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Walton, AnnMarie

Overview:

Dr. Walton's program of research examines minimizing occupational exposures to carcinogens. Her dissertation work combined her educational preparation and over ten years of clinical experience caring for patients with acute leukemia to examine the pesticide protective behaviors of Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers. This work was supported by a T32 Fellowship in Cancer, Aging and End of Life from the National Institutes of Nursing Research, An American Cancer Society Doctoral Scholarship in Oncology Nursing and a Jonas Nurse Leader Scholarship.


Dr. Walton completed a postdoctoral fellowship at UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Nursing. She received support from a T32 Fellowship in Interventions to Prevent and Manage Chronic Illness from the National Institutes of Nursing Research and pilot funds from the NC Occupational Safety and Health Education Research Center for work that focused on understanding the protective behaviors of Nursing Assistants handling antineoplastic drug contaminated excreta.


Dr. Walton's service work centers on preparing and enabling nurses to lead change to advance health. She serves as a nurse consultant for the Center to Champion Nursing in America.

Positions:

Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2015

Ph.D. — University of Utah

Awards:

Excellence in Oncology Nursing Health Policy and Advocacy Award. Oncology Nursing Society.

Type
National
Awarded By
Oncology Nursing Society
Date
January 01, 2016

Breakthrough Leaders in Nursing Award. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, AARP Foundation, Center to Champion Nursing in America.

Type
National
Awarded By
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, AARP Foundation, Center to Champion Nursing in America
Date
January 01, 2014

The Great 100, . Great 100 Nurses of North Carolina .

Type
State
Awarded By
Great 100 Nurses of North Carolina
Date
January 01, 2007

Publications:

Social Media: Support for Survivors and Young Adults With Cancer.

Social media use is ubiquitous among young adults. Young adults with cancer must make important decisions about where, what, and how to share information on social media. Oncology nurses are in a unique position to start conversations about the risks and benefits of social media use. This column aims to review a variety of social media platforms that may be used by young adults with cancer and provide guidance to nurses on initiating open dialogue with young adults about social media usage. 
.

Authors
Walton, AL; Albrecht, TA; Lux, L; Judge Santacroce, S
MLA Citation
Walton, AL, Albrecht, TA, Lux, L, and Judge Santacroce, S. "Social Media: Support for Survivors and Young Adults With Cancer." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 21.5 (October 2017): 537-540.
PMID
28945728
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
21
Issue
5
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
537
End Page
540
DOI
10.1188/17.cjon.537-540

Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise for Recently Treated Adults With Acute Leukemia

Authors
Leak Bryant, A; Walton, A; Pergolotti, M; Phillips, B; Bailey, C; Mayer, D; Battaglini, C
MLA Citation
Leak Bryant, A, Walton, A, Pergolotti, M, Phillips, B, Bailey, C, Mayer, D, and Battaglini, C. "Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise for Recently Treated Adults With Acute Leukemia." Oncology Nursing Forum 44.4 (July 1, 2017): 413-420.
Source
crossref
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
44
Issue
4
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
413
End Page
420
DOI
10.1188/17.ONF.413-420

Benefits, Facilitators, Barriers, and Strategies to Improve Pesticide Protective Behaviors: Insights from Farmworkers in North Carolina Tobacco Fields

Authors
Walton, A; LePrevost, C; Linnan, L; Sanchez-Birkhead, A; Mooney, K
MLA Citation
Walton, A, LePrevost, C, Linnan, L, Sanchez-Birkhead, A, and Mooney, K. "Benefits, Facilitators, Barriers, and Strategies to Improve Pesticide Protective Behaviors: Insights from Farmworkers in North Carolina Tobacco Fields." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14.7 (July 2017): 677-677.
Source
crossref
Published In
International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume
14
Issue
7
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
677
End Page
677
DOI
10.3390/ijerph14070677

Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review

Authors
Walton, A; Rogers, B
MLA Citation
Walton, A, and Rogers, B. "Workplace Hazards Faced by Nursing Assistants in the United States: A Focused Literature Review." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14.6 (June 2017): 544-544.
Source
crossref
Published In
International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume
14
Issue
6
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
544
End Page
544
DOI
10.3390/ijerph14050544

Hazardous Drugs: Legislative and Regulatory Efforts to Improve Safe Handling

Authors
Walton, A; Eisenberg, S; Friese, C
MLA Citation
Walton, A, Eisenberg, S, and Friese, C. "Hazardous Drugs: Legislative and Regulatory Efforts to Improve Safe Handling ." Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing 21.2 (April 1, 2017): 254-256.
Source
crossref
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
21
Issue
2
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
254
End Page
256
DOI
10.1188/17.CJON.254-256

Pesticides: Perceived Threat and Protective Behaviors Among Latino Farmworkers.

