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Schneider, Susan Moeller

Overview:

* Cancer Care
* Symptom Management
* Distraction Interventions
* Virtual Reality

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, with tenure

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S. 1985

M.S. — Texas Womans University

Ph.D. 1998

Ph.D. — Case Western Reserve University

Grants:

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Simpson

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2016
End Date
June 30, 2018

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Griffie

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2015
End Date
June 30, 2017

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Sherry

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2015
End Date
June 30, 2017

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Bayless

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2014
End Date
June 30, 2016

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Figuracion

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2014
End Date
June 30, 2016

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Gadler

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2014
End Date
June 30, 2016

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Krimmel

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2014
End Date
June 30, 2016

Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice - Dunn

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2014
End Date
June 30, 2015

Tailored Intervention Protocol for Oral Chemotherapy Adherence

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
April 09, 2009
End Date
March 31, 2012

Palliative and End-of-Life Care in Advanced Nursing Practice

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Health Resources and Service Administration
Role
Faculty Member
Start Date
July 01, 2008
End Date
December 31, 2011

Advanced Diabetes Management for Nurse Practitioners

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Health Resources and Service Administration
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
July 01, 2007
End Date
June 30, 2010

Informal Caregiver Training in Cancer Symptom Management

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
March 01, 2006
End Date
August 31, 2009
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Awards:

Fellow. American Academy of Nursing.

Type
National
Awarded By
American Academy of Nursing
Date
January 01, 2008

Ford Foundation Fellowships/ Dissertaton. National Academies, The.

Type
National
Awarded By
National Academies, The
Date
January 01, 2003

Ford Foundation Fellowships/ Dissertaton. National Academies, The.

Type
National
Awarded By
National Academies, The
Date
January 01, 2003

Publications:

Effects of neratinib and combination with irradiation and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer cells.

Prognosis of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is still poor. Novel therapeutic approaches are of great interest to improve the effects of radiochemotherapy. We evaluated the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor neratinib on HNSCC cell lines CAL27, SCC25 and FaDu as a single agent and in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy.Effects of neratinib were evaluated in HNSCC cell lines CAL27, SCC25 and FaDu. Effect on cell viability of neratinib and combination with cisplatin and irradiation was measured using CCK-8 assays and clonogenic assays. Western blot analysis was performed to distinguish the effect on epithelial growth factor receptor and HER2 expression. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry analysis.Growth inhibition was achieved in all cell lines, whereas combination of cisplatin and neratinib showed greater inhibition than each agent alone. Apoptosis was induced in all cell lines. Combination of neratinib with irradiation or cisplatin showed significantly increased apoptosis. In clonogenic assays, significant growth inhibition was observed in all investigated cell lines.Neratinib, as a single agent or in combination with chemo-irradiation, may be a promising treatment option for patients with head and neck cancer.

Authors
Schneider, S; Thurnher, D; Kadletz, L; Seemann, R; Brunner, M; Kotowski, U; Schmid, R; Lill, C; Heiduschka, G
MLA Citation
Schneider, S, Thurnher, D, Kadletz, L, Seemann, R, Brunner, M, Kotowski, U, Schmid, R, Lill, C, and Heiduschka, G. "Effects of neratinib and combination with irradiation and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer cells." Oral diseases 22.8 (November 2016): 797-804.
PMID
27476950
Source
epmc
Published In
Oral Diseases
Volume
22
Issue
8
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
797
End Page
804
DOI
10.1111/odi.12552

Blinatumomab: A New Treatment for Adults With Relapsed Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

Patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) often experience relapse of their disease following standard treatment. Blinatumomab (Blincyto®) is a newly approved option for inducing remission in individuals with relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative B-cell ALL.This article provides an overview of blinatumomab, its benefits demonstrated in clinical trials, adverse effects, administration details, and the role of the oncology nurse in caring for and educating patients who receive blinatumomab.This article summarizes the results of two phase II studies on blinatumomab and provides practice implications for nurses caring for patients receiving this therapy.Attentive symptom monitoring and management are crucial. Individuals who achieve remission from blinatumomab can then be considered for stem cell transplantation and a chance for cure.

Authors
Turner, J; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Turner, J, and Schneider, SM. "Blinatumomab: A New Treatment for Adults With Relapsed Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 20.2 (April 2016): 165-168.
PMID
26991709
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
20
Issue
2
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
165
End Page
168
DOI
10.1188/16.cjon.165-168

Nivolumab: Immunotherapy in Malignant Melanoma

Authors
Bayless, H; Schneider, S
MLA Citation
Bayless, H, and Schneider, S. "Nivolumab: Immunotherapy in Malignant Melanoma." Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing 19.4 (August 1, 2015): 430-432.
Source
crossref
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
19
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
430
End Page
432
DOI
10.1188/15.CJON.430-432

Ibrutinib: a new targeted therapy for hematologic cancers.

Hematologic cancers can occur from the overactivity of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, a proto-oncogene in blood cell maturation. Ibrutinib, a new oral targeted therapy drug, is the first agent that binds to the Bruton's tyrosine kinases and inhibits overgrowth of B cells. In blocking this overgrowth, ibrutinib has been shown to achieve lengthy remissions for patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Remissions are highly valued in these cancers; cure is rare in MCL, and CLL is incurable.This article reviews ibrutinib, its risks and benefits, and the role that oncology nurses play in educating patients and promoting drug adherence.A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted using key words such as ibrutinib, mantle cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and oral chemotherapy.Ibrutinib has been shown to be well tolerated, with manageable, low-grade toxicities compared to traditional cytotoxic agents. For all patients with a hematologic cancer, but particularly for the large proportion of older adults affected by hematologic malignancies, ibrutinib provides a new treatment option with a low toxicity profile.

Authors
Smithson, CR; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Smithson, CR, and Schneider, SM. "Ibrutinib: a new targeted therapy for hematologic cancers." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 19.3 (June 2015): E47-E51.
PMID
26000590
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
19
Issue
3
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
E47
End Page
E51
DOI
10.1188/15.cjon.e47-e51

A pilot study comparing the neutropenic diet to a non-neutropenic diet in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation population.

Historically, dietary restrictions imposed on patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were severe and limited to prevent exposure to foodborne organisms. With improvements in supportive care and anti-infective agents, the necessity of the neutropenic diet for this population has been in question.This study aimed to determine whether the incidence of infection differs and to analyze the nutritional status in patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HSCT with a neutropenic diet as compared to those with a diet without restrictions.This study was a randomized, controlled prospective pilot study beginning within the first 24 hours of the start of the conditioning regimen. Patients were randomized to receive a neutropenic diet or a diet without restrictions. All patients received care in a high-efficiency particulate air-filtered room on the inpatient adult blood and marrow transplantation unit (ABMTU). All patients received antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis. Patients were followed until the end of neutropenia (defined as absolute neutrophil count of greater than 500 for three days) or until discharge from the inpatient ABMTU.In 46 evaluable patients, no significant difference was found between infection rates or nutritional status. The neutropenic diet did not offer a protective effect against infection in patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HSCT. No differences were found in nutritional status between the two groups.

