Jesse Troy

Overview:

I am a biostatistician supporting research in cell therapies and regenerative medicine at the Duke Marcus Center for Cellular Cures, and research studies in cancer therapeutics and palliative care at the Duke Cancer Institute. I also teach biostatistics in the Master of Biostatistics program and the Clinical Research Training Program at Duke.

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2012

University of Pittsburgh

Grants:

Marcus Foundation Phase II MSC ASD

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
The Marcus Foundation
Role
Statistician
Start Date
End Date

"Understanding the Patient Experience of Stage 3 Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) in the Immuno-oncology Era"

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AstraZeneca PLC
Role
Statistician
Start Date
End Date

Enabling effective anti-tumor immunity from targeted antibodies through dual innate and adaptive immune checkpoint blockade in non-immunogenic cancers

Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Smartphone Enabled Point-of-Care Detection of Serum Markers of Liver Cancer

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

High Fidelity Diffusion MRI for Children with Cerebral Palsy in Stem Cell Therapy

Administered By
Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The relationship between emotional well-being and understanding of prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

PURPOSE: Adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) face considerable distress and often have a poor prognosis. However, little is known about these patients' perceptions of prognosis and how this relates to emotional well-being (EWB). METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational study of 50 adult patients with AML initiating chemotherapy, and surveyed them longitudinally for 6 months about their prognosis, treatment goals, quality of life, and EWB (by FACT-G). We derived a prognostic estimate for each patient based on data from published trials summarized in National Comprehensive Care Network Guidelines. We used descriptive statistics and longitudinal modeling to test the hypothesis that more accurate prognostic awareness is associated with worse EWB. RESULTS: Most patients (n = 43; 86%) had an objectively poor prognosis attributable to relapsed disease, complex karyotype, or FLT3 mutation. Yet, 74% of patients reported expecting a 50% or greater chance of cure. Patients with a poor prognosis more often had discordant prognostic estimates, compared to those with favorable risk AML (OR = 7.25, 95% CI 1.21, 43.37). Patient-reported prognostic estimates did not vary significantly over time. At baseline, patients who better understood their prognosis had worse EWB and overall quality-of-life scores (EWB 12 vs. 19.5; p = 0.01; FACT-G 65 vs. 75.5; p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Patients with AML overestimate their prognosis, and awareness of a poor prognosis is associated with worse emotional well-being. Efforts are needed to improve patients' understanding of their prognosis, and to provide more psychosocial support and attention to well-being as part of high-quality leukemia care.
Authors
Singh, A; Locke, SC; Wolf, SP; Albrecht, TA; Troy, JD; Derry, H; El-Jawahri, A; LeBlanc, TW
MLA Citation
Singh, Anmol, et al. “The relationship between emotional well-being and understanding of prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Support Care Cancer, Aug. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-021-06499-w.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1493746
PMID
34401981
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s00520-021-06499-w

Expression of EGFR, VEGF, and NOTCH1 suggest differences in tumor angiogenesis in HPV-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

There is current interest in anti-angiogenesis therapies for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), although the utility of these therapies in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and HPV-negative HNSCC is unclear. Therefore, we explored heterogeneity in expression of a distal factor in angiogenesis (EGFR, the epidermal growth factor receptor), a proximal factor in angiogenesis (VEGF, the vascular endothelial growth factor) and a putative factor in angiogenesis (NOTCH1) in a HNSCC case series using immunohistochemistry in N = 67 cases (27 HPV-positive, 40 HPV-negative, by in situ hybridization). Box plots and the Wilcoxon rank sum or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare staining scores (intensity × percent of cells staining) by HPV status and lifestyle factors. Associations between EGFR, VEGF, and NOTCH1 were assessed using box plots and Spearman correlation (ρ) in all cases, and stratified by HPV status. HPV-negative HNSCC over-expressed EGFR [median (range): 30 (0-300)] relative to HPV-positive HNSCC [7.5 (0-200)] (P = 0.006). VEGF and NOTCH1 were unrelated to HPV status (P > 0.05). EGFR was associated with VEGF in HPV-negative (ρ = 0.40, P = 0.01) but not HPV-positive HNSCC (ρ = 0.25, P = 0.20). NOTCH1 and VEGF were associated in HPV-negative (ρ = 0.40, P = 0.01) but not HPV-positive tumors (ρ = -0.12, P = 0.57). NOTCH1 was not associated with EGFR (P > 0.05). Our results are suggestive of heterogeneity in HNSCC angiogenesis. Future studies should explore angiogenesis mechanisms in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC.
Authors
Troy, JD; Weissfeld, JL; Youk, AO; Thomas, S; Wang, L; Grandis, JR
MLA Citation
Troy, Jesse D., et al. “Expression of EGFR, VEGF, and NOTCH1 suggest differences in tumor angiogenesis in HPV-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.Head Neck Pathol, vol. 7, no. 4, Dec. 2013, pp. 344–55. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s12105-013-0447-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1043336
PMID
23645351
Source
pubmed
Published In
Head Neck Pathol
Volume
7
Published Date
Start Page
344
End Page
355
DOI
10.1007/s12105-013-0447-y

