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Rimer, Barbara K.

Overview:

Dr. Rimer is a behavioral scientist whose research focuses on several areas, including smoking cessation, breast and cervical screening, and dissemination of medical innovations. In a research track that has evolved over the last ten years, she demonstrated that even when the economic barriers to cancer screening are removed, other psychosocial and access barriers remain. Much of the subsequent research has focused on developing and testing behavioral interventions for overcoming barriers to participation in screening. This work has been funded by the NCI and NIA. Most particularly, Dr. Rimer and her colleagues demonstrated that telephone counseling can triple the odds that women who were previously non-adherent will obtain mammograms. She is currently funded to study strategies for increasing adherence to cancer screening among women in community health centers and managed care settings.

Some of Dr. Rimer's research focuses on developing and testing counseling strategies for women who are at high risk for breast cancer.

Dr. Rimer was the first researcher to develop a behavioral intervention directed at older smokers. She and her colleagues demonstrated that older smokers who received tailored smoking cessation materials were twice as likely to quit as those who received generic materials.

Positions:

Adjunct Professor in Community and Family Medicine

Community and Family Medicine, Prevention Research
School of Medicine

Director of Cancer Control, CCC

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 1970

B.A. — University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

M.P.H. 1973

M.P.H. — University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

DrPH 1981

DrPH — Johns Hopkins University

Grants:

Using Tailored Messages To Improve Colorectal Screening

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 1997
End Date
June 30, 1999

Improving Cancer Risk Communication

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1996
End Date
May 31, 1999

Cancer Information Service

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
May 15, 1994
End Date
May 15, 1999

Cancer Center Core Support Grant

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 01, 1976
End Date
December 31, 1998

Comprehensive Cancer Center Core Support Grant

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 01, 1976
End Date
December 31, 1998

Spore In Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1995
End Date
August 31, 1998

Spore In Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1995
End Date
August 31, 1998

Spore In Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1995
End Date
August 31, 1998

Increasing Breast Cancer Screening Among Nonadherent Women

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1993
End Date
August 31, 1998

Increasing Breast Screening Among Nonadherant Women

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1993
End Date
July 31, 1998

Increasing Breast Screening Among Nonadherent Women

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1993
End Date
July 31, 1998

Clinical Practice Guidelines On Chronic Pain: Headache

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 29, 1994
End Date
June 30, 1998

Enhancing Cancer Control In A Community Health Center

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 1993
End Date
December 31, 1997

Cancer Information Service

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
May 15, 1993
End Date
October 14, 1997

Cancer Information Service

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
May 15, 1993
End Date
October 14, 1997

Tailored Information Materials About Brca1 Testing

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1995
End Date
September 29, 1997

Exploratory Center Grants For Research On Health Promotion

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1993
End Date
August 31, 1996

Exploratory Center For Research On Health Promotion

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
September 30, 1993
End Date
August 31, 1995

N C Breast Cancer Summit

Administered By
Community and Family Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
January 15, 1992
End Date
January 14, 1993
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Publications:

Effects of a mammography decision-making intervention at 12 and 24 months.

BACKGROUND: Most women are not getting regular mammograms, and there is confusion about several mammography-related issues, including the age at which women should begin screening. Numerous groups have called for informed decision making about mammography, but few programs have resulted. Our research is intended to fill this gap. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial, which ran from 1997 to 2000. Women aged 40 to 44 and 50 to 54, who were enrolled in Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina, were randomly assigned to one of three groups: usual care (UC), tailored print (TP) materials, or TP plus tailored telephone counseling (TP+TC). We assessed the impact of tailored interventions on knowledge about breast cancer and mammography, accuracy of breast cancer risk perceptions, and use of mammography at two time points after intervention-12 and 24 months. RESULTS: At 12 and 24 months, women who received TP+TC had significantly greater knowledge and more accurate breast cancer risk perceptions. Compared to UC, they were 40% more likely to have had mammograms (odds ratio=0.9-2.1). The effect was primarily for women in their 50s. TP had significant effects for knowledge and accuracy, but women who received TP were less likely to have had mammography. CONCLUSIONS: Decision-making interventions, comprised of two tailored print interventions (booklet and newsletter), delivered a year apart, with or without two tailored telephone calls, significantly increased knowledge and accuracy of perceived breast cancer risk at 12 and 24 months post-intervention. The effect on mammography use was significant in bivariate relationships but had a much more modest impact in multivariate analyses.

Authors
Rimer, BK; Halabi, S; Sugg Skinner, C; Lipkus, IM; Strigo, TS; Kaplan, EB; Samsa, GP
MLA Citation
Rimer, BK, Halabi, S, Sugg Skinner, C, Lipkus, IM, Strigo, TS, Kaplan, EB, and Samsa, GP. "Effects of a mammography decision-making intervention at 12 and 24 months." Am J Prev Med 22.4 (May 2002): 247-257.
PMID
11988381
Source
pubmed
Published In
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume
22
Issue
4
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
247
End Page
257

The short-term impact of tailored mammography decision-making interventions.