The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and beliefs of 72 Latino farmworkers in North Carolina about the threat of health effects of pesticides, including cancer. It sought to explore relationships between threat perceptions and pesticide protective behaviors observed in the field.Utilizing stepwise multiple regression, the authors found that years worked in agriculture in the United States was associated with decreased use of protective clothing.Pesticide protective behaviors in the field may be improved by utilizing moderately experienced farmworkers (<10 years) as lay advisors to reinforce training.

Authors
Walton, AL; LePrevost, C; Wong, B; Linnan, L; Sanchez-Birkhead, A; Mooney, K
MLA Citation
Walton, AL, LePrevost, C, Wong, B, Linnan, L, Sanchez-Birkhead, A, and Mooney, K. "Pesticides: Perceived Threat and Protective Behaviors Among Latino Farmworkers." Journal of agromedicine 22.2 (January 27, 2017): 140-147.
PMID
28129083
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Agromedicine
Volume
22
Issue
2
Publish Date
2017
Start Page
140
End Page
147
DOI
10.1080/1059924x.2017.1283278

A Systematic Review of Psychometric Properties of Health-Related Quality-of-Life and Symptom Instruments in Adult Acute Leukemia Survivors.

Acute leukemia represents 4% of cancer cases in the United States annually. There are more than 302 000 people living with acute and chronic leukemia in the United States. Treatment has been shown to have both positive and negative effects on health-related quality of life (HRQOL).The aims of this study were to examine psychometric properties of symptom and HRQOL instruments and to provide implications for the assessment in adults with acute leukemia relevant to clinical practice and future research.Systematic literature search was conducted from 1990 to 2014 using electronic databases and manual searches. Psychometric studies were considered eligible for inclusion if (1) the psychometric paper was published using at least 1 HRQOL or symptom instrument, and (2) adults with acute leukemia were included in the sample. Studies were excluded if the age groups were not adults, or if the instrument was in a language other than English.Review identified a total of 7 instruments (1 cancer generic HRQOL, 2 symptom related, 3 HRQOL combined with symptom questions, and 1 disease specific). The most commonly used instrument was the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30, followed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue.An acute leukemia diagnosis can have a significant impact on HRQOL. Our recommendations include using both an HRQOL and symptom instrument to capture patient experiences during and after treatment.The availability of comprehensive, valid, and reliable HRQOL and symptom instruments to capture the experiences of adults with acute leukemia during and after treatment is limited.

Authors
Bryant, AL; Walton, A; Shaw-Kokot, J; Mayer, DK; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Bryant, AL, Walton, A, Shaw-Kokot, J, Mayer, DK, and Reeve, BB. "A Systematic Review of Psychometric Properties of Health-Related Quality-of-Life and Symptom Instruments in Adult Acute Leukemia Survivors." Cancer nursing 39.5 (September 2016): 375-382. (Review)
PMID
26645111
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Nursing
Volume
39
Issue
5
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
375
End Page
382
DOI
10.1097/ncc.0000000000000327

Increasing the Number of Oncology Nurses Serving on Boards.

Nurses have knowledge about quality, safety, and the patient experience that is valuable to governing boards. In 2011, the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommended that nurses be prepared and enabled to lead change to advance health care. Five years after the recommendation, work toward this goal is still needed.
.

Authors
Walton, A; Mullinix, C
MLA Citation
Walton, A, and Mullinix, C. "Increasing the Number of Oncology Nurses Serving on Boards." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 20.4 (August 2016): 440-442.
PMID
27441519
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
20
Issue
4
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
440
End Page
442
DOI
10.1188/16.cjon.440-442

Observed and self-reported pesticide protective behaviors of Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

Agricultural pesticide exposure has potential adverse health effects for farmworkers that may be reduced by pesticide protective behaviors (PPBs). The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Worker Protection Standard (WPS) requires PPBs be taught to farmworkers prior to field work. Studies to date have not utilized observational methods to evaluate the degree to which PPBs are practiced by Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the United States. The purpose of this study was to describe, compare, and contrast observed and self-reported PPBs used by Latino farmworkers; both PPBs that the WPS requires be taught and other PPBs were included. Observed and self-reported data were collected from 71 Latino farmworkers during the 2014 tobacco growing season in North Carolina. Participants were consistent in reporting and using long pants and closed shoes in the field most of the time. In addition, gloves, hats/bandanas, and water-resistant outerwear were frequently observed, although they are not required to be taught by the WPS. Farmworkers reported more long-sleeve (p=.028) and glove use (p=.000) than what was observed. It was uncommon to observe washing behavior before eating or drinking, even when washing supplies were available. Washing behaviors were significantly overreported for hand (p=.000; p=.000) and face (p=.000; p=.058) washing before eating and drinking in the field. This study documents that protective clothing behaviors that the WPS requires be taught, plus a few others are commonly practiced by Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers, but washing behaviors in the field are not. Targeted strategies to improve washing behaviors in the field are needed.

