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Reeve III, Bryce B

Overview:

Areas of expertise: Health Measurement and Health Services Research

Positions:

Instructor in the Department of Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1994

B.S. — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

M.A. 1999

M.A. — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2000

Ph.D. — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

Patient Reported Outcomes Project of HCV-TARGET (PROP up TARGET)

Administered By
Basic Science Departments
AwardedBy
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
August 01, 2017
End Date
July 31, 2018

Planning Grant_Center for Pediatric Patient-reported Outcomes in Research and Healthcare

Administered By
Center for Population Health Sciences
AwardedBy
PhRMA Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2017
End Date
August 31, 2017

Publications:

Child and adolescent self-report symptom measurement in pediatric oncology research: a systematic literature review.

Previous work in pediatric oncology has found that clinicians and parents tend to under-report the frequency and severity of treatment-related symptoms compared to child self-report. As such, there is a need to identify high-quality self-report instruments to be used in pediatric oncology research studies. This study's objective was to conduct a systematic literature review of existing English language instruments used to measure self-reported symptoms in children and adolescents undergoing cancer treatment.A comprehensive literature search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO to identify relevant articles published through November 10, 2016. Using pre-specified inclusion/exclusion criteria, six trained reviewers carefully screened abstracts and full-text articles for eligibility.There were 7738 non-duplicate articles identified in the literature search. Forty articles met our eligibility criteria, and within these articles, there were 38 self-report English symptom instruments. Most studies evaluated only cross-sectional psychometric properties, such as reliability or validity. Ten studies assessed an instrument's responsiveness or ability to detect changes in symptoms over time. Eight instruments met our criteria for use in future longitudinal pediatric oncology studies.This systematic review aids pediatric oncology researchers in identifying and selecting appropriate symptom measures with strong psychometric evidence for their studies. Enhancing the child's voice in pediatric oncology research studies allows us to better understand the impact of cancer and its treatment on the lives of children.

Authors
Pinheiro, LC; McFatrich, M; Lucas, N; Walker, JS; Withycombe, JS; Hinds, PS; Sung, L; Tomlinson, D; Freyer, DR; Mack, JW; Baker, JN; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Pinheiro, LC, McFatrich, M, Lucas, N, Walker, JS, Withycombe, JS, Hinds, PS, Sung, L, Tomlinson, D, Freyer, DR, Mack, JW, Baker, JN, and Reeve, BB. "Child and adolescent self-report symptom measurement in pediatric oncology research: a systematic literature review." Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation (September 6, 2017). (Review)
PMID
28879501
Source
epmc
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Publish Date
2017
DOI
10.1007/s11136-017-1692-4

Responsiveness of the PROMIS® measures to changes in disease status among pediatric nephrotic syndrome patients: a Midwest pediatric nephrology consortium study.

Nephrotic syndrome represents a condition in pediatric nephrology typified by a relapsing and remitting course, proteinuria and the presence of edema. The PROMIS measures have previously been studied and validated in cross-sectional studies of children with nephrotic syndrome. This study was designed to longitudinally validate the PROMIS measures in pediatric nephrotic syndrome.One hundred twenty seven children with nephrotic syndrome between the ages of 8 and 17 years participated in this prospective cohort study. Patients completed a baseline assessment while their nephrotic syndrome was active, a follow-up assessment at the time of their first complete proteinuria remission or study month 3 if no remission occurred, and a final assessment at study month 12. Participants completed six PROMIS measures (Mobility, Fatigue, Pain Interference, Depressive Symptoms, Anxiety, and Peer Relationships), the PedsQL version 4.0, and two global assessment of change items.Disease status was classified at each assessment: nephrotic syndrome active in 100% at baseline, 33% at month 3, and 46% at month 12. The PROMIS domains of Mobility, Fatigue, Pain Interference, Depressive Symptoms, and Anxiety each showed a significant overall improvement over time (p < 0.001). When the PROMIS measures were compared to the patients' global assessment of change, the domains of Mobility, Fatigue, Pain Interference, and Anxiety consistently changed in an expected fashion. With the exception of Pain Interference, change in PROMIS domain scores did not correlate with changes in disease activity. PROMIS domain scores were moderately correlated with analogous PedsQL domain scores.This study demonstrates that the PROMIS Mobility, Fatigue, Pain Interference, and Anxiety domains are sensitive to self-reported changes in disease and overall health status over time in children with nephrotic syndrome. The lack of significant anchoring to clinically defined nephrotic syndrome disease active and remission status may highlight an opportunity to improve the measurement of HRQOL in children with nephrotic syndrome through the development of a nephrotic syndrome disease-specific HRQOL measure.

Authors
Selewski, DT; Troost, JP; Cummings, D; Massengill, SF; Gbadegesin, RA; Greenbaum, LA; Shatat, IF; Cai, Y; Kapur, G; Hebert, D; Somers, MJ; Trachtman, H; Pais, P; Seifert, ME; Goebel, J; Sethna, CB; Mahan, JD; Gross, HE; Herreshoff, E; Liu, Y; Carlozzi, NE; Reeve, BB; DeWalt, DA; Gipson, DS
MLA Citation
Selewski, DT, Troost, JP, Cummings, D, Massengill, SF, Gbadegesin, RA, Greenbaum, LA, Shatat, IF, Cai, Y, Kapur, G, Hebert, D, Somers, MJ, Trachtman, H, Pais, P, Seifert, ME, Goebel, J, Sethna, CB, Mahan, JD, Gross, HE, Herreshoff, E, Liu, Y, Carlozzi, NE, Reeve, BB, DeWalt, DA, and Gipson, DS. "Responsiveness of the PROMIS® measures to changes in disease status among pediatric nephrotic syndrome patients: a Midwest pediatric nephrology consortium study." Health and quality of life outcomes 15.1 (August 23, 2017): 166-.
Website
http://hdl.handle.net/10161/15415
PMID
28835233
Source
epmc
Published In
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Volume
15
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
166
DOI
10.1186/s12955-017-0737-2

Psychometric evaluation and design of patient-centered communication measures for cancer care settings.

To evaluate the psychometric properties of questions that assess patient perceptions of patient-provider communication and design measures of patient-centered communication (PCC).Participants (adults with colon or rectal cancer living in North Carolina) completed a survey at 2 to 3 months post-diagnosis. The survey included 87 questions in six PCC Functions: Exchanging Information, Fostering Health Relationships, Making Decisions, Responding to Emotions, Enabling Patient Self-Management, and Managing Uncertainty. For each Function we conducted factor analyses, item response theory modeling, and tests for differential item functioning, and assessed reliability and construct validity.Participants included 501 respondents; 46% had a high school education or less. Reliability within each Function ranged from 0.90 to 0.96. The PCC-Ca-36 (36-question survey; reliability=0.94) and PCC-Ca-6 (6-question survey; reliability=0.92) measures differentiated between individuals with poor and good health (i.e., known-groups validity) and were highly correlated with the HINTS communication scale (i.e., convergent validity).This study provides theory-grounded PCC measures found to be reliable and valid in colorectal cancer patients in North Carolina. Future work should evaluate measure validity over time and in other cancer populations.The PCC-Ca-36 and PCC-Ca-6 measures may be used for surveillance, intervention research, and quality improvement initiatives.

Authors
Reeve, BB; Thissen, DM; Bann, CM; Mack, N; Treiman, K; Sanoff, HK; Roach, N; Magnus, BE; He, J; Wagner, LK; Moultrie, R; Jackson, KD; Mann, C; McCormack, LA
MLA Citation
Reeve, BB, Thissen, DM, Bann, CM, Mack, N, Treiman, K, Sanoff, HK, Roach, N, Magnus, BE, He, J, Wagner, LK, Moultrie, R, Jackson, KD, Mann, C, and McCormack, LA. "Psychometric evaluation and design of patient-centered communication measures for cancer care settings." Patient education and counseling 100.7 (July 2017): 1322-1328.
PMID
28214167
Source
epmc
Published In
Patient Education and Counseling
Volume
100
Issue
7
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1322
End Page
1328
DOI
10.1016/j.pec.2017.02.011

Sexual Satisfaction and the Importance of Sexual Health to Quality of Life Throughout the Life Course of U.S. Adults.

Discussions about sexual health are uncommon in clinical encounters, despite the sexual dysfunction associated with many common health conditions. Understanding of the importance of sexual health and sexual satisfaction in U.S. adults is limited.To provide epidemiologic data on the importance of sexual health for quality of life and people's satisfaction with their sex lives and to examine how each is associated with demographic and health factors.Data are from a cross-sectional self-report questionnaire from a sample of 3,515 English-speaking U.S. adults recruited from an online panel that uses address-based probability sampling.We report ratings of importance of sexual health to quality of life (single item with five-point response) and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Satisfaction With Sex Life score (five items, each with five-point responses, scores centered on the U.S. mean).High importance of sexual health to quality of life was reported by 62.2% of men (95% CI = 59.4-65.0) and 42.8% of women (95% CI = 39.6-46.1, P < .001). Importance of sexual health varied by sex, age, sexual activity status, and general self-rated health. For the 55% of men and 45% of women who reported sexual activity in the previous 30 days, satisfaction with sex life differed by sex, age, race-ethnicity (among men only), and health. Men and women in excellent health had significantly higher satisfaction than participants in fair or poor health. Women with hypertension reported significantly lower satisfaction (especially younger women), as did men with depression or anxiety (especially younger men).In this large study of U.S. adults' ratings of the importance of sexual health and satisfaction with sex life, sexual health was a highly important aspect of quality of life for many participants, including participants in poor health. Moreover, participants in poorer health reported lower sexual satisfaction. Accordingly, sexual health should be a routine part of clinicians' assessments of their patients. Health care systems that state a commitment to improving patients' overall health must have resources in place to address sexual concerns. These resources should be available for all patients across the lifespan.

Authors
Flynn, KE; Lin, L; Bruner, DW; Cyranowski, JM; Hahn, EA; Jeffery, DD; Reese, JB; Reeve, BB; Shelby, RA; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Lin, L, Bruner, DW, Cyranowski, JM, Hahn, EA, Jeffery, DD, Reese, JB, Reeve, BB, Shelby, RA, and Weinfurt, KP. "Sexual Satisfaction and the Importance of Sexual Health to Quality of Life Throughout the Life Course of U.S. Adults." The journal of sexual medicine 13.11 (November 2016): 1642-1650.
PMID
27671968
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Sexual Medicine
Volume
13
Issue
11
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
1642
End Page
1650
DOI
10.1016/j.jsxm.2016.08.011

PROMIS measures of pain, fatigue, negative affect, physical function, and social function demonstrated clinical validity across a range of chronic conditions.

To present an overview of a series of studies in which the clinical validity of the National Institutes of Health's Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (NIH; PROMIS) measures was evaluated, by domain, across six clinical populations.Approximately 1,500 individuals at baseline and 1,300 at follow-up completed PROMIS measures. The analyses reported in this issue were conducted post hoc, pooling data across six previous studies, and accommodating the different designs of the six, within-condition, parent studies. Changes in T-scores, standardized response means, and effect sizes were calculated in each study. When a parent study design allowed, known groups validity was calculated using a linear mixed model.The results provide substantial support for the clinical validity of nine PROMIS measures in a range of chronic conditions.The cross-condition focus of the analyses provided a unique and multifaceted perspective on how PROMIS measures function in "real-world" clinical settings and provides external anchors that can support comparative effectiveness research. The current body of clinical validity evidence for the nine PROMIS measures indicates the success of NIH PROMIS in developing measures that are effective across a range of chronic conditions.

Authors
Cook, KF; Jensen, SE; Schalet, BD; Beaumont, JL; Amtmann, D; Czajkowski, S; Dewalt, DA; Fries, JF; Pilkonis, PA; Reeve, BB; Stone, AA; Weinfurt, KP; Cella, D
MLA Citation
Cook, KF, Jensen, SE, Schalet, BD, Beaumont, JL, Amtmann, D, Czajkowski, S, Dewalt, DA, Fries, JF, Pilkonis, PA, Reeve, BB, Stone, AA, Weinfurt, KP, and Cella, D. "PROMIS measures of pain, fatigue, negative affect, physical function, and social function demonstrated clinical validity across a range of chronic conditions." Journal of clinical epidemiology 73 (May 2016): 89-102.
PMID
26952842
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume
73
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
89
End Page
102
DOI
10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.08.038

Validity and Reliability of the US National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE).

To integrate the patient perspective into adverse event reporting, the National Cancer Institute developed a patient-reported outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE).To assess the construct validity, test-retest reliability, and responsiveness of PRO-CTCAE items.A total of 975 adults with cancer undergoing outpatient chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy enrolled in this questionnaire-based study between January 2011 and February 2012. Eligible participants could read English and had no clinically significant cognitive impairment. They completed PRO-CTCAE items on tablet computers in clinic waiting rooms at 9 US cancer centers and community oncology practices at 2 visits 1 to 6 weeks apart. A subset completed PRO-CTCAE items during an additional visit 1 business day after the first visit.Primary comparators were clinician-reported Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30).A total of 940 of 975 (96.4%) and 852 of 940 (90.6%) participants completed PRO-CTCAE items at visits 1 and 2, respectively. At least 1 symptom was reported by 938 of 940 (99.8%) participants. Participants' median age was 59 years; 57.3% were female, 32.4% had a high school education or less, and 17.1% had an ECOG PS of 2 to 4. All PRO-CTCAE items had at least 1 correlation in the expected direction with a QLQ-C30 scale (111 of 124, P<.05 for all). Stronger correlations were seen between PRO-CTCAE items and conceptually related QLQ-C30 domains. Scores for 94 of 124 PRO-CTCAE items were higher in the ECOG PS 2 to 4 vs 0 to 1 group (58 of 124, P<.05 for all). Overall, 119 of 124 items met at least 1 construct validity criterion. Test-retest reliability was 0.7 or greater for 36 of 49 prespecified items (median [range] intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.76 [0.53-.96]). Correlations between PRO-CTCAE item changes and corresponding QLQ-C30 scale changes were statistically significant for 27 prespecified items (median [range] r=0.43 [0.10-.56]; all P≤.006).Evidence demonstrates favorable validity, reliability, and responsiveness of PRO-CTCAE in a large, heterogeneous US sample of patients undergoing cancer treatment. Studies evaluating other measurement properties of PRO-CTCAE are under way to inform further development of PRO-CTCAE and its inclusion in cancer trials.

