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Rodgers, Cheryl C

Overview:

Dr. Cheryl Rodgers, who joined the DUSON faculty in 2013, has extensive clinical and research experience among pediatric bone marrow transplant patients. She is doubly certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and Pediatric Oncology Nurse. Dr. Rodgers earned her BSN from the University of Nebraska Medical Center in 1989, her MSN from the University of Texas Houston Health Science Center in 2000; and her PhD from Texas Woman’s University in 2009. Her dissertation focused on exploring the symptom experiences of children and adolescents during their bone marrow transplant recovery. During a three-year post-doctoral fellowship (NIH-NCI, K12CA090433-09, Pediatric Oncology Clinical Research Faculty Fellowship) at Baylor College of Medicine, she developed and evaluated an early symptom management intervention for adolescent bone marrow transplant patients. She will continue to develop her program of research focused on expanding symptom experience knowledge and exploring symptom management strategies.


Dr. Rodgers has served as a manuscript reviewer for pediatric and oncology journals and is a member of the Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing Editorial Board. She currently serves as a Board Member for the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation.

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S.N. 2000

M.S.N. — University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Ph.D. 2009

Ph.D. — Texas Womans University

Grants:

A Nurse-Led Parent Educational Discharge Support Strategies (PEDSS) for Children Newly Diagnosed with Cancer

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2017
End Date
June 30, 2020

Phenotype-Genotype Associations with Symptoms During Childhood Leukemia Treatment

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
September 20, 2012
End Date
July 31, 2018

Symptom Patterns and Resource Utilization among Pediatric Patients during Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recovery

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Alex's Lemonade Stand
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
January 15, 2015
End Date
January 14, 2018

Understanding Effective Delivery of Patient/Family Education in Pediatric Oncology

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
April 01, 2014
End Date
February 28, 2017
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Publications:

Palliative care: Improving nursing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors

© 2017, Oncology Nursing Society. All rights reserved. BACKGROUND: Oncology nurses affect patient care at every point along the cancer journey. This creates the perfect opportunity to educate patients and caregivers about palliative care early and often throughout treatment. However, healthcare providers frequently do not have the knowledge and confidence to engage in meaningful conversations about palliative care. OBJECTIVES: The specific aims were to improve oncology nurses’ palliative care knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors by providing a palliative care nursing education program. An additional aim was to increase the number of conversations with patients and families about palliative care. METHODS: This project had a pre-/post-test design to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors at baseline and one month after implementation of an established education curriculum. The teaching strategy included one four-hour class for oncology RNs with topics about the definition of palliative care, pain and symptom management, and how to have palliative care conversations. FINDINGS: Results showed a statistically significant difference after the educational intervention for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The number of conversations with patients and caregivers about palliative and end-of-life care increased significantly.

Authors
Harden, K; Price, D; Duffy, E; Galunas, L; Rodgers, C
MLA Citation
Harden, K, Price, D, Duffy, E, Galunas, L, and Rodgers, C. "Palliative care: Improving nursing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors." Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing 21.5 (October 1, 2017): E232-E238.
Source
scopus
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
21
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
E232
End Page
E238
DOI
10.1188/17.CJON.E232-E238

Symptom Trajectories in Children Receiving Treatment for Leukemia: A Latent Class Growth Analysis With Multitrajectory Modeling.

Cancer treatment symptoms play a major role in determining the health of children with cancer. Symptom toxicity often results in complications, treatment delays, and therapy dose reductions that can compromise leukemia therapy and jeopardize chances for long-term survival. Critical to understanding symptom experiences during treatment is the need for exploration of "why" inter-individual symptom differences occur; this will determine who may be most susceptible to treatment toxicities.This study examined specific symptom trajectories during the first 18 months of childhood leukemia treatment. Symptom measures included fatigue, sleep disturbances, pain, nausea, and depression.Symptom trajectories of 236 children with leukemia three to 18 years old were explored prospectively over four periods: initiation of post-induction therapy, four and eight post-induction therapy, and the last time point was at the beginning of maintenance/continuation therapy. Latent class growth analysis was used to classify patients into distinctive groups with similar symptom trajectories based on patients' response patterns on the symptom measures over time.Three latent classes of symptom trajectories were identified and classified into mild, moderate, and severe symptom trajectories. The only demographic characteristic with a significant relationship to membership in the latent class symptom trajectories was race/ethnicity. All other demographic characteristics including leukemia risk levels showed no significant relationships.This study is unique in that groups of patients with similar symptoms were identified rather than groups of symptoms. Further research using latent class growth analysis is needed.

Authors
Hockenberry, MJ; Hooke, MC; Rodgers, C; Taylor, O; Koerner, KM; Mitby, P; Moore, I; Scheurer, ME; Pan, W
MLA Citation
Hockenberry, MJ, Hooke, MC, Rodgers, C, Taylor, O, Koerner, KM, Mitby, P, Moore, I, Scheurer, ME, and Pan, W. "Symptom Trajectories in Children Receiving Treatment for Leukemia: A Latent Class Growth Analysis With Multitrajectory Modeling." Journal of pain and symptom management 54.1 (July 2017): 1-8.
PMID
28433546
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume
54
Issue
1
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
1
End Page
8
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2017.03.002

Pilot Study of Parent Psychophysiologic Outcomes in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Parents of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at risk for psychological distress. This distress may result in aberrant immune, inflammatory, or endocrine effects. These physiologic outcomes have not been reported previously.The aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of longitudinal testing of psychophysiological parameters of stress in parents of children undergoing HSCT.This pilot study was conducted at a large children's hospital in the Midwest and included parents of children who received autologous or allogeneic HSCT. Time points included before the start of HSCT conditioning and day +30, +60, and +100. Outcome variables included parent-perceived stress, lymphocyte subsets, C-reactive protein (CRP), proinflammatory cytokines, salivary cortisol, and salivary amylase. Effect sizes were calculated for each outcome.Twelve parent-child dyads were enrolled (10 mothers, 2 fathers). Missing data were minimal. Parent-perceived stress significantly increased from pre-HSCT through day +100, and parent CD3+ T-lymphocyte counts decreased from pre-HSCT through day +100. No significant effects were observed for salivary studies, CRP, or proinflammatory cytokines. Effect sizes ranged from 1.23 (perceived stress) to 0.07 (CRP).The results of this study suggest that it is feasible longitudinally measure parent psychophysiologic outcomes in the pediatric HSCT setting. In addition, parent-perceived stress increased linearly from start of conditioning through day +100, whereas parent T-lymphocyte counts decreased concurrently.Routine psychological and physical health screening of parents of children undergoing HSCT is needed. Multidisciplinary psychosocial support services should be offered to parents at regular intervals during their child's HSCT.