Authors
Lassiter, M; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Lassiter, M, and Schneider, SM. "A pilot study comparing the neutropenic diet to a non-neutropenic diet in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation population." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 19.3 (June 2015): 273-278.
PMID
26000578
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
19
Issue
3
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
273
End Page
278
DOI
10.1188/15.cjon.19-03ap

Adherence to antiemetic guidelines in patients with malignant glioma: a quality improvement project to translate evidence into practice.

A quality improvement project was implemented to improve adherence to evidence-based antiemetic guidelines for malignant glioma patients treated with moderately emetic chemotherapy (MEC). Poorly controlled chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) reduce cancer treatment efficacy and significantly impair cancer patients' quality of life (QOL). A review of Duke University Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center (PRTBTC)'s usual practice demonstrates a high incidence (45%) of CINV, despite premedication with short-acting 5-HT3-serotonin-receptor antagonists (5-HT3-RAs). National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)'s evidence-based guidelines recommend the combination of the long-acting 5-HT3-RA palonosetron (PAL) and dexamethasone (DEX) for the prevention of acute and delayed CINV with MEC. Low adherence (58%) to antiemetic guidelines may have explained our high CINV incidence.One-sample binomial test, quasi-experimental design, evaluated a combination intervention that included a provider education session; implementation of risk-assessment tool with computerized, standardized antiemetic guideline order sets; and a monthly audit-feedback strategy. Post-implementation adherence to evidence-based antiemetic order sets and patient outcomes were measured and compared to baseline and historical data. Primary outcome was the guideline order set adherence rate. Secondary outcomes included nausea/vomiting rates and QOL.Adherence to ordering MEC guideline antiemetics increased significantly, from 58% to a sustained 90%, with associated improvement in nausea/vomiting. In acute and delayed phases, 75 and 84% of patients, respectively, did not experience CINV. There was no significant change in QOL.Combination intervention and audit-feedback strategy to translate evidence into oncology practice improved and sustained adherence to antiemetic guidelines. Adherence corresponded with effective nausea/vomiting control and preserved QOL in patients with malignant gliomas.

Authors
Affronti, ML; Schneider, SM; Herndon, JE; Schlundt, S; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Affronti, ML, Schneider, SM, Herndon, JE, Schlundt, S, and Friedman, HS. "Adherence to antiemetic guidelines in patients with malignant glioma: a quality improvement project to translate evidence into practice." Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer 22.7 (July 2014): 1897-1905.
PMID
24570103
Source
epmc
Published In
Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume
22
Issue
7
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1897
End Page
1905
DOI
10.1007/s00520-014-2136-0

A tailored nurse coaching intervention for oral chemotherapy adherence.

Although patients frequently express a preference for oral medications, compliance to these medications varies. Patients often have difficulty adhering to their medication schedules due to lack of understanding, inadequate support, or unwelcome side effects. Fostering adherence to oral chemotherapy regimens improves patients' chance of survival and long-term quality of life. This randomized trial tested the effectiveness of a tailored intervention to promote adherence to oral chemotherapeutic agents in 45 adult patients with cancer. The control group received the standard chemotherapy education provided at the cancer center. The intervention group received standard education and a tailored adherence plan developed by an advanced practice nurse. The nurse coaching intervention was administered via telephone. Adherence was measured using self-report and pharmacy refill rates. For adherence measures at both 2 and 4 months, the intervention group adherence rates were superior to the control group rates. Pharmacy refill rates of adherence were lower than self-reports. Results suggest that for some participants, the tailored coaching intervention was bene-ficial. Barriers to and facilitators of better adherence are discussed.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Adams, DB; Gosselin, T
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Adams, DB, and Gosselin, T. "A tailored nurse coaching intervention for oral chemotherapy adherence." Journal of the advanced practitioner in oncology 5.3 (May 2014): 163-172. (Review)
PMID
25089216
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the advanced practitioner in oncology
Volume
5
Issue
3
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
163
End Page
172

Implementing distress management guidelines in ambulatory oncology: A quality improvement project

Distress assessment and referral to psychosocial services is an essential component of evidence-based oncologic nursing care. Oncology nurses have an opportunity to address patient distress needs through leadership of implementation programs and support for the positive outcomes that engaging in psychosocial services provides. This quality improvement project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and utility of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network's distress management clinical practice guidelines in ambulatory oncology. A theoretical framework guided the process design that included staff education, screening, and management in a cohort implementation project with historical control. © Oncology Nursing Society.

Authors
Hammelef, KJ; Friese, CR; Breslin, TM; Riba, M; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Hammelef, KJ, Friese, CR, Breslin, TM, Riba, M, and Schneider, SM. "Implementing distress management guidelines in ambulatory oncology: A quality improvement project." Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing 18.1 SUPPL. (February 1, 2014): 31-36.
Source
scopus
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
18
Issue
1 SUPPL.
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
31
End Page
36
DOI
10.1188/14.CJON.S1.31-36

Adherence to antiemetic guidelines in patients with malignant glioma: A quality improvement project to translate evidence into practice

Purpose: A quality improvement project was implemented to improve adherence to evidence-based antiemetic guidelines for malignant glioma patients treated with moderately emetic chemotherapy (MEC). Poorly controlled chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) reduce cancer treatment efficacy and significantly impair cancer patients' quality of life (QOL). A review of Duke University Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center (PRTBTC)'s usual practice demonstrates a high incidence (45 %) of CINV, despite premedication with short-acting 5-HT3-serotonin-receptor antagonists (5-HT 3-RAs). National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)'s evidence-based guidelines recommend the combination of the long-acting 5-HT3-RA palonosetron (PAL) and dexamethasone (DEX) for the prevention of acute and delayed CINV with MEC. Low adherence (58 %) to antiemetic guidelines may have explained our high CINV incidence. Methods: One-sample binomial test, quasi-experimental design, evaluated a combination intervention that included a provider education session; implementation of risk-assessment tool with computerized, standardized antiemetic guideline order sets; and a monthly audit-feedback strategy. Post-implementation adherence to evidence-based antiemetic order sets and patient outcomes were measured and compared to baseline and historical data. Primary outcome was the guideline order set adherence rate. Secondary outcomes included nausea/vomiting rates and QOL. Results: Adherence to ordering MEC guideline antiemetics increased significantly, from 58 % to a sustained 90 %, with associated improvement in nausea/vomiting. In acute and delayed phases, 75 and 84 % of patients, respectively, did not experience CINV. There was no significant change in QOL. Conclusion: Combination intervention and audit-feedback strategy to translate evidence into oncology practice improved and sustained adherence to antiemetic guidelines. Adherence corresponded with effective nausea/vomiting control and preserved QOL in patients with malignant gliomas. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

Authors
Affronti, ML; Schneider, SM; Herndon, JE; Schlundt, S; Friedman, HS
MLA Citation
Affronti, ML, Schneider, SM, Herndon, JE, Schlundt, S, and Friedman, HS. "Adherence to antiemetic guidelines in patients with malignant glioma: A quality improvement project to translate evidence into practice." Supportive Care in Cancer 22.7 (January 1, 2014): 1897-1905.
Source
scopus
Published In
Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume
22
Issue
7
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
1897
End Page
1905
DOI
10.1007/s00520-014-2136-0

Implementing distress management guidelines in ambulatory oncology: a quality improvement project.

