Sophia Smith

Overview:

Dr. Sophia Smith is an Associate Professor with Tenure at the Duke School of Nursing and earned her PhD and MSW degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Her research explores ways to improve the quality of cancer care including post-treatment survivorship and palliative care with a primary focus on leveraging technology in delivering behavioral health interventions to the community. She is leading efforts to integrate clinical cancer care and research in building the scientific evidence that informs evidence-based practice through her current and past membership on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Survivorship Guidelines Panel and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Survivorship Committee. Dr. Smith’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, NCCN, and Pfizer Grants for Independent Learning and Change.

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S.W. 2001

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2007

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Grants:

Symptom Burden and Quality of Life in Multiple Myeloma Patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pillars4Life: An Online Self-Management Curriculum for Cancer Survivors

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Advanced symptom burden and quality of life in multiple myeloma patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Advanced symptom burden and quality of life in multiple myeloma patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Promoting Effective Self-Management of Chronic Pain with mHealth Neurofeedback

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Relationships among uncertainty, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, and quality of life in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors.

<h4>Purpose</h4>The aim of this study was to examine relationships among uncertainty, PTSD symptoms (PTSS), and quality of life (QOL) in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) survivors.<h4>Methods</h4>Eligible NMIBC survivors were identified through the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, and 398 survivors participated in a mailed survey that measured survivor's outcomes (uncertainty, PTSS, and QOL). Structural equation modeling was used to examine the mediating effect of uncertainty and PTSS on the association between personal characteristics and QOL in NMIBC survivors.<h4>Results</h4>NMIBC survivors experienced cancer-related uncertainty; higher uncertainty was associated with male, lower income, lack of cure, and lower cognition-ability. Uncertainty was significantly and negatively associated with QOL. In addition, PTSS completely mediated the effect of uncertainty on QOL, and higher PTSS had a strong association with poorer QOL. Additionally, comorbidities, cognition-general concerns, uncertainty, and PTSS had strong negative effects on QOL.<h4>Conclusion</h4>This study has identified modifiable psychosocial factors which affect QOL in NMIBC survivors. The study findings can be used in the development of interventions to improve QOL for NMIBC survivors.
Authors
Jung, A; Crandell, JL; Nielsen, ME; Smith, SK; Bryant, AL; Mayer, DK
MLA Citation
Jung, Ahrang, et al. “Relationships among uncertainty, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, and quality of life in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors.Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 30, no. 7, July 2022, pp. 6175–85. Epmc, doi:10.1007/s00520-022-07034-1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1518167
PMID
35437672
Source
epmc
Published In
Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
6175
End Page
6185
DOI
10.1007/s00520-022-07034-1

A cross-sectional observational study of health-related quality of life in adults with multiple myeloma.

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this manuscript is to describe health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes in a United States (US)-based sample of multiple myeloma (MM) patients and identify characteristics associated with poor HRQoL. PATIENTS AND METHODS: MM patients identified through the Tumor Registry of a Southeastern US medical center were mailed surveys assessing patient characteristics and HRQoL outcomes. HRQoL outcomes were measured using PROMIS short form instruments which included measures of global health (global physical health and global mental health), physical function, and ability to participate in social roles and activities (social function). HRQoL domain scores were summarized, and best subset linear regression was used to identify predictors of HRQoL. RESULTS: A total of 690 patients completed and returned surveys for a response rate of 64.7%. Respondents reported global physical health (44.9), global mental health (47.5), and physical function (44.1) significantly worse than the general population mean of 50 (p < .0001). Social function (49.5) did not differ significantly (p = .09). Worse socioeconomic status, higher comorbidities, not being in remission, and past receipt of radiation therapy were significantly associated with worse HRQoL. Treatment status and time since diagnosis were not associated with HRQoL outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with MM have significantly worse HRQoL than the general population. These findings warrant increased attention from clinicians and researchers. More research is needed to better describe the relationship between treatment patterns and HRQoL in patients with MM, and to identify effective interventions.
Authors
LeBlanc, MR; Bryant, AL; LeBlanc, TW; Yang, Q; Sellars, E; Chase, CC; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
LeBlanc, Matthew R., et al. “A cross-sectional observational study of health-related quality of life in adults with multiple myeloma.Support Care Cancer, vol. 30, no. 6, June 2022, pp. 5239–48. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-022-06943-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1512627
PMID
35262791
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
5239
End Page
5248
DOI
10.1007/s00520-022-06943-5

Exploring Nurse and Patient Experiences of Developing Rapport During Oncology Ambulatory Care Videoconferencing Visits: A Qualitative Study (Preprint)

Authors
Koppel, PD; De Gagne, JC; Docherty, S; Smith, S; Prose, NS; Jabaley, T
MLA Citation
Koppel, Paula D., et al. “Exploring Nurse and Patient Experiences of Developing Rapport During Oncology Ambulatory Care Videoconferencing Visits: A Qualitative Study (Preprint).” Journal of Medical Internet Research, JMIR Publications Inc., May 2022. Crossref, doi:10.2196/39920.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1532021
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Published Date
DOI
10.2196/39920

Exploring the relationship between social support and mental health status among lymphoma survivors: Does patient-centered communication really matter? A brief report

The purpose of this study was to explore whether patient-centered communication (PCC) would partially mediate the relationship between social support and mental health status among adult survivors of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Methods: Secondary analysis of self-administered questionnaires mailed to 682 adults with NHL who were assumed living and had completed the baseline 2005 study (83% response rate). Adult NHL survivors (n = 566) and data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Sobel test. Results: PCC partially mediated the relationship between social support and three measures of mental health outcomes (SF-36 Mental Component Summary [SF36-MCS], Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version [PCL-C], Impact of Cancer–Negative Impact Summary [IOCv2 NIS]). Results of the conservative Sobel test were significant (p <.01) in three mediation models. Conclusions: Future research should focus on testing interventions that target PCC and identifying additional mediators and moderators between social support and mental health outcomes among cancer survivors.
Authors
Caviness-Ashe, N; Zimmerman, S; Chappel-Aiken, L; Onsomu, EO; Bryant, AL; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
Caviness-Ashe, N., et al. “Exploring the relationship between social support and mental health status among lymphoma survivors: Does patient-centered communication really matter? A brief report.” Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Jan. 2022. Scopus, doi:10.1080/07347332.2022.2072792.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1524368
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1080/07347332.2022.2072792

Exploring Nurse and Patient Experiences of Developing Rapport During Oncology Ambulatory Care Videoconferencing Visits: A Qualitative Study (Preprint)

Authors
Koppel, PD; De Gagne, JC; Docherty, S; Smith, S; Prose, NS; Jabaley, T
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1522413
Source
crossref
DOI
10.2196/preprints.39920

Research Areas:

Cancer
Cancer Survivors
Cancer--Patients
Palliative Care
Palliative treatment
Social Work
Technology--Information services
Telemedicine