Authors
Ward, J; Swanson, B; Fogg, L; Rodgers, C
MLA Citation
Ward, J, Swanson, B, Fogg, L, and Rodgers, C. "Pilot Study of Parent Psychophysiologic Outcomes in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation." Cancer nursing 40.3 (May 2017): E48-E57.
PMID
27257801
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
40
Issue
3
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
E48
End Page
E57
DOI
10.1097/ncc.0000000000000394

Reducing Surgery Cancellations at a Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery Center.

Surgery cancellations are costly and can be frustrating for patients, their families, and the surgical team. Because of the inherent nature of an ambulatory surgery center, which only performs scheduled elective procedures, surgical cancellations typically result in wasted time and resources. Pediatric surgery cancellations can be mitigated with proper preoperative screening and communication between nurses and patients' guardians. To reduce the rate of cancellation at our pediatric ambulatory surgery center, we implemented a Nurse-Patient Preoperative Call Log. Preoperative nurses called patients or their guardians on two separate occasions during the two weeks before surgery to review health history and instructions and answer questions about the upcoming surgery. Three months after implementing the call log, surgery cancellation rates significantly decreased from 16.8% to 8.8% (P < .05). Nurses used the call log for all patients, with 85.6% of patients receiving two calls in the two weeks before their surgery.

Authors
Lee, CM; Rodgers, C; Oh, AK; Muckler, VC
MLA Citation
Lee, CM, Rodgers, C, Oh, AK, and Muckler, VC. "Reducing Surgery Cancellations at a Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery Center." AORN journal 105.4 (April 2017): 384-391.
PMID
28336027
Source
epmc
Published In
AORN Journal
Volume
105
Issue
4
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
384
End Page
391
DOI
10.1016/j.aorn.2017.01.011

Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients.

There is a paucity of data to support evidence-based practices in the provision of patient/family education in the context of a new childhood cancer diagnosis. Since the majority of children with cancer are treated on pediatric oncology clinical trials, lack of effective patient/family education has the potential to negatively affect both patient and clinical trial outcomes. The Children's Oncology Group Nursing Discipline convened an interprofessional expert panel from within and beyond pediatric oncology to review available and emerging evidence and develop expert consensus recommendations regarding harmonization of patient/family education practices for newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients across institutions. Five broad principles, with associated recommendations, were identified by the panel, including recognition that (1) in pediatric oncology, patient/family education is family-centered; (2) a diagnosis of childhood cancer is overwhelming and the family needs time to process the diagnosis and develop a plan for managing ongoing life demands before they can successfully learn to care for the child; (3) patient/family education should be an interprofessional endeavor with 3 key areas of focus: (a) diagnosis/treatment, (b) psychosocial coping, and (c) care of the child; (4) patient/family education should occur across the continuum of care; and (5) a supportive environment is necessary to optimize learning. Dissemination and implementation of these recommendations will set the stage for future studies that aim to develop evidence to inform best practices, and ultimately to establish the standard of care for effective patient/family education in pediatric oncology.

Authors
Landier, W; Ahern, J; Barakat, LP; Bhatia, S; Bingen, KM; Bondurant, PG; Cohn, SL; Dobrozsi, SK; Haugen, M; Herring, RA; Hooke, MC; Martin, M; Murphy, K; Newman, AR; Rodgers, CC; Ruccione, KS; Sullivan, J; Weiss, M; Withycombe, J; Yasui, L; Hockenberry, M
MLA Citation
Landier, W, Ahern, J, Barakat, LP, Bhatia, S, Bingen, KM, Bondurant, PG, Cohn, SL, Dobrozsi, SK, Haugen, M, Herring, RA, Hooke, MC, Martin, M, Murphy, K, Newman, AR, Rodgers, CC, Ruccione, KS, Sullivan, J, Weiss, M, Withycombe, J, Yasui, L, and Hockenberry, M. "Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 33.6 (November 2016): 422-431.
PMID
27385664
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
33
Issue
6
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
422
End Page
431
DOI
10.1177/1043454216655983

Understanding Effective Delivery of Patient and Family Education in Pediatric OncologyA Systematic Review From the Children's Oncology Group [Formula: see text].

A diagnosis of childhood cancer is a life-changing event for the entire family. Parents must not only deal with the cancer diagnosis but also acquire new knowledge and skills to care safely for their child at home. Best practices for delivery of patient/family education after a new diagnosis of childhood cancer are currently unknown. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the existing body of evidence to determine the current state of knowledge regarding the delivery of education to newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients and families. Eighty-three articles regarding educational methods, content, influencing factors, and interventions for newly diagnosed pediatric patients with cancer or other chronic illnesses were systematically identified, summarized, and appraised according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria. Based on the evidence, 10 recommendations for practice were identified. These recommendations address delivery methods, content, influencing factors, and educational interventions for parents and siblings. Transferring these recommendations into practice may enhance the quality of education delivered by health care providers and received by patients and families following a new diagnosis of childhood cancer.

Authors
Rodgers, CC; Laing, CM; Herring, RA; Tena, N; Leonardelli, A; Hockenberry, M; Hendricks-Ferguson, V
MLA Citation
Rodgers, CC, Laing, CM, Herring, RA, Tena, N, Leonardelli, A, Hockenberry, M, and Hendricks-Ferguson, V. "Understanding Effective Delivery of Patient and Family Education in Pediatric OncologyA Systematic Review From the Children's Oncology Group [Formula: see text]." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 33.6 (November 2016): 432-446. (Review)
PMID
27450361
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
33
Issue
6
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
432
End Page
446
DOI
10.1177/1043454216659449

Processing Information After a Child's Cancer Diagnosis-How Parents Learn.