Distress assessment and referral to psychosocial services is an essential component of evidence-based oncologic nursing care. Oncology nurses have an opportunity to address patient distress needs through leadership of implementation programs and support for the positive outcomes that engaging in psychosocial services provides. This quality improvement project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and utility of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network's distress management clinical practice guidelines in ambulatory oncology. A theoretical framework guided the process design that included staff education, screening, and management in a cohort implementation project with historical control.

Authors
Hammelef, KJ; Friese, CR; Breslin, TM; Riba, M; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Hammelef, KJ, Friese, CR, Breslin, TM, Riba, M, and Schneider, SM. "Implementing distress management guidelines in ambulatory oncology: a quality improvement project." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 18 Suppl (January 2014): 31-36.
PMID
24480661
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
18 Suppl
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
31
End Page
36
DOI
10.1188/14.cjon.s1.31-36

Group appointments in a breast cancer survivorship clinic.

Authors
Trotter, K; Schneider, SM; Turner, BS
MLA Citation
Trotter, K, Schneider, SM, and Turner, BS. "Group appointments in a breast cancer survivorship clinic." Journal of the advanced practitioner in oncology 4.6 (November 2013): 423-431. (Review)
PMID
25032022
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the advanced practitioner in oncology
Volume
4
Issue
6
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
423
End Page
431

PCA safety data review after clinical decision support and smart pump technology implementation.

INTRODUCTION: Medication errors account for 20% of medical errors in the United States with the largest risk at prescribing and administration. Analgesics or opioids are frequently used medications that can be associated with patient harm when prescribed or administered improperly. In an effort to decrease medication errors, Duke University Hospital implemented clinical decision support via computer provider order entry (CPOE) and "smart pump" technology, 2/2008, with the goal to decrease patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) adverse events. METHODS: This project evaluated PCA safety events, reviewing voluntary report system and adverse drug events via surveillance (ADE-S), on intermediate and step-down units preimplementation and postimplementation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pumps for the prescribing and administration of opioids therapy in the adult patient requiring analgesia for acute pain. DISCUSSION: Voluntary report system and ADE-S PCA events decreased based upon 1000 PCA days; ADE-S PCA events per 1000 PCA days decreased 22%, from 5.3 (pre) to 4.2 (post) (P = 0.09). Voluntary report system events decreased 72%, from 2.4/1000 PCA days (pre) to 0.66/1000 PCA days (post) and was statistically significant (P < 0.001). There was a difference in the ADE-S data for causality (P < 0.0001) with sleep apnea and renal insufficiency approaching significance. Voluntary report system safety event were statistically significant for obesity [body mass index (BMI) ≥30] and weight. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated a decrease in PCA events between time periods in both the ADE-S and voluntary report system data, thus supporting the recommendation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pump technology.

Authors
Prewitt, J; Schneider, S; Horvath, M; Hammond, J; Jackson, J; Ginsberg, B
MLA Citation
Prewitt, J, Schneider, S, Horvath, M, Hammond, J, Jackson, J, and Ginsberg, B. "PCA safety data review after clinical decision support and smart pump technology implementation." J Patient Saf 9.2 (June 2013): 103-109.
PMID
23697982
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Patient Safety
Volume
9
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
103
End Page
109
DOI
10.1097/PTS.0b013e318281b866

Ruxolitinib: a new treatment for myelofibrosis.

Myelofibrosis (MF) is a blood cancer characterized by fibrotic bone marrow and altered hematopoiesis. Although the prevalence of MF is low, its severe symptoms have a significantly negative impact on patient quality of life, and its ability to transform into leukemia increases morbidity. Conventional drug therapies provide modest symptom palliation, but allogeneic stem cell transplantation has been the only treatment capable of affecting MF's natural history. Ruxolitinib (Jakafi®) is a new targeted therapy indicated to treat patients with intermediate- and high-risk MF. Although the research is conflicted regarding ruxolitinib's ability to affect survival or induce remission, studies show that it offers dramatic improvements in symptom management. However, ruxolitinib carries some potentially life-threatening adverse effects. This article reviews ruxolitinib, discusses its risks and benefits, and describes the vital role of oncology nurses in education, monitoring, and support.

Authors
Lowery, EW; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Lowery, EW, and Schneider, SM. "Ruxolitinib: a new treatment for myelofibrosis." Clin J Oncol Nurs 17.3 (June 2013): 312-318.
PMID
23715708
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
17
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
312
End Page
318
DOI
10.1188/13.CJON.312-318

Implementing an evidence-based risk assessment tool to predict chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in women with breast cancer.

BACKGROUND: Several studies have documented the efficacy of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in reducing rates of infections and risk of febrile neutropenia. An appropriate risk assessment model is pivotal to identify high-risk patients who would require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the study were to develop, implement, and evaluate a risk assessment model for neutropenic events in breast cancer patients who were receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. METHODS: During the study period, neutropenia risk was assessed for breast cancer patients by using an innovative risk model before the first cycle of chemotherapy. A stepwise logistic regression model was performed to determine significant factors for the prediction. RESULTS: A total of 119 patients were evaluated for neutropenia risk between August 2010 and December 2010. Twenty-nine percent (35/119) of the patients have experienced at least 1 neutropenic event during the initial 3 cycles of chemotherapy. Based on the logistic regression model, only the risk score was retained as the significant predictor; the probability of an individual patient developing neutropenic events increased 1.24 times by increasing 1 score number (odds ratio, 1.24; with 95% confidence interval, 1.063-1.457). CONCLUSIONS: Based on the examination of different cutoff points, the performance of the risk model is best when the risk threshold is set at 6, which was found to have a sensitivity of 0.49 and a specificity of 0.69; the misclassification rate was 0.37, with a positive predictive value of 0.40 and a negative predictive value of 0.76. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The results of this project support incorporating the discussed risk assessment model into routine nursing assessments to prevent neutropenic complications.