Authors
Dueck, AC; Mendoza, TR; Mitchell, SA; Reeve, BB; Castro, KM; Rogak, LJ; Atkinson, TM; Bennett, AV; Denicoff, AM; O'Mara, AM; Li, Y; Clauser, SB; Bryant, DM; Bearden, JD; Gillis, TA; Harness, JK; Siegel, RD; Paul, DB; Cleeland, CS; Schrag, D; Sloan, JA; Abernethy, AP; Bruner, DW; Minasian, LM; Basch, E; National Cancer Institute PRO-CTCAE Study Group,
MLA Citation
Dueck, AC, Mendoza, TR, Mitchell, SA, Reeve, BB, Castro, KM, Rogak, LJ, Atkinson, TM, Bennett, AV, Denicoff, AM, O'Mara, AM, Li, Y, Clauser, SB, Bryant, DM, Bearden, JD, Gillis, TA, Harness, JK, Siegel, RD, Paul, DB, Cleeland, CS, Schrag, D, Sloan, JA, Abernethy, AP, Bruner, DW, Minasian, LM, Basch, E, and National Cancer Institute PRO-CTCAE Study Group, . "Validity and Reliability of the US National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)." JAMA oncology 1.8 (November 2015): 1051-1059.
PMID
26270597
Source
epmc
Published In
JAMA oncology
Volume
1
Issue
8
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1051
End Page
1059
DOI
10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.2639

The impact of disease duration on quality of life in children with nephrotic syndrome: a Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study

© 2015, IPNA. Background: The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) II is a prospective study that evaluates patient reported outcomes in pediatric chronic diseases as a measure of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). We have evaluated the influence of disease duration on HRQOL and, for the first time, compared the findings of the PROMIS measures to those of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Scales (PedsQL) from the PROMIS II nephrotic syndrome (NS) longitudinal cohort. Methods: This was a prospective study in which 127 children (age range 8–17 years) with active NS from 14 centers were enrolled. Children with active NS defined as the presence of nephrotic range proteinuria ( > 2+ urinalysis and edema or urine protein/creatinine ratio > 2 g/g) were eligible. Comparisons were made between children with prevalent (N = 67) and incident (N = 60) disease at the study enrollment visit. Results: The PROMIS scores were worse in prevalent patients in the domains of peer relationship (p = 0.01) and pain interference (p < 0.01). The PedsQL showed worse scores in prevalent patients for social functioning (p < 0.01) and school functioning (p = 0.03). Multivariable analyses showed that prevalent patients had worse scores in PROMIS pain interference (p = 0.02) and PedsQL social functioning (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The PROMIS measures detected a significant impact of disease duration on HRQOL in children, such that peer relationships were worse and pain interfered with daily life to a greater degree among those with longer disease duration. These findings were in agreement with those for similar domains in the PedsQL legacy instrument.

Authors
Selewski, DT; Troost, JP; Massengill, SF; Gbadegesin, RA; Greenbaum, LA; Shatat, IF; Cai, Y; Kapur, G; Hebert, D; Somers, MJ; Trachtman, H; Pais, P; Seifert, ME; Goebel, J; Sethna, CB; Mahan, JD; Gross, HE; Herreshoff, E; Liu, Y; Song, PX; Reeve, BB; DeWalt, DA; Gipson, DS
MLA Citation
Selewski, DT, Troost, JP, Massengill, SF, Gbadegesin, RA, Greenbaum, LA, Shatat, IF, Cai, Y, Kapur, G, Hebert, D, Somers, MJ, Trachtman, H, Pais, P, Seifert, ME, Goebel, J, Sethna, CB, Mahan, JD, Gross, HE, Herreshoff, E, Liu, Y, Song, PX, Reeve, BB, DeWalt, DA, and Gipson, DS. "The impact of disease duration on quality of life in children with nephrotic syndrome: a Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study." Pediatric Nephrology 30.9 (September 18, 2015): 1467-1476.
Source
scopus
Published In
Pediatric Nephrology
Volume
30
Issue
9
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1467
End Page
1476
DOI
10.1007/s00467-015-3074-x

Development and Initial Validation of the PROMIS(®) Sexual Function and Satisfaction Measures Version 2.0.

The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)(®) Sexual Function and Satisfaction measure (SexFS) version 1.0 was developed with cancer populations. There is a need to expand the SexFS and provide evidence of its validity in diverse populations.The aim of this study was to describe the development of the SexFS v2.0 and present preliminary evidence for its validity.Development built on version 1.0, plus additional review of extant items, discussions with 15 clinical experts, 11 patient focus groups (including individuals with diabetes, heart disease, anxiety, depression, and/or are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or aged 65 or older), 48 cognitive interviews, and psychometric evaluation in a random sample of U.S. adults plus an oversample for specific sexual problems (2281 men, 1686 women). We examined differential item functioning (DIF) by gender and sexual activity. We examined convergent and known-groups validity.The final set of domains includes 11 scored scales (interest in sexual activity, lubrication, vaginal discomfort, clitoral discomfort, labial discomfort, erectile function, orgasm ability, orgasm pleasure, oral dryness, oral discomfort, satisfaction), and six nonscored item pools (screeners, sexual activities, anal discomfort, therapeutic aids, factors interfering with sexual satisfaction, bother). Domains from version 1.0 were reevaluated and improved. Domains considered applicable across gender and sexual activity status, namely interest, orgasm, and satisfaction, were found to have significant DIF. We identified subsets of items in each domain that provided consistent measurement across these important respondent groups. Convergent and known-groups validity was supported.The SexFS version 2.0 has several improvements and enhancements over version 1.0 and other extant measures, including expanded evidence for validity, scores centered around norms for sexually active U.S. adults, new domains, and a final set of items applicable for both men and women and those sexually active with a partner and without. The SexFS is customizable, allowing users to select relevant domains and items for their study.

Authors
Weinfurt, KP; Lin, L; Bruner, DW; Cyranowski, JM; Dombeck, CB; Hahn, EA; Jeffery, DD; Luecht, RM; Magasi, S; Porter, LS; Reese, JB; Reeve, BB; Shelby, RA; Smith, AW; Willse, JT; Flynn, KE
MLA Citation
Weinfurt, KP, Lin, L, Bruner, DW, Cyranowski, JM, Dombeck, CB, Hahn, EA, Jeffery, DD, Luecht, RM, Magasi, S, Porter, LS, Reese, JB, Reeve, BB, Shelby, RA, Smith, AW, Willse, JT, and Flynn, KE. "Development and Initial Validation of the PROMIS(®) Sexual Function and Satisfaction Measures Version 2.0." The journal of sexual medicine 12.9 (September 7, 2015): 1961-1974.
PMID
26346418
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Sexual Medicine
Volume
12
Issue
9
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1961
End Page
1974
DOI
10.1111/jsm.12966

The impact of disease duration on quality of life in children with nephrotic syndrome: a Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) II is a prospective study that evaluates patient reported outcomes in pediatric chronic diseases as a measure of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). We have evaluated the influence of disease duration on HRQOL and, for the first time, compared the findings of the PROMIS measures to those of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Scales (PedsQL) from the PROMIS II nephrotic syndrome (NS) longitudinal cohort.This was a prospective study in which 127 children (age range 8-17 years) with active NS from 14 centers were enrolled. Children with active NS defined as the presence of nephrotic range proteinuria (>2+ urinalysis and edema or urine protein/creatinine ratio >2 g/g) were eligible. Comparisons were made between children with prevalent (N = 67) and incident (N = 60) disease at the study enrollment visit.The PROMIS scores were worse in prevalent patients in the domains of peer relationship (p = 0.01) and pain interference (p < 0.01). The PedsQL showed worse scores in prevalent patients for social functioning (p < 0.01) and school functioning (p = 0.03). Multivariable analyses showed that prevalent patients had worse scores in PROMIS pain interference (p = 0.02) and PedsQL social functioning (p < 0.01).The PROMIS measures detected a significant impact of disease duration on HRQOL in children, such that peer relationships were worse and pain interfered with daily life to a greater degree among those with longer disease duration. These findings were in agreement with those for similar domains in the PedsQL legacy instrument.

Authors
Selewski, DT; Troost, JP; Massengill, SF; Gbadegesin, RA; Greenbaum, LA; Shatat, IF; Cai, Y; Kapur, G; Hebert, D; Somers, MJ; Trachtman, H; Pais, P; Seifert, ME; Goebel, J; Sethna, CB; Mahan, JD; Gross, HE; Herreshoff, E; Liu, Y; Song, PX; Reeve, BB; DeWalt, DA; Gipson, DS
MLA Citation
Selewski, DT, Troost, JP, Massengill, SF, Gbadegesin, RA, Greenbaum, LA, Shatat, IF, Cai, Y, Kapur, G, Hebert, D, Somers, MJ, Trachtman, H, Pais, P, Seifert, ME, Goebel, J, Sethna, CB, Mahan, JD, Gross, HE, Herreshoff, E, Liu, Y, Song, PX, Reeve, BB, DeWalt, DA, and Gipson, DS. "The impact of disease duration on quality of life in children with nephrotic syndrome: a Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study." Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany) 30.9 (September 2015): 1467-1476.
PMID
25784017
Source
epmc
Published In
Pediatric Nephrology
Volume
30
Issue
9
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
1467
End Page
1476
DOI
10.1007/s00467-015-3074-x

Health related quality of life (HRQOL) in older adults with cancer: The potential of a single-item screen

Authors
Pergolotti, M; Deal, AM; Williams, GR; Bensen, JT; Bryant, AL; Reeve, BB; Muss, HB
MLA Citation
Pergolotti, M, Deal, AM, Williams, GR, Bensen, JT, Bryant, AL, Reeve, BB, and Muss, HB. "Health related quality of life (HRQOL) in older adults with cancer: The potential of a single-item screen." May 20, 2015.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
33
Issue
15
Publish Date
2015

Comparison of seven-day and repeated 24-hour recall of symptoms in the first 100 days after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) provide a way to understand the effects of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)-related stress on patients' lives. We previously reported that weekly collection of PROs is feasible.Here, we report on the feasibility of daily patient-reported symptom collection and examine the relationship between daily vs. weekly symptom reporting over time.We analyzed data from 32 autologous and allogeneic HCT patients obtained until Day (D) +100. We used questions from the PRO version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to capture symptoms.We found that overall rates of daily survey completion were moderate to high (range 67%-86%). The effect size of the difference between the maximum daily severity score and the weekly severity score ranged from 0.15 to 0.35, and the concordance correlation coefficient ranged from 0.513 to 0.834. Concordance of daily and weekly surveys was higher for maximum daily severity rating and mean daily severity rating than for minimum daily severity rating or most recent daily severity rating.We conclude that a seven-day recall period for symptom severity provides acceptable accuracy and precision in the first 100 days after HCT. Further studies to explore the utility of daily symptom reporting within specific clinical contexts may be warranted.

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Bennett, AV; Mitchell, SA; Abernethy, AP; Basch, E; Bailey, C; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Bennett, AV, Mitchell, SA, Abernethy, AP, Basch, E, Bailey, C, and Reeve, BB. "Comparison of seven-day and repeated 24-hour recall of symptoms in the first 100 days after hematopoietic cell transplantation." Journal of pain and symptom management 49.3 (March 2015): 513-520.
PMID
25128608
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume
49
Issue
3
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
513
End Page
520
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2014.06.011

Patient-reported symptoms and quality of life 
in adults with acute leukemia: a systematic review.

Systematically summarize findings from research conducted on adult acute leukemia survivors as they relate to symptoms and quality of life (QOL). 
Systematic review of the literature from 1990–2013 found in the PubMed, PsycINFO®, EMBASE, and CINAHL® databases, as well as manual searches. 
The review identified 16 quantitative studies and 1 qualitative study published from 1990–2013 that used a self-reported QOL or symptom questionnaire. Fatigue was the most commonly assessed and reported symptom, followed by depression. 
Acute leukemia and its treatment have a significant impact in all QOL domains. Future studies should include longitudinal research, more than one recruitment site, increased minority representation, and home-based exercise interventions as ways to improve all domains of QOL. 
This review increases awareness of commonly reported symptoms faced by adults with acute leukemia. Oncology nurses are central in monitoring and reporting symptoms to the interdisciplinary team that may contribute to changes in function, with the overall goal of optimizing QOL over time. 


Authors
Leak Bryant, A; Lee Walton, A; Shaw-Kokot, J; Mayer, DK; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Leak Bryant, A, Lee Walton, A, Shaw-Kokot, J, Mayer, DK, and Reeve, BB. "Patient-reported symptoms and quality of life 
in adults with acute leukemia: a systematic review." Oncology nursing forum 42.2 (March 2015): E91-E101. (Review)
PMID
25806895
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
42
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
E91
End Page
E101
DOI
10.1188/15.onf.e91-e101

Determining the predictors of innovation implementation in healthcare: a quantitative analysis of implementation effectiveness.