Parents of a child newly diagnosed with cancer must receive an extensive amount of information before their child's initial hospital discharge; however, little is known about best practices for providing this education. An interpretive descriptive study design was used to describe actual and preferred educational content, timing, and methods among parents of children newly diagnosed with cancer prior to their child's first hospital discharge. Twenty parents of children diagnosed with various malignancies participated in individual interviews 2 to 12 months after their child's diagnosis. Data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Education delivery occurred in a telling manner at diagnosis transitioning to a reciprocal process of teaching during the inpatient stay, then primarily back to telling immediately before discharge. Parents expressed a variety of preferred learning styles but noted that their preferences were rarely assessed by health care providers. Multiple factors influenced parents' ability to process educational information received during their child's initial hospitalization. Findings suggest that nursing practices should include assessing for influencing factors, providing anticipatory guidance, and incorporating parents' preferred learning style into the educational plan.

Authors
Rodgers, CC; Stegenga, K; Withycombe, JS; Sachse, K; Kelly, KP
MLA Citation
Rodgers, CC, Stegenga, K, Withycombe, JS, Sachse, K, and Kelly, KP. "Processing Information After a Child's Cancer Diagnosis-How Parents Learn." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 33.6 (November 2016): 447-459.
PMID
28084180
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
33
Issue
6
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
447
End Page
459
DOI
10.1177/1043454216668825

Symptom Clusters in Children and Adolescents with Cancer

Authors
Rodgers, C; Hooke, MC; Ward, J; Linder, LA
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Hooke, MC, Ward, J, and Linder, LA. "Symptom Clusters in Children and Adolescents with Cancer." Seminars in Oncology Nursing 32.4 (November 2016): 394-404.
Source
crossref
Published In
Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Volume
32
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
394
End Page
404
DOI
10.1016/j.soncn.2016.08.005

Fatigue and Oxidative Stress in Children Undergoing Leukemia Treatment.

Fatigue is a frequent and distressing symptom in children undergoing leukemia treatment; however, little is known about factors influencing this symptom. Antioxidants such as glutathione can decrease symptom severity in adult oncology patients, but no study has evaluated antioxidants' effects on symptoms in pediatric oncology patients. This study describes fatigue patterns and associations of fatigue with antioxidants represented by reduced glutathione (GSH) and the reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio among children receiving leukemia treatment. A repeated measures design assessed fatigue and antioxidants among 38 children from two large U.S. cancer centers. Fatigue was assessed among school-age children and by parent proxy among young children. Antioxidants (GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio) were assessed from cerebrospinal fluid at four phases during leukemia treatment. Young children had a steady decline of fatigue from the end of induction treatment through the continuation phase of treatment, but no significant changes were noted among the school-age children. Mean antioxidant scores varied slightly over time; however, the GSH/GSSG ratios in these children were significantly lower than the normal ratio. Mean GSH/GSSG ratios significantly correlated to fatigue scores of the school-age children during early phases of treatment. Children with low mean GSH/GSSG ratios demonstrated oxidative stress. The low ratios noted early in therapy were significantly correlated with higher fatigue scores during induction and postinduction treatment phases. This finding suggests that increased oxidative stress during the more intensive phases of therapy may explain the experience of fatigue children report.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Sanborn, C; Taylor, O; Gundy, P; Pasvogel, A; Moore, IMK; Hockenberry, MJ
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Sanborn, C, Taylor, O, Gundy, P, Pasvogel, A, Moore, IMK, and Hockenberry, MJ. "Fatigue and Oxidative Stress in Children Undergoing Leukemia Treatment." Biological research for nursing 18.5 (October 2016): 515-520.
PMID
27179013
Source
epmc
Published In
Biological Research For Nursing
Volume
18
Issue
5
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
515
End Page
520
DOI
10.1177/1099800416647794

Use of a Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire in the Screening of Von Willebrand Disease in Young Females at Menarche in the Primary Care Setting

Authors
Duran, J; Lasky, JL; Rodgers, C
MLA Citation
Duran, J, Lasky, JL, and Rodgers, C. "Use of a Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire in the Screening of Von Willebrand Disease in Young Females at Menarche in the Primary Care Setting." Journal of Pediatric Health Care 30.5 (September 2016): 408-413.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Health Care
Volume
30
Issue
5
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
408
End Page
413
DOI
10.1016/j.pedhc.2015.10.005

Reconsidering Physical Activity Restrictions for Mononephric Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

Although traditional recommendations for mononephric childhood cancer survivors are to avoid contact sports in order to protect the remaining kidney, review of available evidence suggests that the majority of renal loss is caused by accidents not involving sports. An interdisciplinary team performed a review of the English literature published from 1999 to 2012 within the PubMed, Cochrane, Google Scholar, and National Guidelines Clearinghouse databases. The level of evidence and proposed recommendations were graded according to an established rubric and GRADE criteria. Our review found that kidney loss is most commonly caused by nonsports activities such as motor vehicle accidents and falls, implying that restrictions on sports-related activity in mononephric pediatric survivors are not well supported. This favors encouraging ordinary sports and related activities without restriction in mononephric childhood cancer survivors because the known benefits of exercise outweigh the exceedingly low risk of renal loss. Accordingly, activity recommendations for mononephric patients have been revised in the most current version of the Children's Oncology Group Long-term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers. This has important implications for this and similar populations who may now undertake individual and organized sports without undue regard for their mononephric status.