Authors
Chang, L-L; Schneider, SM; Chiang, S-C; Horng, C-F
MLA Citation
Chang, L-L, Schneider, SM, Chiang, S-C, and Horng, C-F. "Implementing an evidence-based risk assessment tool to predict chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in women with breast cancer." Cancer Nurs 36.3 (May 2013): 198-205.
PMID
23051869
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
36
Issue
3
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
198
End Page
205
DOI
10.1097/NCC.0b013e3182642d98

The Experience and Self-Management Of Fatigue in Patients on Hemodialysis

Authors
Horigan, AE; Schneider, SM; Docherty, S; Barroso, J
MLA Citation
Horigan, AE, Schneider, SM, Docherty, S, and Barroso, J. "The Experience and Self-Management Of Fatigue in Patients on Hemodialysis." NEPHROLOGY NURSING JOURNAL 40.2 (2013): 113-122.
PMID
23767335
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Nephrology Nursing Journal
Volume
40
Issue
2
Publish Date
2013
Start Page
113
End Page
122

Evaluation of a breast cancer survivorship clinic that uses a group medical appointment model: Patient program evaluation and financial analysis.

Authors
Trotter, K; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Trotter, K, and Schneider, SM. "Evaluation of a breast cancer survivorship clinic that uses a group medical appointment model: Patient program evaluation and financial analysis." JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY 30.27 (September 20, 2012).
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
30
Issue
27
Publish Date
2012

Evaluation of a cancer survivorship protocol: transitioning patients to survivors.

This article describes the implementation and evaluation of a survivorship protocol for cancer survivors to improve knowledge about their disease and decrease anxiety. The study included a convenience sample of 30 cancer survivors at an outpatient community cancer center in the southeastern United States following completion of acute oncology treatment. One month after the survivorship protocol was delivered, knowledge about diagnosis, treatments, recommended follow-up, signs of recurrence, and late side effects increased. Anxiety scores were lower one month after the intervention, and satisfaction with the protocol was high. The results demonstrated that the survivorship protocol is a feasible method of educating cancer survivors, supporting the Institute of Medicine's recommendation that strategies for delivering education to cancer survivors are important. Survivors have additional needs that must be addressed following treatment, and a survivorship protocol can provide the knowledge survivors need to participate in their own health care.

Authors
Curcio, KR; Lambe, C; Schneider, S; Khan, K
MLA Citation
Curcio, KR, Lambe, C, Schneider, S, and Khan, K. "Evaluation of a cancer survivorship protocol: transitioning patients to survivors." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 16.4 (August 2012): 400-406. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
16
Issue
4
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
400
End Page
406
DOI
10.1188/12.CJON.400-406

Evaluation of a cancer survivorship protocol: Transitioning patients to survivors

This article describes the implementation and evaluation of a survivorship protocol for cancer survivors to improve knowledge about their disease and decrease anxiety. The study included a convenience sample of 30 cancer survivors at an outpatient community cancer center in the southeastern United States following completion of acute oncology treatment. One month after the survivorship protocol was delivered, knowledge about diagnosis, treatments, recommended follow-up, signs of recurrence, and late side effects increased. Anxiety scores were lower one month after the intervention, and satisfaction with the protocol was high. The results demonstrated that the survivorship protocol is a feasible method of educating cancer survivors, supporting the Institute of Medicine's recommendation that strategies for delivering education to cancer survivors are important. Survivors have additional needs that must be addressed following treatment, and a survivorship protocol can provide the knowledge survivors need to participate in their own health care.

Authors
Curcio, KR; Lambe, C; Schneider, S; Khan, K
MLA Citation
Curcio, KR, Lambe, C, Schneider, S, and Khan, K. "Evaluation of a cancer survivorship protocol: Transitioning patients to survivors." Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing 16.4 (2012): 400-406.
PMID
22842691
Source
scival
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
16
Issue
4
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
400
End Page
406
DOI
10.1188/12.CJON

Interventions to promote adherence with oral agents.

OBJECTIVES: The advent of oral therapies has dramatically changed the landscape of cancer therapy. Yet the degree to which patients actually take the prescribed agents as ordered remains unknown. This article outlines the challenges that oral chemotherapy agents present to both patients and providers and suggests interventions for promoting adherence. DATA SOURCES: Published articles and web resources. CONCLUSION: Barriers and facilitators to medication adherence are reviewed and interventions to promote medication adherence are presented. Strategies that include patient education and symptom management can promote adherence. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Maximizing adherence to oral chemotherapy agents can have many positive outcomes, but most important is improvement in overall survival and life expectancy. Other outcomes include improved safety and quality of life. Patients risk improper dosing and an increase in disease recurrence when there is nonadherence with medications. Correct dosing, education, and symptom management are all critical to ensuring adherence. Nursing interventions that incorporate education, early symptom identification, and reminder prompts can improve outcomes.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Hess, K; Gosselin, T
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Hess, K, and Gosselin, T. "Interventions to promote adherence with oral agents." Semin Oncol Nurs 27.2 (May 2011): 133-141. (Review)
PMID
21514482
Source
pubmed
Published In
Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Volume
27
Issue
2
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
133
End Page
141
DOI
10.1016/j.soncn.2011.02.005

Effect of virtual reality on time perception in patients receiving chemotherapy.

PURPOSE: Virtual reality (VR) during chemotherapy has resulted in an elapsed time compression effect, validating the attention diversion capabilities of VR. Using the framework of the pacemaker-accumulator cognitive model of time perception, this study explored the influence of age, gender, state anxiety, fatigue, and cancer diagnosis in predicting the difference between actual time elapsed during receipt of intravenous chemotherapy while immersed in a VR environment versus patient's retrospective estimates of time elapsed during this treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This secondary analysis from three studies yielded a pooled sample of N = 137 participants with breast, lung, or colon cancer. Each study employed a crossover design requiring two matched intravenous chemotherapy treatments, with participants randomly assigned to receive VR during one treatment. Regressions modeled the effect of demographic variables, diagnosis, and Piper Fatigue Scale and State Anxiety Inventory scores on the difference between actual and estimated time elapsed during chemotherapy with VR. RESULTS: In a forward regression model, three predictors (diagnosis, gender, and anxiety) explained a significant portion of the variability for altered time perception (F=5.06, p = 0.0008). Diagnosis was the strongest predictor; individuals with breast and colon cancer perceived time passed more quickly. CONCLUSIONS: VR is a noninvasive intervention that can make chemotherapy treatments more tolerable. Women with breast cancer are more likely and lung cancer patients less likely to experience altered time perception during VR (a possible indicator of effectiveness for this distraction intervention). Understanding factors that predict responses to interventions can help clinicians tailor coping strategies to meet each patient's needs.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Kisby, CK; Flint, EP
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Kisby, CK, and Flint, EP. "Effect of virtual reality on time perception in patients receiving chemotherapy." Support Care Cancer 19.4 (April 2011): 555-564.
PMID
20336327
Source
pubmed
Published In
Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume
19
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
555
End Page
564
DOI
10.1007/s00520-010-0852-7