BACKGROUND: We assessed the short-term impact of decision-making interventions on knowledge about mammography, accuracy of women's breast cancer risk perceptions, attitudes toward mammography, satisfaction with decisions, and mammography use since the intervention. METHODS: The study was conducted among women who were members of Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina and were in their 40s or 50s at the time the study began in 1997. Women were randomly assigned to usual care (UC), tailored print booklets (TP) alone, or TP plus telephone counseling (TP+TC ). RESULTS: 12-month interviews were completed by 1127 women to assess short-term intervention effects. Generally, women who received TP+TC were significantly more knowledgeable about mammography and breast cancer risk and were more accurate in their breast cancer risk perceptions than women in the TP and UC groups. They also were more likely to have had a mammogram since the baseline interview. In multivariable analyses, we found significant benefits of the combination of TP+TC compared to TP and to UC for knowledge, accuracy of risk perceptions, and mammography use. DISCUSSION: For complex decision-making tasks, such as women's decisions about mammography in the face of controversy, the combination of TP and TC may be more effective than TP alone, and certainly more effective than UC. It is critical that investigators determine the topics for which TP is appropriate and the situations that require additional supportive interventions.

Authors
Rimer, BK; Halabi, S; Sugg Skinner, C; Kaplan, EB; Crawford, Y; Samsa, GP; Strigo, TS; Lipkus, IM
MLA Citation
Rimer, BK, Halabi, S, Sugg Skinner, C, Kaplan, EB, Crawford, Y, Samsa, GP, Strigo, TS, and Lipkus, IM. "The short-term impact of tailored mammography decision-making interventions." Patient Educ Couns 43.3 (June 2001): 269-285.
PMID
11384825
Source
pubmed
Published In
Patient Education and Counseling
Volume
43
Issue
3
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
269
End Page
285

Searching for evidence about health education and health behavior interventions.

Evidence is fundamental to science, but finding the right evidence in health education and health behavior (HEHB) is often a challenge. The authors discuss some of the controversies about the types of evidence that should be considered acceptable in HEHB, the tension between the use of qualitative versus quantitative data, the need for measures of important but neglected constructs, and interpretation of data from experimental and nonexperimental research. This article discusses some of the challenges to the use of evidence and describes a number of strategies and some forces encouraging the use of evidence-based interventions. Finally, the authors suggest ways to improve the practice and dissemination of evidence-based HEHB. Ultimately, if evidence-based interventions are not disseminated, the interventions will not achieve their potential. The goal should be to develop more effective interventions and disseminate them to improve the public's health.

Authors
Rimer, BK; Glanz, K; Rasband, G
MLA Citation
Rimer, BK, Glanz, K, and Rasband, G. "Searching for evidence about health education and health behavior interventions." Health education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education 28.2 (April 2001): 231-248.
PMID
11265831
Source
epmc
Published In
Health Education & Behavior
Volume
28
Issue
2
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
231
End Page
248
DOI
10.1177/109019810102800208

Use of multiple media and breast cancer screening: an introduction.

Authors
Rimer, BK
MLA Citation
Rimer, BK. "Use of multiple media and breast cancer screening: an introduction." Journal of health communication 5.2 (April 2000): 113-116.
PMID
11010344
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Health Communication
Volume
5
Issue
2
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
113
End Page
116
DOI
10.1080/108107300406848

Cancer control research 2001.

OBJECTIVES: Major societal changes, including the changing demographics of US society and the genetics and communications revolutions, are providing new opportunities to control cancer both in the United States and around the world. This article examines the implications of these trends and other issues in the context of cancer control research. A seven-item strategy for cancer control research is proposed. RESULTS: Epidemiology, statistics, genetics, and bio-behavioral research are central disciplines for cancer control research. The identification of particular at-risk populations is increasingly possible. Cancer control research must focus on increasing fundamental knowledge in order to accelerate improvements in cancer prevention and early detection. Cancer control research also must be used to conduct trials of new cancer detection methods, overcome differential participation in cancer screening, develop evidence-based strategies to improve decision-making, and develop evidence-based cancer communications. A comprehensive cancer surveillance system is the foundation for cancer control research. Cancer control research must aim to reduce cancer risk, incidence, and mortality, and improve quality of life. These are important challenges for the new millennium.

Authors
Rimer, BK
MLA Citation
Rimer, BK. "Cancer control research 2001." Cancer causes & control : CCC 11.3 (March 2000): 257-270.
PMID
10782660
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Causes & Control
Volume
11
Issue
3
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
257
End Page
270
DOI
10.1023/a:1008953206396

Is there a use for tailored print communications in cancer risk communication?

The manner of presentation of cancer risk information is critical to its understanding and acceptance by the individual recipient. Optimal communication of cancer risk information must effectively translate the technical meaning and subtleties of risk and its associated factors to a conceptual level understandable by the recipient. Tailored print communications (TPCs) may be an appropriate medium for cancer risk communication (CRC). TPCs are more refined than targeted communication materials. They are print materials created especially for an individual on the basis of knowledge about that person. The goal is to provide individually relevant and appropriate information. This review examines the nature of TPCs, assesses the use and potential of TPCs for the purpose of CRC, and highlights new directions in CRC. Articles dealing with TPCs were located by searching the MEDLINE(R) and PsychInfo(R) databases and seeking in-press articles. TPCs were identified for several areas of CRC, including dietary change, smoking cessation, mammography use, hormone replacement therapy, health risk appraisal, and genetic susceptibility to cancer. Although TPCs have been used in a number of different behavioral areas, they have not yet achieved their potential for CRC. The use of TPCs in the communication of cancer risk shows great promise, however, particularly as knowledge evolves regarding both the nature of risk and the most effective tailoring of health communication messages.

Authors
Rimer, BK; Glassman, B
MLA Citation
Rimer, BK, and Glassman, B. "Is there a use for tailored print communications in cancer risk communication?." Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs 25 (January 1999): 140-148.
PMID
10854470
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs
Issue
25
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
140
End Page
148
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