The failure rates for implementing complex innovations in healthcare organizations are high. Estimates range from 30% to 90% depending on the scope of the organizational change involved, the definition of failure, and the criteria to judge it. The innovation implementation framework offers a promising approach to examine the organizational factors that determine effective implementation. To date, the utility of this framework in a healthcare setting has been limited to qualitative studies and/or group level analyses. Therefore, the goal of this study was to quantitatively examine this framework among individual participants in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program using structural equation modeling.We examined the innovation implementation framework using structural equation modeling (SEM) among 481 physician participants in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP). The data sources included the CCOP Annual Progress Reports, surveys of CCOP physician participants and administrators, and the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile.Overall the final model fit well. Our results demonstrated that not only did perceptions of implementation climate have a statistically significant direct effect on implementation effectiveness, but physicians' perceptions of implementation climate also mediated the relationship between organizational implementation policies and practices (IPP) and enrollment (p <0.05). In addition, physician factors such as CCOP PI status, age, radiological oncologists, and non-oncologist specialists significantly influenced enrollment as well as CCOP organizational size and structure, which had indirect effects on implementation effectiveness through IPP and implementation climate.Overall, our results quantitatively confirmed the main relationship postulated in the innovation implementation framework between IPP, implementation climate, and implementation effectiveness among individual physicians. This finding is important, as although the model has been discussed within healthcare organizations before, the studies have been predominately qualitative in nature and/or at the organizational level. In addition, our findings have practical applications. Managers looking to increase implementation effectiveness of an innovation should focus on creating an environment that physicians perceive as encouraging implementation. In addition, managers should consider instituting specific organizational IPP aimed at increasing positive perceptions of implementation climate. For example, IPP should include specific expectations, support, and rewards for innovation use.

Authors
Jacobs, SR; Weiner, BJ; Reeve, BB; Hofmann, DA; Christian, M; Weinberger, M
MLA Citation
Jacobs, SR, Weiner, BJ, Reeve, BB, Hofmann, DA, Christian, M, and Weinberger, M. "Determining the predictors of innovation implementation in healthcare: a quantitative analysis of implementation effectiveness." BMC health services research 15 (January 22, 2015): 6-.
PMID
25608564
Source
epmc
Published In
BMC Health Services Research
Volume
15
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
6
DOI
10.1186/s12913-014-0657-3

Comparison of seven-day and repeated 24-hour recall of symptoms in the first 100 days after hematopoietic cell transplantation

© 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Context Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) provide a way to understand the effects of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)-related stress on patients' lives. We previously reported that weekly collection of PROs is feasible. Objectives Here, we report on the feasibility of daily patient-reported symptom collection and examine the relationship between daily vs. weekly symptom reporting over time. Methods We analyzed data from 32 autologous and allogeneic HCT patients obtained until Day (D) +100. We used questions from the PRO version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to capture symptoms. Results We found that overall rates of daily survey completion were moderate to high (range 67%-86%). The effect size of the difference between the maximum daily severity score and the weekly severity score ranged from 0.15 to 0.35, and the concordance correlation coefficient ranged from 0.513 to 0.834. Concordance of daily and weekly surveys was higher for maximum daily severity rating and mean daily severity rating than for minimum daily severity rating or most recent daily severity rating. Conclusion We conclude that a seven-day recall period for symptom severity provides acceptable accuracy and precision in the first 100 days after HCT. Further studies to explore the utility of daily symptom reporting within specific clinical contexts may be warranted.

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Bennett, AV; Mitchell, SA; Abernethy, AP; Basch, E; Bailey, C; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Bennett, AV, Mitchell, SA, Abernethy, AP, Basch, E, Bailey, C, and Reeve, BB. "Comparison of seven-day and repeated 24-hour recall of symptoms in the first 100 days after hematopoietic cell transplantation." Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 49.3 (January 1, 2015): 513-520.
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume
49
Issue
3
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
513
End Page
520
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2014.06.011

Extent and reasons for nonadherence to antihypertensive, cholesterol, and diabetes medications: the association with depressive symptom burden in a sample of American veterans.

OBJECTIVE: Persons with depressive symptoms generally have higher rates of medication nonadherence than persons without depressive symptoms. However, little is known about whether this association differs by comorbid medical condition or whether reasons for nonadherence differ by depressive symptoms or comorbid medical condition. METHODS: Self-reported extent of nonadherence, reasons for nonadherence, and depressive symptoms among 1,026 veterans prescribed medications for hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or type 2 diabetes were assessed. RESULTS: In multivariable logistic regression adjusted for clinical and demographic factors, the odds of nonadherence were higher among participants with high depressive symptom burden for dyslipidemia (n=848; odds ratio [OR]: 1.42, P=0.03) but not hypertension (n=916; OR: 1.24, P=0.15), or type 2 diabetes (n=447; OR: 1.15, P=0.51). Among participants reporting nonadherence to antihypertensive and antilipemic medications, those with greater depressive symptom burden had greater odds of endorsing medication nonadherence reasons related to negative expectations and excessive economic burden. Neither extent of nonadherence nor reasons for nonadherence differed by depressive symptom burden among patients with diabetes. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that clinicians may consider tailoring interventions to improve adherence to antihypertensive and antilipemic medications to specific medication concerns of participants with depressive symptoms.

Authors
Weidenbacher, HJ; Beadles, CA; Maciejewski, ML; Reeve, BB; Voils, CI
MLA Citation
Weidenbacher, HJ, Beadles, CA, Maciejewski, ML, Reeve, BB, and Voils, CI. "Extent and reasons for nonadherence to antihypertensive, cholesterol, and diabetes medications: the association with depressive symptom burden in a sample of American veterans." Patient preference and adherence 9 (January 2015): 327-336.
PMID
25759567
Source
epmc
Published In
Patient Preference and Adherence
Volume
9
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
327
End Page
336
DOI
10.2147/ppa.s74531

Organizational and physician factors associated with patient enrollment in cancer clinical trials.

Our purpose was to identify physicians' individual characteristics, attitudes, and organizational contextual factors associated with higher enrollment of patients in cancer clinical trials among physician participants in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP). We hypothesized that physicians' individual characteristics, such as age, medical specialty, tenure, CCOP organizational factors (i.e. policies and procedures to encourage enrollment), and attitudes toward participating in CCOP would directly determine enrollment. We also hypothesized that physicians' characteristics and CCOP organizational factors would influence physicians' attitudes toward participating in CCOP, which in turn would predict enrollment.We evaluated enrollment in National Cancer Institute-sponsored cancer clinical trials in 2011 among 481 physician participants using Structural Equation Modeling. The data sources include CCOP Annual Progress Reports, two surveys of CCOP administrators and physician participants, and the American Medical Association Masterfile.Physicians with more positive attitudes toward participating in CCOP enrolled more patients than physicians with less positive attitudes. In addition, physicians who practiced in CCOPs that had more supportive policies and practices in place to encourage enrollment (i.e. offered trainings, provided support to screen and enroll patients, gave incentives to enroll patients, instituted minimum accrual expectations) also significantly enrolled more patients. Physician status as CCOP Principal Investigator had a positive direct effect on enrollment, while physician age and non-oncology medical specialty had negative direct effects on enrollment. Neither physicians' characteristics nor CCOP organizational factors indirectly influenced enrollment through an effect on physician attitudes.We examined whether individual physicians' characteristics and attitudes, as well as CCOP organizational factors, influenced patient enrollment in cancer clinical trials among CCOP physicians. Physician attitudes and CCOP organizational factors had positive direct effects, but not indirect effects, on physician enrollment of patients. Our results could be used to develop physician-directed strategies aimed at increasing involvement in clinical research. For example, administrators may want to ensure physicians have access to support staff to help screen and enroll patients or institute minimum accrual expectations. Our results also highlight the importance of recruiting physicians for volunteer clinical research programs whose attitudes and values align with programmatic goals. Given that physician involvement is a key determinant of patient enrollment in clinical trials, these interventions could expand the overall number of patients involved in cancer research. These strategies will be increasingly important as the CCOP network continues to evolve.

Authors
Jacobs, SR; Weiner, BJ; Reeve, BB; Weinberger, M; Minasian, LM; Good, MJ
MLA Citation
Jacobs, SR, Weiner, BJ, Reeve, BB, Weinberger, M, Minasian, LM, and Good, MJ. "Organizational and physician factors associated with patient enrollment in cancer clinical trials." Clinical trials (London, England) 11.5 (October 2014): 565-575.
PMID
24902923
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Trials
Volume
11
Issue
5
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
565
End Page
575
DOI
10.1177/1740774514536000

Development of the National Cancer Institute's patient-reported outcomes version of the common terminology criteria for adverse events (PRO-CTCAE).

The standard approach for documenting symptomatic adverse events (AEs) in cancer clinical trials involves investigator reporting using the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Because this approach underdetects symptomatic AEs, the NCI issued two contracts to create a patient-reported outcome (PRO) measurement system as a companion to the CTCAE, called the PRO-CTCAE. This Commentary describes development of the PRO-CTCAE by a group of multidisciplinary investigators and patient representatives and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative studies of its measurement properties. A systematic evaluation of all 790 AEs listed in the CTCAE identified 78 appropriate for patient self-reporting. For each of these, a PRO-CTCAE plain language term in English and one to three items characterizing the frequency, severity, and/or activity interference of the AE were created, rendering a library of 124 PRO-CTCAE items. These items were refined in a cognitive interviewing study among patients on active cancer treatment with diverse educational, racial, and geographic backgrounds. Favorable measurement properties of the items, including construct validity, reliability, responsiveness, and between-mode equivalence, were determined prospectively in a demographically diverse population of patients receiving treatments for many different tumor types. A software platform was built to administer PRO-CTCAE items to clinical trial participants via the internet or telephone interactive voice response and was refined through usability testing. Work is ongoing to translate the PRO-CTCAE into multiple languages and to determine the optimal approach for integrating the PRO-CTCAE into clinical trial workflow and AE analyses. It is envisioned that the PRO-CTCAE will enhance the precision and patient-centeredness of adverse event reporting in cancer clinical research.

Authors
Basch, E; Reeve, BB; Mitchell, SA; Clauser, SB; Minasian, LM; Dueck, AC; Mendoza, TR; Hay, J; Atkinson, TM; Abernethy, AP; Bruner, DW; Cleeland, CS; Sloan, JA; Chilukuri, R; Baumgartner, P; Denicoff, A; St Germain, D; O'Mara, AM; Chen, A; Kelaghan, J; Bennett, AV; Sit, L; Rogak, L; Barz, A; Paul, DB; Schrag, D
MLA Citation
Basch, E, Reeve, BB, Mitchell, SA, Clauser, SB, Minasian, LM, Dueck, AC, Mendoza, TR, Hay, J, Atkinson, TM, Abernethy, AP, Bruner, DW, Cleeland, CS, Sloan, JA, Chilukuri, R, Baumgartner, P, Denicoff, A, St Germain, D, O'Mara, AM, Chen, A, Kelaghan, J, Bennett, AV, Sit, L, Rogak, L, Barz, A, Paul, DB, and Schrag, D. "Development of the National Cancer Institute's patient-reported outcomes version of the common terminology criteria for adverse events (PRO-CTCAE)." Journal of the National Cancer Institute 106.9 (September 29, 2014).
PMID
25265940
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume
106
Issue
9
Publish Date
2014
DOI
10.1093/jnci/dju244

Improving patients' understanding of terms and phrases commonly used in self-reported measures of sexual function.

There is a significant gap in research regarding the readability and comprehension of existing sexual function measures. Patient-reported outcome measures may use terms not well understood by respondents with low literacy.This study aims to test comprehension of words and phrases typically used in sexual function measures to improve validity for all individuals, including those with low literacy.We recruited 20 men and 28 women for cognitive interviews on version 2.0 of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System(®) (PROMIS(®) ) Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures. We assessed participants' reading level using the word reading subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test. Sixteen participants were classified as having low literacy.In the first round of cognitive interviews, each survey item was reviewed by five or more people, at least two of whom had lower than a ninth-grade reading level (low literacy). Patient feedback was incorporated into a revised version of the items. In the second round of interviews, an additional three or more people (at least one with low literacy) reviewed each revised item.Participants with low literacy had difficulty comprehending terms such as aroused, orgasm, erection, ejaculation, incontinence, and vaginal penetration. Women across a range of literacy levels had difficulty with clinical terms like labia and clitoris. We modified unclear terms to include parenthetical descriptors or slang equivalents, which generally improved comprehension.Common words and phrases used across measures of self-reported sexual function are not universally understood. Researchers should appreciate these misunderstandings as a potential source of error in studies using self-reported measures of sexual function. This study also provides evidence for the importance of including individuals with low literacy in cognitive pretesting during the measure development.

Authors
Alexander, AM; Flynn, KE; Hahn, EA; Jeffery, DD; Keefe, FJ; Reeve, BB; Schultz, W; Reese, JB; Shelby, RA; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Alexander, AM, Flynn, KE, Hahn, EA, Jeffery, DD, Keefe, FJ, Reeve, BB, Schultz, W, Reese, JB, Shelby, RA, and Weinfurt, KP. "Improving patients' understanding of terms and phrases commonly used in self-reported measures of sexual function." The journal of sexual medicine 11.8 (August 2014): 1991-1998.
PMID
24902984
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Sexual Medicine
Volume
11
Issue
8
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1991
End Page
1998
DOI
10.1111/jsm.12599

Review of electronic patient-reported outcomes systems used in cancer clinical care.

The use of electronic patient-reported outcomes (PRO) systems is increasing in cancer clinical care settings. This review comprehensively identifies existing PRO systems and explores how systems differ in the administration of PRO assessments, the integration of information into the clinic workflow and electronic health record (EHR) systems, and the reporting of PRO information.Electronic PRO (e-PRO) systems were identified through a semistructured review of published studies, gray literature, and expert identification. System developers were contacted to provide detailed e-PRO system characteristics and clinical implementation information using a structured review form.A total of 33 unique systems implemented in cancer clinical practice were identified. Of these, 81% provided detailed information about system characteristics. Two system classifications were established: treatment-centered systems designed for patient monitoring during active cancer treatment (n = 8) and patient-centered systems following patients across treatment and survivorship periods (n = 19). There was little consensus on administration, integration, or result reporting between these system types. Patient-centered systems were more likely to provide user-friendly features such as at-home assessments, integration into larger electronic system networks (eg, EHRs), and more robust score reporting options. Well-established systems were more likely to have features that increased assessment flexibility (eg, location, automated reminders) and better clinical integration.The number of e-PRO systems has increased. Systems can be programmed to have numerous features that facilitate integration of PRO assessment and routine monitoring into clinical care. Important barriers to system usability and widespread adoption include assessment flexibility, clinical integration, and high-quality data collection and reporting.