A machine learning approach for identifying predictors of success in a Medicaid-funded, community-based behavioral health program using the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS)

Authors
Troy, JD; Torrie, RM; Warner, DN
MLA Citation
Troy, Jesse D., et al. “A machine learning approach for identifying predictors of success in a Medicaid-funded, community-based behavioral health program using the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS).” Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 126, Elsevier BV, July 2021, pp. 106010–106010. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2021.106010.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1489486
Source
crossref
Published In
Children and Youth Services Review
Volume
126
Published Date
Start Page
106010
End Page
106010
DOI
10.1016/j.childyouth.2021.106010

Childhood passive smoke exposure is associated with adult head and neck cancer.

INTRODUCTION: Passive smoke is carcinogenic but its association with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is uncertain. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of childhood passive smoke exposure (CPSE) and HNSCC in 858 cases and 806 frequency-matched controls using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated with logistic regression controlling for adult smoking in the total study population, and in never-smokers only (184 cases and 415 controls). CPSE was also studied in oropharyngeal separately from other HNSCC using polytomous logistic regression. RESULTS: CPSE was associated with HNSCC (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.01-1.63) after controlling for adult smoking and other factors. This association was similar in magnitude, although not statistically significant, among subjects who never smoked as adults (OR, 1.19, 95% CI, 0.80-1.76). CPSE was associated more strongly with oropharyngeal cancer (a HNSCC subtype commonly associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection) than with HNSCC at non-oropharyngeal sites (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.01-4.06, N=52 cases vs. OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.68-1.60, N=132 cases; P-for-heterogeneity=0.08). CONCLUSIONS: Data from this large US-based case control study suggest a role for CPSE in HNSCC etiology.
Authors
Troy, JD; Grandis, JR; Youk, AO; Diergaarde, B; Romkes, M; Weissfeld, JL
MLA Citation
Troy, Jesse D., et al. “Childhood passive smoke exposure is associated with adult head and neck cancer.Cancer Epidemiol, vol. 37, no. 4, Aug. 2013, pp. 417–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.canep.2013.03.011.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1043337
PMID
23619143
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Epidemiol
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
417
End Page
423
DOI
10.1016/j.canep.2013.03.011

Expression of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) in Breast Cancer Is Associated with Shorter Survival and Resistance to Chemotherapy.

XIAP, the most potent inhibitor of cell death pathways, is linked to chemotherapy resistance and tumor aggressiveness. Currently, multiple XIAP-targeting agents are in clinical trials. However, the characterization of XIAP expression in relation to clinicopathological variables in large clinical series of breast cancer is lacking. We retrospectively analyzed non-metastatic, non-inflammatory, primary, invasive breast cancer samples for XIAP mRNA (n = 2341) and protein (n = 367) expression. XIAP expression was analyzed as a continuous value and correlated with clinicopathological variables. XIAP mRNA expression was heterogeneous across samples and significantly associated with younger patients' age (≤50 years), pathological ductal type, lower tumor grade, node-positive status, HR+/HER2- status, and PAM50 luminal B subtype. Higher XIAP expression was associated with shorter DFS in uni- and multivariate analyses in 909 informative patients. Very similar correlations were observed at the protein level. This prognostic impact was significant in the HR+/HER2- but not in the TN subtype. Finally, XIAP mRNA expression was associated with lower pCR rate to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in both uni- and multivariate analyses in 1203 informative patients. Higher XIAP expression in invasive breast cancer is independently associated with poorer prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy, suggesting the potential therapeutic benefit of targeting XIAP.
Authors
Devi, GR; Finetti, P; Morse, MA; Lee, S; de Nonneville, A; Van Laere, S; Troy, J; Geradts, J; McCall, S; Bertucci, F
MLA Citation
Devi, Gayathri R., et al. “Expression of X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) in Breast Cancer Is Associated with Shorter Survival and Resistance to Chemotherapy.Cancers (Basel), vol. 13, no. 11, June 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/cancers13112807.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484291
PMID
34199946
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancers
Volume
13
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/cancers13112807

Research Areas:

Adolescent
Adult
Biostatistics
Cellular therapy
Child
Epidemiology
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Hematological oncology
Mouth Neoplasms
Myelodysplastic Syndromes
Pediatrics
Stem Cell Transplantation