Linda Sutton

Overview:

Clinical

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Medical Director, Duke Oncology Consortium

Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1987

U Mass Memorial Medical Center

Resident, Internal Medicine

Montefiore Medical Center

Fellowship, Hematology/ Oncology

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

NCI National Clinical Trials Network (UG1)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Spore In Breast Cancer

Administered By
Surgery
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Self-Management Intervention for Women with Breast Cancer and Diabetes

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Caregiver-Assisting Coping Skills Training for Lung Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Increasing physical activity in Cancer Survivors through a Text-messaging Exercise motivation Program (ICanSTEP).

PURPOSE: Cancer survivors are often sedentary. Self-monitoring may promote physical activity through self-activation. We conducted a pilot trial to evaluate whether wearable activity tracker with personalized text message feedback would increase physical activity. METHODS: We enrolled 30 patients with solid tumor cancers into a non-randomized prospective intervention trial (NCT02627079): 15 had completed treatment in the past year and 15 under active treatment. Each participant received an activity tracker and daily text messages personalized to their activity level. We assessed patient-reported outcomes and 6-min walk (6 MW) at baseline and 3 months. RESULTS: Twenty-six participants completed the study. There was substantial variation in baseline activity. Overall, 39% of participants increased their steps taken by at least 20%, and 23% increased their 6 MW distance by 20% or more. More participants who had completed treatment strongly agreed (73%) that the intervention increased their exercise levels than those receiving active treatment (47%). At 3 months, there was a significant improvement in median Beck Depression Inventory-II and Godin Leisure Index composite scores. At 6 months, 72% still wore their activity tracker at least 4 days per week. CONCLUSION: We found that the intervention was well-accepted with a high completion rate at 3 months and continued self-use at 6 months. In this pilot study of combined activity tracker and motivational messaging, we found a signal for increased physical activity over a 3-month period. Future research is needed to study this technique for its impact on activity and other physical and psychological measures of well-being. IMPLICATION FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Activity tracker with personalized motivational messaging may be useful in promoting physical activity in cancer survivors.
Authors
Koontz, BF; Levine, E; McSherry, F; Niedzwiecki, D; Sutton, L; Dale, T; Streicher, M; Rushing, C; Owen, L; Kraus, WE; Bennett, G; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Koontz, Bridget F., et al. “Increasing physical activity in Cancer Survivors through a Text-messaging Exercise motivation Program (ICanSTEP).Support Care Cancer, vol. 29, no. 12, Dec. 2021, pp. 7339–49. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-021-06281-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484312
PMID
34050402
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
29
Published Date
Start Page
7339
End Page
7349
DOI
10.1007/s00520-021-06281-y

NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Palliative Care, Version 2.2021.

Palliative care has evolved to be an integral part of comprehensive cancer care with the goal of early intervention to improve quality of life and patient outcomes. The NCCN Guidelines for Palliative Care provide recommendations to help the primary oncology team promote the best quality of life possible throughout the illness trajectory for each patient with cancer. The NCCN Palliative Care Panel meets annually to evaluate and update recommendations based on panel members' clinical expertise and emerging scientific data. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel's recent discussions and highlights updates on the importance of fostering adaptive coping strategies for patients and families, and on the role of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions to optimize symptom management.
Authors
Dans, M; Kutner, JS; Agarwal, R; Baker, JN; Bauman, JR; Beck, AC; Campbell, TC; Carey, EC; Case, AA; Dalal, S; Doberman, DJ; Epstein, AS; Fecher, L; Jones, J; Kapo, J; Lee, RT; Loggers, ET; McCammon, S; Mitchell, W; Ogunseitan, AB; Portman, DG; Ramchandran, K; Sutton, L; Temel, J; Teply, ML; Terauchi, SY; Thomas, J; Walling, AM; Zachariah, F; Bergman, MA; Ogba, N; Campbell, M
MLA Citation
Dans, Maria, et al. “NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Palliative Care, Version 2.2021.J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 19, no. 7, July 2021, pp. 780–88. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2021.0033.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1492386
PMID
34340208
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
780
End Page
788
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2021.0033

Behavioral cancer pain intervention using videoconferencing and a mobile application for medically underserved patients: Rationale, design, and methods of a prospective multisite randomized controlled trial.