Authors
Jensen, RE; Snyder, CF; Abernethy, AP; Basch, E; Potosky, AL; Roberts, AC; Loeffler, DR; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Jensen, RE, Snyder, CF, Abernethy, AP, Basch, E, Potosky, AL, Roberts, AC, Loeffler, DR, and Reeve, BB. "Review of electronic patient-reported outcomes systems used in cancer clinical care." Journal of oncology practice 10.4 (July 2014): e215-e222. (Review)
PMID
24301843
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Oncology Practice
Volume
10
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
e215
End Page
e222
DOI
10.1200/jop.2013.001067

Comparing unmet needs between community-based palliative care patients with heart failure and patients with cancer.

As the role of palliative care (PC) has yet to be clearly defined in patients with heart failure (HF), such patients may face barriers regarding PC referral. In order to maximally meet the needs of HF patients, it is necessary to understand how they compare to the classic PC population: patients with cancer.To characterize the unresolved symptom and treatment needs with which patients with HF and those with cancer present to PC.We used data from the Palliative Care Research Registry (PCRR), a repository of quality improvement data from three community-based PC organizations. We abstracted first PC visit data from the PCRR for patients with primary diagnoses of HF or cancer seen between 2008 and 2012. We assessed the association of primary diagnosis (i.e., HF or cancer) on three outcomes: unresolved symptoms, treatment gaps, and a composite indicator of symptom control and quality of life. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariate Poisson regression.Our analytic sample comprised 334 patients with HF and 697 patients with cancer, the majority of whom were white and male. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with HF presented with fewer unresolved symptoms, both overall and at moderate/severe distress levels. Patients with HF more commonly reported moderately/severely distressful dyspnea (25% versus 18%, p=0.02), and more commonly experienced dyspnea-related treatment gaps (17% versus 8%, p<0.001).Patients with HF possess care needs that are squarely within the purview of PC. Future work is needed to delineate how PC referral policies should be refined to optimize PC access for patients with HF.

Authors
Kavalieratos, D; Kamal, AH; Abernethy, AP; Biddle, AK; Carey, TS; Dev, S; Reeve, BB; Weinberger, M
MLA Citation
Kavalieratos, D, Kamal, AH, Abernethy, AP, Biddle, AK, Carey, TS, Dev, S, Reeve, BB, and Weinberger, M. "Comparing unmet needs between community-based palliative care patients with heart failure and patients with cancer." Journal of palliative medicine 17.4 (April 2014): 475-481.
PMID
24588568
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Palliative Medicine
Volume
17
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
475
End Page
481
DOI
10.1089/jpm.2013.0526

"Not the 'grim reaper service'": an assessment of provider knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions regarding palliative care referral barriers in heart failure.

Although similar to cancer patients regarding symptom burden and prognosis, patients with heart failure (HF) tend to receive palliative care far less frequently. We sought to explore factors perceived by cardiology, primary care, and palliative care providers to impede palliative care referral for HF patients.We conducted semistructured interviews regarding (1) perceived needs of patients with advanced HF; (2) knowledge, attitudes, and experiences with specialist palliative care; (3) perceived indications for and optimal timing of palliative care referral in HF; and (4) perceived barriers to palliative care referral. Two investigators analyzed data using template analysis, a qualitative technique. We interviewed 18 physician, nurse practitioner, and physician assistant providers from 3 specialties: cardiology, primary care, and palliative care. Providers had limited knowledge regarding what palliative care is, and how it can complement traditional HF therapy to decrease HF-related suffering. Interviews identified several potential barriers: the unpredictable course of HF; lack of clear referral triggers across the HF trajectory; and ambiguity regarding what differentiates standard HF therapy from palliative care. Nevertheless, providers expressed interest for integrating palliative care into traditional HF care, but were unsure of how to initiate collaboration.Palliative care referral for HF patients may be suboptimal due to limited provider knowledge and misperceptions of palliative care as a service reserved for those near death. These factors represent potentially modifiable targets for provider education, which may help to improve palliative care referral for HF patients with unresolved disease-related burden.

Authors
Kavalieratos, D; Mitchell, EM; Carey, TS; Dev, S; Biddle, AK; Reeve, BB; Abernethy, AP; Weinberger, M
MLA Citation
Kavalieratos, D, Mitchell, EM, Carey, TS, Dev, S, Biddle, AK, Reeve, BB, Abernethy, AP, and Weinberger, M. ""Not the 'grim reaper service'": an assessment of provider knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions regarding palliative care referral barriers in heart failure." Journal of the American Heart Association 3.1 (January 2, 2014): e000544-.
PMID
24385453
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the American Heart Association
Volume
3
Issue
1
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
e000544
DOI
10.1161/jaha.113.000544

Improving patients' understanding of terms and phrases commonly used in self-reported measures of sexual function

Introduction: There is a significant gap in research regarding the readability and comprehension of existing sexual function measures. Patient-reported outcome measures may use terms not well understood by respondents with low literacy. Aim: This study aims to test comprehension of words and phrases typically used in sexual function measures to improve validity for all individuals, including those with low literacy. Methods: We recruited 20 men and 28 women for cognitive interviews on version 2.0 of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System ® (PROMIS ® ) Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures. We assessed participants' reading level using the word reading subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test. Sixteen participants were classified as having low literacy. Main Outcome Measures: In the first round of cognitive interviews, each survey item was reviewed by five or more people, at least two of whom had lower than a ninth-grade reading level (low literacy). Patient feedback was incorporated into a revised version of the items. In the second round of interviews, an additional three or more people (at least one with low literacy) reviewed each revised item. Results: Participants with low literacy had difficulty comprehending terms such as aroused, orgasm, erection, ejaculation, incontinence, and vaginal penetration. Women across a range of literacy levels had difficulty with clinical terms like labia and clitoris. We modified unclear terms to include parenthetical descriptors or slang equivalents, which generally improved comprehension. Conclusions: Common words and phrases used across measures of self-reported sexual function are not universally understood. Researchers should appreciate these misunderstandings as a potential source of error in studies using self-reported measures of sexual function. This study also provides evidence for the importance of including individuals with low literacy in cognitive pretesting during the measure development. Alexander AM, Flynn KE, Hahn EA, Jeffery DD, Keefe FJ, Reeve BB, Schultz W, Reese JB, Shelby RA, and Weinfurt KP. Improving patients' understanding of terms and phrases commonly used in self-reported measures of sexual function. J Sex Med 2014;11:1991-1998. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

Authors
Alexander, AM; Flynn, KE; Hahn, EA; Jeffery, DD; Keefe, FJ; Reeve, BB; Schultz, W; Reese, JB; Shelby, RA; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Alexander, AM, Flynn, KE, Hahn, EA, Jeffery, DD, Keefe, FJ, Reeve, BB, Schultz, W, Reese, JB, Shelby, RA, and Weinfurt, KP. "Improving patients' understanding of terms and phrases commonly used in self-reported measures of sexual function." Journal of Sexual Medicine 11.8 (January 1, 2014): 1991-1998.
Source
scopus
Published In
The Journal of Sexual Medicine
Volume
11
Issue
8
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1991
End Page
1998
DOI
10.1111/jsm.12599

Characterizing weekly self-reported antihypertensive medication nonadherence across repeated occasions.

Little is known about weekly variability in medication nonadherence both between and within persons.To characterize medication nonadherence across repeated, closely spaced occasions.This prospective cohort study comprised four unannounced telephone assessment occasions, each separated by approximately 2 weeks. On each occasion, adult outpatients taking at least a single antihypertensive medication completed a measure of extent of, and reasons for, nonadherence.Two hundred and sixty-one participants completed 871 (83%) of 1,044 occasions. Nonadherence was reported on 152 (17.5%) of 871 occasions by 93 (36%) of 261 participants. The most commonly endorsed reasons for nonadherence were forgetting (39.5%), being busy (23.7%), and traveling (19.7%). Among 219 participants completing at least three occasions, 50% of the variability in extent of nonadherence was a result of within-person fluctuations, and 50% was a result of between-person differences.Interventions to reduce nonadherence should be informed by variability in the extent of nonadherence and specific reasons for nonadherence.

Authors
Voils, CI; King, HA; Neelon, B; Hoyle, RH; Reeve, BB; Maciejewski, ML; Yancy, WS
MLA Citation
Voils, CI, King, HA, Neelon, B, Hoyle, RH, Reeve, BB, Maciejewski, ML, and Yancy, WS. "Characterizing weekly self-reported antihypertensive medication nonadherence across repeated occasions." Patient preference and adherence 8 (January 2014): 643-650.
PMID
24855340
Source
epmc
Published In
Patient Preference and Adherence
Volume
8
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
643
End Page
650
DOI
10.2147/ppa.s60715

An examination of racial differences in process and outcome of colorectal cancer care quality among users of the veterans affairs health care system

Background Veterans Affairs (VA) manages the largest US integrated health care system. Although quality of VA colorectal cancer (CRC) care is well chronicled, there is a paucity of research examining racial differences in this care. This study examines racial differences in 2 dimensions of quality of VA CRC care: processes (time to treatment) and outcomes (survival). Patients and Methods Retrospective data were from the VA External Peer Review Program (EPRP), a nationwide VA quality-monitoring program. Study patients were white and African American men diagnosed with nonmetastatic CRC between 2003 and 2006 who received definitive CRC surgery. We examined 3 quality indicators: time from (1) surgery to initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy (stages II-III disease), (2) surgery to surveillance colonoscopy (stages I-III disease), and (3) surgery to death (stages I-III disease). Unadjusted analyses used log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. Adjusted analyses used Cox proportional hazard models. Results In unadjusted analyses, there was no evidence of racial differences across the 3 quality measures. In adjusted Cox regression, there were no racial differences in time to initiation of chemotherapy (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; P =.61) or surgery to death (HR, 0.94; P =.49). In adjus ted Cox regression, among those receiving colonoscopy within 7 to 18 months after surgery, white patients experienced slightly shorter median times to surveillance colonoscopy than did African American patients (367 vs. 383 days; HR, 0.63; P =.02). Conclusion Other than a small racial difference in timing of surveillance colonoscopy, there was little evidence of racial differences in quality of CRC care among VA health care system users. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Authors
Zullig, LL; Jackson, GL; Weinberger, M; Provenzale, D; Reeve, BB; Carpenter, WR
MLA Citation
Zullig, LL, Jackson, GL, Weinberger, M, Provenzale, D, Reeve, BB, and Carpenter, WR. "An examination of racial differences in process and outcome of colorectal cancer care quality among users of the veterans affairs health care system." Clinical Colorectal Cancer 12.4 (December 1, 2013): 255-260.
Source
scopus
Published In
Clinical colorectal cancer
Volume
12
Issue
4
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
255
End Page
260
DOI
10.1016/j.clcc.2013.06.004

An examination of racial differences in process and outcome of colorectal cancer care quality among users of the veterans affairs health care system.

Veterans Affairs (VA) manages the largest US integrated health care system. Although quality of VA colorectal cancer (CRC) care is well chronicled, there is a paucity of research examining racial differences in this care. This study examines racial differences in 2 dimensions of quality of VA CRC care: processes (time to treatment) and outcomes (survival).Retrospective data were from the VA External Peer Review Program (EPRP), a nationwide VA quality-monitoring program. Study patients were white and African American men diagnosed with nonmetastatic CRC between 2003 and 2006 who received definitive CRC surgery. We examined 3 quality indicators: time from (1) surgery to initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy (stages II-III disease), (2) surgery to surveillance colonoscopy (stages I-III disease), and (3) surgery to death (stages I-III disease). Unadjusted analyses used log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. Adjusted analyses used Cox proportional hazard models.In unadjusted analyses, there was no evidence of racial differences across the 3 quality measures. In adjusted Cox regression, there were no racial differences in time to initiation of chemotherapy (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; P = .61) or surgery to death (HR, 0.94; P = .49). In adjusted Cox regression, among those receiving colonoscopy within 7 to 18 months after surgery, white patients experienced slightly shorter median times to surveillance colonoscopy than did African American patients (367 vs. 383 days; HR, 0.63; P = .02).Other than a small racial difference in timing of surveillance colonoscopy, there was little evidence of racial differences in quality of CRC care among VA health care system users.

Authors
Zullig, LL; Jackson, GL; Weinberger, M; Provenzale, D; Reeve, BB; Carpenter, WR
MLA Citation
Zullig, LL, Jackson, GL, Weinberger, M, Provenzale, D, Reeve, BB, and Carpenter, WR. "An examination of racial differences in process and outcome of colorectal cancer care quality among users of the veterans affairs health care system." Clinical colorectal cancer 12.4 (December 2013): 255-260.
PMID
23988481
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical colorectal cancer
Volume
12
Issue
4
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
255
End Page
260
DOI
10.1016/j.clcc.2013.06.004

Conceptual model for the PROMIS sexual function and satisfaction measure

Authors
Flynn, KE; Cyranowski, J; Dombeck, C; Jeffery, D; Magasi, S; Moore, A; Porter, L; Reese, JB; Reeve, BB; Shelby, R
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Cyranowski, J, Dombeck, C, Jeffery, D, Magasi, S, Moore, A, Porter, L, Reese, JB, Reeve, BB, and Shelby, R. "Conceptual model for the PROMIS sexual function and satisfaction measure." QUALITY OF LIFE RESEARCH 22 (October 2013).
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
22
Publish Date
2013

Are health-related quality of life decrements after breast cancer diagnosis time-limited for women ages 65 and older?: A matched comparative study of medicare beneficiaries

Authors
Stover, AM; Reeve, BB; Muss, H; Mayer, DK; Wheeler, S; Lyons, JC
MLA Citation
Stover, AM, Reeve, BB, Muss, H, Mayer, DK, Wheeler, S, and Lyons, JC. "Are health-related quality of life decrements after breast cancer diagnosis time-limited for women ages 65 and older?: A matched comparative study of medicare beneficiaries." October 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
22
Publish Date
2013

Behind the scenes: a review of instruments used in electronic patient-reported outcomes systems

Authors
Roberts, AC; Snyder, C; Reeve, BB; Abernathy, AP; Basch, E; Potosky, A; Davis, KM; Jensen, RE
MLA Citation
Roberts, AC, Snyder, C, Reeve, BB, Abernathy, AP, Basch, E, Potosky, A, Davis, KM, and Jensen, RE. "Behind the scenes: a review of instruments used in electronic patient-reported outcomes systems." October 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
22
Publish Date
2013

Cardiopulmonary fitness in patients undergoing hematopoietic SCT: a pilot study.