Authors
Okada, M; Hockenberry, MJ; Koh, CJ; Meeske, KA; Rangan, KE; Rodgers, C; Rosenthal, Y; Ruccione, KS; Freyer, DR
MLA Citation
Okada, M, Hockenberry, MJ, Koh, CJ, Meeske, KA, Rangan, KE, Rodgers, C, Rosenthal, Y, Ruccione, KS, and Freyer, DR. "Reconsidering Physical Activity Restrictions for Mononephric Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 33.4 (July 2016): 306-313. (Review)
PMID
26589357
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
33
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
306
End Page
313
DOI
10.1177/1043454215607341

Implementing a Daily Maintenance Care Bundle to Prevent Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

Eliminating central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is a national priority. Central venous catheter (CVC) care bundles are composed of a series of interventions that, when used together, are effective in preventing CLABSI. A CVC daily maintenance care bundle includes procedural guidelines for hygiene, dressing changes, and access as well as specific timeframes. Failure to complete one of the components of the care bundle predisposes the patient to a bloodstream infection. A nurse-led multidisciplinary team implemented and, for six months, sustained a daily maintenance care bundle for pediatric oncology patients. This quality improvement project focused on nursing staffs' implementation of the daily maintenance care bundle and the sustainment of the intervention. The project used a pre-post program design to evaluate outcomes of CVC daily maintenance care bundle compliancy and CLABSI. A statistically significant increase between the pre- and post-assessments of the compliance was noted with the CVC daily maintenance care bundle. CLABSI infection rates decreased during the intervention. Strategies to implement practice change and promote sustainability are discussed.

Authors
Duffy, EA; Rodgers, CC; Shever, LL; Hockenberry, MJ
MLA Citation
Duffy, EA, Rodgers, CC, Shever, LL, and Hockenberry, MJ. "Implementing a Daily Maintenance Care Bundle to Prevent Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Oncology Patients." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 32.6 (November 2015): 394-400.
PMID
25643972
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
32
Issue
6
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
394
End Page
400
DOI
10.1177/1043454214563756

Health-Related Quality of Life among Children and Adolescents during Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recovery.

Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been noted to fluctuate among children during hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recovery; however, the specific timing and associations of these changes are poorly understood. This repeated-measures study aimed to describe HRQoL changes among children and adolescents during the first 6 months of HSCT recovery and estimate the associations of demographic factors, diagnosis, transplant information, and symptoms with HRQoL. Twenty-three children and adolescents who received an allogeneic HSCT were recruited from a pediatric teaching institution in the southern United States. Demographic, diagnosis, and transplant information was obtained from the medical record. The Memorial Symptom Assessment questionnaire and the Peds Quality of Life Cancer Module (PedsQL CM) were completed at 1 month post-HSCT and then once monthly for 5 additional months. Mean HRQoL scores fluctuated during the study with the lowest mean HRQoL noted at 1 month post-HSCT and the highest mean HRQoL noted at 4 months post-HSCT. No significant differences in HRQoL scores were noted among demographic, diagnosis, or transplant factors. Feeling tired, sad, or worried or having insomnia at 1 month post-HSCT was negatively correlated to HRQoL. Nurses have opportunities to explore important issues with patients and need to be aware of fluctuations with HRQoL and factors associated with lower HRQoL during HSCT recovery.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Wills-Bagnato, P; Sloane, R; Hockenberry, M
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Wills-Bagnato, P, Sloane, R, and Hockenberry, M. "Health-Related Quality of Life among Children and Adolescents during Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recovery." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 32.5 (September 2015): 329-336.
PMID
25592668
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
32
Issue
5
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
329
End Page
336
DOI
10.1177/1043454214563413

Measures and Methods for Symptom and Symptom Cluster Assessment in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer.

To provide an overview of resources for measuring symptoms and symptom clusters in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer and to examine methodological strategies for evaluating symptom clusters.Published research articles and clinical experience.Limited research has addressed symptoms and symptom clusters in AYAs with cancer. Reliable, valid, and developmentally appropriate measures are needed to advance this area of research.Use of mobile technology and mixed qualitative and quantitative methods to understand AYAs' experience of symptoms and symptom clusters could enhance symptom awareness and the evidence base for practice.

Authors
Linder, LA; Ameringer, S; Baggott, C; Erickson, J; Macpherson, CF; Rodgers, C; Stegenga, K
MLA Citation
Linder, LA, Ameringer, S, Baggott, C, Erickson, J, Macpherson, CF, Rodgers, C, and Stegenga, K. "Measures and Methods for Symptom and Symptom Cluster Assessment in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer." Seminars in oncology nursing 31.3 (August 2015): 206-215. (Review)
PMID
26210199
Source
epmc
Published In
Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Volume
31
Issue
3
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
206
End Page
215
DOI
10.1016/j.soncn.2015.05.002

Evidence-Based Practice Projects in Pediatric Oncology Nursing.

This introduction article discusses the history and importance of evidence-based practice, along with describing the process that 6 nurse-led teams completed for the systematic reviews listed in this journal issue.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Withycombe, JS; Hockenberry, MJ
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Withycombe, JS, and Hockenberry, MJ. "Evidence-Based Practice Projects in Pediatric Oncology Nursing." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 31.4 (July 2014): 182-184.
PMID
24928755
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
31
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
182
End Page
184
DOI
10.1177/1043454214532023

The influence of oxidative stress on symptom occurrence, severity, and distress during childhood leukemia treatment.

To explore the symptom trajectory during the first 16 months of childhood leukemia treatment and any associations with the oxidative stress pathway measured by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of oxidized phosphatidylcholine (PC), the predominant glycerophospholipid in the brain and cell membranes.Prospective, longitudinal design.Two cancer centers in the southwestern United States.36 children (aged 3-14 years) newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Symptoms were measured using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale at six specific time points during treatment. Biochemical changes in oxidative stress were measured by oxidized PC in the CSF.Childhood cancer symptoms, oxidized PC.Significant differences were found in the number of symptoms experienced during the three phases of treatment. Symptom trajectory changes and influence of the oxidative stress pathway on symptom experiences were identified.Symptoms experienced during treatment for childhood leukemia are associated with increased oxidative stress.Children with leukemia experience symptoms throughout treatment. Physiologic measures indicate the influence of oxidative stress on symptoms.