Authors
Walton, AL; LePrevost, C; Wong, B; Linnan, L; Sanchez-Birkhead, A; Mooney, K
MLA Citation
Walton, AL, LePrevost, C, Wong, B, Linnan, L, Sanchez-Birkhead, A, and Mooney, K. "Observed and self-reported pesticide protective behaviors of Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers." Environmental research 147 (May 2016): 275-283.
PMID
26918841
Source
epmc
Published In
Environmental Research
Volume
147
Publish Date
2016
Start Page
275
End Page
283
DOI
10.1016/j.envres.2016.02.020

Cancer-related fatigue: scientific progress has been made in 40 years.

Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing, persistent symptom that is experienced by survivors during and after treatment. Unsurprisingly, many early CRF studies were conducted by nurses. These studies included a look at patients receiving localized radiation treatment (Haylock & Hart, 1979); an exploration of fatigue as a conceptual approach to a clinical problem (Aistars, 1987); the development of a nursing theory focused on fatigue mechanisms (Piper, Lindsey, & Dodd, 1987); an examination of fatigue mechanisms (St Pierre, Kasper, & Lindsey, 1992), as well as of fatigue in advanced cancer (Bruera & MacDonald, 1988) and in non-small cell lung cancer (Sarna, 1993); and a description of fatigue and potential nursing interventions (Nail & King, 1987). Winningham et al. (1994) wrote a state-of-the-science article about fatigue in the cancer experience for the Oncology Nursing Forum, and Mock et al. (1997) was one of the first to conduct an exercise study regarding the effects of exercise on fatigue, physical functioning, and emotional distress during radiation therapy for breast cancer. Nurse scholars from the 1970s-2000s were pivotal in advancing the science of fatigue in various cancers and have provided a scientific foundation for those four decades. 
.

Authors
Leak Bryant, A; Walton, AL; Phillips, B
MLA Citation
Leak Bryant, A, Walton, AL, and Phillips, B. "Cancer-related fatigue: scientific progress has been made in 40 years." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 19.2 (April 2015): 137-139.
PMID
25840376
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
19
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
137
End Page
139
DOI
10.1188/15.cjon.137-139

Use of ED and hospital services for patients with acute leukemia after induction therapy: one year follow-up.

Previous studies have documented use of health care services by oncology patients in the Emergency Department (ED), but little is known about the utilization of health services of patients with acute leukemia after induction therapy. The aim of this study was to examine chief reasons for ED and hospital use by patients newly diagnosed with acute leukemia patients after induction therapy up to one year after discharge. A retrospective, longitudinal study of all visits to the ED or unplanned hospital admissions at a single institution for patients with acute leukemia was conducted. Inclusion criteria were patients ≥18 years of age at time of diagnosis, a confirmed diagnosis of AML or ALL, and received and discharged from induction treatment between 2007 and 2010. Donabedian's structure-process-outcome framework guided this study examining health services utilization and assessing patient outcomes. 80 patients met the inclusion criteria; 52 had AML and 28 had ALL; median age was 48 (range: 18-76) and 29% (n=23) were non-Caucasian. 70% (n=56) were discharged from induction in remission. 81% (n=65) had at least 1 ED or hospitalization event, and 44% (n=35) had 2 or more events. Of 137 events in 65 patients, the most common reason was neutropenic fever/infection (55%), bleeding (12%), and GI problems (11%). Mean number of events for ALL was 2.43 compared to 1.33 for AML patients (p=0.02), and 2.23 for <50 years of age compared to 1.20 for those older (p=0.002). 20 patients died within one year of diagnosis. Findings from this study can help inform health services delivery and utilization among patients with acute leukemia after induction therapy. Oncology providers can anticipate discharge needs and enhance follow-up care for those at higher risk for problems needing hospitalization.