BACKGROUND: Women with breast cancer in medically underserved areas are particularly vulnerable to persistent pain and disability. Behavioral pain interventions reduce pain and improve outcomes. Cancer patients in medically underserved areas receive limited adjunctive cancer care, as many lack access to pain therapists trained in behavioral interventions, face travel barriers to regional medical centers, and may have low literacy and limited resources. mHealth technologies have the potential to decrease barriers but must be carefully adapted for, and efficacy-tested with, medically underserved patients. We developed an mHealth behavioral pain coping skills training intervention (mPCST-Community). We now utilize a multisite randomized controlled trial to: 1) test the extent mPCST-Community reduces breast cancer patients' pain severity (primary outcome), pain interference, fatigue, physical disability, and psychological distress; 2) examine potential mediators of intervention effects; and 3) evaluate the intervention's cost and cost-effectiveness. METHODS/DESIGN: Breast cancer patients (N = 180) will be randomized to mPCST-Community or an attention control. mPCST-Community's four-session protocol will be delivered via videoconferencing at an underserved community clinic by a remote pain therapist at a major medical center. Videoconference sessions will be supplemented with a mobile application. Participants will complete self-report measures at baseline, post-intervention, and 3- and 6-month follow-ups. CONCLUSIONS: mPCST-Community has the potential to reduce pain and disability, and decrease barriers for cancer patients in medically underserved areas. This is one of the first trials to test an mHealth behavioral cancer pain intervention developed specifically for medically underserved communities. If successful, it could lead to widespread implementation and decreased health disparities.
Authors
Kelleher, SA; Winger, JG; Fisher, HM; Miller, SN; Reed, SD; Thorn, BE; Spring, B; Samsa, GP; Majestic, CM; Shelby, RA; Sutton, LM; Keefe, FJ; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1472509
PMID
33497833
Source
pubmed
Published In
Contemp Clin Trials
Volume
102
Published Date
Start Page
106287
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2021.106287

Improving health engagement and lifestyle management for breast cancer survivors with diabetes.

Breast cancer survivors with type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cancer recurrence, serious health complications, more severe symptoms, psychological distress, and premature death relative to breast cancer survivors without diabetes. Maintaining glycemic control is critical for decreasing symptoms and preventing serious health problems. Many breast cancer survivors with type 2 diabetes have difficulty maintaining diabetes self-management behaviors and achieving glycemic control. Both cancer and diabetes-related symptoms (e.g., physical symptoms and psychological distress) are often barriers to engaging in diabetes self-management strategies. This study evaluates a novel diabetes coping skills training (DCST) intervention for improving breast cancer survivors' abilities to manage symptoms and adhere to recommended diabetes self-management behaviors. The telephone-based DCST protocol integrates three key theory-based strategies: coping skills training for managing symptoms, adherence skills training, and healthy lifestyle skills training. A randomized clinical trial will test the DCST intervention plus diabetes education by comparing it to diabetes education alone. Symptoms, distress, diabetes self-management behaviors, and self-efficacy will be assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) will be assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months. This study addresses a critical gap in the care of breast cancer survivors by evaluating a novel behavioral intervention to improve the management of symptoms, adherence, and glycemic control in breast cancer survivors with type 2 diabetes. Special considerations for this medically underserved population are also provided. The findings of this study could lead to significant improvements in clinical care and beneficial outcomes for breast cancer survivors. Trials registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02970344, registered 11/22/2016.
Authors
Shelby, RA; Dorfman, CS; Arthur, SS; Bosworth, HB; Corsino, L; Sutton, L; Owen, L; Erkanli, A; Keefe, F; Corbett, C; Kimmick, G
MLA Citation
Shelby, Rebecca A., et al. “Improving health engagement and lifestyle management for breast cancer survivors with diabetes.Contemp Clin Trials, vol. 92, May 2020, p. 105998. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cct.2020.105998.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1437949
PMID
32289471
Source
pubmed
Published In
Contemp Clin Trials
Volume
92
Published Date
Start Page
105998
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2020.105998

The need for a Serious Illness Digital Ecosystem (SIDE) to improve outcomes for patients receiving palliative and hospice care.

Palliative and hospice care services produce immense benefits for patients living with serious illness and for their families. Due to the national shift toward value-based payment models, health systems and payers share a heightened awareness of the need to incorporate palliative and hospice services into their service mix for seriously ill patient populations. During the last decade, a tremendous amount of capital has been invested to better integrate information technology into healthcare. This includes development of technologies to promote utilization of palliative and hospice services. However, no coordinated strategy exists to link such efforts together to create a cohesive strategy that transitions from identification of patients through receipt of services. A Serious Illness Digital Ecosystem (SIDE) is the intentional aggregation of disparate digital and mobile health technologies into a single system that connects all of the actors involved in serious illness patient care. A SIDE leverages deployed health technologies across disease continuums and geographic locations of care to facilitate the flow of information among patients, providers, health systems, and payers. Five pillars constitute a SIDE, and each one is critical to the success of the system. The 5 pillars of a SIDE are: Identification, Education, Engagement, Service Delivery, and Remote Monitoring. As information technology continues to evolve and becomes a part of the care delivery landscape, it is necessary to develop cohesive ecosystems that inform all parts of the serious illness patient experience and identifies patients for the right services, at the right time.
Authors
Nicolla, J; Bosworth, HB; Docherty, SL; Pollak, KI; Powell, J; Sellers, N; Reeve, BB; Samsa, G; Sutton, L; Kamal, AH
MLA Citation
Nicolla, Jonathan, et al. “The need for a Serious Illness Digital Ecosystem (SIDE) to improve outcomes for patients receiving palliative and hospice care.Am J Manag Care, vol. 26, no. 4 Spec No., Apr. 2020, pp. SP124–26. Pubmed, doi:10.37765/ajmc.2020.42960.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1438086
PMID
32286036
Source
pubmed
Published In
Am J Manag Care
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
SP124
End Page
SP126
DOI
10.37765/ajmc.2020.42960