Authors
Hockenberry, MJ; Taylor, OA; Pasvogel, A; Rodgers, C; McCarthy, K; Gundy, P; Montgomery, DW; Ribbeck, P; Scheurer, ME; Moore, IMK
MLA Citation
Hockenberry, MJ, Taylor, OA, Pasvogel, A, Rodgers, C, McCarthy, K, Gundy, P, Montgomery, DW, Ribbeck, P, Scheurer, ME, and Moore, IMK. "The influence of oxidative stress on symptom occurrence, severity, and distress during childhood leukemia treatment." Oncology nursing forum 41.4 (July 2014): E238-E247.
PMID
24969258
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
41
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
E238
End Page
E247
DOI
10.1188/14.onf.e238-e247

Neutropenia Precautions for Children Receiving Chemotherapy or Stem Cell Transplantation for Cancer.

Infections in children and adolescents with cancer are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in those receiving chemotherapy who are neutropenic and/or immunocompromised. The aim of this article is to review existing evidence in order to provide a practice recommendation to prevent or minimize infections in neutropenic and/or immunocompromised patients receiving chemotherapy and/or stem cell transplant. Systematic reviews were undertaken and research was graded according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. A variety of interventions are implemented to reduce infections in the neutropenic and/or immunocompromised population; however, few are supported by research evidence. Existing literature should continue to be reviewed to further identify interventions that can influence positive patient outcomes and provide opportunities for individuals in the medical field to work together to improve clinical care.

Authors
Mize, L; Harris, N; Stokhuyzen, A; Avery, T; Cash, J; Kasse, M; Sanborn, C; Leonardelli, A; Rodgers, C; Hockenberry, M
MLA Citation
Mize, L, Harris, N, Stokhuyzen, A, Avery, T, Cash, J, Kasse, M, Sanborn, C, Leonardelli, A, Rodgers, C, and Hockenberry, M. "Neutropenia Precautions for Children Receiving Chemotherapy or Stem Cell Transplantation for Cancer." Journal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses 31.4 (July 2014): 200-210. (Review)
PMID
24928756
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
31
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
200
End Page
210
DOI
10.1177/1043454214532027

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Hydration in Children and Adolescents With Cancer Receiving Intravenous Cyclophosphamide

Authors
Robinson, D; Schulz, G; Langley, R; Donze, K; Winchester, K; Rodgers, C
MLA Citation
Robinson, D, Schulz, G, Langley, R, Donze, K, Winchester, K, and Rodgers, C. "Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations for Hydration in Children and Adolescents With Cancer Receiving Intravenous Cyclophosphamide." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 31.4 (July 2014): 191-199.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
31
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
191
End Page
199
DOI
10.1177/1043454214532024

Evidence-Based Recommendations for Fertility Preservation Options for Inclusion in Treatment Protocols for Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Diagnosed With Cancer

Authors
Fernbach, A; Lockart, B; Armus, CL; Bashore, LM; Levine, J; Kroon, L; Sylvain, G; Rodgers, C
MLA Citation
Fernbach, A, Lockart, B, Armus, CL, Bashore, LM, Levine, J, Kroon, L, Sylvain, G, and Rodgers, C. "Evidence-Based Recommendations for Fertility Preservation Options for Inclusion in Treatment Protocols for Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Diagnosed With Cancer." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 31.4 (July 2014): 211-222.
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
31
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
211
End Page
222
DOI
10.1177/1043454214532025

Symptom prevalence and physiologic biomarkers among adolescents using a mobile phone intervention following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

To examine symptom reports and physiologic parameters in adolescents using the Eating After Transplant (EAT!) intervention during recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).Repeated measures design.HSCT service at a pediatric teaching institution in the southern United States.16 adolescents recovering from a first-time allogeneic HSCT.Use of EAT! was monitored electronically, symptom reports were obtained from a questionnaire, and physiologic parameters were obtained from the medical record at HSCT hospital discharge and 20, 40, and 60 days postdischarge.EAT! use, symptom prevalence, symptom-related distress, and physiologic parameters including weight, body mass index (BMI), pre-albumin, and albumin.Symptom prevalence was highest at hospital discharge and steadily declined; however, mean symptom distress scores remained stable. Mean weight and BMI significantly declined during the first 60 days postdischarge; pre-albumin and albumin markers were unchanged. No correlation was noted among use of EAT! and any research variables.The most frequent symptoms were not always the most distressing symptoms. Weight and BMI significantly declined during HSCT recovery.Nurses should assess symptom frequency and distress to fully understand patients' symptom experiences. Nurses should monitor weight and BMI throughout HSCT recovery.

Authors
Rodgers, CC; Krance, R; Street, RL; Hockenberry, MJ
MLA Citation
Rodgers, CC, Krance, R, Street, RL, and Hockenberry, MJ. "Symptom prevalence and physiologic biomarkers among adolescents using a mobile phone intervention following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation." Oncology nursing forum 41.3 (May 2014): 229-236.
PMID
24769589
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
41
Issue
3
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
229
End Page
236
DOI
10.1188/14.onf.229-236

Feasibility of a symptom management intervention for adolescents recovering from a hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

BACKGROUND: Adolescents undergoing a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience a variety of adverse effects and eating difficulties. Few interventions exist to assist patients with self-care after HSCT hospitalization. The Eating After Transplant (EAT!) program is a mobile phone applications developed to assist adolescents with self-management of common eating-related issues during HSCT recovery. OBJECTIVE: This study examined the acceptability and usability of the EAT! program among adolescents and assessed the competency of the participants using the program after hospital discharge through the first 100 days after HSCT. METHODS: A repeated-measures design was used to evaluate the EAT! application with 16 adolescent patients recovering from an allogeneic HSCT. Participants provided verbal feedback and used a Likert scale to rate acceptability and usability of the application. In addition, a tracking device monitored use of the application. Competency was measured with orientation time and independent demonstration of use of the application. RESULTS: Acceptability remained high throughout the study, but use significantly decreased over time. Patients reported familiarity with the program's content as the reason for the declining use. Competency was excellent with a short orientation period and independent demonstration throughout the study. CONCLUSIONS: A mobile phone application is a feasible intervention to educate adolescents with symptom management strategies. Future research needs to examine factors affecting sustainability of use over time. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Healthcare providers need to continue to develop and evaluate innovative methods to educate adolescents on effective self-care strategies throughout HSCT recovery.

