Hannah Lane

Overview:

I am an implementation scientist with expertise in mixed methods and community-engaged research. My research focuses on improve implementation of federal policies that increase access to nutritious foods and physical activity for children facing social and economic disadvantages.

My research centers around 3 primary focus areas:
(1) optimizing implementation of evidence-based healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in child-serving settings (mostly schools);

(2) studying implementation flexibilities of federal child nutrition assistance policies during COVID-19

(3) engaging children and adolescents as active participants in implementation research, including developing and testing pragmatic, age-appropriate evaluation metrics;

The ultimate goal of my research is to develop and disseminate strategies that improve health-promoting policy implementation in under-resourced community settings and, ultimately, reduce pediatric health inequities


My methods expertise is broadly applicable across child and adolescent health outcomes and community settings. This expertise includes: implementation and dissemination methods, stakeholder-driven research, youth participatory research methods, mixed methods evaluation, pragmatic measures development (including rapid qualitative data collection and analysis), organizational capacity-building, theory-based program development, policy implementation.

Areas of Expertise: Implementation Science, Health Behavior, and Health Management

Positions:

Medical Instructor in the Department of Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2016

Virginia Polytech Institute and State University

Grants:

North STAR Trial: Specialty Telemedicine Access for Referrals in Rural Alaska

Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Developing a "playbook": defining best practices and a lessons learned from school meal programs during COVID-19

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
Share Our Strength
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

COVID-19 Policies: Impact Over Time on Child Health, Obesity, and Disparities

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

North STAR Trial: Specialty Telemedicine Access for Referrals in Rural Alaska

Administered By
Duke Global Health Institute
Awarded By
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

COVID-19 Policies: Impact Over Time on Child Health, Obesity, and Disparities

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
Johns Hopkins University
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Leveraging Implementation Science in the Public Health Response to COVID-19 : Child Food Insecurity and Federal Nutrition Assistance Programs.

Authors
Lane, HG; Turner, L; Dunn, CG; Hager, ER; Fleischhacker, S
MLA Citation
Lane, Hannah G., et al. “Leveraging Implementation Science in the Public Health Response to COVID-19 : Child Food Insecurity and Federal Nutrition Assistance Programs.Public Health Rep, vol. 135, no. 6, 2020, pp. 728–36. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/0033354920959285.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1462181
PMID
33031712
Source
pubmed
Published In
Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)
Volume
135
Published Date
Start Page
728
End Page
736
DOI
10.1177/0033354920959285

Development of a novel tool for assessing coverage of implementation factors in health promotion program resources.

Authors
Bejarano, CM; Snow, K; Lane, H; Calvert, H; Hoppe, K; Alfonsin, N; Turner, L; Carlson, JA
MLA Citation
Bejarano, Carolina M., et al. “Development of a novel tool for assessing coverage of implementation factors in health promotion program resources.Prev Med Rep, vol. 15, Sept. 2019, p. 100909. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2019.100909.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1410993
PMID
31194155
Source
pubmed
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
15
Published Date
Start Page
100909
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2019.100909

Recommendations for Measurement of Child Health Literacy: A Pragmatic Approach

Authors
Lane, HG; Aldoory, L
MLA Citation
Lane, Hannah G., and Linda Aldoory. “Recommendations for Measurement of Child Health Literacy: A Pragmatic Approach.” Hlrp: Health Literacy Research and Practice, vol. 3, no. 3, SLACK, Inc., July 2019. Crossref, doi:10.3928/24748307-20190521-01.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1410995
Source
crossref
Published In
Hlrp: Health Literacy Research and Practice
Volume
3
Published Date
DOI
10.3928/24748307-20190521-01

Wellness Committee Status and Local Wellness Policy Implementation Over Time

Authors
McIlree, CD; Lane, HG; Wang, Y; Hager, ER
MLA Citation
McIlree, Carolyn D., et al. “Wellness Committee Status and Local Wellness Policy Implementation Over Time.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 56, no. 3, Elsevier BV, Mar. 2019, pp. e75–83. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.023.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1410998
Source
crossref
Published In
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume
56
Published Date
Start Page
e75
End Page
e83
DOI
10.1016/j.amepre.2018.10.023

A Participatory Process to Engage Appalachian Youth in Reducing Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption.

Children and adolescents consume excessive amounts of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which are associated with adverse health outcomes. We describe a yearlong participatory research study to reduce SSBs in Central Appalachia, where excessive consumption is particularly prevalent. This study was conducted in partnership with a community advisory board in Southwest Virginia. Nine "youth ambassadors," aged 10 to 13 years helped to systematically adapt SIPsmartER, an effective theory-based program for Appalachian adults, to be age and culturally appropriate and meet desired theoretical objectives. They then assisted with delivering the curriculum during a school-based feasibility study and led an advocacy event in their community. Satisfaction surveys and feedback sessions indicate that ambassadors found the program acceptable and important for other students. Validated surveys and focus groups suggested that theoretical objectives were met. Findings from these mixed methods sources informed curricular changes to further enhance acceptability and refine theoretical objectives. Participation in follow-up advocacy activities was tracked and described. Following the yearlong study, ambassadors reported having advocacy skills and motivation to continue reducing SSB intake in their community. Results, challenges, and lessons learned are presented to inform larger efforts to enhance acceptability of programs and inspire youth to take action to reduce health disparities in Appalachian communities.
Authors
Lane, HG; Porter, KJ; Hecht, E; Harris, P; Zoellner, JM
MLA Citation
Lane, Hannah G., et al. “A Participatory Process to Engage Appalachian Youth in Reducing Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption.Health Promot Pract, vol. 20, no. 2, Mar. 2019, pp. 258–68. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/1524839918762123.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411001
PMID
29577771
Source
pubmed
Published In
Health Promotion Practice
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
258
End Page
268
DOI
10.1177/1524839918762123

Research Areas:

Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Literacy
Implementation Science
Pediatric Obesity