You are here

Rein, Lindsay Anne Magura

Positions:

Medical Instructor in the Department of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2008

M.D. — University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Grants:

B-arrestin2 and the disease course of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)

Administered By
Medicine, Hematological Malignancies
AwardedBy
American Society of Hematology
Role
PI-Fellow
Start Date
July 01, 2014
End Date
June 30, 2015

Publications:

WT1 vaccination in acute myeloid leukemia: new methods of implementing adoptive immunotherapy.

INTRODUCTION: The Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene was originally identified as a tumor suppressor gene that, when mutated, would lead to the development of pediatric renal tumors. More recently, it has been determined that WT1 is overexpressed in 90% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is mutated in approximately 10% of AML patients. WT1 plays a role in normal hematopoiesis and, in AML specifically, it has oncogenic function and plays an important role in cellular proliferation and differentiation. The ubiquity of WT1 in leukemia has lead to the development of vaccines aimed at employing the host immune system to mount a T-cell response to a known antigen. AREAS COVERED: In this evaluation, the authors discuss the role of WT1 in normal hematopoiesis as well as in the development of hematologic malignancies. Furthermore, the authors discuss the data supporting the development of WT1 vaccines, and the clinical trials supporting their use in patients with acute leukemia. EXPERT OPINION: Several small trials have been conducted which support the safety and efficacy of this therapy, although larger trials are certainly warranted. In the authors' opinion, the WT1 vaccination has potential in terms of its application as an adjuvant therapy for patients with AML who are at high risk of relapse or who have detectable minimal residual disease after initial standard therapy.

Authors
Rein, LAM; Chao, NJ
MLA Citation
Rein, LAM, and Chao, NJ. "WT1 vaccination in acute myeloid leukemia: new methods of implementing adoptive immunotherapy." Expert opinion on investigational drugs 23.3 (March 2014): 417-426. (Review)
PMID
24521058
Source
epmc
Published In
Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs
Volume
23
Issue
3
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
417
End Page
426
DOI
10.1517/13543784.2014.889114

Statin use and need for therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Authors
Friedman, DR; Magura, LA; Warren, HAC; Harrison, JD; Diehl, LF; Weinberg, JB
MLA Citation
Friedman, DR, Magura, LA, Warren, HAC, Harrison, JD, Diehl, LF, and Weinberg, JB. "Statin use and need for therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia." Leukemia and Lymphoma 51.12 (2010): 2295-2298.
PMID
20929315
Source
scival
Published In
Leukemia & Lymphoma (Informa)
Volume
51
Issue
12
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
2295
End Page
2298
DOI
10.3109/10428194.2010.520050

Hypercholesterolemia and prostate cancer: a hospital-based case-control study.

OBJECTIVE: High levels of serum cholesterol have been proposed to increase the risk of prostate cancer but the epidemiologic evidence is limited. METHODS: We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Fargo, ND, USA, to examine the association between hypercholesterolemia and prostate cancer. Cases were men with incident, histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Controls were men without clinical cancer who were seen at the same hospital for an annual physical exam. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from patients' medical charts. RESULTS: From a patient population aged 50 to 74 years old, we obtained data on 312 White cases and 319 White controls. Hypercholesterolemia was defined as total cholesterol greater than 5.17 (mmol/l). Univariate logistic regression showed a significant association between hypercholesterolemia and prostate cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19-2.27). This association changed only slightly after adjustment for age, family history of prostate cancer, body mass index, type 2 diabetes, smoking, and multivitamin use (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.11-2.24). A significant association was found between low HDL and prostate cancer (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.04-2.36). High LDL was associated with a 60% increased risk for prostate cancer (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.09-2.34). Compared to never smokers, current smokers had an 84% increased risk for prostate cancer (OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.09-3.13). CONCLUSION: This study adds to recent evidence that hypercholesterolemia may increase the risk of prostate cancer in white men.

Authors
Magura, L; Blanchard, R; Hope, B; Beal, JR; Schwartz, GG; Sahmoun, AE
MLA Citation
Magura, L, Blanchard, R, Hope, B, Beal, JR, Schwartz, GG, and Sahmoun, AE. "Hypercholesterolemia and prostate cancer: a hospital-based case-control study." Cancer causes & control : CCC 19.10 (December 2008): 1259-1266.
PMID
18704722
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Causes & Control
Volume
19
Issue
10
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
1259
End Page
1266
DOI
10.1007/s10552-008-9197-7