Authors
Rodgers, CC; Krance, R; Street, RL; Hockenberry, MJ
MLA Citation
Rodgers, CC, Krance, R, Street, RL, and Hockenberry, MJ. "Feasibility of a symptom management intervention for adolescents recovering from a hematopoietic stem cell transplant." Cancer Nurs 36.5 (September 2013): 394-399.
PMID
23842522
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
36
Issue
5
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
394
End Page
399
DOI
10.1097/NCC.0b013e31829629b5

Symptom clusters in children.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Researchers have focused on identifying and describing symptom experiences among children with various diseases but symptoms can have a synergistic and/or an antecedent effect that must be evaluated. This review reports the current knowledge of symptoms among various pediatric diseases and highlights symptom cluster research. RECENT FINDINGS: Symptoms of depression and anxiety are the most prevalent variables studied across pediatric disease studies followed by pain, fatigue, and quality of life. Although previous pediatric symptom research provides a foundation for understanding the complexities of these symptoms, there is limited evidence on symptom cluster research in pediatrics. Pain and fatigue are the most common symptoms analyzed for correlations, and relationships among symptoms that have been evaluated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, HIV, cancer, cardiac disease requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, and at end of life. Pain and fatigue have been associated with sleep disturbances, anxiety, depression, anorexia, and nausea/vomiting. SUMMARY: Pediatric oncology researchers are leading the way with symptom cluster studies; however, this work remains in the early stages. There is great potential to advance the state of the science with cluster analysis. Future research work should focus on evaluating symptoms and their interactions.

Authors
Rodgers, CC; Hooke, MC; Hockenberry, MJ
MLA Citation
Rodgers, CC, Hooke, MC, and Hockenberry, MJ. "Symptom clusters in children." Curr Opin Support Palliat Care 7.1 (March 2013): 67-72. (Review)
PMID
23108342
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care
Volume
7
Issue
1
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
67
End Page
72
DOI
10.1097/SPC.0b013e32835ad551

Enhancing Pediatric Oncology Nursing Care Through Research, Quality Improvement, and Evidence-Based Practice

Research, quality improvement (QI), and evidence-based practice (EBP) are knowledge-based methods used to enhance nursing practice. Nurses need to conduct studies to fill empirical gaps of knowledge (research), continually monitor health care practices and processes (QI), and systematically compile and review evidence (EBP). Research, QI, and EBP are valuable instruments within the health care setting as they can benefit the patient, families, health care team members, and the nursing profession, but it is important to understand when and how to use each method. This article will differentiate between and provide examples of research, QI, and EBP by focusing on the characteristics and purposes of each method. Clinical issues and concerns can transform practices based on evidence through the proper use of these methods. Nurses are highly motivated to create the best possible environment of healing for their patients. Therefore, it is essential that nurses use research, QI, and EBP so pediatric oncology knowledge can continue to evolve. © 2013 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

Authors
Bryant, R; Rodgers, C; Stone, S
MLA Citation
Bryant, R, Rodgers, C, and Stone, S. "Enhancing Pediatric Oncology Nursing Care Through Research, Quality Improvement, and Evidence-Based Practice." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 30.3 (2013): 123-128.
PMID
23486864
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
30
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
123
End Page
128
DOI
10.1177/1043454213478837

Nausea and vomiting perspectives among children receiving moderate to highly emetogenic chemotherapy treatment

Background: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are common adverse effects, but occurrences among pediatric oncology patients are not well documented. Objective: The primary aim was to describe anticipatory, acute, and delayed CINV among children with cancer from the child's, caregiver's, and nurse's perspective. A secondary aim evaluates the correlation of CINV among the child's, caregiver's, and nurse's perspectives. Methods: CINV perspectives were evaluated before, during, and after a single course of highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. CINV were evaluated among 40 pediatric cancer patients using the Adapted Rhodes Index of Nausea and Vomiting for Pediatrics, among their caregivers using the Adapted Rhodes Index of Nausea and Vomiting for Parents, and among their nurses using the National Cancer Institute Nausea and Vomiting Grading Criteria. Results: CINV were reported by the patient, caregiver, and nurse at all times, with the most frequent reports occurring in the delayed period. Patient's mean total nausea and vomiting scores increased significantly over time. Patient reports of anticipatory, acute, and delayed CINV correlated with caregiver and nurse reports except for anticipatory nausea between the nurse and patient. Conclusions: CINV occurred throughout the chemotherapy course, with delayed CINV occurring most frequently and with greater severity and distress. Caregiver CINV reports correlated closely with patient reports. Implications for Practice: Nurses need to be aware of the frequency, severity, and distress of CINV throughout the chemotherapy regimen. CINV can occur before and after chemotherapy treatment and should be assessed so that appropriate interventions can be implemented. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Kollar, D; Taylor, O; Bryant, R; Crockett, K; Gregurich, MA; Hockenberry, M
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Kollar, D, Taylor, O, Bryant, R, Crockett, K, Gregurich, MA, and Hockenberry, M. "Nausea and vomiting perspectives among children receiving moderate to highly emetogenic chemotherapy treatment." Cancer Nursing 35.3 (2012): 203-210.
PMID
21915041
Source
scival
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
35
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
203
End Page
210
DOI
10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182281493

Children's coping strategies for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

Purpose/Objectives: To identify anticipatory, acute, and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) frequency and coping strategies used among pediatric patients with cancer. Design: Prospective, cohort design. Setting: A pediatric teaching hospital in the southern United States. Sample: A convenience sample of 40 children aged 7-12 years scheduled to receive either moderately emetic chemotherapy or highly emetic chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Methods: Children completed the Adapted Rhodes Index of Nausea and Vomiting for Pediatrics and the Kidcope-Younger Version. Main Research Variables: CINV and coping strategies. Findings: CINV occurred during the anticipatory, acute, and delayed times, with the highest frequency occurring during the delayed time. The most frequently used coping strategies were distraction and wishful thinking, whereas the most effective strategies were social support and distraction. No statistically significant differences were observed in the frequency or efficacy of coping strategies over time. Conclusions: CINV occurs throughout chemotherapy treatment. The most efficacious coping strategies included active and passive coping, with active coping strategies being more effective. Implications for Nursing: Nurses should recognize that CINV occurs at all points of chemotherapy treatment. Nurses can assist children in developing active coping strategies to manage their CINV. © 2012 by the Oncology Nursing Society.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Norville, R; Taylor, O; Poon, C; Hesselgrave, J; Gregurich, MA; Hockenberry, M
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Norville, R, Taylor, O, Poon, C, Hesselgrave, J, Gregurich, MA, and Hockenberry, M. "Children's coping strategies for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting." Oncology Nursing Forum 39.2 (2012): 202-209.
PMID
22374494
Source
scival
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
39
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
202
End Page
209
DOI
10.1188/12.ONF.202-209

