Tian Zhang

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

Harvard Medical School

Internal Medicine Residency, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Fellowship in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Duke-UNC-Wash U Partnership for Early Phase Clinical Trials in Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

CTC-Immune Checkpoints

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Conditional lethality of copper and disulfiram as a therapeutic modality for prostate cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) as Monotherapy in the Adjuvant Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma Post Nephrectomy (KEYNOTE-564)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Salvage Trial of AR Inhibition with ADT and Apalutamide with Docetaxel followed by Radiation Therapy in Men with PSA Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy (¿STARTAR¿)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

WOMENtorship: The #WomenInMedicine perspective.

Mentorship is essential for career development, personal development, and job satisfaction for physicians in academic medicine. Women in academic medicine face unique challenges including significant gender disparities in positions of leadership as well as difficulty finding mentors. As leaders in academic medicine, we have collated several structured recommendations for physicians of both genders seeking to be better mentors to female trainees and early career physicians. We discuss each of these recommendations in detail including the following: acknowledging your own strengths and limitations as a mentor, addressing issues of work-life integration, helping your mentee set long-term career goals, and acting as a sponsor as well as a mentor. We hope these suggestions are helpful for current and aspiring mentors and provide a platform to improve career development for female physicians and reduce gender inequities in academic medicine.
Authors
Marshall, AL; Dversdal, RK; Murphy, M; Prill, DM; Zhang, T; Jain, S
MLA Citation
Marshall, Ariela L., et al. “WOMENtorship: The #WomenInMedicine perspective..” Med Teach, Oct. 2019, pp. 1–3. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/0142159X.2019.1671967.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415569
PMID
31599174
Source
pubmed
Published In
Medical Teacher
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
3
DOI
10.1080/0142159X.2019.1671967

Biologically Targeted Photo-Crosslinkable Nanopatch to Prevent Postsurgical Peritoneal Adhesion.

Peritoneal adhesion occurs in a majority of patients following abdominal surgery and can result in significant side effects and complications. Current strategies to minimize adhesions involve the use of nontargeted anatomical barriers that are either inefficient in protecting injured areas or lacking the adequate residence time to prevent adhesions. Herein, the development of a biologically targeted photo-crosslinkable nanopatch (pCNP) is reported that can prevent postsurgical adhesion. It is demonstrated that pCNP can form a compact protective barrier over surfaces with exposed collagen IV. Using a rat parietal peritoneal excision adhesion model, it is showed that pCNP is highly effective and safe in preventing postsurgical adhesions. This work presents a novel approach to preventing peritoneal adhesion with nanomaterials.
Authors
Mi, Y; Yang, F; Bloomquist, C; Xia, Y; Sun, B; Qi, Y; Wagner, K; Montgomery, SA; Zhang, T; Wang, AZ
MLA Citation
Mi, Yu, et al. “Biologically Targeted Photo-Crosslinkable Nanopatch to Prevent Postsurgical Peritoneal Adhesion..” Adv Sci (Weinh), vol. 6, no. 19, Oct. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/advs.201900809.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1406412
PMID
31592414
Source
pubmed
Published In
Advanced Science (Weinheim, Baden Wurttemberg, Germany)
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
1900809
DOI
10.1002/advs.201900809

Androgen Receptor Splice Variant, AR-V7, as a Biomarker of Resistance to Androgen Axis-Targeted Therapies in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

Many therapeutic options are now available for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), including next-generation androgen receptor axis-targeted therapies (AATTs), immunotherapy, chemotherapy, and radioisotope therapies. No clear consensus has been reached for the optimal sequencing of treatments for patients with mCRPC, and few well-validated molecular markers exist to guide the treatment decisions for individual patients. The androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7), a splice variant of the androgen receptor mRNA resulting in the truncation of the ligand-binding domain, has emerged as a biomarker for resistance to AATT. AR-V7 expression in circulating tumor cells has been associated with poor outcomes in patients treated with second- and third-line AATTs. Clinically validated assays are now commercially available for the AR-V7 biomarker. In the present review of the current literature, we have summarized the biology of resistance to AATT, with a focus on the AR-V7; and the clinical studies that have validated AR-V7 expression as a strong independent predictor of a lack of clinical benefit from AATTs. Existing evidence has indicated that patients with AR-V7-positive mCRPC will have better outcomes if treated with taxane chemotherapy regimens rather than additional AATTs.
Authors
Zhang, T; Karsh, LI; Nissenblatt, MJ; Canfield, SE
MLA Citation
Zhang, Tian, et al. “Androgen Receptor Splice Variant, AR-V7, as a Biomarker of Resistance to Androgen Axis-Targeted Therapies in Advanced Prostate Cancer..” Clin Genitourin Cancer, Sept. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.clgc.2019.09.015.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417841
PMID
31653572
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Genitourin Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.clgc.2019.09.015

Altered expression of TIM-3, LAG-3, IDO, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 during nimotuzumab therapy correlates with responses and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

BACKGROUND: Since the inhibitory immune checkpoint receptors have been described to benefit the OSCC patients clinically, it is unknown that whether their expression in tumor immune microenvironment (TME) can determine the clinical outcome in response to nimotuzumab therapy. METHODS: We examined the expression patterns of immune checkpoint receptors (including TIM-3, LAG-3, PD-L1, and CTLA-4) and an immunoregulatory enzyme called IDO in 36 OSCC patients during nimotuzumab therapy by immunohistochemistry. Then, we divided the recruited patients into clinical responders and non-responders according to computed tomography (CT) scan and analyzed the relationship between the immunological parameters and clinical outcome. RESULTS: We observed that nimotuzumab therapy significantly increased the expression of TIM-3, LAG-3, IDO, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 in the TME, and the expression of LAG-3 and PD-L1 before nimotuzumab therapy was inversely correlated with the overall survival. In clinical non-responders, we found the expression of TIM-3, LAG-3, IDO, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 was significantly increased during nimotuzumab therapy, and the expression of TIM-3, LAG-3, IDO, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 before nimotuzumab therapy was negatively correlated with the overall survival. However, in clinical responders, neither of those showed significant. CONCLUSIONS: It suggests that these immune checkpoint receptors and IDO could be considered as biomarkers to reflect immune status in the tumor microenvironment during nimotuzumab therapy. Blockade of these immune checkpoint receptors might enhance nimotuzumab-based cancer immunotherapy, thus potentially improving clinical outcomes of OSCC patients.
Authors
Wang, H; Mao, L; Zhang, T; Zhang, L; Wu, Y; Guo, W; Hu, J; Ju, H; Ren, G
MLA Citation
Wang, Hong, et al. “Altered expression of TIM-3, LAG-3, IDO, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 during nimotuzumab therapy correlates with responses and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients..” J Oral Pathol Med, vol. 48, no. 8, Sept. 2019, pp. 669–76. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/jop.12883.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421336
PMID
31132187
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Oral Pathol Med
Volume
48
Published Date
Start Page
669
End Page
676
DOI
10.1111/jop.12883

Characterization of tumor mutational burden (TMB), PD-L1, and DNA repair genes to assess correlation with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) response in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).

Authors
Labriola, M; Zhu, J; Gupta, R; McCall, S; Jackson, J; White, JR; Weingartner, E; Kong, E; Simone, P; Papp, E; Gerding, K; Simmons, J; George, DJ; Zhang, T
MLA Citation
Labriola, Matthew, et al. “Characterization of tumor mutational burden (TMB), PD-L1, and DNA repair genes to assess correlation with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) response in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)..” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 37, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2019, pp. e16079–e16079. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.e16079.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415115
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
e16079
End Page
e16079
DOI
10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.e16079