Authors
Bryant, AL; Deal, AM; Walton, A; Wood, WA; Muss, H; Mayer, DK
MLA Citation
Bryant, AL, Deal, AM, Walton, A, Wood, WA, Muss, H, and Mayer, DK. "Use of ED and hospital services for patients with acute leukemia after induction therapy: one year follow-up." Leukemia research 39.4 (April 2015): 406-410.
PMID
25711944
Source
epmc
Published In
Leukemia Research
Volume
39
Issue
4
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
406
End Page
410
DOI
10.1016/j.leukres.2015.01.006

Enabling nurses to lead change: the orientation experiences of nurses to boards.

Nurses need to be full partners in shaping health care and health care policy. One way to do this is to be present and active on boards at all levels. The purpose of this study is to examine the orientation experiences of nurses to boards and their preparation to influence health care and health care policy.A Web-based survey about the efficacy of board orientation was sent to members of three local boards made up exclusively of nurses.Liabilities and fiduciary duties were least likely to be addressed in board orientation for nurses. Board members requested more training in finance and a more formal/structured orientation process.Standardizing orientation elements for nurses serving on boards would best prepare them to serve on interprofessional hospital boards and work in the health policy arena. The orientation experience on local- and state-level nursing boards is fundamental to nurses beginning board service.

Authors
Walton, A; Lake, D; Mullinix, C; Allen, D; Mooney, K
MLA Citation
Walton, A, Lake, D, Mullinix, C, Allen, D, and Mooney, K. "Enabling nurses to lead change: the orientation experiences of nurses to boards." Nursing outlook 63.2 (March 2015): 110-116.
PMID
25771188
Source
epmc
Published In
Nursing Outlook
Volume
63
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
110
End Page
116
DOI
10.1016/j.outlook.2014.12.015

Patient-reported symptoms and quality of life 
in adults with acute leukemia: a systematic review.

Systematically summarize findings from research conducted on adult acute leukemia survivors as they relate to symptoms and quality of life (QOL). 
Systematic review of the literature from 1990–2013 found in the PubMed, PsycINFO®, EMBASE, and CINAHL® databases, as well as manual searches. 
The review identified 16 quantitative studies and 1 qualitative study published from 1990–2013 that used a self-reported QOL or symptom questionnaire. Fatigue was the most commonly assessed and reported symptom, followed by depression. 
Acute leukemia and its treatment have a significant impact in all QOL domains. Future studies should include longitudinal research, more than one recruitment site, increased minority representation, and home-based exercise interventions as ways to improve all domains of QOL. 
This review increases awareness of commonly reported symptoms faced by adults with acute leukemia. Oncology nurses are central in monitoring and reporting symptoms to the interdisciplinary team that may contribute to changes in function, with the overall goal of optimizing QOL over time. 


Authors
Leak Bryant, A; Lee Walton, A; Shaw-Kokot, J; Mayer, DK; Reeve, BB
MLA Citation
Leak Bryant, A, Lee Walton, A, Shaw-Kokot, J, Mayer, DK, and Reeve, BB. "Patient-reported symptoms and quality of life 
in adults with acute leukemia: a systematic review." Oncology nursing forum 42.2 (March 2015): E91-E101. (Review)
PMID
25806895
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
42
Issue
2
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
E91
End Page
E101
DOI
10.1188/15.onf.e91-e101

The unique supportive care needs of a mother with acute myeloid leukemia during treatment.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the blood that is linked with poor survival. The disease requires immediate intensive chemotherapy treatment that leaves patients hospitalized for at least one month and often longer, depending on their supportive care needs. Mothers undergoing treatment for AML may benefit from having attention paid to their supportive care needs during that time.

Authors
Albrecht, TA; Lee Walton, A; Leak Bryant, A
MLA Citation
Albrecht, TA, Lee Walton, A, and Leak Bryant, A. "The unique supportive care needs of a mother with acute myeloid leukemia during treatment." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 19.1 (February 2015): 16-19.
PMID
25689644
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
19
Issue
1
Publish Date
2015
Start Page
16
End Page
19
DOI
10.1188/15.cjon.16-19

Voices of oncology nursing society members matter in advocacy and decisions related to U.S. Health Policy.

The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), a member of the Nursing Organizations Alliance, invests in advocating for health and public policy decisions by sending members to the Nurse in Washington Internship (NIWI) program annually. NIWI provides a forum to educate nurses on the legislative process, giving attendees a better understanding of political, legislative, and regulatory issues facing nurses. The 2014 ONS delegation participated in training and lobbying focused on federal funding issues, nursing education, workforce oversight, and funding for nursing research. The three-day program ended with a Capitol Hill visit where nurses met with their respective legislators or their staff, using skills learned at NIWI briefings to influence policy for nurses and the patients they serve. Critical health and public policy decisions affecting nurses, their practice, and their patients require participation in and understanding of the legislative process. This article provides a glimpse into the three-day experience of the delegates attending the 2014 NIWI.