Nurse and physician perspectives on patients with cancer having online access to their laboratory results

Purpose/Objectives: To compare the perspectives of oncology nurses and physicians regarding online access to laboratory results for patients with cancer pre- and postimplementation, and to evaluate the impact on workload. Design: Pre- and postimplementation surveys distributed to nurses and physicians. In addition, a nursing workload study was conducted to measure the number of phone calls received from patients regarding laboratory results. Setting: The outpatient department of a comprehensive cancer center in a large, urban setting in the northeastern United States with more than 500,000 patient visits each year. Sample: 460 outpatient nurses and 349 attending physicians were surveyed; 10 of those nurses were invited to participate in the nursing workload study, as well. Methods: A survey was sent to nurses and physicians one month prior to implementation and then repeated six months postimplementation. A nursing workload study was conducted for 16 weeks beginning one month prior to implementation and completed three months postimplementation. Main Research Variables: Nurse and physician perspectives; nursing workload Findings: Nurses demonstrated greater support than physicians with regard to patient access, their level of comfort with the patient access, and patients' ability to interpret results. Statistical significance was identified in all three questions (p < 0.05). Perspectives on workload did not differ by role; nurses and physicians anticipated an increase in workload prior to implementation, but reported that workload decreased or stayed the same postimplementation (p < 0.005). The nursing workload study supported that finding because no change was observed in the average number of phone calls per day during the implementation period. Conclusions: Oncology nurses and physicians have different perspectives on providing patients with cancer with online access to laboratory results. Concerns about increasing workload were not substantiated in the current study. Implications for Nursing: Providing patients with online access to their laboratory results is a growing trend. Understanding the perspectives of oncology nurses can inform future directions for increasing health-record transparency for patients with cancer. Future research may explore the impact on the nurse-patient relationship.

Authors
Rodriguez, ES; Thom, B; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Rodriguez, ES, Thom, B, and Schneider, SM. "Nurse and physician perspectives on patients with cancer having online access to their laboratory results." Oncology Nursing Forum 38.4 (2011): 476-482.
PMID
21708538
Source
scival
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
38
Issue
4
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
476
End Page
482
DOI
10.1188/11.ONF.476-482

A prospective randomized, placebo-controlled skin care study in women diagnosed with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of three different skin care products versus a placebo in reducing the incidence of radiation therapy-induced skin reactions prophylactically. DESIGN: Prospective randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. SETTING: A radiation oncology department at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the southeastern United States. SAMPLE: 208 women with breast cancer who were to receive whole breast radiation therapy. METHODS: Patients were invited to participate after radiation therapy was documented as part of their treatment plan. Patients applied a skin care product starting on the first day of treatment and were assessed weekly by their radiation oncology nurse. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Skin reaction score and skin product. FINDINGS: None of the products were statistically better than placebo in preventing skin reactions. Increases in skin reaction over time did not vary with treatment group for the linear (p = 0.16) and nonlinear (p = 0.94) effects of time and for both time components tested together (p = 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: Ninety-five percent of women participating in this study experienced a radiation therapy-induced skin reaction. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: The development of guidelines to support safe patient care is encouraged because patients prefer to take action rather than do nothing. However, the findings do not demonstrate improved clinical outcomes with the use of skin care products. Healthcare providers should proactively educate patients about acute skin reactions and self-care strategies to minimize skin breakdown.

Authors
Gosselin, TK; Schneider, SM; Plambeck, MA; Rowe, K
MLA Citation
Gosselin, TK, Schneider, SM, Plambeck, MA, and Rowe, K. "A prospective randomized, placebo-controlled skin care study in women diagnosed with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy." Oncol Nurs Forum 37.5 (September 2010): 619-626.
PMID
20797953
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
37
Issue
5
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
619
End Page
626
DOI
10.1188/10.ONF.619-626

Overview of stereotactic body radiotherapy and the nursing role.

Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a rapidly emerging technology that enhances radiation therapy delivery. It allows for tightly conformed treatment fields and accurate delivery even with moving targets in the body. SBRT currently is used most commonly in treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancers, as well as lung, liver, and spinal metastases. Studies to date are encouraging for increased local control with acceptable patient tolerance. This article familiarizes nurses with the use of this new technology and proposes the potential nursing role in maximizing patient preparation and follow-up care.

Authors
Smink, KA; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Smink, KA, and Schneider, SM. "Overview of stereotactic body radiotherapy and the nursing role." Clin J Oncol Nurs 12.6 (December 2008): 889-893.
PMID
19064382
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
12
Issue
6
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
889
End Page
893
DOI
10.1188/08.CJON.889-893

Issues in clinical trials management. Academic research units: opportunities and challenges for nursing practice.

Improving our ability to translate research findings from discovery into clinical practice is a priority if we are to benefit from scientific discovery. The academic research unit serves as a catalyst for investigator-initiated and industry-initiated clinical trials. Expert nursing care for individuals who participate in clinical trials is essential for this effort. In this paper we discussed a model of nursing practice, roles for nurses on an academic research unit, and the deployment of nursing assets to create an efficient, safe, and nimble academic research unit. We also will discuss the use of the academic research unit as an educational site and learning environment for both undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Turner, BS; Califf, RM; Burks, W; McHutchinson, JG; Gilliss, CL
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Turner, BS, Califf, RM, Burks, W, McHutchinson, JG, and Gilliss, CL. "Issues in clinical trials management. Academic research units: opportunities and challenges for nursing practice." Research Practitioner 9.5 (September 2008): 175-184. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
Research Practitioner
Volume
9
Issue
5
Publish Date
2008
Start Page
175
End Page
184

Nursing advocacy in North Carolina.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To identify the ways oncology nurses in one state advocate for patients, as well as the resources they use to do so. DESIGN: Descriptive, cross-sectional survey. SETTING: North Carolina. SAMPLE: 141 RNs in North Carolina who were members of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS). METHODS: Subjects completed a two-page, self-administered questionnaire comprised of fixed-choice and open-ended questions. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Demographics, frequency of advocating for patient services, and awareness of ONS resources. FINDINGS: Nurses in North Carolina advocate for patients in a variety of ways. A need exists to develop ongoing methods to keep nurses up to date on advocacy issues, as well as to establish mentoring opportunities for them. Nurses believe that they are most challenged in addressing patients' financial and insurance concerns. CONCLUSIONS: Oncology nurses frequently advocate for patients' needs. The findings provide direction for future initiatives to educate nurses about their role in patient advocacy and available resources. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Ongoing education and research are needed to enhance the role of oncology nurses as patient advocates.