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a life-saving treatment for patients with high-risk hematological malignancies. Prognostic measures to determine fitness for HCT are needed to inform decision-making and interventions. VO(2peak) is obtained by measuring gas exchange during cycle ergometry and has not been studied as a prognostic factor in HCT. Thirty-two autologous and allogeneic HCT patients underwent VO(2peak) and 6 Minute Walk (6MW) testing before HCT, and provided weekly symptom and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) assessments before HCT and concluding at Day 100. Twenty-nine patients completed pre-HCT testing. Pre-HCT VO(2peak) was positively correlated with pre-HCT 6MW (r=0.65, P<0.001) and negatively correlated with number of chemotherapy regimens and months of chemotherapy. Patients with lower VO(2peak) reported higher symptom burden and inferior HRQOL at baseline and during early post-HCT period. Patients with pre-HCT VO(2peak) <16 mL/kg/min had higher risk of mortality post HCT (entire cohort: hazard ratio (HR) 9.1 (1.75-47.0), P=0.01; allogeneic HCT patients only: HR 6.70 (1.29-34.75), P=0.02) and more hospitalized days before Day 100 (entire cohort: median 33 vs 19, P=0.003; allogeneic HCT patients only: median 33 vs 21, P=0.004). VO(2peak) pre-HCT is feasible and might predict symptom severity, HRQOL and mortality. Additional studies are warranted.

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Reeve, BB; Abernethy, AP; Basch, E; Mitchell, SA; Shatten, C; Hie Kim, Y; Whitley, J; Serody, JS; Shea, T; Battaglini, C
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Reeve, BB, Abernethy, AP, Basch, E, Mitchell, SA, Shatten, C, Hie Kim, Y, Whitley, J, Serody, JS, Shea, T, and Battaglini, C. "Cardiopulmonary fitness in patients undergoing hematopoietic SCT: a pilot study." Bone marrow transplantation 48.10 (October 2013): 1342-1349.
PMID
23584437
Source
epmc
Published In
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Volume
48
Issue
10
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
1342
End Page
1349
DOI
10.1038/bmt.2013.58

Examining potential colorectal cancer care disparities in the Veterans Affairs health care system.

Racial disparities in cancer treatment and outcomes are a national problem. The nationwide Veterans Affairs (VA) health system seeks to provide equal access to quality care. However, the relationship between race and care quality for veterans with colorectal cancer (CRC) treated within the VA is poorly understood. We examined the association between race and receipt of National Comprehensive Cancer Network guideline-concordant CRC care.This was an observational, retrospective medical record abstraction of patients with CRC treated in the VA. Two thousand twenty-two patients (white, n = 1,712; African American, n = 310) diagnosed with incident CRC between October 1, 2003, and March 31, 2006, from 128 VA medical centers, were included. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between race and receipt of guideline-concordant care (computed tomography scan, preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen, clear surgical margins, medical oncology referral for stages II and III, fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III, and surveillance colonoscopy for stages I to III). Explanatory variables included demographic and disease characteristics.There were no significant racial differences for receipt of guideline-concordant CRC care. Older age at diagnosis was associated with reduced odds of medical oncology referral and surveillance colonoscopy. Presence of cardiovascular comorbid conditions was associated with reduced odds of medical oncology referral (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.89).In these data, we observed no evidence of racial disparities in CRC care quality. Future studies could examine causal pathways for the VA's equal, quality care and ways to translate the VA's success into other hospital systems.

Authors
Zullig, LL; Carpenter, WR; Provenzale, D; Weinberger, M; Reeve, BB; Jackson, GL
MLA Citation
Zullig, LL, Carpenter, WR, Provenzale, D, Weinberger, M, Reeve, BB, and Jackson, GL. "Examining potential colorectal cancer care disparities in the Veterans Affairs health care system." Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 31.28 (October 2013): 3579-3584.
PMID
24002515
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Issue
28
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
3579
End Page
3584
DOI
10.1200/jco.2013.50.4753

Are there racial differences in colorectal cancer care timeliness among users of the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System?

Authors
Zullig, LL; Jackson, GL; Weinberger, M; Provenzale, DT; Reeve, BB; Carpenter, WR
MLA Citation
Zullig, LL, Jackson, GL, Weinberger, M, Provenzale, DT, Reeve, BB, and Carpenter, WR. "Are there racial differences in colorectal cancer care timeliness among users of the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System?." May 20, 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Issue
15
Publish Date
2013

Usability testing of the PRO-CTCAE measurement system in patients with cancer.

Authors
Fawzy, MR; Abernethy, AP; Schoen, MW; Rogak, LJ; Mendoza, TR; St Germain, DC; Paul, DB; Baumgartner, P; Gangoli, V; Chilukuri, R; Mitchell, SA; Reeve, BB; Castro, KM; Shalley, E; Basch, EM
MLA Citation
Fawzy, MR, Abernethy, AP, Schoen, MW, Rogak, LJ, Mendoza, TR, St Germain, DC, Paul, DB, Baumgartner, P, Gangoli, V, Chilukuri, R, Mitchell, SA, Reeve, BB, Castro, KM, Shalley, E, and Basch, EM. "Usability testing of the PRO-CTCAE measurement system in patients with cancer." May 20, 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
31
Issue
15
Publish Date
2013

In response.

Authors
Voils, CI; Maciejewski, ML; Hoyle, RH; Reeve, BB; Gallagher, MP; Bryson, CL; Yancy, WS
MLA Citation
Voils, CI, Maciejewski, ML, Hoyle, RH, Reeve, BB, Gallagher, MP, Bryson, CL, and Yancy, WS. "In response." Med Care 51.5 (May 2013): 468-469. (Letter)
PMID
23552432
Source
pubmed
Published In
Medical Care
Volume
51
Issue
5
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
468
End Page
469
DOI
10.1097/MLR.0b013e31828fadbf

Construct validity of the PROMIS® sexual function and satisfaction measures in patients with cancer.

With data from a diverse sample of patients either in treatment for cancer or post-treatment for cancer, we examine inter-domain and cross-domain correlations among the core domains of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures (PROMIS® SexFS) and the corresponding domains from conceptually-similar measures of sexual function, the International Index of Erectile Function and the Female Sexual Function Index.Men (N=389) and women (N=430) were recruited from a tumor registry, oncology clinics, and an internet panel. The PROMIS SexFS, International Index of Erectile Function, and Female Sexual Function Index were used to collect participants' self-reported sexual function. The domains shared among the measures include desire/interest in sexual activity, lubrication and vaginal discomfort/pain (women), erectile function (men), orgasm, and satisfaction. We examined correlations among different domains within the same instrument (discriminant validity) and correlations among similar domains measured by different instruments (convergent validity). Correlations demonstrating discriminant validity ranged from 0.38 to 0.73 for men and 0.48 to 0.74 for women, while correlations demonstrating convergent validity ranged from 0.62 to 0.83 for men and 0.71 to 0.92 for women. As expected, correlations demonstrating convergent validity were higher than correlations demonstrating discriminant validity, with one exception (orgasm for men).Construct validity was supported by convergent and discriminant validity in a diverse sample of patients with cancer. For patients with cancer who may or may not have sexual dysfunction, the PROMIS SexFS measures provide a comprehensive assessment of key domains of sexual function and satisfaction.

Authors
Flynn, KE; Reeve, BB; Lin, L; Cyranowski, JM; Bruner, DW; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Reeve, BB, Lin, L, Cyranowski, JM, Bruner, DW, and Weinfurt, KP. "Construct validity of the PROMIS® sexual function and satisfaction measures in patients with cancer." Health and quality of life outcomes 11 (March 11, 2013): 40-.
PMID
23497200
Source
epmc
Published In
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Volume
11
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
40
DOI
10.1186/1477-7525-11-40

Feasibility of frequent patient-reported outcome surveillance in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), including symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), provide a patient-centered description of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)-related toxicity. These data characterize the patient experience after HCT and may have prognostic usefulness for long-term outcomes after HCT. We conducted a study of 32 patients after HCT (10 autologous HCT recipients, 11 full-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients, and 11 reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients) to determine the feasibility of weekly electronic PRO collection from HCT until day (D) +100. We used questions from the PRO version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to capture symptoms, and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health scale to measure physical and mental HRQOL. The vast majority (94%) of patients used the electronic PRO system, with only 6% opting for paper-and-pencil only. The median weekly percentage of participants who completed the surveys was 100% in all cohorts through hospital discharge, and remained 100% for the autologous HCT and reduced-intensity allogeneic HCT cohorts through D+100. Patients were satisfied with the electronic system, giving high marks for readability, comfort, and questionnaire length. Symptom severity varied by absolute level and type of symptom across the 3 cohorts, with the full-intensity allogeneic HCT cohort exhibiting the greatest median overall symptom severity, peaking at D+7. Median physical health HRQOL scores decreased with time in the 3 cohorts, and HRQOL was generally correlated with overall symptom severity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of frequent electronic PROs in the early post-HCT period. Future studies in larger populations to explore predictive models using frequent PRO data for outcomes, including long-term HRQOL and survival, are warranted.

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Abernethy, A; Basch, E; Battaglini, C; Kim, YH; Whitley, J; Shatten, C; Serody, J; Shea, T; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Abernethy, A, Basch, E, Battaglini, C, Kim, YH, Whitley, J, Shatten, C, Serody, J, Shea, T, and Reeve, BB. "Feasibility of frequent patient-reported outcome surveillance in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation." Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation 19.3 (March 2013): 450-459.
PMID
23253558
Source
epmc
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
19
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
450
End Page
459
DOI
10.1016/j.bbmt.2012.11.014

Development of the NIH PROMIS ® Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures in patients with cancer.

We describe the development and validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System(®) Sexual Function and Satisfaction (PROMIS(®) SexFS; National Institutes of Health) measures, version 1.0, for cancer populations.To develop a customizable self-report measure of sexual function and satisfaction as part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health PROMIS Network.Our multidisciplinary working group followed a comprehensive protocol for developing psychometrically robust patient-reported outcome measures including qualitative (scale development) and quantitative (psychometric evaluation) development. We performed an extensive literature review, conducted 16 focus groups with cancer patients and multiple discussions with clinicians, and evaluated candidate items in cognitive testing with patients. We administered items to 819 cancer patients. Items were calibrated using item-response theory and evaluated for reliability and validity.The PROMIS SexFS measures, version 1.0, include 81 items in 11 domains: Interest in Sexual Activity, Lubrication, Vaginal Discomfort, Erectile Function, Global Satisfaction with Sex Life, Orgasm, Anal Discomfort, Therapeutic Aids, Sexual Activities, Interfering Factors, and Screener Questions.In addition to content validity (patients indicate that items cover important aspects of their experiences) and face validity (patients indicate that items measure sexual function and satisfaction), the measure shows evidence for discriminant validity (domains discriminate between groups expected to be different) and convergent validity (strong correlations between scores on PROMIS and scores on conceptually similar older measures of sexual function), as well as favorable test-retest reliability among people not expected to change (interclass correlations from two administrations of the instrument, 1 month apart).The PROMIS SexFS offers researchers a reliable and valid set of tools to measure self-reported sexual function and satisfaction among diverse men and women. The measures are customizable; researchers can select the relevant domains and items comprising those domains for their study.

Authors
Flynn, KE; Lin, L; Cyranowski, JM; Reeve, BB; Reese, JB; Jeffery, DD; Smith, AW; Porter, LS; Dombeck, CB; Bruner, DW; Keefe, FJ; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Lin, L, Cyranowski, JM, Reeve, BB, Reese, JB, Jeffery, DD, Smith, AW, Porter, LS, Dombeck, CB, Bruner, DW, Keefe, FJ, and Weinfurt, KP. "Development of the NIH PROMIS ® Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures in patients with cancer." The journal of sexual medicine 10 Suppl 1 (February 2013): 43-52.
PMID
23387911
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Sexual Medicine
Volume
10 Suppl 1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
43
End Page
52
DOI
10.1111/j.1743-6109.2012.02995.x

Feasibility of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing and Longitudinal Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) Assessment in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Abernethy, A; Battaglini, C; Kim, YH; Whitley, J; Shatten, C; Serody, JS; Shea, TC; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Abernethy, A, Battaglini, C, Kim, YH, Whitley, J, Shatten, C, Serody, JS, Shea, TC, and Reeve, BB. "Feasibility of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing and Longitudinal Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) Assessment in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation." February 2013.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
19
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
S221
End Page
S221

The association of race with timeliness of care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

Non-small cell lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Patients with late-stage disease (stage 3/4) have five-year survival rates of 2%-15%. Care quality may be measured as time to receiving recommended care and, ultimately, survival. This study examined the association between race and receipt of timely non-small cell lung cancer care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients.Data were from the External Peer Review Program, a nationwide Veterans Affairs quality-monitoring program. We included Caucasian or African American patients with pathologically confirmed late-stage non-small cell lung cancer in 2006 and 2007. We examined three quality measures: time from diagnosis to (1) treatment initiation, (2) palliative care or hospice referral, and (3) death. Unadjusted analyses used log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. Adjusted analyses used Cox proportional hazard models.After controlling for patient and disease characteristics using Cox regression, there were no racial differences in time to initiation of treatment (72 days for African American versus 65 days for Caucasian patients, hazard ratio 1.04, P = 0.80) or palliative care or hospice referral (129 days versus 116 days, hazard ratio 1.10, P = 0.34). However, the adjusted model found longer survival for African American patients than for Caucasian patients (133 days versus 117 days, hazard ratio 0.31, P < 0.01).For process measures of care quality (eg, time to initiation of treatment and referral to supportive care) the Veterans Affairs health care system provides racially equitable care. The small racial difference in survival time of approximately 2 weeks is not clinically meaningful. Future work should validate this possible trend prospectively, with longer periods of follow-up, in other veteran groups.