Authors
Saria, MG; Stone, A; Walton, AL; Brown, G; Norton, V; Barton-Burke, M
MLA Citation
Saria, MG, Stone, A, Walton, AL, Brown, G, Norton, V, and Barton-Burke, M. "Voices of oncology nursing society members matter in advocacy and decisions related to U.S. Health Policy." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 18.6 (December 2014): 719-721.
PMID
25427709
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
18
Issue
6
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
719
End Page
721
DOI
10.1188/14.cjon.719-721

Management of febrile neutropenia in a patient with acute leukemia.

Authors
Bryant, AL; Walton, A; Albrecht, TA
MLA Citation
Bryant, AL, Walton, A, and Albrecht, TA. "Management of febrile neutropenia in a patient with acute leukemia." Journal of emergency nursing: JEN : official publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association 40.4 (July 2014): 377-381.
PMID
24054730
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Emergency Nursing
Volume
40
Issue
4
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
377
End Page
381
DOI
10.1016/j.jen.2013.07.021

Implementing survivorship care plans for colon cancer survivors.

To evaluate the feasibility, usability, and satisfaction of a survivorship care plan (SCP) and identify the optimum time for its delivery during the first 12 months after diagnosis.Prospective, descriptive, single-arm study.A National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in the southeastern United States.28 nonmetastatic colon cancer survivors within the first year of diagnosis and their primary care physicians (PCPs).Regular screening identified potential participants who were followed until treatment ended. An oncology certified nurse developed the JourneyForward™ SCP, which then was delivered to the patient by the oncology nurse practitioner (NP) during a routine follow-up visit and mailed to the PCP.Time to complete, time to deliver, usability, and satisfaction with the SCP.During one year, 75 patients were screened for eligibility, 34 SCPs were delivered, and 28 survivors and 15 PCPs participated in the study. It took an average of 49 minutes to complete a surgery SCP and 90 minutes to complete a surgery plus chemotherapy SCP. Most survivors identified that before treatment ended or within the first three months was the preferred time to receive an SCP.The SCPs were well received by the survivors and their PCPs, but were too time and labor intensive to track and complete.More work needs to be done to streamline processes that identify eligible patients and to develop and implement SCPs. Measuring outcomes will be needed to demonstrate whether SCPs are useful or not.

Authors
Mayer, DK; Gerstel, A; Walton, AL; Triglianos, T; Sadiq, TE; Hawkins, NA; Davies, JM
MLA Citation
Mayer, DK, Gerstel, A, Walton, AL, Triglianos, T, Sadiq, TE, Hawkins, NA, and Davies, JM. "Implementing survivorship care plans for colon cancer survivors." Oncology nursing forum 41.3 (May 2014): 266-273.
PMID
24769591
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncology Nursing Forum
Volume
41
Issue
3
Publish Date
2014
Start Page
266
End Page
273
DOI
10.1188/14.onf.266-273

The impact of education on caregiver burden on two inpatient oncology units.

Providing standardized education can alleviate the burden felt by the caregiver and improve health outcomes for both the patient and caregiver. Four disease groups were included in this study that represent a significantly longer hospital stay than other cancers: acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma, or those undergoing blood marrow transplant. The complexity of care is significantly higher, necessitating greater caregiver burden following hospitalization. Eligible patients and their caregivers received post-hospitalization care education through an Oncology CarePartner Program addressing the patient's physical and emotional needs. The impact of the CarePartners program on caregiver burden was evaluated by the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) and Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS) on two oncology units (medical/oncology (n = 17) and blood marrow transplant (n = 21)) at three times: within 5 days of admission (T1), patient discharge from the hospital (T2), and 30 days post-discharge (T3). There were significant increases seen from T1-T2 (median = 4, p = 0.0007) and T1-T3 (median = 5.5, p = 0.003) in the BCOS. No significant changes in OCBS (time or difficulty) were seen. Standardized patient education helped improve caregivers' overall well-being but lacked in impacting the time spent and difficulty with caregiving tasks. Educational changes to address these specific areas or evaluation by different scales are both worth further investigation.