Authors
Gosselin-Acomb, TK; Schneider, SM; Clough, RW; Veenstra, BA
MLA Citation
Gosselin-Acomb, TK, Schneider, SM, Clough, RW, and Veenstra, BA. "Nursing advocacy in North Carolina." Oncol Nurs Forum 34.5 (September 2007): 1070-1074.
PMID
17878134
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
34
Issue
5
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
1070
End Page
1074
DOI
10.1188/07.ONF.1070-1074

Virtual reality: a distraction intervention for chemotherapy.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To explore virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in adults receiving chemotherapy treatments for breast, colon, and lung cancer. DESIGN: Crossover design in which participants served as their own control. SETTING: Outpatient clinic at a comprehensive cancer center in the southeastern United States. SAMPLE: 123 adults receiving initial chemotherapy treatments. METHODS: Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and then received no intervention (control) during an alternate matched chemotherapy treatment. The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale-2, Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, and State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure symptom distress. The Presence Questionnaire and an open-ended questionnaire were used to evaluate the subjects' VR experience. The influence of type of cancer, age, and gender on symptom outcomes was explored. Mixed models were used to test for differences in levels of symptom distress. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Virtual reality and symptom distress. FINDINGS: Patients had an altered perception of time (p < 0.001) when using VR, which validates the distracting capacity of the intervention. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that patients believed the head-mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cyber-sickness, and 82% would use VR again. However, analysis demonstrated no significant differences in symptom distress immediately or two days following chemotherapy treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Patients stated that using VR made the treatment seem shorter and that chemotherapy treatments with VR were better than treatments without the distraction intervention. However, positive experiences did not result in a decrease in symptom distress. The findings support the idea that using VR can help to make chemotherapy treatments more tolerable, but clinicians should not assume that use of VR will improve chemotherapy-related symptoms. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Patients found using VR during chemotherapy treatments to be enjoyable. VR is a feasible and cost-effective distraction intervention to implement in the clinical setting.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Hood, LE
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, and Hood, LE. "Virtual reality: a distraction intervention for chemotherapy." Oncol Nurs Forum 34.1 (January 2007): 39-46.
PMID
17562631
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
34
Issue
1
Publish Date
2007
Start Page
39
End Page
46
DOI
10.1188/07.ONF.39-46

Virtual reality intervention for chemotherapy symptoms

Authors
Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM. "Virtual reality intervention for chemotherapy symptoms." CYBERPSYCHOLOGY & BEHAVIOR 9.6 (December 2006): 717-718.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Cyber Psychology & Behavior
Volume
9
Issue
6
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
717
End Page
718

Virtual reality intervention for chemotherapy symptoms

Authors
Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM. "Virtual reality intervention for chemotherapy symptoms." PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY 15.1 (February 2006): S7-S7.
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Psycho-Oncology
Volume
15
Issue
1
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
S7
End Page
S7

Gefitinib (Iressa™, ZD1839) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors: The wave of the future in cancer therapy

Targeted therapies are one of the latest innovative trends in cancer therapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target found in high concentrations in several solid tumors including lung, breast, colorectal, and brain. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839), block the EGFR. As a result, there is inhibition of cellular proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and inhibition of anti-angiogenesis. Gefitinib has demonstrated significant efficacy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), leading to FDA approval for treatment of this refractory disease. Phase 2 trials with gefitinib for platinum refractory NSCLC reported disease response and symptom improvement. Early results of phase 2 studies of gefitinib, combined with standard chemotherapy in colorectal cancer, showed a 75% response rate compared with 55% with standard therapy alone. Gefitinib, combined with flutamide, produced an additive growth inhibition in prostate cancer. A phase 2 trial of gefitinib in first-relapse glioblastoma multiforme demonstrated median overall survival from treatment start of 39.4 weeks compared with 40 weeks with standard chemotherapy. Gefitinib is an oral agent with a mild toxicity profile, and thus, may be an optimal addition to chemotherapeutic regimens for some solid tumors. Gefitinib is potentially a vital and useful weapon in the arsenal of cancer therapies. © 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Authors
Penne, K; Bohlin, C; Schneider, S; Allen, D
MLA Citation
Penne, K, Bohlin, C, Schneider, S, and Allen, D. "Gefitinib (Iressa™, ZD1839) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors: The wave of the future in cancer therapy." Cancer Nursing 28.6 (2006): 481-486.
PMID
16330971
Source
scival
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
28
Issue
6
Publish Date
2006
Start Page
481
End Page
486
DOI
10.1097/00002820-200511000-00012

Profile of cancer-related symptoms prior to chemotherapy.

Authors
Rowe, K; Schneider, S
MLA Citation
Rowe, K, and Schneider, S. "Profile of cancer-related symptoms prior to chemotherapy." Journal of Supportive Oncology 3.6 Suppl 4 (November 2005): 32-33. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
The Journal of Supportive Oncology
Volume
3
Issue
6 Suppl 4
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
32
End Page
33

Profile of cancer-related symptoms prior to chemotherapy

Authors
Rowe, K; Schneider, S
MLA Citation
Rowe, K, and Schneider, S. "Profile of cancer-related symptoms prior to chemotherapy." Journal of Supportive Oncology 3.6 SUPPL. 4 (2005): 32-33.
PMID
16355560
Source
scival
Published In
The Journal of Supportive Oncology
Volume
3
Issue
6 SUPPL. 4
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
32
End Page
33

Virtual reality as a distraction intervention for women receiving chemotherapy.

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To explore the use of virtual reality as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer. DESIGN: Crossover study. SETTING: The outpatient clinic of a midwestern comprehensive cancer center. SAMPLE: 20 women 18-55 years of age. METHODS: Using a crossover design, 20 subjects served as their own controls. For two matched chemotherapy treatments, one pretest and two post-test measures were employed. Participants were assigned randomly to receive the virtual reality distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and received no distraction intervention (control condition) during an alternate chemotherapy treatment. An open-ended questionnaire elicited each subject's evaluation of the intervention. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Symptom distress, fatigue, anxiety. FINDINGS: Significant decreases in symptom distress and fatigue occurred immediately following chemotherapy treatments when women used the virtual reality intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The distraction intervention decreased symptom distress, was well received, and was easy to implement in the clinical setting. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Nursing interventions to manage chemotherapy-related symptom distress can improve patient quality of life and increase chances for survival by reducing treatment-related symptom distress and enhancing patients' ability to adhere to treatment regimens and cope with their disease.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Prince-Paul, M; Allen, MJ; Silverman, P; Talaba, D
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Prince-Paul, M, Allen, MJ, Silverman, P, and Talaba, D. "Virtual reality as a distraction intervention for women receiving chemotherapy." Oncol Nurs Forum 31.1 (January 2004): 81-88.
PMID
14722591
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
31
Issue
1
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
81
End Page
88
DOI
10.1188/04.ONF.81-88

Virtual reality intervention for older women with breast cancer.