Lipid Profiles of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among adults in the United States. CVD pathology, including abnormal lipid levels, may begin in childhood. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors have increased risk of abnormal lipid levels, but there is limited information in children post-HSCT. The study aimed to describe lipid levels and identify the factors associated with dyslipidemia in pediatric HSCT survivors during the first 3 years post-HSCT. This descriptive research study used a retrospective chart review to assess lipid profiles among 31 pediatric HSCT patients. Mean lipid levels were within normal limits but contained large ranges in values. There was no statistically significant change over time; however, there was an increased trend of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels and a decreased trend of high-density lipoprotein levels. The majority of patients had one abnormal lipid level at 1 and 2 years post-HSCT. Body mass index was the only factor significantly associated with dyslipidemia. An awareness of dyslipidemia among HSCT survivors may allow for early identification and treatment of abnormal lipid levels. © 2012 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Gregurich, MA; Hockenberry, M
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Gregurich, MA, and Hockenberry, M. "Lipid Profiles of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 29.2 (2012): 63-69.
PMID
22415856
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
29
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
63
End Page
69
DOI
10.1177/1043454212438404

Aggressive peripheral CD70-positive t-cell lymphoma associated with severe chronic active EBV infection

Severe chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) in T or NK cells is a rare complication of latent EBV infection. CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) consists of polyclonal lesions as well as aggressive lymphomas. Here, we report such a patient. In addition, we show that this primary CAEBV associated T-cell lymphoma expresses CD70 and is sensitive to killing by CD70-specific T cells, identifying CD70 as a potential immunotherapeutic target for CAEBV-associated T-cell lymphoma. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2012;59:758-761. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors
Shaffer, DR; Sheehan, AM; Yi, Z; Rodgers, CC; Bollard, CM; Brenner, MK; Rooney, CM; Heslop, HE; Gottschalk, S
MLA Citation
Shaffer, DR, Sheehan, AM, Yi, Z, Rodgers, CC, Bollard, CM, Brenner, MK, Rooney, CM, Heslop, HE, and Gottschalk, S. "Aggressive peripheral CD70-positive t-cell lymphoma associated with severe chronic active EBV infection." Pediatric Blood and Cancer 59.4 (2012): 758-761.
PMID
21994111
Source
scival
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
59
Issue
4
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
758
End Page
761
DOI
10.1002/pbc.23352

The meaning of adolescents' eating experiences during bone marrow transplant recovery

Bone marrow transplant (BMT) is a common treatment option for adolescents with various diseases; however, the aggressive therapy often causes significant side effects that can lead to poor eating. There is little documentation of eating experiences and necessary support needed after the initial BMT hospitalization. This phenomenological study, guided by Martin Heidegger's philosophical influences, revealed the meaning of adolescents' eating experiences, eating strategies, and the impact of eating on the adolescents' quality of life during the first 100 days post-BMT. Individual interviews were conducted at 50 and 100 days post-BMT. Data analysis used the hermeneutic circle and revealed 5 themes. Adolescents discussed the slow return of eating, barriers that affected their eating, personal eating strategies, significance of eating, and feelings regarding eating. Eating issues do not end when a BMT patient is discharged from the hospital, and caregivers need to have a better understanding of the ongoing issues affecting adolescents throughout the BMT recovery phase. © 2010 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Young, A; Hockenberry, M; Binder, B; Symes, L
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Young, A, Hockenberry, M, Binder, B, and Symes, L. "The meaning of adolescents' eating experiences during bone marrow transplant recovery." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 27.2 (2010): 65-72.
PMID
20176916
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
27
Issue
2
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
65
End Page
72
DOI
10.1177/1043454209355984

Growth patterns and gastrointestinal symptoms in pediatric patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Purpose/Objectives: To identify growth patterns and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in pediatric patients during the first four months after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and to assess whether an association exists between acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHO) and growth pattern changes or GI symptoms. Design: A prospective, longitudinal cohort design. Setting: A tertiary children's hospital in a metropolitan area in the southern United States. Sample: A convenience sample of 35 pediatric patients receiving allogeneic HSCT. Methods: Anthropometric measurements were obtained and Gl symptoms were surveyed In pediatric patients before HSCT and two and four months after HSCT. Main Research Variables: GI symptoms, anthropometric measurements, and presence or absence of acute GVHD. Findings: All anthropometric measurements showed a significant change over time; height showed an increase, and weight, skinfold triceps, and mid-arm circumference showed a decrease over the fourmonth measurement period. Eight GI symptoms were prevalent over the four months, and the mean severity and distress scores fluctuated minimally during that time. No statistically significant differences were noted in any of the anthropometric measurements or GI symptoms between pediatric patients with and without GVHD. Conclusions: Pediatric patients in the study exhibited poor growth patterns during the four months after HSCT and experienced multiple GI symptoms before and after HSCT. Implications for Nursing: Nurses should be aware of the importance of evaluating growth and symptom experience in all pediatric patients during HSCT recovery and assist in defining treatment plans that will optimize patient health.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Wills-Alcoser, P; Monroe, R; McDonald, L; Trevino, M; Hockenberry, M
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, Wills-Alcoser, P, Monroe, R, McDonald, L, Trevino, M, and Hockenberry, M. "Growth patterns and gastrointestinal symptoms in pediatric patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation." Oncology Nursing Forum 35.3 (2008): 443-448.
PMID
18467293
Source
scival
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
35
Issue
3
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
443
End Page
448
DOI
10.1188/08.ONF.443-448