Authors
Creedle, C; Leak, A; Deal, AM; Walton, AM; Talbert, G; Riff, B; Hornback, A
MLA Citation
Creedle, C, Leak, A, Deal, AM, Walton, AM, Talbert, G, Riff, B, and Hornback, A. "The impact of education on caregiver burden on two inpatient oncology units." Journal of cancer education : the official journal of the American Association for Cancer Education 27.2 (June 2012): 250-256.
PMID
22241024
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Cancer Education
Volume
27
Issue
2
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
250
End Page
256
DOI
10.1007/s13187-011-0302-3

Safe handling: implementing hazardous drug precautions.

Occupational exposure to chemotherapy is a significant and ubiquitous danger to oncology nurses. The Oncology Clinical Nurse III/IV leadership group at the University of North Carolina Hospitals embarked on the challenge of a comprehensive standards review regarding personal protective equipment necessary when handling waste after hazardous drug administration. This review led to practice improvements in education, the use of chemotherapy-rated gloves when handling hazardous waste, and changes in the disposal options available to staff. A discharge teaching pamphlet on safe handling for the caregivers of patients receiving hazardous drugs was created and piloted.

Authors
Walton, AML; Mason, S; Busshart, M; Spruill, AD; Cheek, S; Lane, A; Sabo, K; Taylor, A
MLA Citation
Walton, AML, Mason, S, Busshart, M, Spruill, AD, Cheek, S, Lane, A, Sabo, K, and Taylor, A. "Safe handling: implementing hazardous drug precautions." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 16.3 (June 2012): 251-254. (Review)
PMID
22641316
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
16
Issue
3
Publish Date
2012
Start Page
251
End Page
254
DOI
10.1188/12.cjon.251-254

Imagine: compassion fatigue training for nurses.

Authors
Lee Walton, AM; Alvarez, M
MLA Citation
Lee Walton, AM, and Alvarez, M. "Imagine: compassion fatigue training for nurses." Clinical journal of oncology nursing 14.4 (August 2010): 399-400.
PMID
20682494
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
14
Issue
4
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
399
End Page
400
DOI
10.1188/10.cjon.399-400

Recognition: a key retention strategy for the mature nurse.

Recognition of staff can be one of the easiest, cost-effective strategies to retain experienced mature nursing staff. The authors discuss the Senior and Generational Excellence initiative that identifies strategies and brings attention to the unique skills and needs of mature professional nurses.

Authors
Bryant-Hampton, L; Walton, AM; Carroll, T; Strickler, L
MLA Citation
Bryant-Hampton, L, Walton, AM, Carroll, T, and Strickler, L. "Recognition: a key retention strategy for the mature nurse." The Journal of nursing administration 40.3 (March 2010): 121-123.
PMID
20485211
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Nursing Administration
Volume
40
Issue
3
Publish Date
2010
Start Page
121
End Page
123
DOI
10.1097/nna.0b013e3181d04137

Planning and the Professional Preparation of Health Educators: Implications for Teaching, Research, and Practice

Authors
Linnan, LA; Sterba, KR; Lee, AM; Bontempi, JB; Yang, J; Crump, C
MLA Citation
Linnan, LA, Sterba, KR, Lee, AM, Bontempi, JB, Yang, J, and Crump, C. "Planning and the Professional Preparation of Health Educators: Implications for Teaching, Research, and Practice." Health Promotion Practice 6.3 (July 2005): 308-319.
Source
crossref
Published In
Health Promotion Practice
Volume
6
Issue
3
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
308
End Page
319
DOI
10.1177/1524839903260946

Using community-based participatory research methods to reach women with health messages: results from the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Pilot Project.

This pilot study used a community-based participatory research approach to recruit and train five licensed cosmetologists from two beauty salons to deliver health promotion messages to their customers. Stylists attended a 4-hr workshop to develop skills for delivering targeted health messages. Educational displays in the salons reinforced these messages. Qualitative and quantitative methods assessed satisfaction, readiness to change, and self-reported health behavior changes in customers immediately postintervention and at 12 months. Trained stylists reported they would continue delivering health messages after the 7-week pilot was completed; 81% of customers read the educational displays, and 86% of customers talked with their cosmetologist about the Bringing Education and Understanding to You Project. At 12 months, 55% of customers reported making changes in their health because of the conversations they had with their cosmetologist. Customers who spoke more often with their cosmetologists about health also reported a higher percentage of self-reported behavior changes. It appears that trained licensed cosmetologists are effective in promoting health messages to their customers.

Authors
Linnan, LA; Ferguson, YO; Wasilewski, Y; Lee, AM; Yang, J; Solomon, F; Katz, M
MLA Citation
Linnan, LA, Ferguson, YO, Wasilewski, Y, Lee, AM, Yang, J, Solomon, F, and Katz, M. "Using community-based participatory research methods to reach women with health messages: results from the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Pilot Project." Health promotion practice 6.2 (April 2005): 164-173.
PMID
15855286
Source
epmc
Published In
Health Promotion Practice
Volume
6
Issue
2
Publish Date
2005
Start Page
164
End Page
173
DOI
10.1177/1524839903259497

Observational study in ten beauty salons: results informing development of the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Project.