This study examined the effects of a virtual reality distraction intervention on chemotherapy-related symptom distress levels in 16 women aged 50 and older. A cross-over design was used to answer the following research questions: (1) Is virtual reality an effective distraction intervention for reducing chemotherapy-related symptom distress levels in older women with breast cancer? (2) Does virtual reality have a lasting effect? Chemotherapy treatments are intensive and difficult to endure. One way to cope with chemotherapy-related symptom distress is through the use of distraction. For this study, a head-mounted display (Sony PC Glasstron PLM - S700) was used to display encompassing images and block competing stimuli during chemotherapy infusions. The Symptom Distress Scale (SDS), Revised Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), and the State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) were used to measure symptom distress. For two matched chemotherapy treatments, one pre-test and two post-test measures were employed. Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and received no distraction intervention (control condition) during an alternate chemotherapy treatment. Analysis using paired t-tests demonstrated a significant decrease in the SAI (p = 0.10) scores immediately following chemotherapy treatments when participants used VR. No significant changes were found in SDS or PFS values. There was a consistent trend toward improved symptoms on all measures 48 h following completion of chemotherapy. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that women thought the head mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cybersickness, and 100% would use VR again.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Ellis, M; Coombs, WT; Shonkwiler, EL; Folsom, LC
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Ellis, M, Coombs, WT, Shonkwiler, EL, and Folsom, LC. "Virtual reality intervention for older women with breast cancer." Cyberpsychol Behav 6.3 (June 2003): 301-307.
PMID
12855087
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cyber Psychology & Behavior
Volume
6
Issue
3
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
301
End Page
307
DOI
10.1089/109493103322011605

Cancer-related fatigue.

Approximately 1.3 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer in 2003 and millions of other individuals are already living with the disease. Fatigue continues to be the most prevalent and disruptive symptom of cancer and its treatment regimens. Fatigue was the most frequent and distressing cancer-related symptom occurring in women with lung cancer, two times greater than the next symptom, pain, and remains one of the most common symptoms in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients at any stage of the disease. There are many causes of cancer-related fatigue including preexisting conditions, physical and psychological symptoms caused by cancer, and the consequences of cancer treatment. High levels of fatigue decrease quality of life, physical functional status, and symptom management. This article presents an evidenced-base review of cancer-related fatigue, strategies for the management of cancer-related fatigue, and recommendations for clinical practice.

Authors
Visovsky, C; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Visovsky, C, and Schneider, SM. "Cancer-related fatigue." Online J Issues Nurs 8.3 (2003): 8-. (Review)
PMID
14656195
Source
pubmed
Published In
Online journal of issues in nursing
Volume
8
Issue
3
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
8

Cancer-related fatigue

Approximately 1.3 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer in 2003 and millions of other individuals are already living with the disease. Fatigue continues to be the most prevalent and disruptive symptom of cancer and its treatment regimens. Fatigue was the most frequent and distressing cancer-related symptom occurring in women with lung cancer, two times greater than the next symptom, pain, and remains one of the most common symptoms in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients at any stage of the disease. There are many causes of cancer-related fatigue including preexisting conditions, physical and psychological symptoms caused by cancer, and the consequences of cancer treatment. High levels of fatigue decrease quality of life, physical functional status, and symptom management. This article presents an evidenced-base review of cancer-related fatigue, strategies for the management of cancer-related fatigue, and recommendations for clinical practice.

Authors
Visovsky, C; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Visovsky, C, and Schneider, SM. "Cancer-related fatigue." Online Journal of Issues in Nursing 8.3 (2003): 88-112.
Source
scival
Published In
Online journal of issues in nursing
Volume
8
Issue
3
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
88
End Page
112

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

Nausea and vomiting (N&V) is among the most distressing side effects of chemotherapy, despite the development of more efficacious antiemetic agents. As many as 60% of patients who receive cancer chemotherapy experience some degree of N&V. However, the actual incidence is difficult to determine with accuracy because of the variety of drugs, doses, and health conditions of the patients who receive cancer treatments. This article examines the state of the science related to chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and reviews both pharmacologic and behavioral strategies that have demonstrated efficacy in managing these distressing symptoms.

Authors
Bender, CM; McDaniel, RW; Murphy-Ende, K; Pickett, M; Rittenberg, CN; Rogers, MP; Schneider, SM; Schwartz, RN
MLA Citation
Bender, CM, McDaniel, RW, Murphy-Ende, K, Pickett, M, Rittenberg, CN, Rogers, MP, Schneider, SM, and Schwartz, RN. "Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting." Clin J Oncol Nurs 6.2 (March 2002): 94-102. (Review)
PMID
11889684
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
6
Issue
2
Publish Date
2002
Start Page
94
End Page
102
DOI
10.1188/02.CJON.94-102

From single site to societal belief: the impact of pediatric oncology nursing research.

This review describes the evolution of pediatric oncology nursing research over the past 25 years. It highlights practice-changing contributions from single-site studies and from multisite trials and discusses strategies for interdisciplinary collaboration. Technological advances that will alter the way in which studies are conducted and findings are disseminated will influence the future of nursing research. Studies implemented by pediatric nurse researchers will continue to influence practice and change how we, and others, view the experience of childhood cancer.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Hinds, PS; Pritchard, M
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Hinds, PS, and Pritchard, M. "From single site to societal belief: the impact of pediatric oncology nursing research." J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 18.4 (July 2001): 164-170. (Review)
PMID
11471117
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing (Elsevier)
Volume
18
Issue
4
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
164
End Page
170
DOI
10.1053/jpon.2001.24797

Virtual reality as a distraction intervention for older children receiving chemotherapy.

The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the perceived effectiveness and feasibility of using virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention for children, aged 10-17, receiving outpatient chemotherapy. Treatments for cancer are intensive and difficult to endure. Distraction interventions are effective because the individual concentrates on pleasant or interesting stimuli instead of focusing on unpleasant symptoms. VR is a computer-simulated technique allowing an individual to hear and feel stimuli that correspond with a visual image. Evaluation of the VR intervention demonstrated positive outcomes. Eighty-two percent of the children (n = 11) indicated the chemotherapy treatment with the VR was better than previous chemotherapy treatments. All subjects responded positively when asked if they would like to use the VR again. The intervention was easy to implement, did not require practice to be effective, and required minimal nursing time. Results from this pilot study suggest that VR as a distraction intervention has the potential to enhance positive clinical outcomes. This intervention warrants further investigation with both pediatric and adult populations.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Workman, ML
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, and Workman, ML. "Virtual reality as a distraction intervention for older children receiving chemotherapy." Pediatr Nurs 26.6 (November 2000): 593-597.
PMID
12026359
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pediatric Nursing
Volume
26
Issue
6
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
593
End Page
597

The influence of uncertainty in illness, stress appraisal, and hope on coping in survivors of breast cancer

On the basis of Mishel's uncertainty in illness theory, Lazarus and Folkman's stress on appraisal and coping, and Herth's perspective of hope, this cross-sectional, correlational study was designed to examine the influence of uncertainty, stress appraisal, and hope on coping in 71 survivors of breast cancer. Uncertainty was measured by the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness: Community Scale, stress appraisal by the Stress Appraisal Index, hope by the Herth Hope Index, and coping by the Ways of Coping Questionnaires (WCQ).

