biospecimen donation, remains a national challenge. This study examined factors associated with an invitation to participate in biomedical research, intent to participate in biomedical research in the future, and participation in biomedical research and biospecimen donation among a diverse, multilingual, community-based sample across 3 distinct geographic areas. METHODS: Three National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers engaged in community partnerships to develop and implement population health assessments, reaching a convenience sample of 4343 participants spanning their respective catchment areas. Data harmonization, multiple imputation, and multivariable logistic modeling were used. RESULTS: African Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, and other racial minority groups were more likely to be offered opportunities to participate in biomedical research compared to whites. Access to care, history of cancer, educational level, survey language, nativity, and rural residence also influenced opportunity, intent, and actual participation in biomedical research. CONCLUSIONS: Traditionally underserved racial and ethnic groups reported heightened opportunity and interest in participating in biomedical research. Well-established community partnerships and long-standing community engagement around biomedical research led to a diverse sample being reached at each site and may in part explain the current study findings. However, this study illustrates an ongoing need to establish trust and diversify biomedical research participation through innovative and tailored approaches. National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers have the potential to increase opportunities for diverse participation in biomedical research through community partnerships and engagement. Additional work remains to identify and address system-level and individual-level barriers to participation in both clinical trials and biospecimen donation for research.
Authors
Barrett, NJ; Rodriguez, EM; Iachan, R; Hyslop, T; Ingraham, KL; Le, GM; Martin, K; Haring, RC; Rivadeneira, NA; Erwin, DO; Fish, LJ; Middleton, D; Hiatt, RA; Patierno, SR; Sarkar, U; Gage-Bouchard, EA
MLA Citation
Barrett, Nadine J., et al. “Factors associated with biomedical research participation within community-based samples across 3 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers.Cancer, vol. 126, no. 5, Mar. 2020, pp. 1077–89. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32487.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426848
PMID
31909824
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
126
Published Date
Start Page
1077
End Page
1089
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32487

Prostate cancer in African American men

Authors
MLA Citation
Patierno, S. R. “Prostate cancer in African American men.” Clinical Advances in Hematology and Oncology, vol. 18, no. 3, Mar. 2020, pp. 154–56.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1435168
Source
scopus
Published In
Clinical Advances in Hematology & Oncology : H&O
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
154
End Page
156

Project PLACE: Enhancing community and academic partnerships to describe and address health disparities.

Achieving cancer health equity is a national imperative. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and in North Carolina (NC), where the disease disproportionately impacts traditionally underrepresented race and ethnic groups, those who live in rural communities, the impoverished, and medically disenfranchised and/or health-disparate populations at high-risk for cancer. These populations have worse cancer outcomes and are less likely to be participants in clinical research and trials. It is critical for cancer centers and other academic health centers to understand the factors that contribute to poor cancer outcomes, the extent to which they impact the cancer burden, and develop effective interventions to address them. Key to this process is engaging diverse stakeholders in the development and execution of community and population health assessments, and the subsequent programs and interventions designed to address the need across the catchment area. This chapter describes the processes and lessons learned of the Duke Cancer Institute's (DCI) long standing community partnerships that led to Project PLACE (Population Level Approaches to Cancer Elimination), a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded community health assessment reaching 2315 respondents in 7 months, resulting in a community partnered research agenda to advance cancer equity within the DCI catchment area. We illustrate the application of a community partnered health assessment and offer examples of strategic opportunities, successes, lessons learned, and implications for practice.
Authors
Barrett, NJ; Ingraham, KL; Bethea, K; Hwa-Lin, P; Chirinos, M; Fish, LJ; Randolph, S; Zhang, P; Le, P; Harvey, D; Godbee, RL; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Barrett, Nadine J., et al. Project PLACE: Enhancing community and academic partnerships to describe and address health disparities. Vol. 146, 2020, pp. 167–88. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/bs.acr.2020.01.009.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436736
PMID
32241388
Source
pubmed
Volume
146
Published Date
Start Page
167
End Page
188
DOI
10.1016/bs.acr.2020.01.009

Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training.

Authors
Valverde, PA; Burhansstipanov, L; Patierno, S; Gentry, S; Dwyer, A; Wysocki, KL; Patterson, AK; Krebs, LU; Sellers, J; Johnston, D
MLA Citation
Valverde, Patricia A., et al. “Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training.Cancer, vol. 125, no. 24, Dec. 2019, pp. 4350–59. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32470.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1409904
PMID
31503340
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
125
Published Date
Start Page
4350
End Page
4359
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32470