Researchers from the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Project conducted an observational study in 10 North Carolina beauty salons to gain insight into naturally occurring conversations between cosmetologists and customers, and to assess features of the salon environment that might be used to inform the development of salon-based health promotion interventions. Results revealed that the social environment of a salon is a place where cosmetologists and customers talk openly about many subjects, including health. Information, advice, appraisal, humor, and empathy are typically shared in these health conversations. Several features of the physical environment of the salon may be mobilized to support health--access to healthy foods, snacks, and beverages; smoking restrictions; and availability of print or video materials, signs, or displays that include healthy messages. Implications for planning salon-based health promotion interventions--including the training of licensed cosmetologists to deliver health messages--are discussed in light of these findings.

Authors
Solomon, FM; Linnan, LA; Wasilewski, Y; Lee, AM; Katz, ML; Yang, J
MLA Citation
Solomon, FM, Linnan, LA, Wasilewski, Y, Lee, AM, Katz, ML, and Yang, J. "Observational study in ten beauty salons: results informing development of the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Project." Health education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education 31.6 (December 2004): 790-807.
PMID
15539548
Source
epmc
Published In
Health Education & Behavior
Volume
31
Issue
6
Publish Date
2004
Start Page
790
End Page
807
DOI
10.1177/1090198104264176

Racial differences in influenza vaccination among older Americans 1996-2000: longitudinal analysis of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) survey

BACKGROUND: Influenza is a common and serious public health problem among the elderly. The influenza vaccine is safe and effective. METHODS: The purpose of the study was to determine whether frequencies of receipt vary by race, age group, gender, and time (progress from 1995/1996 to 2000), and whether any racial differences remain in age groups covered by Medicare. Subjects were selected from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (12,652 Americans 50-61 years of age (1992-2000)) and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) survey (8,124 community-dwelling seniors aged 70+ years (1993-2000)). Using multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders, we estimated the relationship between race, age group, gender, time and the main outcome measure, receipt of influenza vaccination in the last 2 years. RESULTS: There has been a clear increase in the unadjusted rates of receipt of influenza vaccination for all groups from 1995/1996 to 2000. However, the proportions immunized are 10-20% higher among White than among Black elderly, with no obvious narrowing of the racial gap from 1995/1996 to 2000. There is an increase in rates from age 50 to age 65. After age 70, the rate appears to plateau. In multivariate analyses, the racial difference remains after adjusting for a series of socioeconomic, health, and health care related variables. (HRS: OR = 0.63 (0.55-0.72), AHEAD: OR = 0.55 (0.44-0.66)) CONCLUSIONS: There is much work left if the Healthy People 2010 goal of 90% of the elderly immunized against influenza annually is to be achieved. Close coordination between public health programs and clinical prevention efforts in primary care is necessary, but to be truly effective, these services must be culturally appropriate.

Authors
Østbye, T; Taylor, DH; Lee, AMAM; Greenberg, G; van Scoyoc, L
MLA Citation
Østbye, T, Taylor, DH, Lee, AMAM, Greenberg, G, and van Scoyoc, L. "Racial differences in influenza vaccination among older Americans 1996-2000: longitudinal analysis of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) survey." BMC public health 3 (December 16, 2003): 41-.
Source
scopus
Published In
BMC Public Health
Volume
3
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
41

Screening mammography and Pap tests among older American women 1996-2000: results from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD).

BACKGROUND: We wanted to determine the frequency of self-reported receipt of screening mammography and Papanicolaou (Pap) tests in older women and investigate important predictors of utilization, based on 2 national longitudinal surveys. METHODS: This cohort study includes participants from 4 waves (1994-2000) of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS)--5,942 women aged 50 to 61 years, and 4 waves (1993-2000) of the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) survey--4,543 women aged 70 years and older. The self-reported receipt of screening mammograms and Pap smears in the most recent 2 years were reported in 1996 and 2000 for HRS, with predictors of receipt measured in 1994 and 1998. In AHEAD, the self-reported receipt of screening mammograms and Pap smears in the most recent 2 years were reported in 1995 and 2000, with predictors of receipt measured in 1993 and 1998. RESULTS: Receipt of mammography is stable at 70% to 80% among women aged 50 to 64 years, then declines to around 40% among those aged 85 to 90 years. For Pap tests there is a decline from 75% among women aged 50 to 54 years to 25% in those aged 85 to 90 years. For both mammography and Pap tests, the rates increased in all groups from 1995/1996 to 2000. Higher education, being married, higher income, not smoking, and vigorous exercise were consistently associated with higher rates of receipt. CONCLUSIONS: Although the use of mammography and Pap tests for screening declines into old age, use has been increasing recently. The large and increasing number of tests performed might not be justified given the lack of evidence of effect in older age-groups.