Authors
Wonghongkul, T; Moore, SM; Musil, C; Schneider, S; Deimling, G
MLA Citation
Wonghongkul, T, Moore, SM, Musil, C, Schneider, S, and Deimling, G. "The influence of uncertainty in illness, stress appraisal, and hope on coping in survivors of breast cancer." Cancer Nursing 23.6 (2000): 422-429.
PMID
11128121
Source
scival
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
23
Issue
6
Publish Date
2000
Start Page
422
End Page
429

I look funny and I feel bad. Measurement of symptom distress.

Authors
Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM. "I look funny and I feel bad. Measurement of symptom distress." J Child Fam Nurs 2.5 (September 1999): 380-384. (Review)
PMID
10795194
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of child and family nursing
Volume
2
Issue
5
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
380
End Page
384

Effects of virtual reality on symptom distress in children receiving chemotherapy

This study tested the premise that virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention could mitigate chemotherapy-related symptom distress in children with cancer aged 10-17 years. Cancer treatments are intensive and difficult to endure. Distraction interventions are effective because the individual concentrates on pleasant or interesting stimuli instead of focusing on unpleasant symptoms. VR as a distraction intervention is both immersive and interactive. For this study the individual wore a Virtual IO® headset during a single intravenous chemotherapy treatment. Participants chose one of three commercially available, CD ROM-based scenarios: Magic Carpet®, Sherlock Holmes Mystery®, and Seventh Guest®. An interrupted time series design with removed treatment was used to answer these research questions: (1) Is VR an effective distraction intervention for reducing chemotherapy-related symptom distress in children? and (2) Does VR have a lasting effect? The convenience sample consisted of 11 children receiving outpatient chemotherapy. The Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC-1) were used to measure the dependent variable of symptom distress. Repeated-measures ANOVA were used for data analysis. Data analysis of the SDS suggested that the VR intervention was effective at reducing the level of symptom distress immediately following the chemotherapy treatment (p < .10), but did not have a lasting effect. Analysis of the STAIC-1 demonstrated high levels of anxiety during the initial chemotherapy treatment that decreased during subsequent treatments. State anxiety levels were not influenced by the VR intervention. This study supports the application of VR as a distraction intervention.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Workman, ML
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, and Workman, ML. "Effects of virtual reality on symptom distress in children receiving chemotherapy." Cyberpsychology and Behavior 2.2 (1999): 125-134.
Source
scival
Published In
Cyber Psychology & Behavior
Volume
2
Issue
2
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
125
End Page
134
DOI
10.1089/cpb.1999.2.125

Relationship among uncertainty in illness, stress appraisal, hope, and coping in breast cancer survivors.

Authors
Wonghongkul, T; Moore, SM; Musil, C; Schneider, S; Deimling, G
MLA Citation
Wonghongkul, T, Moore, SM, Musil, C, Schneider, S, and Deimling, G. "Relationship among uncertainty in illness, stress appraisal, hope, and coping in breast cancer survivors." The Journal of Nursing Research, Thai Journal (English Language) 3.3 (1999): 1-15. (Academic Article)
Source
manual
Published In
The Journal of Nursing Research, Thai Journal (English Language)
Volume
3
Issue
3
Publish Date
1999
Start Page
1
End Page
15

Clinical implications for the administration of colony stimulating factors.

This article familiarizes the practitioner with the clinical nursing implications of the colony stimulating factors that have been approved for use. The process of hematopoiesis is reviewed with a focus on the mechanisms of action for Sargramostim, Filgrastim, and Epoetin Alfa. Each agent is discussed individually and information is presented regarding indications, pharmacologic properties, routes of administration, and potential adverse reactions. Nursing interventions for care of the patient receiving colony stimulating factors are discussed.

Authors
Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM. "Clinical implications for the administration of colony stimulating factors." Orthop Nurs 13.1 (January 1994): 56-64.
PMID
8164990
Source
pubmed
Published In
Orthopaedic Nursing
Volume
13
Issue
1
Publish Date
1994
Start Page
56
End Page
64

Common electrolyte imbalances associated with malignancy.

More than one million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer during 1992, and 50% will be cured of their disease. Of those individuals not cured of the malignancy, survival time after diagnosis has increased tremendously compared to 1980. Because of advances in therapy and the increase in long-term survival, the presence of cancer patients in critical care units should no longer represent either a medical contradiction or an ethical dilemma when the condition requiring critical care is potentially reversible. Many of these individuals may become patients in critical care settings as a result of specific electrolyte imbalances caused by the malignant disease or treatment of malignancy. Although the imbalances often are temporary, they can be life-threatening without intervention. The most common temporary electrolyte imbalances associated with malignant conditions are hypercalcemia, hyperkalemia, and tumor lysis syndrome. Critical care nurses can contribute skill and knowledge in ameliorating these conditions so that the person with cancer can have better quality and longer survival time.

Authors
Hawthorne, JL; Schneider, SM; Workman, ML
MLA Citation
Hawthorne, JL, Schneider, SM, and Workman, ML. "Common electrolyte imbalances associated with malignancy." AACN Clin Issues Crit Care Nurs 3.3 (August 1992): 714-723.
PMID
1524943
Source
pubmed
Published In
AACN clinical issues in critical care nursing
Volume
3
Issue
3
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
714
End Page
723

Using diversional activity to enhance coping.

Diversional activity deficit, a nursing diagnosis that occurs with prolonged hospital treatment, requires creative and practical ways for nurses to support patients. A tool designed to assess diversional needs is described. Benefits include improved relationships and enhanced patient coping with a minimum of cost and inconvenience.

Authors
Radziewicz, RM; Schneider, SM
MLA Citation
Radziewicz, RM, and Schneider, SM. "Using diversional activity to enhance coping." Cancer Nurs 15.4 (August 1992): 293-298.
PMID
1504959
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
15
Issue
4
Publish Date
1992
Start Page
293
End Page
298

Chemotherapy-induced emergencies.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Distelhorst, CW
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, and Distelhorst, CW. "Chemotherapy-induced emergencies." Semin Oncol 16.6 (December 1989): 572-578. (Review)
PMID
2688116
Source
pubmed
Published In
Seminars in Oncology
Volume
16
Issue
6
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
572
End Page
578

Chemotherapy experts.

Authors
Schneider, SM; Roe, CA; Hawthorne, JL
MLA Citation
Schneider, SM, Roe, CA, and Hawthorne, JL. "Chemotherapy experts." Nursing 19.11 (November 1989): 72-73.
PMID
2586903
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nursing
Volume
19
Issue
11
Publish Date
1989
Start Page
72
End Page
73
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