Authors
Zullig, LL; Carpenter, WR; Provenzale, DT; Weinberger, M; Reeve, BB; Williams, CD; Jackson, GL
MLA Citation
Zullig, LL, Carpenter, WR, Provenzale, DT, Weinberger, M, Reeve, BB, Williams, CD, and Jackson, GL. "The association of race with timeliness of care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer." Cancer management and research 5 (January 2013): 157-163.
PMID
23900515
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Management and Research
Volume
5
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
157
End Page
163
DOI
10.2147/cmar.s46688

Examining potential cancer care disparities in an equal access system: Quality of colorectal cancer care (CRC) in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system

Authors
Zullig, LL; Carpenter, WR; Abbott, DH; Provenzale, DT; Weinberger, M; Reeve, BB; Jackson, GL
MLA Citation
Zullig, LL, Carpenter, WR, Abbott, DH, Provenzale, DT, Weinberger, M, Reeve, BB, and Jackson, GL. "Examining potential cancer care disparities in an equal access system: Quality of colorectal cancer care (CRC) in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system." JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY 30.34 (December 1, 2012).
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
30
Issue
34
Publish Date
2012

Initial validation of a self-report measure of the extent of and reasons for medication nonadherence.

BACKGROUND: Self-report measures of medication nonadherence confound the extent of and reasons for medication nonadherence. Each construct is assessed with a different type of psychometric model, which dictates how to establish reliability and validity. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the psychometric properties of a self-report measure of medication nonadherence that assesses separately the extent of nonadherence and reasons for nonadherence. RESEARCH DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey involving the new measure and comparison measures to establish convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. The new measure was readministered 2-21 days later. SUBJECTS: A total of 202 veterans with treated hypertension were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. MEASURES: A new self-report measure assessed the extent of nonadherence and reasons for nonadherence. Comparison measures included self-reported medication self-efficacy, beliefs about medications, impression management, conscientiousness, habit strength, and an existing nonadherence measure. RESULTS: Three items assessing the extent of nonadherence produced reliable scores for this sample, α = 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.87). Correlations with comparison measures provided evidence of convergent and discriminant validity. Correlations with systolic ( r = 0.27, P < 0.0001) and diastolic (r = 0.27, P < 0.0001) blood pressure provided evidence of predictive validity. Reasons for nonadherence were assessed with 21 independent items. Intraclass correlations were 0.58 for the extent score and ranged from 0.07 to 0.64 for the reasons. CONCLUSIONS: The dual conceptualization of medication nonadherence allowed a stronger evaluation of the reliability and validity than was previously possible with measures that confounded these 2 constructs. Measurement of self-reported nonadherence consistent with psychometric principles will enable reliable, valid evaluation of interventions to reduce nonadherence.

Authors
Voils, CI; Maciejewski, ML; Hoyle, RH; Reeve, BB; Gallagher, P; Bryson, CL; Yancy, WS
MLA Citation
Voils, CI, Maciejewski, ML, Hoyle, RH, Reeve, BB, Gallagher, P, Bryson, CL, and Yancy, WS. "Initial validation of a self-report measure of the extent of and reasons for medication nonadherence." Med Care 50.12 (December 2012): 1013-1019.
PMID
22922431
Source
pubmed
Published In
Medical Care
Volume
50
Issue
12
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
1013
End Page
1019
DOI
10.1097/MLR.0b013e318269e121

Recommendations for incorporating patient-reported outcomes into clinical comparative effectiveness research in adult oncology.

Examining the patient's subjective experience in prospective clinical comparative effectiveness research (CER) of oncology treatments or process interventions is essential for informing decision making. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are the standard tools for directly eliciting the patient experience. There are currently no widely accepted standards for developing or implementing PRO measures in CER. Recommendations for the design and implementation of PRO measures in CER were developed via a standardized process including multistakeholder interviews, a technical working group, and public comments. Key recommendations are to include assessment of patient-reported symptoms as well as health-related quality of life in all prospective clinical CER studies in adult oncology; to identify symptoms relevant to a particular study population and context based on literature review and/or qualitative and quantitative methods; to assure that PRO measures used are valid, reliable, and sensitive in a comparable population (measures particularly recommended include EORTC QLQ-C30, FACT, MDASI, PRO-CTCAE, and PROMIS); to collect PRO data electronically whenever possible; to employ methods that minimize missing patient reports and include a plan for analyzing and reporting missing PRO data; to report the proportion of responders and cumulative distribution of responses in addition to mean changes in scores; and to publish results of PRO analyses simultaneously with other clinical outcomes. Twelve core symptoms are recommended for consideration in studies in advanced or metastatic cancers. Adherence to methodologic standards for the selection, implementation, and analysis/reporting of PRO measures will lead to an understanding of the patient experience that informs better decisions by patients, providers, regulators, and payers.

Authors
Basch, E; Abernethy, AP; Mullins, CD; Reeve, BB; Smith, ML; Coons, SJ; Sloan, J; Wenzel, K; Chauhan, C; Eppard, W; Frank, ES; Lipscomb, J; Raymond, SA; Spencer, M; Tunis, S
MLA Citation
Basch, E, Abernethy, AP, Mullins, CD, Reeve, BB, Smith, ML, Coons, SJ, Sloan, J, Wenzel, K, Chauhan, C, Eppard, W, Frank, ES, Lipscomb, J, Raymond, SA, Spencer, M, and Tunis, S. "Recommendations for incorporating patient-reported outcomes into clinical comparative effectiveness research in adult oncology." Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 30.34 (December 2012): 4249-4255. (Review)
PMID
23071244
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
30
Issue
34
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
4249
End Page
4255
DOI
10.1200/jco.2012.42.5967

Feasibility and Prognostic Value of VO2(peak) in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT)

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Battaglini, CL; Reeve, BB; Abernethy, AP; Kim, YH; Whitley, JS; Shatten, C; Irons, RN; Essenmacher, AN; Wehner, K; Pinto, A; Coghill, J; Armistead, PM; Sarantopoulos, S; Gabriel, DA; Serody, JS; Shea, TC
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Battaglini, CL, Reeve, BB, Abernethy, AP, Kim, YH, Whitley, JS, Shatten, C, Irons, RN, Essenmacher, AN, Wehner, K, Pinto, A, Coghill, J, Armistead, PM, Sarantopoulos, S, Gabriel, DA, Serody, JS, and Shea, TC. "Feasibility and Prognostic Value of VO2(peak) in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT)." November 16, 2012.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Blood
Volume
120
Issue
21
Publish Date
2012

Feasibility and Prognostic Value of VO2(peak) in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT)

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Battaglini, CL; Reeve, BB; Abernethy, AP; Kim, YH; Whitley, JS; Shatten, C; Irons, RN; Essenmacher, AN; Wehner, K; Pinto, A; Coghill, J; Armistead, PM; Sarantopoulos, S; Gabriel, DA; Serody, JS; Shea, TC
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Battaglini, CL, Reeve, BB, Abernethy, AP, Kim, YH, Whitley, JS, Shatten, C, Irons, RN, Essenmacher, AN, Wehner, K, Pinto, A, Coghill, J, Armistead, PM, Sarantopoulos, S, Gabriel, DA, Serody, JS, and Shea, TC. "Feasibility and Prognostic Value of VO2(peak) in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT)." November 16, 2012.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Blood
Volume
120
Issue
21
Publish Date
2012

Feasibility of Daily and Weekly Symptom and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) Surveillance in Patients Receiving Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT)

Authors
Wood, WA; Deal, AM; Reeve, BB; Abernethy, AP; Battaglini, CL; Kim, YH; Whitley, JS; Shatten, C; Irons, RN; Essenmacher, AN; Wehner, K; Pinto, A; Coghill, J; Armistead, PM; Sarantopoulos, S; Gabriel, DA; Serody, JS; Shea, TC
MLA Citation
Wood, WA, Deal, AM, Reeve, BB, Abernethy, AP, Battaglini, CL, Kim, YH, Whitley, JS, Shatten, C, Irons, RN, Essenmacher, AN, Wehner, K, Pinto, A, Coghill, J, Armistead, PM, Sarantopoulos, S, Gabriel, DA, Serody, JS, and Shea, TC. "Feasibility of Daily and Weekly Symptom and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) Surveillance in Patients Receiving Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT)." November 16, 2012.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Blood
Volume
120
Issue
21
Publish Date
2012

Attitudes and intentions regarding abortion provision among medical school students in South Africa.

CONTEXT: Although South Africa liberalized its abortion law in 1996, significant barriers still impede service provision, including the lack of trained and willing providers. A better understanding is needed of medical students' attitudes, beliefs and intentions regarding abortion provision. METHODS: Surveys about abortion attitudes, beliefs and practice intentions were conducted in 2005 and 2007 among 1,308 medical school students attending the University of Cape Town and Walter Sisulu University in South Africa. Bivariate and multivariate analyses identified associations between students' characteristics and their general and conditional support for abortion provision, as well as their intention to act according to personal attitudes and beliefs. RESULTS: Seventy percent of medical students believed that women should have the right to decide whether to have an abortion, and large majorities thought that abortion should be legal in a variety of medical circumstances. Nearly one-quarter of students intended to perform abortions once they were qualified, and 72% said that conscientiously objecting clinicians should be required to refer women for such services. However, one-fifth of students believed that abortion should not be allowed for any reason. Advanced medical students were more likely than others to support abortion provision. In multivariate analyses, year in medical school, race or ethnicity, religious affiliation, relationship status and sexual experience were associated with attitudes, beliefs and intentions regarding provision. CONCLUSIONS: Academic medical institutions must ensure that students understand their responsibilities with respect to abortion care--regardless of their personal views--and must provide appropriate abortion training to those who are willing to offer these services in the future.

Authors
Wheeler, SB; Zullig, LL; Reeve, BB; Buga, GA; Morroni, C
MLA Citation
Wheeler, SB, Zullig, LL, Reeve, BB, Buga, GA, and Morroni, C. "Attitudes and intentions regarding abortion provision among medical school students in South Africa." International perspectives on sexual and reproductive health 38.3 (September 2012): 154-163.
PMID
23018137
Source
epmc
Published In
International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume
38
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
154
End Page
163

A dimensional approach to understanding severity estimates and risk correlates of marijuana abuse and dependence in adults.

While item response theory (IRT) research shows a latent severity trait underlying response patterns of substance abuse and dependence symptoms, little is known about IRT-based severity estimates in relation to clinically relevant measures. In response to increased prevalences of marijuana-related treatment admissions, an elevated level of marijuana potency, and the debate on medical marijuana use, we applied dimensional approaches to understand IRT-based severity estimates for marijuana use disorders (MUDs) and their correlates while simultaneously considering gender- and race/ethnicity-related differential item functioning (DIF). Using adult data from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (N = 37,897), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for MUDs among past-year marijuana users were examined by IRT, logistic regression, and multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) approaches. Among 6917 marijuana users, 15% met criteria for a MUD; another 24% exhibited subthreshold dependence. Abuse criteria were highly correlated with dependence criteria (correlation = 0.90), indicating unidimensionality; item information curves revealed redundancy in multiple criteria. MIMIC analyses showed that MUD criteria were positively associated with weekly marijuana use, early marijuana use, other substance use disorders, substance abuse treatment, and serious psychological distress. African Americans and Hispanics showed higher levels of MUDs than Whites, even after adjusting for race/ethnicity-related DIF. The redundancy in multiple criteria suggests an opportunity to improve efficiency in measuring symptom-level manifestations by removing low-informative criteria. Elevated rates of MUDs among African Americans and Hispanics require research to elucidate risk factors and improve assessments of MUDs for different racial/ethnic groups.

Authors
Wu, L-T; Woody, GE; Yang, C; Pan, J-J; Reeve, BB; Blazer, DG
MLA Citation
Wu, L-T, Woody, GE, Yang, C, Pan, J-J, Reeve, BB, and Blazer, DG. "A dimensional approach to understanding severity estimates and risk correlates of marijuana abuse and dependence in adults." Int J Methods Psychiatr Res 21.2 (June 2012): 117-133.
PMID
22351489
Source
pubmed
Published In
International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research
Volume
21
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
117
End Page
133
DOI
10.1002/mpr.1354

Knowledge of termination of pregnancy (TOP) legislation and attitudes toward TOP clinical training among medical students attending two South African universities.

Provision of safe, voluntary, termination of pregnancy (TOP) in South Africa is challenged by an insufficient number of TOP-trained clinicians. Medical students' understanding of TOP legality and their attitudes toward TOP training are indicators for future service provision. We administered a 63-item questionnaire to explore these issues at the University of Cape Town and Walter Sisulu University. Ordinary least squares regression assessed predictors of TOP legislation knowledge and training attitudes.Of 1308 students, 95% knew that TOP was legal in South Africa, but few (27%) understood the specific provisions of the legislation beyond 13 weeks' gestation. Sixty-three percent desired more information about TOP. In multivariate models, female, white and sexually experienced students and students more advanced in school had better legislation knowledge (all p < .01). Attending religious services regularly (p < .01) was associated with lack of support for TOP training, whereas being in a relationship (p < .01) was associated with support for TOP training.

Authors
Wheeler, SB; Zullig, L; Jungerwirth, R; Reeve, BB; Buga, GA; Morroni, C
MLA Citation
Wheeler, SB, Zullig, L, Jungerwirth, R, Reeve, BB, Buga, GA, and Morroni, C. "Knowledge of termination of pregnancy (TOP) legislation and attitudes toward TOP clinical training among medical students attending two South African universities." World health & population 14.1 (January 2012): 5-18.
PMID
23135069
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of World Health and Population
Volume
14
Issue
1
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
5
End Page
18

Assuring the patient centeredness of patient-reported outcomes: content validity in medical product development and comparative effectiveness research.