Authors
Ostbye, T; Greenberg, GN; Taylor, DH; Lee, AMM
MLA Citation
Ostbye, T, Greenberg, GN, Taylor, DH, and Lee, AMM. "Screening mammography and Pap tests among older American women 1996-2000: results from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD)." Ann Fam Med 1.4 (November 2003): 209-217.
PMID
15055410
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of family medicine
Volume
1
Issue
4
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
209
End Page
217

Evaluation of an infrared/radiofrequency equipment-tracking system in a tertiary care hospital.

Optimal management of assets in large hospitals is important to both cost control and patient care. A prospective controlled evaluation was conducted to determine whether an asset-tracking system using combined radiofrequency and infrared signals could increase equipment utilization, increase appropriate charge capture, and decrease personnel time spent looking for equipment. Two wards at Duke University Medical Center were randomly assigned as intervention and control. Beds sequential compression devices (SCDs), and infusion pumps were monitored during a 6-week intervention period, preceded and followed by 6-week control periods. The system's accuracy for detecting equipment, relative to a trained surveyor, was greater than 80%. Accuracy for locating equipment to a specific room was 60-80%. With the system available, we observed increased utilization of infusion pumps but not of beds or SCDs. Nursing staff and system users had positive impressions of the system and its potential. Tracking systems can successfully locate hospital equipment and may improve utilization.

Authors
Ostbye, T; Lobach, DF; Cheesborough, D; Lee, AMM; Krause, KM; Hasselblad, V; Bright, D
MLA Citation
Ostbye, T, Lobach, DF, Cheesborough, D, Lee, AMM, Krause, KM, Hasselblad, V, and Bright, D. "Evaluation of an infrared/radiofrequency equipment-tracking system in a tertiary care hospital." J Med Syst 27.4 (August 2003): 367-380.
PMID
12846468
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Medical Systems
Volume
27
Issue
4
Publish Date
2003
Start Page
367
End Page
380

Working with licensed cosmetologists to promote health: results from the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Pilot Study.

BACKGROUND: Beauty salons are located in all communities and represent a promising channel for delivering health promotion programs. No previous salon-based health promotion program has assessed the needs, interests, and preferences of licensed cosmetologists about sharing health information with their clients. METHODS: Licensed cosmetologists in one town completed a mailed survey assessing (1) health topics typically discussed with clients, (2) interest in delivering messages about beauty and health, and (3) preferred methods for learning about and sharing health information with their clients. RESULTS: The average cosmetologist sees 47 clients per week and spends 30-60 min per appointment. Eighty-two percent report that they are interested in talking about health with their clients. Most cosmetologists already discuss a wide range of health topics with their clients and are most comfortable discussing healthy eating (65.3%), physical activity (63.3%), and dieting (63.3%). Cosmetologists preferred reading pamphlets (55.1%) and watching educational videos (46.9%) to learn about beauty and health. Distributing pamphlets (69.4%), talking with clients (61.2%), and placing posters/mirror stickers in the salons (59.2%) were the methods cosmetologists most preferred for sharing health information with their clients. CONCLUSIONS: Licensed cosmetologists are in a unique position to serve as "natural helpers" by delivering health messages to their clients and reinforcing those messages over time. Partnerships with licensed cosmetologists should be developed to deliver salon-based health promotion programs.

Authors
Linnan, LA; Kim, AE; Wasilewski, Y; Lee, AM; Yang, J; Solomon, F
MLA Citation
Linnan, LA, Kim, AE, Wasilewski, Y, Lee, AM, Yang, J, and Solomon, F. "Working with licensed cosmetologists to promote health: results from the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Pilot Study." Preventive medicine 33.6 (December 2001): 606-612.
PMID
11716657
Source
epmc
Published In
Preventive Medicine
Volume
33
Issue
6
Publish Date
2001
Start Page
606
End Page
612
DOI
10.1006/pmed.2001.0933
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Research Areas:

  • Cancer--Nursing
  • Migrant agricultural laborers
  • Occupational Health
  • Self-protective behavior