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Westbrook, Kelly W

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

M.D. — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Grants:

Optimizing Delivery of a Behavioral Cancer Pain Intervention Using a SMART

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
AwardedBy
National Institutes of Health
Role
Clinical Associate
Start Date
June 01, 2016
End Date
May 31, 2021

AFT-05/PALLAS

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
AwardedBy
Alliance Foundation Trials, LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
October 25, 2016
End Date
October 11, 2018

Reimagine End of Life: An Online, Personalized Coping and Decision Aid for Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients and Providers

Administered By
School of Nursing
AwardedBy
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
July 21, 2016
End Date
July 21, 2018

Couple Communication in Cancer: A Multi-method Examination

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
AwardedBy
Arizona State University
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
September 20, 2016
End Date
August 31, 2017
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Publications:

Low-grade follicular lymphoma of the small intestine: A challenge for management

Authors
Bennani-Baiti, N; Daw, HA; Cotta, C; Martin, P; Mitchell, KW; Ambinder, RF; MacKlis, R; Pollock, R; Spiro, T
MLA Citation
Bennani-Baiti, N, Daw, HA, Cotta, C, Martin, P, Mitchell, KW, Ambinder, RF, MacKlis, R, Pollock, R, and Spiro, T. "Low-grade follicular lymphoma of the small intestine: A challenge for management." Seminars in Oncology 38.6 (2011): 714-720.
PMID
22082756
Source
scival
Published In
Seminars in Oncology
Volume
38
Issue
6
Publish Date
2011
Start Page
714
End Page
720
DOI
10.1053/j.seminoncol.2011.08.002

Reporting of race and ethnicity in breast cancer research: Room for improvement

Health disparities in breast cancer outcomes according to race/ethnicity are well documented. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) offer an opportunity to evaluate differences in disease biology and response to therapy that may contribute to disparities. We conducted a PubMed search to identify all English language original reports of breast cancer RCT from October 2001 to October 2006. The primary outcomes of interest were reporting of accrual and results by race or ethnicity of trial subjects. We evaluated the correlation between study characteristics and reporting of race/ethnicity. A total of 197 eligible trials were identified among 29 journals. Accrual was reported by race in 17% of studies and results analyzed by race in only 2%. Reporting of race was associated with National Cancer Institute funding (38 vs. 13%, P = 0.001), US cooperative group trials (52 vs. 13%, P < 0.0001), trials with US sites (43 vs. 5%, P < 0.0001), and trials enrolling > 500 subjects (24 vs. 12%, P = 0.055). Pharmaceutical industry funding, # of centers, stage of disease, nature of experimental intervention and study outcomes were not associated with reporting of race. Among US studies reporting trial accrual by race/ethnicity, the mean accrual distribution was 81% white, 7.6% black, 9.6% Asian, and 7.2% Hispanic subjects. The majority of breast cancer RCT fail to report the race/ethnicity of participants. Low accrual of black subjects and failure to report accrual and outcomes by race in RCT may contribute to difficulty in understanding and overcoming health disparities in breast cancer. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Authors
Mitchell, KW; Carey, LA; Peppercorn, J
MLA Citation
Mitchell, KW, Carey, LA, and Peppercorn, J. "Reporting of race and ethnicity in breast cancer research: Room for improvement." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 118.3 (2009): 511-517.
PMID
19444602
Source
scival
Published In
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume
118
Issue
3
Publish Date
2009
Start Page
511
End Page
517
DOI
10.1007/s10549-009-0411-4