Authors
Basch, E; Abernethy, AP; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Basch, E, Abernethy, AP, and Reeve, BB. "Assuring the patient centeredness of patient-reported outcomes: content validity in medical product development and comparative effectiveness research." Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research 14.8 (December 2011): 965-966.
PMID
22152164
Source
epmc
Published In
Value in Health
Volume
14
Issue
8
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
965
End Page
966
DOI
10.1016/j.jval.2011.10.002

Use of item response theory and latent class analysis to link poly-substance use disorders with addiction severity, HIV risk, and quality of life among opioid-dependent patients in the Clinical Trials Network.

BACKGROUND: This study applied item response theory (IRT) and latent class analysis (LCA) procedures to examine the dimensionality and heterogeneity of comorbid substance use disorders (SUDs) and explored their utility for standard clinical assessments, including the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), HIV Risk Behavior Scale (HRBS), and SF-36 quality-of-life measures. METHODS: The sample included 343 opioid-dependent patients enrolled in two national multisite studies of the U.S. National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN001-002). Patients were recruited from inpatient and outpatient addiction treatment settings at 12 programs. Data were analyzed by factor analysis, IRT, LCA, and latent regression procedures. RESULTS: A two-class LCA model fit dichotomous SUD data empirically better than one-parameter and two-parameter IRT models. LCA distinguished 10% of severe comorbid opioid-dependent individuals who had high rates of all SUDs examined-especially amphetamine and sedative abuse/dependence-from the remaining 90% who had SUDs other than amphetamine and sedative abuse/dependence (entropy=0.99). Item-level results from both one-parameter and two-parameter IRT models also found that amphetamine and sedative abuse/dependence tapped the more severe end of the latent poly-SUD trait. Regardless of whether SUDs were defined as a continuous trait or categorically, individuals characterized by a high level of poly-SUD demonstrated more psychiatric problems and HIV risk behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: A combined application of categorical and dimensional latent approaches may improve the understanding of comorbid SUDs and their associations with other clinical indicators. Abuse of sedatives and methamphetamine may serve as a useful marker for identifying subsets of opioid-dependent individuals with needs for more intensive interventions.

Authors
Wu, L-T; Ling, W; Burchett, B; Blazer, DG; Yang, C; Pan, J-J; Reeve, BB; Woody, GE
MLA Citation
Wu, L-T, Ling, W, Burchett, B, Blazer, DG, Yang, C, Pan, J-J, Reeve, BB, and Woody, GE. "Use of item response theory and latent class analysis to link poly-substance use disorders with addiction severity, HIV risk, and quality of life among opioid-dependent patients in the Clinical Trials Network." Drug Alcohol Depend 118.2-3 (November 1, 2011): 186-193.
PMID
21501933
Source
pubmed
Published In
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume
118
Issue
2-3
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
186
End Page
193
DOI
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.03.018

Electronic toxicity monitoring and patient-reported outcomes.

Understanding the potential profile of adverse events associated with cancer treatment is essential in balancing safety versus benefits. Multiple stakeholders make use of this information for decision making, including patients, clinicians, researchers, regulators, and payors. Currently, adverse events are reported by clinical research staff, yet evidence suggests that this may contribute to underreporting of symptom events. Direct patient reporting via electronic interfaces offers a promising mechanism to enhance the efficiency and precision of our current approach and may complement clinician reports of adverse events. The National Cancer Institute has contracted to develop and test an item bank and software system for directly eliciting adverse symptom event information from patients in cancer clinical research, called the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. The validity, usability, and scalability of the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events prototype are currently being examined in academic and community-based settings.

Authors
Basch, EM; Reeve, BB; Mitchell, SA; Clauser, SB; Minasian, L; Sit, L; Chilukuri, R; Baumgartner, P; Rogak, L; Blauel, E; Abernethy, AP; Bruner, D
MLA Citation
Basch, EM, Reeve, BB, Mitchell, SA, Clauser, SB, Minasian, L, Sit, L, Chilukuri, R, Baumgartner, P, Rogak, L, Blauel, E, Abernethy, AP, and Bruner, D. "Electronic toxicity monitoring and patient-reported outcomes." Cancer journal (Sudbury, Mass.) 17.4 (July 2011): 231-234. (Review)
PMID
21799330
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Journal
Volume
17
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
231
End Page
234
DOI
10.1097/ppo.0b013e31822c28b3

Sexual functioning along the cancer continuum: focus group results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®).

OBJECTIVE: Cancer and treatments for cancer affect specific aspects of sexual functioning and intimacy; however, limited qualitative work has been done in diverse cancer populations. As part of an effort to improve measurement of self-reported sexual functioning, we explored the scope and importance of sexual functioning and intimacy to patients across cancer sites and along the continuum of care. METHODS: We conducted 16 diagnosis- and sex-specific focus groups with patients recruited from the Duke University tumor registry and oncology/hematology clinics (N=109). A trained note taker produced field notes summarizing the discussions. An independent auditor verified field notes against written transcripts. The content of the discussions was analyzed for major themes by two independent coders. RESULTS: Across all cancers, the most commonly discussed cancer- or treatment-related effects on sexual functioning and intimacy were fatigue, treatment-related hair loss, weight gain and organ loss or scarring. Additional barriers were unique to particular diagnoses, such as shortness of breath in lung cancer, gastrointestinal problems in colorectal cancers and incontinence in prostate cancer. Sexual functioning and intimacy were considered important to quality of life. While most effects of cancer were considered negative, many participants identified improvements to intimacy after cancer. CONCLUSION: Overall evaluations of satisfaction with sex life did not always correspond to specific aspects of functioning (e.g. erectile dysfunction), presenting a challenge to researchers aiming to measure sexual functioning as an outcome. Health-care providers should not assume that level of sexual impairment determines sexual satisfaction and should explore cancer patients' sexual concerns directly.

Authors
Flynn, KE; Jeffery, DD; Keefe, FJ; Porter, LS; Shelby, RA; Fawzy, MR; Gosselin, TK; Reeve, BB; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Jeffery, DD, Keefe, FJ, Porter, LS, Shelby, RA, Fawzy, MR, Gosselin, TK, Reeve, BB, and Weinfurt, KP. "Sexual functioning along the cancer continuum: focus group results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®)." Psychooncology 20.4 (April 2011): 378-386.
PMID
20878833
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
20
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
378
End Page
386
DOI
10.1002/pon.1738

Stakeholder perspectives on implementing the National Cancer Institute's patient-reported outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE).

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing a patient-reported version of its Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, called the "PRO-CTCAE." The PRO-CTCAE consists of a library of patient-reported items which can be administered in clinical trials to directly capture the patient experience of adverse events during cancer treatment, as well as a software platform for administering these items via computer or telephone. In order to better understand the impressions of stakeholders involved in cancer clinical research about the potential value of the PRO-CTCAE approach to capturing adverse event information in clinical research, as well as their perspectives about barriers and strategies for implementing the PRO-CTCAE in NCI-sponsored cancer trials, a survey was conducted. A survey including structured and open-ended questions was developed to elicit perceptions about the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) for adverse event reporting, and to explore logistical considerations for implementing the PRO-CTCAE in cancer trials. The survey was distributed electronically and by paper to a convenience sample of leadership and committee members in the NCI's cooperative group network, including principal investigators, clinical investigators, research nurses, data managers, patient advocates, and representatives of the NCI and Food and Drug Administration. Between October, 2008 through February, 2009, 727 surveys were collected. Most respondents (93%) agreed that patient reporting of adverse symptoms would be useful for improving understanding of the patient experience with treatment in cancer trials, and 88%, 80%, and 76%, respectively, endorsed that administration of PRO-CTCAE items in clinical trials would improve the completeness, accuracy, and efficiency of symptom data collection. More than three fourths believed that patient reports would be useful for informing treatment dose modifications and towards FDA regulatory evaluation of drugs. Eighty-eight percent felt that patients in clinical trials would be willing to self-report adverse symptoms at clinic visits via computer, and 68% felt patients would self-report weekly from home via the internet or an automated telephone system. Lack of computers and limited space and personnel were seen as potential barriers to in-clinic self-reporting, but these were judged to be surmountable with adequate funding. The PRO-CTCAE items and software are viewed by a majority of survey respondents as a means to improve adverse event data quality and comprehensiveness, enhance clinical decision-making, and foster patient-clinician communication. Research is ongoing to assess the measurement properties and feasibility of implementing this measure in cancer clinical trials.

Authors
Bruner, DW; Hanisch, LJ; Reeve, BB; Trotti, AM; Schrag, D; Sit, L; Mendoza, TR; Minasian, L; O'Mara, A; Denicoff, AM; Rowland, JH; Montello, M; Geoghegan, C; Abernethy, AP; Clauser, SB; Castro, K; Mitchell, SA; Burke, L; Trentacosti, AM; Basch, EM
MLA Citation
Bruner, DW, Hanisch, LJ, Reeve, BB, Trotti, AM, Schrag, D, Sit, L, Mendoza, TR, Minasian, L, O'Mara, A, Denicoff, AM, Rowland, JH, Montello, M, Geoghegan, C, Abernethy, AP, Clauser, SB, Castro, K, Mitchell, SA, Burke, L, Trentacosti, AM, and Basch, EM. "Stakeholder perspectives on implementing the National Cancer Institute's patient-reported outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)." Translational behavioral medicine 1.1 (March 2011): 110-122.
PMID
24073038
Source
epmc
Published In
Translational Behavioral Medicine
Volume
1
Issue
1
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
110
End Page
122
DOI
10.1007/s13142-011-0025-3

Perceived Barriers to Implementing the Patient-Reported Outcomes-Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Event (PRO-CTCAE) System in Cancer Clinical Trials

Authors
Bruner, DW; Hanisch, LJ; Reeve, BB; Minasian, LM; Rowland, JH; O'Mara, AM; Sit, L; Sloan, JA; Cleeland, CS; Denicoff, AM; Trimble, EL; Clauser, SB; Geoghegan, C; Paul, DB; Abernethy, AP; Schrag, D; Basch, EM
MLA Citation
Bruner, DW, Hanisch, LJ, Reeve, BB, Minasian, LM, Rowland, JH, O'Mara, AM, Sit, L, Sloan, JA, Cleeland, CS, Denicoff, AM, Trimble, EL, Clauser, SB, Geoghegan, C, Paul, DB, Abernethy, AP, Schrag, D, and Basch, EM. "Perceived Barriers to Implementing the Patient-Reported Outcomes-Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Event (PRO-CTCAE) System in Cancer Clinical Trials." October 2010.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
19
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
31
End Page
32

Progress on the PROMIS (R) Sexual Function Measure

Authors
Flynn, KE; Jeffery, DD; Reeve, BB; Lin, L; Smith, AW; Abernethy, A; Reese, J; Weinfurt, K
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Jeffery, DD, Reeve, BB, Lin, L, Smith, AW, Abernethy, A, Reese, J, and Weinfurt, K. "Progress on the PROMIS (R) Sexual Function Measure." QUALITY OF LIFE RESEARCH 19 (October 2010): 98-99.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
19
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
98
End Page
99

Sleep-wake functioning along the cancer continuum: focus group results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(®)).

OBJECTIVE: Cancer and its treatments disturb sleep-wake functioning; however, there is little information available on the characteristics and consequences of sleep problems associated with cancer. As part of an effort to improve measurement of sleep-wake functioning, we explored the scope of difficulties with sleep in a diverse group of patients diagnosed with cancer. METHODS: We conducted 10 focus groups with patients recruited from the Duke University tumor registry and oncology/hematology clinics. Separate groups were held with patients scheduled to begin or currently undergoing treatment for breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, hematological, and other cancer types and with patients who were in posttreatment follow-up. The content of the focus group discussions was transcribed and analyzed for major themes by independent coders. RESULTS: Participants not only reported causes of sleep disturbance common in other populations, such as pain and restless legs, but they also reported causes that may be unique to cancer populations, including abnormal dreams, anxiety about cancer diagnosis and recurrence, night sweats, and problems with sleep positioning. Many participants felt that sleep problems reduced their productivity, concentration, social interactions, and overall quality of life. Many also shared beliefs about the increased importance of sleep when fighting cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The findings underscore the need for interventions that minimize the negative impact of cancer and its treatments on sleep. This study will inform efforts now underway to develop a patient-reported measure of sleep-wake functioning that reflects the breadth of concepts considered important by patients with cancer.

Authors
Flynn, KE; Shelby, RA; Mitchell, SA; Fawzy, MR; Hardy, NC; Husain, AM; Keefe, FJ; Krystal, AD; Porter, LS; Reeve, BB; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Shelby, RA, Mitchell, SA, Fawzy, MR, Hardy, NC, Husain, AM, Keefe, FJ, Krystal, AD, Porter, LS, Reeve, BB, and Weinfurt, KP. "Sleep-wake functioning along the cancer continuum: focus group results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(®))." Psychooncology 19.10 (October 2010): 1086-1093.
PMID
20013938
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
19
Issue
10
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
1086
End Page
1093
DOI
10.1002/pon.1664

Development of the patient-reported version of the common terminology criteria for adverse events (PRO-CTCAE)

Authors
Basch, EM; Reeve, BB; Cleeland, CS; Sloan, JA; Mendoza, TR; Abemethy, AP; Bruner, D; Minasian, LM; Burke, LB; Schrag, D; Investigators, PRO-CTCAE
MLA Citation
Basch, EM, Reeve, BB, Cleeland, CS, Sloan, JA, Mendoza, TR, Abemethy, AP, Bruner, D, Minasian, LM, Burke, LB, Schrag, D, and Investigators, PRO-CTCAE. "Development of the patient-reported version of the common terminology criteria for adverse events (PRO-CTCAE)." May 20, 2010.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
28
Issue
15
Publish Date
2010

Refinement of the patient-reported outcomes version of the common terminology criteria for adverse events (PRO-CTCAE) via cognitive interviewing.