Nutritional issues in adolescents after bone marrow transplant: A literature review

Bone marrow transplantation and related complications can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects that can lead to poor nutrition, which has been associated with several morbidity and mortality issues. Adolescents require adequate nutrition not only to maintain health but to advance with normal growth and development. This article synthesizes the bone marrow transplant (BMT) literature regarding adolescents' nutritional needs, etiologies of altered oral intake, GI symptoms, nutritional assessments, nutritional interventions, and quality of life associated with poor nutrition. In addition, gaps in knowledge in the literature are identified. To provide effective and thorough care to patients during their BMT recovery, the knowledge base of nutritional and eating issues after transplant needs to become more comprehensive. Nurses play an important role in gathering and reporting clinical information. By anticipating potential risk factors, assessing and identifying symptoms, and initiating appropriate interventions promptly, patients can experience a more positive BMT experience. © 2008 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Walsh, T
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, and Walsh, T. "Nutritional issues in adolescents after bone marrow transplant: A literature review." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 25.5 (2008): 254-264.
PMID
18648090
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
25
Issue
5
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
254
End Page
264
DOI
10.1177/1043454208321115

Osteopenia and osteoporosis in pediatric patients after stem cell transplant

As more patients are surviving the transplant experience, more children are coping with long-term side effects. Long-term side effects, such as osteopenia and osteoporosis, are not as well acknowledged in pediatric stem cell transplant survivors. Osteopenia and osteoporosis can lead to fractures, deformities, pain, and financial burden. There are many factors during and after a stem cell transplant that cause patients to be at an increased risk for osteopenia or osteoporosis. Nurses have the ability to prevent these potentially debilitating and progressive diseases and to provide adequate treatment to prevent further complications. Key features of the history, physical examination, and diagnostic imaging can assist with making a diagnosis of osteoporosis or osteopenia. Prevention of osteopenia and osteoporosis involves both lifestyle modifications and medical management. Measures to prevent and treat bone loss are crucial. Transplant nurses must be knowledgeable regarding the risk factors and prevention and treatment strategies for osteopenia and osteoporosis. © 2007 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

Authors
Rodgers, C; Monroe, R
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C, and Monroe, R. "Osteopenia and osteoporosis in pediatric patients after stem cell transplant." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 24.4 (2007): 184-189.
PMID
17588890
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
24
Issue
4
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
184
End Page
189
DOI
10.1177/1043454207303942

Successful treatment of bronchiolitis obliterans in a bone marrow transplant patient with tumor necrosis factor-α blockade

Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) in children is a rare, inflammatory/fibrosing process involving the small airways that often results in progressive, irreversible obstructive pulmonary disease. Because treatment has focused mainly on supportive care and generally unsuccessful immunosuppression, children with BO experience significant morbidity and mortality. We report a case of biopsy-proven BO after bone marrow transplantation in a child who, after failed corticosteroid therapy, was treated with infliximab, a monoclonal antibody with binding specificity for human tumor necrosis factor-α. With initiation of treatment, her pulmonary symptoms and radiographic and spirometric evidence of BO resolved. Nine months later, she remains asymptomatic and shows no evidence of pulmonary decompensation. This case illustrates a successful treatment of BO with selective tumor necrosis factor-α blockade. Copyright © 2005 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Authors
Fullmer, JJ; Fan, LL; Dishop, MK; Rodgers, C; Krance, R
MLA Citation
Fullmer, JJ, Fan, LL, Dishop, MK, Rodgers, C, and Krance, R. "Successful treatment of bronchiolitis obliterans in a bone marrow transplant patient with tumor necrosis factor-α blockade." Pediatrics 116.3 (2005): 767-770.
PMID
16140721
Source
scival
Published In
Pediatrics
Volume
116
Issue
3
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
767
End Page
770
DOI
10.1542/peds.2005-0806

Weight gain and height velocity in young children 1 year following bone marrow transplant: A single institution study

The nutritional and growth effects on children following a bone marrow transplant (BMT) have not been well documented. The purpose of this study was to describe the growth patterns of young children during the first year following BMT. A retrospective chart review was used to examine the nutritional status of 25 young children, 1 to 6 years of age, who received an allogeneic BMT. Nutritional data were reviewed prior to BMT and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following BMT. The mean weight gain was 2.5 kg with a median weight gain of 2.3 kg (range, -1.2 to 9.4 kg). The mean height gain was 7 cm with a median height gain of 7.4 cm (range, 1.2 to 16.8 cm). Growth related to gender, age, and incidence of infection was similar to the overall average; however, children with graft-versus-host disease revealed poor weight and height gain. Nurses must learn to recognize patients at nutritional risk and intervene when necessary. More research is needed to address specific nutritional needs of the pediatric BMT patient.

Authors
Rodgers, C
MLA Citation
Rodgers, C. "Weight gain and height velocity in young children 1 year following bone marrow transplant: A single institution study." Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing 21.6 (2004): 358-363.
PMID
15475473
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
21
Issue
6
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
358
End Page
363
DOI
10.1177/1043454204269607

Treatment strategies in childhood cancer

Strategies for the treatment of childhood cancer have significantly evolved over time. Years ago, surgery was the only option for treating childhood cancer. Now, research has advanced treatment options to include multimodal therapy with chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and hematopoeitic stem cell transplantation. The focus on gene therapy research is also increasing. Pediatric nurses must have a thorough understanding of the treatment for childhood cancer so that as frontline healthcare providers, they give accurate information to patients and their families, deliver appropriate care, and assist with gathering data in support of ongoing research. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Authors
Alcoser, PW; Rodgers, C
MLA Citation
Alcoser, PW, and Rodgers, C. "Treatment strategies in childhood cancer." Journal of Pediatric Nursing 18.2 (2003): 103-112.
PMID
12720207
Source
scival
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume
18
Issue
2
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
103
End Page
112
DOI
10.1053/jpdn.2003.10
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