John Strickler

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2005

The University of Chicago

Residency, Medicine

University of Washington

Fellowship in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

A Phase 1/1b first-in-human dose escalation and expansion study for theevaluation of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and anti-tumor activity of SAR439459 administered intravenously as monotherapy and in combination with REGN2810 in adult

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Sanofi US
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1 Open-label Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of CGX1321 in Subjects with Advanced Solid Tumors and Phase 1b Study of CGX1321 in Combination with Pembrolizumab in Subjects with Advanced Gastrointestinal Tumors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Curegenix Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASE Ib, MULTICENTER, OPEN-LABELSTUDY TO EVALUATE THE SAFETY, EFFICACY, AND PHARMACOKINETICS OF CIBISATAMAB IN COMBINATION WITH ATEZOLIZUMAB AFTER PRETREATMENT WITH OBINUTUZUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUSLY TREATED METASTATIC, MICROSATELLITE-STABL

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Genentech, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASE 1/2, OPEN-LABEL, MULTICENTER, DOSE ESCALATION AND DOSE EXPANSION STUDY OF NKTR-262 IN COMBINATION WITH NKTR-214 AND IN COMBINATION WITH NKTR-214 PLUS NIVOLUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED OR METASTATIC SOLID TUMOR MALIGNANCIES

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Nektar Therapeutics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase 2 Study Comparing Efficacy and Safety of ABT-165 plus FOLFIRI vs Bevacizumab plus FOLFIRI in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Previously Treated with Fluoropyrimidine/Oxaliplatin and Bevacizumab

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Trends in Receipt of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and its Impact on Survival in Resected Biliary Tract Cancers.

BACKGROUND: Resection remains the cornerstone of curative-intent treatment for biliary tract cancers (BTCs). However, recent randomized data also support a role for adjuvant chemotherapy (AC). This study aimed to characterize trends in the use of AC and subsequent outcomes in gallbladder cancer and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). METHODS: The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was queried for patients with resected, localized BTC from 2010 to 2018. Trends in AC were compared among BTC subtypes and stages of disease. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with receipt of AC. Survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox proportional hazards methods. RESULTS: The study identified 7039 patients: 4657 (66%) with gallbladder cancer, 1159 (17%) with intrahepatic CCA (iCCA), and 1223 (17%) with extrahepatic CCA (eCCA). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 2172 (31%) patients, increasing from 23% in 2010 to 41% in 2018. Factors associated with AC included female sex, year of diagnosis, private insurance, care at an academic center, higher education, eCCA (vs iCCA), positive margins, and stage II or III disease (vs stage I). Alternatively, increasing age, higher comorbidity score, gallbladder cancer (vs iCCA), and farther travel distance for treatment were associated with reduced odds of AC. Overall, AC was not associated with a survival advantage. However, subgroup analysis showed that AC was associated with a significant reduction in mortality among patients with eCCA. CONCLUSIONS: Among the patients with resected BTC, those who received AC were in the minority. In the context of recent randomized data and evolving recommendations, emphasis on guideline concordance with a focus on at-risk populations may improve outcomes.
Authors
Rhodin, KE; Liu, A; Bartholomew, A; Kramer, R; Parameswaran, A; Uronis, H; Strickler, J; Hsu, D; Morse, MA; Shah, KN; Herbert, G; Zani, S; Nussbaum, DP; Allen, PJ; Lidsky, ME
MLA Citation
Rhodin, Kristen E., et al. “Trends in Receipt of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and its Impact on Survival in Resected Biliary Tract Cancers.Ann Surg Oncol, vol. 30, no. 8, Aug. 2023, pp. 4813–21. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-023-13567-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1578203
PMID
37188803
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
4813
End Page
4821
DOI
10.1245/s10434-023-13567-4

ASO Visual Abstract: Trends in Receipt of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Impact on Survival in Resected Biliary Tract Cancers.

Authors
Rhodin, KE; Liu, A; Bartholomew, A; Kramer, R; Parameswaran, A; Uronis, H; Strickler, J; Hsu, D; Morse, MA; Shah, KN; Herbert, G; Zani, S; Nussbaum, DP; Allen, PJ; Lidsky, ME
MLA Citation
Rhodin, Kristen E., et al. “ASO Visual Abstract: Trends in Receipt of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Impact on Survival in Resected Biliary Tract Cancers.Ann Surg Oncol, vol. 30, no. 8, Aug. 2023, pp. 4824–25. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-023-13637-7.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1578937
PMID
37183199
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
30
Published Date
Start Page
4824
End Page
4825
DOI
10.1245/s10434-023-13637-7

Hepatic artery infusion for unresectable colorectal cancer liver metastases: Palliation and conversion.

Patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases are commonly treated with systemic chemotherapy to convert their disease to an operable state. Unfortunately, many patients remain unresectable after first-line chemotherapy and resort to second- and third-line regimens with poor results. Liver-directed strategies have historically been used in this setting. There has been a renewed interest in offering hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy to improve resectability or palliate disease. Prospective studies over the past 2 decades have produced encouraging data, even in chemorefractory patients. This therapy has expanded to multiple centers across North America and worldwide with similar results. This review addresses these data, specifically focusing on conversion to resection and palliation of colorectal liver metastases after patients have received multiple lines of systemic chemotherapy.
Authors
Zaidi, MY; Nussbaum, DP; Hsu, SD; Strickler, JH; Uronis, HE; Zani, S; Allen, PJ; Lidsky, ME
MLA Citation
Zaidi, Mohammad Y., et al. “Hepatic artery infusion for unresectable colorectal cancer liver metastases: Palliation and conversion.Surgery, May 2023. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.surg.2023.04.025.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1578423
PMID
37183130
Source
pubmed
Published In
Surgery
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.surg.2023.04.025

Introduction and overview of cancer precision medicine

While cancer causes premature death in millions of persons around the globe yearly, in the last few years incredible advances have been made in our understanding of molecular drivers of cancers. Cancer treatment programs have benefited significantly from the discovery of targeted drivers and synthetic lethal approaches leveraging existing and novel therapeutics. Much of this progress have reflected rapid advances in high throughput genomic sequencing technology that allow clinical implementation of assays that can rapidly interrogate tumors for the presence of any of 1000s of individual molecular alterations. While significant gains have been made in our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer (and multiple novel therapeutics have been established through this work), outcomes in many cancer subtypes continue to be unacceptably poor. Additionally, uptake of molecular testing and limited access to novel therapeutics in many areas has limited the ability of precision medicine to improve outcomes for cancer patients. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these issues as an introduction to the remainder of this volume.
Authors
McKinney, MS; Strickler, JH
MLA Citation
McKinney, M. S., and J. H. Strickler. “Introduction and overview of cancer precision medicine.” Genomic and Precision Medicine: Oncology, Third Edition, 2022, pp. 1–11. Scopus, doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-800684-9.00008-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1551018
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
11
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-12-800684-9.00008-3

Preface

Authors
Strickler, JH; McKinney, MS
MLA Citation
Strickler, J. H., and M. S. McKinney. Preface. 2022, pp. xvii–xix. Scopus, doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-800684-9.00007-1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1551019
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
xvii
End Page
xix
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-12-800684-9.00007-1