Authors
Hay, J; Atkinson, TM; Mendoza, TR; Reeve, BB; Willis, G; Gagne, JJ; Abernethy, AP; Cleeland, CS; Schrag, D; Basch, EM
MLA Citation
Hay, J, Atkinson, TM, Mendoza, TR, Reeve, BB, Willis, G, Gagne, JJ, Abernethy, AP, Cleeland, CS, Schrag, D, and Basch, EM. "Refinement of the patient-reported outcomes version of the common terminology criteria for adverse events (PRO-CTCAE) via cognitive interviewing." May 20, 2010.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
28
Issue
15
Publish Date
2010

An item response theory analysis of DSM-IV criteria for hallucinogen abuse and dependence in adolescents.

AIM: This study applied both item response theory (IRT) and multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) methods to evaluate item-level psychometric properties of diagnostic questions for hallucinogen use disorders (HUDs), differential item functioning (DIF), and predictors of latent HUD. METHODS: Data were drawn from 2004-2006 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Analyses were based on 1548 past-year hallucinogen users aged 12-17 years. Substance use and symptoms were assessed by audio computer-assisted self-interviewing methods. RESULTS: Abuse and dependence criteria empirically were arrayed along a single continuum of severity. All abuse criteria indicated middle-to-high severity on the IRT-defined HUD continuum, while dependence criteria captured a wider range from the lowest (tolerance and time spent) to the highest (taking larger amounts and inability to cut down) severity levels. There was indication of DIF by hallucinogen users' age, gender, race/ethnicity, and ecstasy use status. Adjusting for DIF, ecstasy users (vs. non-ecstasy hallucinogen users), females (vs. males), and whites (vs. Hispanics) exhibited increased odds of HUD. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of hallucinogen abuse and dependence empirically do not reflect two discrete conditions in adolescents. Trends and problems related to hallucinogen use among girls and whites should be examined further to inform the designs of effective gender-appropriate and culturally sensitive prevention programs.

Authors
Wu, L-T; Pan, J-J; Yang, C; Reeve, BB; Blazer, DG
MLA Citation
Wu, L-T, Pan, J-J, Yang, C, Reeve, BB, and Blazer, DG. "An item response theory analysis of DSM-IV criteria for hallucinogen abuse and dependence in adolescents." Addict Behav 35.3 (March 2010): 273-277.
PMID
19896773
Source
pubmed
Published In
Addictive Behaviors
Volume
35
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
273
End Page
277
DOI
10.1016/j.addbeh.2009.10.009

Using cognitive interviews to evaluate items for measuring sexual functioning across cancer populations: improvements and remaining challenges.

One goal of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is to develop a measure of sexual functioning that broadens the definition of sexual activity and incorporates items that reflect constructs identified as important by patients with cancer. We describe how cognitive interviews improved the quality of the items and discuss remaining challenges to assessing sexual functioning in research with cancer populations.We conducted 39 cognitive interviews of patients with cancer and survivors on the topic of sexual experience. Each of the 83 candidate items was seen by 5-24 participants. Participants included both men and women and varied by cancer type, treatment trajectory, race, and literacy level. Significantly revised items were retested in subsequent interviews.Cognitive interviews provided useful feedback about the relevance, sensitivity, appropriateness, and clarity of the items. Participants identified broad terms (e.g., "sex life") to assess sexual experience and exposed the challenges of measuring sexual functioning consistently, considering both adjusted and unadjusted sexual experiences.Cognitive interviews were critical for item refinement in the development of the PROMIS measure of sexual function. Efforts are underway to validate the measure in larger cancer populations.

Authors
Fortune-Greeley, AK; Flynn, KE; Jeffery, DD; Williams, MS; Keefe, FJ; Reeve, BB; Willis, GB; Weinfurt, KP; PROMIS Sexual Function Domain Committee,
MLA Citation
Fortune-Greeley, AK, Flynn, KE, Jeffery, DD, Williams, MS, Keefe, FJ, Reeve, BB, Willis, GB, Weinfurt, KP, and PROMIS Sexual Function Domain Committee, . "Using cognitive interviews to evaluate items for measuring sexual functioning across cancer populations: improvements and remaining challenges." Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation 18.8 (October 2009): 1085-1093.
PMID
19672697
Source
epmc
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
18
Issue
8
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1085
End Page
1093
DOI
10.1007/s11136-009-9523-x

Construct and differential item functioning in the assessment of prescription opioid use disorders among American adolescents.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties of diagnostic criteria for prescription analgesic opioid use disorders (OUDs) and to identify background predictors of a latent continuum for OUD liability. METHOD: Data were drawn from the adolescent sample of the 2006 National Survey of Drug Use and Health. Item response theory (IRT) and multiple indicators-multiple causes methods were used to examine DSM-IV criteria for OUDs in a subsample of adolescents who reported nonmedical prescription opioid use in the past year (N = 1,290). RESULTS: Among nonmedical users of prescription opioids, the criteria of OUDs were arrayed along a single continuum of severity. All abuse criteria were endorsed at a severity level higher than D1 (tolerance) and D5 (time spent) but lower than D3 (taking larger amounts) and D4 (inability to cut down). Differential item functioning in reports of dependence symptoms across adolescents' sex and race/ethnicity were identified: withdrawal, time spent, and continued use despite medical or psychological problems. Adjusting for the effects of differential item functioning and the demographic variables examined, female subjects were more likely than male subjects to exhibit a higher level of OUD liability. CONCLUSIONS: Study findings do not support the DSM-IV's current hierarchical distinction between abuse of and dependence on prescription opioids. Abuse symptoms in adolescents are not necessarily less severe than those of dependence. There is evidence of some differential item functioning in the assessment of OUDs.

Authors
Wu, L-T; Ringwalt, CL; Yang, C; Reeve, BB; Pan, J-J; Blazer, DG
MLA Citation
Wu, L-T, Ringwalt, CL, Yang, C, Reeve, BB, Pan, J-J, and Blazer, DG. "Construct and differential item functioning in the assessment of prescription opioid use disorders among American adolescents." J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 48.5 (May 2009): 563-572.
PMID
19318987
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume
48
Issue
5
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
563
End Page
572
DOI
10.1097/CHI.0b013e31819e3f45

Initial report of the cancer Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) sexual function committee: review of sexual function measures and domains used in oncology.

For this report, the authors described the initial activities of the Cancer Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-Sexual Function domain group, which is part of the National Institutes of Health Roadmap Initiative to develop brief questionnaires or individually tailored assessments of quality-of-life domains. Presented are a literature review of sexual function measures used in cancer populations and descriptions of the domains found in those measures. By using a consensus-driven approach, an electronic bibliographic search was conducted for articles that were published from 1991 to 2007, and 486 articles were identified for in-depth review. In total, 257 articles reported the administration of a psychometrically evaluated sexual function measure to individuals who were diagnosed with cancer. Apart from the University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index, the International Index of Erectile Function, and the Female Sexual Function Index, the 31 identified measures have not been tested widely in cancer populations. Most measures were multidimensional and included domains related to the sexual response cycle and to general sexual satisfaction. The current review supports the need for a flexible, psychometrically robust measure of sexual function for use in oncology settings and strongly justifies the development of the PROMIS-Sexual Function instrument. When the PROMIS-Sexual Function instrument is available publicly, cancer clinicians and researchers will have another measure with which to assess patient-reported sexual function outcomes in addition to the few legacy measures that were identified through this review.

Authors
Jeffery, DD; Tzeng, JP; Keefe, FJ; Porter, LS; Hahn, EA; Flynn, KE; Reeve, BB; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Jeffery, DD, Tzeng, JP, Keefe, FJ, Porter, LS, Hahn, EA, Flynn, KE, Reeve, BB, and Weinfurt, KP. "Initial report of the cancer Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) sexual function committee: review of sexual function measures and domains used in oncology." Cancer 115.6 (March 2009): 1142-1153. (Review)
PMID
19195044
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer
Volume
115
Issue
6
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
1142
End Page
1153
DOI
10.1002/cncr.24134

The patient reported outcomes measurement information system-Cancer (PROMIS-Ca): Cancer-specific application of a generic fatigue measure

Authors
Cella, D; Lai, J; Garcia, SF; Reeve, BB; Weinfurt, KP; George, J; Stone, A
MLA Citation
Cella, D, Lai, J, Garcia, SF, Reeve, BB, Weinfurt, KP, George, J, and Stone, A. "The patient reported outcomes measurement information system-Cancer (PROMIS-Ca): Cancer-specific application of a generic fatigue measure." JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY 26.15 (May 20, 2008).
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
26
Issue
15
Publish Date
2008

The patient reported outcomes measurement information system-Cancer (PROMIS-Ca): Cancer-specific application of a generic fatigue measure.

6537 Background: PROMIS-Ca is a cancer-specific extension of an NIH Roadmap effort to standardize measures of self-reported symptoms (pain; fatigue; anxiety; depression), physical function, and social function ( http://www.nihpromis.org ). PROMIS provides item banks that support brief-yet-precise computerized adaptive testing and multiple short form options. PROMIS-Ca extends PROMIS to oncology by ensuring the cancer-relevance and performance of its generic item banks. To illustrate, we customized the PROMIS Fatigue item bank to cancer and developed a link ("cross-walk") between the generic PROMIS-Fatigue and the cancer-specific PROMIS-Ca Fatigue banks. METHODS: We first calibrated a 95-item PROMIS Fatigue bank on a sample of 803 people representative of the US general population, with norms set on a T distribution (M=50; SD=10). The 72-item PROMIS-Ca Fatigue bank contains 56 calibrated items from the generic PROMIS Fatigue bank. Its psychometric properties were evaluated on a second sample of 513 cancer patients (72% female, 81% White, mean age=56, mean time since diagnosis=4.1 years). Analyses included item scalability, dimensionality, and IRT model fit. Using general population calibration data, we examined differential item functioning (DIF) between PROMIS-Ca Fatigue and PROMIS Fatigue banks. A cross- walk between these banks was established by equating item parameters using non-DIF items via the Stocking-Lord method. RESULTS: All pre-set analysis criteria were met by 54 items; however, 6 showed DIF between PROMIS and PROMIS-Ca. Stocking-Lord results (using 48 non-DIF items) showed that the cancer sample was slightly more homogeneous and reported more severe fatigue (T-score=53.3) compared to norms. Thus, a fatigue continuum was built by equating item parameters from PROMIS and PROMIS-Ca Fatigue banks. CONCLUSIONS: Comparable item parameters between PROMIS and PROMIS-Ca Fatigue banks provide cross-walk information that enables one to measure fatigue with questions relevant to oncology, and compare their fatigue results to the general US population. Further research in this area will enable comparisons across multiple diseases. No significant financial relationships to disclose.

Authors
Cella, D; Lai, J; Garcia, SF; Reeve, BB; Weinfurt, KP; George, J; Stone, A
MLA Citation
Cella, D, Lai, J, Garcia, SF, Reeve, BB, Weinfurt, KP, George, J, and Stone, A. "The patient reported outcomes measurement information system-Cancer (PROMIS-Ca): Cancer-specific application of a generic fatigue measure." J Clin Oncol 26.15_suppl (May 20, 2008): 6537-.
PMID
27949925
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
26
Issue
15_suppl
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
6537

Sleep/wake functioning during and following cancer

Authors
Flynn, KE; Shelby, R; Krystal, A; Reeve, BB; Mitchell, S; Buysse, D; Keefe, F; Weinfurt, KP; Subc, PROMISSWF
MLA Citation
Flynn, KE, Shelby, R, Krystal, A, Reeve, BB, Mitchell, S, Buysse, D, Keefe, F, Weinfurt, KP, and Subc, PROMISSWF. "Sleep/wake functioning during and following cancer." 2008.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Sleep
Volume
31
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
A298
End Page
A298

Standardizing patient-reported outcomes assessment in cancer clinical trials: a patient-reported outcomes measurement information system initiative.

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as symptom scales or more broad-based health-related quality-of-life measures, play an important role in oncology clinical trials. They frequently are used to help evaluate cancer treatments, as well as for supportive and palliative oncology care. To be most beneficial, these PROs must be relevant to patients and clinicians, valid, and easily understood and interpreted. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Network, part of the National Institutes of Health Roadmap Initiative, aims to improve appreciably how PROs are selected and assessed in clinical research, including clinical trials. PROMIS is establishing a publicly available resource of standardized, accurate, and efficient PRO measures of major self-reported health domains (eg, pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical function, social function) that are relevant across chronic illnesses including cancer. PROMIS is also developing measures of self-reported health domains specifically targeted to cancer, such as sleep/wake function, sexual function, cognitive function, and the psychosocial impacts of the illness experience (ie, stress response and coping; shifts in self-concept, social interactions, and spirituality). We outline the qualitative and quantitative methods by which PROMIS measures are being developed and adapted for use in clinical oncology research. At the core of this activity is the formation and application of item banks using item response theory modeling. We also present our work in the fatigue domain, including a short-form measure, as a sample of PROMIS methodology and work to date. Plans for future validation and application of PROMIS measures are discussed.

Authors
Garcia, SF; Cella, D; Clauser, SB; Flynn, KE; Lad, T; Lai, J-S; Reeve, BB; Smith, AW; Stone, AA; Weinfurt, K
MLA Citation
Garcia, SF, Cella, D, Clauser, SB, Flynn, KE, Lad, T, Lai, J-S, Reeve, BB, Smith, AW, Stone, AA, and Weinfurt, K. "Standardizing patient-reported outcomes assessment in cancer clinical trials: a patient-reported outcomes measurement information system initiative." Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 25.32 (November 2007): 5106-5112. (Review)
PMID
17991929
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
25
Issue
32
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
5106
End Page
5112
DOI
10.1200/jco.2007.12.2341

The sexual function domain of the NIHPROMIS: Preliminary report

Authors
Jeffery, DD; Reeve, BB; Tzeng, J; Weinfurt, KP; Flynn, KE; Keefe, FJ; Porter, LS; Hahn, EA; Cella, D
MLA Citation
Jeffery, DD, Reeve, BB, Tzeng, J, Weinfurt, KP, Flynn, KE, Keefe, FJ, Porter, LS, Hahn, EA, and Cella, D. "The sexual function domain of the NIHPROMIS: Preliminary report." PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY 16.9 (September 2007): S233-S233.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
16
Issue
9
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
S233
End Page
S233
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